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Footage Information

ABCNEWS VideoSource
Australia Whaling - Sea Shepherd prepares to resume chase of Japan whaling fleet
02/14/2008
APTN
VSAP554267
NAME: AUS WHALING 20080214Ix TAPE: EF08/0177 IN_TIME: 11:17:22:20 DURATION: 00:01:36:07 SOURCES: AuBC DATELINE: Melbourne, 14 Feb 2008 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Australia SHOTLIST 1. Wide of the Steve Irwin ship, belonging to activist group Sea Shepherd, docked in Melbourne 2. Close-up of sign on side of ship reading: "Steve Irwin, Rotterdam, Kahnawake" 3. Various of crew working on board 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd Captain: "Well, in January, we were able to stop them from killing whales for three weeks. So, our objective this time is to try and stop them for three or four more weeks. That's going to make a substantial impact on their overall quota and also, as soon as we show up, they're going to start running and they're going to start wasting money on fuel. We cost them about two and a half (m) million dollars in fuel in January. We want to make this costly, and we want to expose what they're doing." 5. Pan of ship 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd Captain: "Next year, I want to come back with two ships and relay them and constantly keep on their case. If we're constantly chasing them, they're not going to kill whales. I think we can shut this down." 7. Close-up of Sea Shepherd flag 8. Watson boarding ship 9. Crew working on ship 10. Tilt-up of ship 11. Pan from harbour to ship STORYLINE: Anti-whaling protest ship, the Steve Irwin, was preparing to leave Australia on Thursday, to head back to the Southern Ocean to resume its chase of the Japanese whaling fleet. The Sea Shepherd vessel has spent 12 days in Melbourne undergoing repairs, refuelling and re-supplying , and new crew members have been brought on board. Captain Paul Watson said local residents in Victoria state had donated money for fuel and other supplies during its stay in Melbourne. Last month, two crew members of the Steve Irwin climbed aboard the Japanese whaling boat Yushin Maru No. 2 in Antarctic waters and were detained by the crew for three days. They were eventually handed over to an Australian Customs vessel before being returned to the Sea Shepherd. A diplomatic row erupted last week between Australia and Japan when the federal government released graphic images of an adult and a calf minke whale being dragged on board a whaling ship. Watson said the Steve Irwin was due to leave Melbourne at 20.00 (0900 GMT). He said they intended to harass and intervene in "illegal" Japanese whaling for the next four to five weeks, when the whaling season was due to end. "In January, we were able to stop them from killing whales for three weeks. So, our objective this time is to try and stop them for three or four more weeks. That's going to make a substantial impact on their overall quota," Watson told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. "And also, as soon as we show up, they're going to start running and they're going to start wasting money on fuel. We cost them about two and a half million dollars in fuel in January. We want to make this costly, and we want to expose what they're doing," he added. Watson said he was working to secure a second ship to enable a non-stop pursuit in the 2008-2009 whaling season. "Next year, I want to come back with two ships and relay them and constantly keep on their case. If we're constantly chasing them, they're not going to kill whales. I think we can shut this down," he said. The 32 crew members on board the Steve Irwin include 15 Australians and volunteers from New Zealand, Canada, the United States, Sweden, South Africa, the Netherlands, Britain and Spain.
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