Summary

Footage Information

ABCNEWS VideoSource
Kenya Mutilation - Efforts to end female genital mutilation
09/18/2004
APTN
VSAP428261
NAME: KEN MUT 180904N TAPE: EF04/0931 IN_TIME: 10:18:04:18 DURATION: 00:02:43:18 SOURCES: APTN DATELINE: Various - Recent RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: Narok Town - 9 September 2004 1. Wide shot of Masai people with sheep 2. Close up of Masai with sheep 3. Exterior of Tasaru Rescue centre 4. Girls sitting at table getting educational lessons about female genital mutilation 5. UPSOUND: (English) Agnes Pareyio, Founder of Tagaru Girls Rescue Centre: "The immediate complications are excessive bleeding, pain, shock and then you get septic wound because of the unsterilised objects used that was used on the cutting." 6. Girls listening 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Agnes Pareyio, Founder of Tagaru Girls Rescue Centre: "What we are trying to fight is what you can see here on the wall. Because you can see the young girl of 12 or 11 years being shaved in preparation for circumcision." 8. Girls listening 9. Girls standing in a queue 10. Various of supplies being given to girls 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Carolyn Glesho, young victim: "I am here because my father wanted to circumcise me and marry me off." 12. Wide of sign of Narok hospital 13. Wide of ward and two girls who were circumcised by force two days earlier 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Judy Kayo, 16-year-old victim: "The men came in and the women came in and they tied us. Because I am the eldest, so they came and cut me. I told them: "Now let me tell you. No I am not going to allow you to do this and I refused." So they say they will do it by force." 15. Close up of Judy's hands 16. Two girls, the second girl is Judy's 14 year-old sister, Durkas Naroibi - 14 September 2004 17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joyce Majiwa, lawyer, Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA): "Our position on the female genital mutilation or female circumcision has always been a no, no. We have always opposed it. We have campaigned against this practice and we have succeeded in 2001 in having it outlawed. That is for the girls below the age of 18." 18. Close up of Federation of Women Lawyers sign 19. Joyce Majiwa in front of Federation of Women Lawyers sign STORYLINE: An international three-day conference to press for the eradication of female genital mutilation in Africa and around the world closes in Kenya on Saturday. The African and European speakers attending the summit in Nairobi stressed that female genital mutilation is a human rights violation that goes against international conventions, and must be made illegal everywhere. The goal of the conference - sponsored by the Kenyan government and an international advocacy group called No Peace Without Justice - is to come up with ways to implement an African Union protocol, adopted in 2003 in Maputo, Mozambique, which, among other things, outlaws all forms of female genital mutilation. Many of the African Union's 53 member-states are in the process of signing the protocol. Approximately two million girls endure female circumcision - also known as female genital mutilation or female genital cutting - across the world every year. Female genital mutilation is the cutting or removal of all or a portion of the female genitals for cultural, not medical, reasons. In Kenya's Masai tribe, girls as young as 11-years-old undergo the procedure, sometimes against their will, to prepare them for marriage. Many girls runaway from home to try and avoid this fate. The lucky ones find their way to a shelter like the Tagaru Girls Rescue Centre in the town of Narok, in the Southern Rift Valley. Once there, founder Agnes Pareyio makes certain that the girls who come to the shelter are educated about their rights and their own physiology. She explains to the girls that the "immediate complications are excessive bleeding, pain, shock and then you get septic wound because of the unsterilised objects used that was used on the cutting." They are also told that they have the right to say NO. Female genital mutilation is illegal in Kenya, however the government faces the problem of not being able to enforce this law in rural areas where various tribes continue the practise. When 16-year-old Judy Kayo refused to be circumcised, her brother beat her and her family cut her by force. Judy told her story while recovering in hospital from the ordeal two days earlier. Her younger sister Durkas was also forced to undergo the procedure. Joyce Majiwa, a lawyer with the Federation of Women Lawyers in Naroibi, continues to fight on behalf of the victims. She said: "Our position on the female genital mutilation or female circumcision has always been a no, no. We have always opposed it. We have campaigned against this practice and we have succeeded in 2001 in having it outlawed. That is for the girls below the age of 18." Female mutilation leads to lifelong pain and problems with sexual health and childbirth. Depending on the environment and type of the procedure, it can lead to serious health issues such as infection, illness and death.
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