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Kenya Africa Food
05/15/2012
ABC
AP0515120930-9
AP-APTN-0930: Kenya Africa Food Tuesday, 15 May 2012 STORY:Kenya Africa Food- UN reports says a quarter of Africans routinely short of food LENGTH: 03:01 FIRST RUN: 0730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients only TYPE: English/Nats SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/UNDP STORY NUMBER: 741111 DATELINE: Various - Recent LENGTH: 03:01 SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya - 13 May 2012 1. Various of Nairobi highway under construction UNDP - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya - 18 April 2012 2. Mid of a Chinese engineer giving instructions to workers 3. Various of buildings under construction AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya - 14 May 2012 4. Wide of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Africa Bureau Chief Economist, Pedro Conceicao, at media conference 5. Mid of journalist 6. Wide of slideshow on food insecurity 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Pedro Conceicao, Chief Economist, UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa: "This report is about the paradox that we have seen in Africa, in sub-saharan Africa over the last decade: where we have seen a great improvement in economic performance but it hasn't been followed by improvement in food security. So the report tries to understand why we are in this situation and looks in to policy options to enable the continent to move towards a new cycle where there is enhancement in economic growth along with improvement in food security." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Mao, Chad - 18 April 2012 8. Various of malnourished children AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya - 14 May 2012 9. Various of Kenyan economist James Shikwati at his office 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) James Shikwati, Kenyan economist: "One would have expected the UN to focus on the existing global trade system which is valued at 36 (t) trillion dollars and Africa participates with only 3 percent. So if the UN really wanted to help African farmers, the point would be to leverage the indigenous crops and foods in Africa and have farmers access global markets so that they can also tap in to this 36 (t) trillion dollars global trade system." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya - 13 May 2012 11. Various of a woman selling food in Korogocho slum 12. Various of slum dwellers eating food. 13. Mid of 31-year-old mother of three Veronica Waiyego making sandals as her children look on 14. Tilt-up of children 15. SOUNDBITE: (Swahili) Veronica Waiyego, 31-year-old slum dweller and sandal maker: "You want your children to have tea in the morning, you want them to have lunch and you also want them to have dinner in the evening but sometimes they have to skip lunch. They have to skip lunch so that they can have something to eat in the evening and when you are talking about the tea in the morning, it does not even have milk." 16. Close-up of Waiyego's sandals 17. Mid of Waiyego making sandals STORYLINE: As the rest of the world grapples with recession and unemployment, much of Africa is enjoying unprecedented economic growth. World Bank figures show that in 2011 Kenya's economy grew by 4.3 percent. The high-end real estate market in the capital Nairobi also grew faster than any other city in the world, according to a survey published by Knight Frank and Citi Private Wealth. But the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is warning that Sub-Saharan Africa cannot sustain present growth levels unless it eliminates the hunger that affects nearly a quarter of its people. THE UNDP made the prediction as it released the African Human Development Report on Tuesday. The launch of the report comes just days before a Camp David Summit attended by US President Barack Obama and African leaders to discuss food security in Africa. "This report is about the paradox that we have seen in Africa, in sub-saharan Africa over the last decade: where we have seen a great improvement in economic performance but it hasn't been followed by improvement in food security," said UNDP Africa Bureau Chief Economist, Pedro Conceicao. "So the report tries to understand why we are in this situation and looks in to policy options to enable the continent to move towards a new cycle where there is enhancement in economic growth along with improvement in food security," he added. Food security, as defined by the 1996 world leaders' Food Summit, means that people can consistently access sufficient and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs for an active and healthy life at a price they can afford. With more than 25 percent of its 856 (m) million people undernourished, Sub-Saharan Africa remains the world's most food-insecure region. Fifteen (m) million Africans are also currently at risk of starvation in Africa's Sahel region. Two-thirds of working Africans make a living off the land but the continent's cities continue to swell as people move to urban areas in search of opportunities. Levels of poverty remain high and with a population projected to exceed two (b) billion sometime after 2050, Sub-Saharan Africa will need to produce substantially more food. Africa is currently a net importer of food, although the continent was producing a surplus 50 years ago. In one of Nairobi's poor slums, a meal a day is considered a luxury for those who can afford to eat. One example is 31-year-old Veronica Waiyego, who finds it difficult to feed her three children after her husband died of AIDS. To make a living she assembles sandals. "You want your children to have tea in the morning, you want them to have lunch and you also want them to have dinner in the evening but sometimes they have to skip lunch. They have to skip lunch so that they can have something to eat in the evening and when you are talking about the tea in the morning, it does not even have milk," Waiyego said. The UNDP Report recommends social protection programmes such as crop insurance, employment guarantee schemes and cash transfers - all of which can shield people from risk and boost incomes. But critics argue that Africa should be allowed to engage in free trade and export agricultural products to Europe and the US. "If the UN really wanted to help African farmers, the point would be to leverage the indigenous crops and foods in Africa and have farmers access global markets so that they can also tap in to this... global trade system," Kenyan economist James Shikwati said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2012 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-05-15-12 0616EDT
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