LOUISIANA FLOODING
BARS. BRIEF INTV/W A POLICE CHIEF (NDS) WHO TALKS ABOUT THE FLOODING IN BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA. CR:75. VS OF THE FLOOD WATERS. VS OF HOMES BURIED UNDER WATER. VS OF RESIDENTS IN A BOAT. VS OF PARTIALLY BURIED ROAD SIGNS-- "RIVER ROAD", "DEAD END". MORE VS OF SUBSTANTIALLY BURIED HOMES. INTVS/W A RESIDENT OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. (HE TALKS ABOUT THE 1977 FLOOD AND THE NEED FOR A WALL TO KEEP THE WATERS AT BAY). REVERSALS. MORE VS OF THE FLOODED AREA. VS OF TWO KIDS AND A DOG IN A BOAT. SU. (MORE VS OF THE FLOODED AREA. BLANK. CI: DISASTERS: FLOODS. TRANSPORTATION: WATER, BOATS. JUSTICE: POLICE.
Plaza Flood Anniversary (09/12/1997)
Two decades ago a wall of water crashed into the plaza, a section south of downtown Kansas City, killing more than two dozen people. Today, the memories of that flood are still fresh for those who were there. Bob Werly talked to some who were present that night twenty years ago.
1977 Rescue Impossible featurette (2/3)
Part 2 of 3 - Rescue Impossible - 1977 Airport ’77 featurette - the making of - behind the scenes - Jack Lemon, Jerry Jameson, James Stewart, William Frye, Lee Grant - disaster film - Boeing 747 - film crew in airplane reconstruction - William Frye - luxury jet - man puts on gas mask - operator - pilot - copilot - crash into ocean - Lee Grant - plane floods - woman punches woman - Jerry Jameson - water tank - scuba divers - hoses - actors interview, behind-the-scenes
WEATHER: the point in ARIEGE - Geoffrey Berg plateau
Midi Atlantique
Weather in the loire atlantique
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
1977 Rescue Impossible featurette (3/3)
Part 3 of 3 - Rescue Impossible - 1977 Airport ’77 featurette - Jack Lemon, Jerry Jameson, James Stewart, William Frye, Lee Grant - disaster film - large section of plane in water - fever inside control room - helicopter - zodiac enters ship in ocean - interview with James Stewart, Jack Lemon - divers in water - flooding plane in ocean - door opens - panic - US navy ship platform
11/24/77 C0061229 - COLOR ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA: AFTERMATH OF CYCLONE AND FLOODS,
11/24/77 C0061229 - COLOR ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA: AFTERMATH OF CYCLONE AND FLOODS, LNC 88443 "CYCLONE A 'MATH" SHOWS: MS SMASHED BOATS PAN TO DEBRIS (3 : MS DEBRIS: MS BODY IN RIVER: MS HOMELESS (2) MS WATERLOGGED VILLAGE: MS CARCASS: MS RESCUE WORKERS: MS REFUGEES AND BELONGINGS: MS REFUGEES EATING: MS PAN REFUGEES WITH BELONGINGS: (SHOT 11/22/77 55FT) INDIA - ANDHRA PRADASH HURRICANES - 1977 CYCLONE UPITN / 55 FT / 16 COLOR / PRINT /
WEATHER AFFECTING CROPS / EFFECTS PRICES (1977)
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN AT CSIS (1987)
President Ronald Reagan’s remarks to the Board of Trustees of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. TRANSCRIPT: It's an honor to address the Center for Strategic and International Studies, all the more so in this, your 25th anniversary year. During this past quarter of a century, CSIS has brought to bear upon our national security policy an extraordinary array of intelligence and insight, drawing from the academic, diplomatic, and business worlds alike. Always you've taken the high ground -- intellectually and morally. Always you've insisted upon bipartisanship, stressing that any successful foreign policy must be built, not upon a Republican or Democratic consensus but upon an American consensus. In fact, coming here today to discuss arms reductions before you who are so expert in this area -- well, would you be surprised to hear that it reminds me of a story? [Laughter] The story has to do with a fellow who finally passed away and arrived at the gates of Heaven. And Saint Peter was making him welcome, and he said, ``You know, you're the most recent arrival from Earth.'' And he said, ``The people who have been up here for a while like to hear about things down there. Would you perhaps have anything?'' ``Oh,'' the man said, ``Would I!'' He said, ``I was the only living survivor of the Johnstown flood for many years.'' And he said, ``Having that distinction, I was out traveling and making after-lunch and after-dinner speeches all over the country telling about the horrors of the flood and how powerful it was and all this.'' And he said, ``I'm sure they'd be interested.'' ``Oh,'' Saint Peter said, ``I'm sure they would.'' So, he found himself before a gathering, and Saint Peter introduced him -- didn't give away his subject, but said he had great word about an exciting happening down on Earth and so forth, and then introduced him. And as he stepped up to the podium, Saint Peter retreated past him. Saint Peter said, ``That fellow with the beard in the aisle seat, second row -- his name is Noah.'' [Laughter] It goes without saying that the Nation owes each of you a profound debt of gratitude. And if I may, I'd like to add a special word of thanks to one who, during his term as your president, has served this institution and the Nation itself, untiringly. Joe Jordan, would you please stand? And to another of your number, one to whom we owe gratitude as a founder of this institution, one to whom we all extend our best wishes as he prepares to become your new president -- former NATO Ambassador and my former Special Counsellor, David Abshire, would you rise? And I am also pleased to see in the audience my former National Security Adviser, Bud McFarlane. A moment ago, I spoke of the need to base our policy upon an American consensus, upon an agreement about our nation's aims in the world that is not sectional nor partisan, but truly rooted in the will and values of the American people themselves. Certain aspects of this consensus we're privileged to have handed down to us by our founders -- above all, our love of peace and our fierce attachment to freedom; freedom not for ourselves alone, but in Lincoln's words: ``The hope, too, that in due time the weights would be lifted from the shoulders of all men.'' Yet, as for a consensus on the specific policy means by which these American values are to be carried into action, that policy consensus is one that, with each major development in our foreign affairs, we must build for ourselves. So, I come to you today. The treaty that General Secretary Gorbachev and I signed last week represents, as you've been told, a landmark achievement and an important step toward a safer world. But there's promise of still greater progress in bolstering our security and in putting East-West relations on a sounder footing. And I want, as well, to share some thoughts on this. First, however, the historic INF treaty itself. Each of you, of course, knows the background from the last decade and this. But permit me to repeat it briefly, for there are vital points to be made. It was in 1977 that the Soviet Union first deployed the SS - 20. This was not another short-range tactical weapon similar to those already in the theater inventories, intended for limited battlefield use. Neither was it another long-range intercontinental weapon like those already possessed by the Soviet Union and the United States. The SS - 20 was a new and threatening intermediate-range nuclear missile capable of striking targets in Asia and anywhere in Western Europe after minutes of launch, much more capable and sophisticated than its predecessors. NATO had in the field no similar weapon to counterbalance this new threat. Still, the Soviets continued to deploy these new weapons. By 1979 they had deployed some 130 INF missiles with some 390 warheads; by 1982, over 300 missiles with more than 900 warheads. For our friends and allies in Europe and Asia, these missiles represented a massive and totally new dimension of threat. And this brings me to my first point: The INF treaty that Mr. Gorbachev and I signed is not intended to achieve some kind of superficial shuffling of the superpower arsenals, some sort of rearrangement of the pieces on a chessboard. All the talk of numbers, numbers, numbers in recent days might quite naturally have led people to feel this. Yet we must remind ourselves that what the treaty will accomplish is, if you will, something entirely real: Not the rearrangement of numbers, but the elimination of a grave danger to our NATO allies and our own troops in Europe and to our friends and allies in Asia. We all remember that it was Chancellor Helmut Schmidt who led the NATO call to counter this new threat. And at a meeting in 1979, NATO made its famous two-track decision. Track one: Deploy a limited number of our own INF missiles. Track two: Use the unity and strength that NATO's own deployment would demonstrate to bring the Soviets to the bargaining table. Never was the aim of this NATO decision the permanent deployment of American INF missiles. Always the American deployment was understood as the means to an end. Giscard D'Estaing, President of France at the time of the 1979 NATO decision, recently wrote that: ``The deployment was a tactical exercise, whose preferred goal was to compel the Soviet Union to eliminate the SS - 20's.'' Well, no doubt the Soviets intended to test NATO's resolve. And to be sure, the deployment of our Pershing II and ground-launched cruise missiles had to be carried out in the face of sharp protest, even mass demonstrations. I remember speaking in Bonn in 1982. Across a river, thousands of demonstrators chanted and marched. And I couldn't help thinking: What irony. For it was to secure the peace they sought that NATO decided to deploy the missiles they protested, and missiles such as they protested helped ensure their very freedom to protest. Yet NATO held fast. The deployment of our missiles commenced. And yes, it was when we showed strength, when it became clear that we would not be intimidated -- only after this had taken place did the Soviets finally begin to negotiate in earnest. The INF treaty represents the culmination -- the historic culmination -- of that long and arduous process. A first step -- and a critical one -- toward building a more durable peace. Two final points about the process itself: First, as will be clear from all I just described -- I shuffled my notes up here pretty good. If I get off track, I will have to stop and tell another story. [Laughter] As will be clear from all I just described, this was not only an American effort but truly a Western effort. NATO had said from the first that we should be prepared to halt, modify, or reverse NATO deployments if the Soviets would eliminate the SS - 20 threat. At all NATO ministerial meetings since 1980, foreign and defense ministers have endorsed American efforts toward reaching a treaty, including our putting forward the zero-option proposal. And at a number of points during this process, our allies have asked that we alter or reshape our negotiating stance. And we did so. Our allies have been with us throughout, and we've been with them. Second, the NATO treaty will leave NATO -- the treaty, I should say, will leave NATO with an effective nuclear deterrent, just as we had before the first Soviet SS - 20 deployment in 1977. In the final communique at their meetings this month, NATO defense ministers, the very officials charged with ensuring allied security, stated that the treaty ``has been made possible by the determination and solidarity of the allied governments over the years. We look forward to the prospect of the INF treaty being signed and ratified in the near future.'' And Prime Minister Thatcher called the treaty -- and I quote her own inimitable words -- ``a marvelous Christmas present, an extra piece of good will and a lovely way to end the year.'' Well, given that the treaty accomplishes NATO aims and has the firm support of our NATO allies, but more important, given our duty to build a safer peace as we work to expand freedom, how can we fail in the end to hail this treaty as an historic achievement? No one thought before that first deployment that NATO had been ``denuclearized.'' No one then believed that the United States and Western Europe had been in any way been ``decoupled.'' Neither, then, can these charges be leveled against this treaty. I know that some in Europe and in the United States, perhaps some in this room, view the treaty with anxiety. I welcome the Senate ratification hearings as a forum in which every concern arising from the treaty can be examined. I am convinced that simply by following their own course the hearings will lay anxieties to rest and help to build up the needed consensus. In the meantime, permit me to lay before you some considerations which I believe should form a major part of this dialog. Over 3 years, we and the Soviets will completely eliminate all our INF missiles, the Soviets eliminating about four times as many deployed warheads as will the United States. The Soviets will dismantle not only their SS - 20's and SS - 4's but also their shorter range ballistic missiles, the SS - 12's and SS - 23's. These shorter range missiles can be used with chemical and improved conventional warheads and aimed at NATO military targets; in particular, those ports, depots, and airfields crucial to NATO's reinforcement plan. Thus, in 3 years there will be no U.S. or Soviet INF missiles in Europe, none in Asia, none on Earth. An entire class of nuclear weapons will be gone. The verification regime will be the most stringent in the history of arms control negotiations, with far-reaching implications. For the first time, the Soviets will permit onsite inspections, including inspections at short notice -- our ability to simply think or suspect something and say we're coming over. And they can do the same to us. It's a remarkable breakthrough in itself. What we have here, then, is a new departure in East-West relations -- an effective, verifiable treaty that will lead, not just to arms control but to the first nuclear arms reductions in history. Chancellor Kohl has called the INF treaty -- and I'll quote him -- ``a great success for the Atlantic alliance.''
1977 Rescue Impossible featurette (1/3)
Part 1 of 3 - Rescue Impossible - 1977 Airport ’77 featurette - Jack Lemon, Jerry Jameson, James Stewart, William Frye, Lee Grant - disaster film - dam - bridge along top of dam - dam gives way - flooding plane on extreme descent - interior airplane: door opens, great winds blow - train falls off bridge - helicopter over ocean - man dives from copter - plan crashes low over ocean - plane pov: landing through snow at night
1/29/77 C0061265 - COLOR ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA: AERIALS OF FLOODED AREAS IN INDIA'S ANDHRA PRADESH PROVINCE.
1/29/77 C0061265 - COLOR ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA: AERIALS OF FLOODED AREAS IN INDIA'S ANDHRA PRADESH PROVINCE. LNC 88754 "CYCLONE RELIEF" SHOWS: GV AERIAL FLOODED LANDSCAPE 3 SHOTS: MS INT HELICOPTER CREW THROW OUT FOOD: GV DAMAGED VILLAGE: MS HELICOPTER IN FLIGHT: GV FLOODED LANDSCAPE: MS CREW DISTRIBUTE MILK TO VILLAGERS FROM HELICOPTER: MS RUBBLE STREWN VILLAGE: MS CATTLE CARCASS: MS CLOTHES ON GROUND: MS BODIES IN VILLAGE AND PEOPLE WALKING PAST: GV SMOKE RISING FROM BUILDING: GV SUNKEN AND DAMAGED BOAT: SHOT 11/27/77 86FT MUTE HURRICANES - 1977 (CYCLONE) INDIA - ANDHRA PRADESH FLOODS - INDIA UPITN / 86 FT / 16 COLOR / PRINT / 900 FT / 16 COLOR / ORIG /
Weather: Record Rainfall
Loire Bretagne
KELLY BARNES DAM FLOOD VICTIMS FUNERAL
OC 800 SOF / MAG ROLL A FTG OF FLOOD FUNERAL. VS FUNERAL SERVICES IN PROGRESS FOR VICTIMS OF FLOOD WHEN KELLY BARNES DAM BURST FLOODING CAMPUS OF TOCCOA FALLS BIBLE COLLEGE IN GEORGIA. VS COFFINS OF VICTIMS BEING CARRIED FROM CHURCH INTO CEMETERY. VS WRECKAGE CAUSED BY FLOOD. VS PEOPLE WEEPING AT SIDE OF GRAVE. INTV W/ VOLUNTEER FIREMAN WHO DESCRIBES FLOOD IN WHICH 39 PEOPLE DIED, DISCUSSES FRIEND WHO LOST HIS ENTIRE FAMILY IN FLOOD. ON NOVEMBER 6, 1977, AT 1:30 AM, THE KELLY BARNES DAM FAILED AFTER A PERIOD OF HEAVY RAIN; SEVEN INCHES HAD FALLEN FROM NOVEMBER 2-5. IN PARTICULAR, 3½ INCHES FELL BETWEEN 6 PM AND MIDNIGHT, NOVEMBER 5. A TOTAL OF 200 FEET (61 M) OF THE DAM HAD FAILED. THE FLOOD CAUSED 39 FATALITIES ALONG WITH DESTROYING NINE HOUSES, 18 HOUSE TRAILERS, TWO COLLEGE BUILDINGS AND MANY MOTOR VEHICLES. FIVE HOUSES AND FIVE COLLEGE BUILDINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED. TWO BRIDGES ON TOCCOA FALLS DRIVE AND A CULVERT AT COUNTY FARM ROAD WERE COMPLETELY DESTROYED. THE EMBANKMENTS AT GEORGIA HIGHWAY 17 WERE DESTROYED ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BRIDGE, AND ONE OF THE BRIDGE ABUTMENTS AT HIGHVIEW ROAD WAS DESTROYED. THE WATER-SUPPLY PIPE FOR THE CITY OF TOCCOA WAS DAMAGED AND THE CITY'S WATER SUPPLY WAS CONTAMINATED FOR SEVERAL DAYS.
Corsica. Following the floods of October: subdivision of disasters a folelli
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
0/00/77 C0061344 - COLOR - RR ALSO C0063004 INDIA: CYCLONE AT ANDHRA PRADESH.
0/00/77 C0061344 - COLOR - RR ALSO C0063004 INDIA: CYCLONE AT ANDHRA PRADESH. RR 7749A "CYCLONE" SHOWS: AERIALS OF FLOODED LANDSCAPE: FLATTENED VILLAGES: CROPS UNDER WATER: SNAPPED TAMARIND TREES: BLOCK ROADS: WRECKED FISHING VILLAGE WITH BOATS: SURVIVING VILLAGERS: CORPSESES BLOATED AND ABANDONED: FLOODED AND STRANDED BUSES: RELIEF OPERATION: HELICOPTERS AIRLIFT RICE AND MILK: GRATEFUL INDIANS FED: RUBBLE OF STONE BUILT HOUSES: PEOPLE QUEUE FOR MILK RATION: WIDE SHOT OF STRICKEN LANDSCAPE: SHOT XX 323FT) INDIA - ANDHRA PRADESH FLOODS - INDIA HURRICANES & TROPICAL STORMS - 1977 CYCLONE) BODIES RELIEF WORK UPITN / 323 FT / 16 COLOR / PRINT /
Bad summer weather ... explanations by METEO FRANCE
Midi Atlantique
VIERZON (18): FLOOD RISK PREVENTION
Loire Bretagne
1/25/77 C0061233 - COLOR
1/25/77 C0061233 - COLOR ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA: CYCLONE DAMAGE AT ANDHRA PRADESH. LNC 88458 "ANDHRA CYCLONE" SHOWS: GV PAN FLOOD WATER: MCU STRANDED FISHING BOAT: MS FALLEN TREE ON HOUSE: GV DESTROYED THATCHED HOUSE:MS UPROOOTED TREE: MS DEAD PIG, FULL OUT TO UPROOTED TREE: GV HALF - BURIED BUS: GV DEAD GOATS: GV HUMAN CORPSES 5 SHOTS: (SHOT 11/23/77 42FT SOF) HURRICANES - 1977 CYCLONE INDIA - ANDHRA PRADESH UPITN / 42 FT / 16 COLOR / PRINT /
KELLY BARNES DAM FLOOD VICTIMS FUNERAL
OC 700 SOF / MAG ROLL B CONTINUATION OF FTG OF FLOOD FUNERAL. EXT OF CHURCH, COFFINS BEING CARRIED IN FOR FUNERAL SERVICES FOR VICTIMS OF FLOOD WHEN KELLY BARNES DAM BURST FLOODING CAMPUS OF TOCCOA FALLS BIBLE COLLEGE IN GEORGIA. VS MOURNERS ARRIVING. MORE EXT OF CHURCH. VS MOURNERS LEAVING. ON NOVEMBER 6, 1977, AT 1:30 AM, THE KELLY BARNES DAM FAILED AFTER A PERIOD OF HEAVY RAIN; SEVEN INCHES HAD FALLEN FROM NOVEMBER 2-5. IN PARTICULAR, 3½ INCHES FELL BETWEEN 6 PM AND MIDNIGHT, NOVEMBER 5. A TOTAL OF 200 FEET (61 M) OF THE DAM HAD FAILED. THE FLOOD CAUSED 39 FATALITIES ALONG WITH DESTROYING NINE HOUSES, 18 HOUSE TRAILERS, TWO COLLEGE BUILDINGS AND MANY MOTOR VEHICLES. FIVE HOUSES AND FIVE COLLEGE BUILDINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED. TWO BRIDGES ON TOCCOA FALLS DRIVE AND A CULVERT AT COUNTY FARM ROAD WERE COMPLETELY DESTROYED. THE EMBANKMENTS AT GEORGIA HIGHWAY 17 WERE DESTROYED ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BRIDGE, AND ONE OF THE BRIDGE ABUTMENTS AT HIGHVIEW ROAD WAS DESTROYED. THE WATER-SUPPLY PIPE FOR THE CITY OF TOCCOA WAS DAMAGED AND THE CITY'S WATER SUPPLY WAS CONTAMINATED FOR SEVERAL DAYS.
The 1993 floods in Aisne
Nord
APTN 1830
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Thursday, 24 June 2010 North America Prime News ++US Afghanistan 01:49 No Access NAmerica/Internet NEW Def Sec Gates and Adm Mullen comment after McChrystal sacking Pakistan US 01:41 See Script REPLAY Anti-terror court convicts 5 Americans France US Sailor 01:03 AP Clients Only REPLAY Brother of teen sailor Abby Sunderland arrives on island Brazil Floods 02:59 Pt No Access Brazil REPLAY Latest on floods in Northeast of Brazil; 135 still missing Belgium Archbishop 00:57 No Access Belgium REPLAY Police raid offices, home of retired archbishop +SAF WC NZ Scuffles 2 01:55 See Script WRAP STILLS of clashes between NZ fans and security forces; ADDS more SAF WC NZ Par Reax 01:29 AP Clients Only REPLAY Reax as unbeaten NZ go out and Paraguay top group to go through SAF WC Italy Slovakia Reax 01:56 AP Clients Only REPLAY Post match reax as champions go Italy go out, Slovakia march on ++Italy WC Reax 01:37 AP Clients Only NEW Misery as the 2006 winners crash out at the group stage France WC Return 2 02:02 AP Clients Only REPLAY French team arrives home after being knocked out of WCup; fans UK Queen 2 01:47 AP Clients Only REPLAY Elizabeth II at Wimbledon for first time since 1977; meets players B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 06-24-10 1456EDT
The 1993 floods in Aisne
Nord
The 1993 floods in Aisne
Nord
Turkey May Day 2
AP-APTN-0930: Turkey May Day 2 Wednesday, 1 May 2013 STORY:Turkey May Day 2- May Day demonstrators and police clash LENGTH: 00:51 FIRST RUN: 0730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 889790 DATELINE: Istanbul - 1 May 2013 LENGTH: 00:51 AP TELEVISON - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Pan of water cannon being fired at demonstrators 2. Wide of media filming tear gas in streets 3. Mid of police with riot shields 4. Police pushing forward and media moving back 5. Cameraman filming empty street filled with tear gas 6. Wide of demonstrators with flags and banner in street 7. Various of demonstrators and flags 8. Mid demonstrators arm in arm 9. Wide of police and water cannon vehicles advancing STORYLINE: Police in the Turkish city of Istanbul clashed with scores of people taking part in May Day demonstrations on Wednesday. The clashes broke out when a group of protesters tried to break a barricade preventing access to the city's Taksim Square. About 200 people gathered in the Besiktas neighbourhood and were preparing to march to the square when police deployed water cannons to try to disperse them. The protesters retaliated by throwing stones. Taksim Square has traditionally played host to the city's largest May Day gatherings. This year, however, the government has banned people from meeting there because of construction work going on in the square. In 1977, 34 people were killed in Taksim Square when shots were fired into the crowd from a nearby building. Security forces intervened and deployed armoured vehicles. Most of the casualties were a result of the chaos that ensued. Tens of thousands are expected to flood the streets to observe May Day and march to the square despite the barricades that have been put up to prevent access. Before being declared a national holiday in 2009, May 1 often marked conflict - leading to widespread violence across many cities in Turkey. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-05-01-13 1021GMT