Summary

Footage Information

ABCNEWS VideoSource
World Iraqis 4 - WRAP Iraqi expats cast ballors in Europe, Mideast, US and Canada
01/28/2005
APTN
VSAP440474
NAME: WORLD IRAQIS4 280105Nx TAPE: EF05/0091 IN_TIME: 10:50:16:09 DURATION: 00:04:05:23 SOURCES: APTN/CTV Canada DATELINE: Various, 28 Jna 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: APTN Amman, Jordan 1. Poster showing Iraqi interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi on front of bus 2. Bus pulling out into traffic, taking voters from downtown area to go to polling station 3. Election poster, saying "Let us hear your voice" 4. Various of security check point with policemen 5. Iraqi man showing identification to election official 6. Iraqi man voting 7. Lamaa Jamal al Talebane, 60-year-old Iraqi woman, voting 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lamaa Jamal al Talebane, Iraqi exile: "I'm Sunni Kurdish, my husband is Shia, it doesn't matter to us. We are all Iraqis. We are work(ing) for Iraq. We all want a good future for Iraq." 9. Set up shot of Lazhar Aloui, head of the Jordanian office of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lazhar Aloui, head of the Jordanian office of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM): "I think that's a very premature conclusion (that people have been put off from voting because of security fears) after half an hour of opening this station to do a head count and see how many (are voting) and draw conclusions about security. I think we have three days, all the stations will be open, and you will see, I can guarantee you, that people will be coming and voting and we will have a chance to see how many came and voted." APTN Paris, France 11. Election poster showing Iraqi couple in front of Eiffel Tower 12. Policeman outside polling station 13. Various of women being checked with metal detectors 14. Polling station 15. Man dipping finger in ink to prevent him voting more than once 16. Wider shot of man, women walks by, camera follows her to ballot box where she casts vote and then ululates (shrieks) with joy APTN New Carrollton, Maryland, USA 17. Wide shot of polling location, pan over to man being escorted in to vote 18. Group of Iraqis being escorted into polling location 19. Man signing in at registration table, pull out to see others in line 20. Man stamping a voter form, pull out to medium shot of him handing form to voter 21. Woman walks over to voting station 22. Man with little girl walks over to voting station 23. Another shot of man and little girl at station CTV Toronto, Canada 24. Iraqi man and woman at voting stations 25. Woman cheering after she voted 26. UPSOUND: (English) Voter: "Victory for Iraq!" 27. Woman at voting station 28. Man hands over ballot 29. Woman hands over ballot and shakes organiser hand 30. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop, Voter: "It is like kind of dream came true for freedom Iraq - free Iraq, freedom." 31. Man places ballot in box 32. Iraqi voters holding up their ink-stained fingers and smiling for camera 33. People applauding after woman votes Ottawa, Canada 34. Wide shot of strip mall where voting is being held 35. Dissolve to poster in entrance of polling location 36. People waiting in line to vote 37. Close shot of man taking out his identification card 38. Various shots of polling location 39. Two shots of men putting their ballots in box STORYLINE: Expatriate Iraqis around the world were voting on Friday in their country's first free elections for more than half a century. In Jordan, more than 20,000 Iraqi expatriates have registered to vote. While some were turning up at polling stations in Amman on Friday, initial turnout was low. The International Organisation for Migration, which organised the vote in Jordan, said 200,000 Iraqis were believed to be living in Jordan, half of them eligible to vote. There have been suggestions that the low turnout may be due to fears about security. The Jordanian press also suggested that many Iraqis with expired residency permits stayed away from registration centres for fear of questioning by Jordanian police. In France, more than one thousand people registered to vote and the situation was similar in neighbouring Germany. In total, more than 117,000 Iraqis living in seven countries across Europe registered to take part in the poll, and will be able to cast ballots until 1700 GMT on Sunday. Long distances to travel to polling stations and the short time to organise the vote put many off registering, the IOM in Geneva said. Some of the thousands of Iraqi exiles living in the United States also cast their votes on Friday. Nearly 26,000 are expected to vote in five US cities: Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington, Nashville, and Southgate, Michigan. At the Michigan polling site, security was tight, with guards checking IDs as people pulled into the parking lot and metal detectors at the doors. The US turnout was only around 10 percent of the 240,000 Iraqi-Americans who were thought to be eligible. Election organisers in the United States estimated that the total who registered here represent slightly more than 10 percent of those eligible - people who had turned 18 by December 31, 2004 and were born in Iraq, were present or former citizens of Iraq, or had an Iraqi father. Lack of documentation was a hurdle for some Iraqis, organisers said. Others feared their relatives in Iraq could face reprisal, even though information collected from voters was kept confidential. In Canada, Iraqi expatriates also turned up to vote in the capital Ottawa and in Canada's largest city, Toronto. Of the estimated 1.2 (m) million eligible Iraqis living overseas, less than a quarter, or 280,303, registered in 14 countries worldwide. The Independent Electoral Commission of Iraq in Baghdad authorised an out-of-country vote in November and enlisted the IOM to organise it. When voting concludes on January 30, all the overseas counts will be sent in to the operation's headquarters in Amman, Jordan, which will forward them on to Baghdad. The results will be announced several days later.
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