GRAND RAPIDS SHOOTING PRESSER / WZZM FEED
FTG OF PRESS CONFERENCE / PRESSER / NEWSER Grand Rapids, MI (WZZM) A pleasant Thursday afternoon turned deadly in Grand Rapids when a gunman killed seven people before fleeing through the city, taking three people hostage in a home for hours, then fatally shooting himself. Around 11 p.m., the hostages were free after the suspect, 34-year-old Rodrick Shonte Dantzler, shot himself in the head, Police Chief Kevin Belk said. Belk said officers were in the house, talking to Dantzler, who had been threatening to shoot the two hostages who remained and had asked officers to shoot him -- before suddenly committing suicide. "It does not make sense," Belk said shortly before midnight. "I don't think you can make sense out of something like this." The hostages -- one, a 53-year-old woman, had been released earlier -- were unharmed. Earlier, the discovery of the bodies -- four in one home and three in another across town -- led police on a high-speed chase into downtown Grand Rapids and along I-96 in an attempt to capture the suspect. City police, Kent County deputies and Michigan State Police in squad cars and a helicopter followed Dantzler, who caused a crash at Fulton and Division in downtown Grand Rapids. As the chase began, Belk said, two other people were shot, but not fatally. Dantzler also repeatedly shot at police, Belk said, though no officers were hurt. "It's an awful situation," Mayor George Heartwell said after the bodies were found. At one point during the chase, the suspect crossed a wide grassy median on the interstate and drove the wrong way down the highway with more than a dozen squad cars in pursuit. Hours later, the highway remained closed. Dantzler then reportedly ditched the Chevy Suburban he was driving and ran to a home in the 4200 block of Elmdale, near one of the crime scenes in the 1200 block of Brynell Court. State Corrections spokesman Russ Marlan said records show Dantzler was discharged from the Michigan Department of Corrections in 2005 after serving time for assault less than murder. He had not been under state supervision since then, Marlan said. A motive remained unknown through it all, though Belk said Thursday night that Dantzler had a "prior relationship" with at least one person at each home where the victims were killed. An autopsy would be conducted on Dantzler's body today, Belk said. The day of gunshots and hot pursuit turned parts of normally placid Grand Rapids into a wild place. Sandra Powney, who lives across the street from one of the homes where the shootings happened, said she had seen Dantzler at the ranch house. She said a couple have lived there for more than 20 years with their two adult daughters. "I've seen him there. He would come periodically," she said. Powney said she had been at home all day and didn't realize anyone had been killed until police converged on the cul-de-sac about 3 p.m. "For a while, we couldn't come outside," she said. "They didn't know if there was someone still inside the house." Sonia Bergers said Dantzler lived in the home with a woman she assumed was his wife and their daughter, a girl who appeared to be about 10 years old. Mary Lahuis said she and her husband had returned home after having coffee at a nearby fast-food restaurant. "We were in the house, and police went down our street, running with guns," she said. "They told us to get in the house." Lee Roedema found himself stuck on westbound I-96 as the suspect's white SUV came "flying past," followed by a phalanx of police cars. "We knew from the radio that he might be coming this way, but we were already on the expressway and trapped," Roedema said. Other people told of shots being fired downtown. A shot-up police car with a shattered windshield was left sitting on a street. "This is just insane," said a woman who declined to give her name. Lisa Schenden lives with her husband and their children, ages 11 and 8, two blocks from the home where four people were killed. She said the homeowners are a couple whose daughter has a daughter with the suspect. Schenden said she did not hear the shooting either, but she saw the suspect and his daughter drive up to the house earlier in the day. "Just last night, my kids went over there swimming, and I went over with them," she said.
PRISON ESCAPEE CHASE 2005
UNDERCOVER AGENTS LOCATE THE VEHICLE OF AN ESCAPED INMATE AND ALERT LOCAL COPS AS TO HIS WHEREABOUTS. WHEN THE MICHIGAN POLICE GET ON HIS TAIL A HIGH SPEED CHASE BREAKS OUT AND INCLUDES THE SUSPECT TRYING TO RAM THE COPS AND AN EVENTUAL FOOT RACE THE MAN SIMPLY LOSES.
GRAND RAPIDS SHOOTING PRESSER / WXMI FEED
FTG OF PRESS CONFERENCE / PRESSER / NEWSER Grand Rapids, MI (WZZM) A pleasant Thursday afternoon turned deadly in Grand Rapids when a gunman killed seven people before fleeing through the city, taking three people hostage in a home for hours, then fatally shooting himself. Around 11 p.m., the hostages were free after the suspect, 34-year-old Rodrick Shonte Dantzler, shot himself in the head, Police Chief Kevin Belk said. Belk said officers were in the house, talking to Dantzler, who had been threatening to shoot the two hostages who remained and had asked officers to shoot him -- before suddenly committing suicide. "It does not make sense," Belk said shortly before midnight. "I don't think you can make sense out of something like this." The hostages -- one, a 53-year-old woman, had been released earlier -- were unharmed. Earlier, the discovery of the bodies -- four in one home and three in another across town -- led police on a high-speed chase into downtown Grand Rapids and along I-96 in an attempt to capture the suspect. City police, Kent County deputies and Michigan State Police in squad cars and a helicopter followed Dantzler, who caused a crash at Fulton and Division in downtown Grand Rapids. As the chase began, Belk said, two other people were shot, but not fatally. Dantzler also repeatedly shot at police, Belk said, though no officers were hurt. "It's an awful situation," Mayor George Heartwell said after the bodies were found. At one point during the chase, the suspect crossed a wide grassy median on the interstate and drove the wrong way down the highway with more than a dozen squad cars in pursuit. Hours later, the highway remained closed. Dantzler then reportedly ditched the Chevy Suburban he was driving and ran to a home in the 4200 block of Elmdale, near one of the crime scenes in the 1200 block of Brynell Court. State Corrections spokesman Russ Marlan said records show Dantzler was discharged from the Michigan Department of Corrections in 2005 after serving time for assault less than murder. He had not been under state supervision since then, Marlan said. A motive remained unknown through it all, though Belk said Thursday night that Dantzler had a "prior relationship" with at least one person at each home where the victims were killed. An autopsy would be conducted on Dantzler's body today, Belk said. The day of gunshots and hot pursuit turned parts of normally placid Grand Rapids into a wild place. Sandra Powney, who lives across the street from one of the homes where the shootings happened, said she had seen Dantzler at the ranch house. She said a couple have lived there for more than 20 years with their two adult daughters. "I've seen him there. He would come periodically," she said. Powney said she had been at home all day and didn't realize anyone had been killed until police converged on the cul-de-sac about 3 p.m. "For a while, we couldn't come outside," she said. "They didn't know if there was someone still inside the house." Sonia Bergers said Dantzler lived in the home with a woman she assumed was his wife and their daughter, a girl who appeared to be about 10 years old. Mary Lahuis said she and her husband had returned home after having coffee at a nearby fast-food restaurant. "We were in the house, and police went down our street, running with guns," she said. "They told us to get in the house." Lee Roedema found himself stuck on westbound I-96 as the suspect's white SUV came "flying past," followed by a phalanx of police cars. "We knew from the radio that he might be coming this way, but we were already on the expressway and trapped," Roedema said. Other people told of shots being fired downtown. A shot-up police car with a shattered windshield was left sitting on a street. "This is just insane," said a woman who declined to give her name. Lisa Schenden lives with her husband and their children, ages 11 and 8, two blocks from the home where four people were killed. She said the homeowners are a couple whose daughter has a daughter with the suspect. Schenden said she did not hear the shooting either, but she saw the suspect and his daughter drive up to the house earlier in the day. "Just last night, my kids went over there swimming, and I went over with them," she said.
TASING ENDS CAR FLIPPING CHASE 2006
MAN STEALS A TRUCK AFTER HIS OWN VEHICLE BREAKS DOWN AND LEADS COPS ON A HIGH SPEED CHASE. AFTER CATCHING UP WITH THE STOLEN VEHICLE THE TRUCK REFUSES TO PULL OVER. AT ONE POINT, THE VEHICLE HITS ANOTHER CAR AND WHEN HE TRIES TO EXIT THE SLIPPERY RAIN AND SNOW COVERED OFF RAMP, THE SUSPECT ROLLS THE TRUCK! OFFICERS CHASE HIM AND WITH THE HELP OF A TASER, THEY NAB THE BAD GUY. THE SUSPECT WAS NOT INJURED. HE WAS CHARGED WITH AUTO THEFT, FLEEING AND ELUDING, RESISTING ARREST AND DRIVING ON A SUSPENDED LICENSE. SUSPECT WAS ARRESTED IN THE PAST ON UNARMED ROBBERY CHARGES AND RECEIVING AND CONCEALING STOLEN PROPERTY. HE WAS ALSO ON PROBATION FOR A 2005 CHARGE OF FLEEING AND ELUDING IN A DIFFERENT COUNTY.
President George Bush Remarks on Prescription Drugs - STIX
VSDC Assign Number: DCBB115526A Library: NEWS-DC Asset Type: Tape Library Number: Current Holder: LIBRARY, DC * LDC/DC * 2005/06/29 18:32:20 Length: 0:00:00 Ordered By: FN FC: VC: Status: Uncatalogued User Field 1: W888H1058 Story Name: Bush Remarks on Prescription Drugs - STIX Date Shot: 2003/01/29 Location: GRAND RAPIDS, MI USA Start Time: 00:00:00 Camera: RS 20, Notes: ldc/03/kgr WASHINGTON HELD W888H1058 Contents: President GW Bush Remarks on Prescription Drugs in Grand Rapids Michigan - STIX 12:30:40 seal is put up 12:36:40 Tommy Thompson 12:36:46 POTUS comes out 12:37:01 push into medium shot of POTUS 12:37:16 pull out to wide shot 12:37:44 push into medium shot of Tommy and POTUS two shot 12:38:06 this wonderful president gave a wonderful speech last night 12:38:30 push to cu shot of Tommy 12:38:43 President Bush put health care. he wants to make sure 12:38:54 Medicare is a good program but it has not kept up with its times 12:39:02 Medicare should as well, seniors say they want more, and this president will give them more 12:39:22 America's seniors are fortunate that we have a president. who cares about all generations of Americans 12:39:38 reduced the tax burden. that's the kind of president we have and I am very happy. 12:39:54 the great president. GWB POTUS 12:40:01 Thank you all very much 12:40:21 thanks for coming 12:40:28 I'm anxious to get started 12:40:33 I woke up this morning and Laura said where are you going and I said Grand Rapids thank fully 12:40:50 Home to many great Americans. 12:40:57 shorten your speech, I want to share some of my thoughts on that speech I gave last night 12:41:29 that we can accomplish . 12:41:48 thanks for coming. 12:41:59 serving our nation, and remember he was the governor of Wisconsin 12:42:36 I traveled today from Washington.. your congressman Burn Ellors. 12:42:52 Neighboring congressman Peter? 12:43:10 appreciate these members traveling with me. I talked about things that mattered to the future of this country 12:43:27 where I visited with docs and hospital administrators and folks on Medicare 12:43:40 I want to share some of that with you 12:43:49 the biggest need at home, it seems like we need to make sure that anybody who wants a job. 12:44:04 my philosophy is the government's job is not to create wealth 12:44:24 that's why I feel so strongly about making sure that people get to keep more of their own money 12:45:03 we've come out of a recession, we've withstood terrorist attacks 12:45:15 we've had some of your fellow citizens think they could fudge the books. 12:45:30 our economy is still nudging along but there is more that we need to do 12:45:47 somebody demands. when somebody produces a good or a service. 12:46:05 that's why tax relief is so important 12:46:12 when I talk about tax relief it equals jobs 12:46:19 you hear a lot of rhetoric about tax relief in Washington D.C., my feeling is if you pay taxes you ought to. 12:46:44 seventy percent of jobs are created by small business owners 12:46:56 take risks to .taxes at the income tax levels 12:47:08 when you hear me talk about tax relief I want you to know that that will help stimulate small business in America 12:47:41 trying to get rid of the effects of the marriage penalty, it doesn't make sense 12:47:57 it seems like we ought to encourage marriage 12:48:14 we ought to drop that lowest rate from 15 percent to 12:48:51 it makes a lot of sense to put tax relief in today 12:49:02 Congress must act 12:49:11 ten million seniors receive dividends.. 12:49:24 dividend is more of a dollar.. 12:49:34 it hurts our seniors 12:49:48 congress needs to end the double dividends of our seniors. for the sake of the quality of life for seniors in America 12:50:08 these measures will help our economy grow 12:50:17 how do you create growth in the economy. the more growth there is the more . 12:50:30 not policies which discourage growth. 12:50:41 there's two equations when it comes.. 12:50:48 there's the revenue side then there's the .. 12:50:55 to set clear and important priorities and not over spend the people's money. 12:51:31 we have some important priorities. my priority is education 12:51:48 the last two years, we've increased it the last two years. 12:52:00 its important to spend on priorities, it is essential that we set high standards four our children 12:52:18 so we know whether or not our children are learning to read and write 12:52:28 which will not teach and will not change, we give parents different opportunities for our children 12:53:01 Yesterday I talked about a measurable part of America's strengths and that is our hearts 12:53:17 where people love their neighbor like they want to be . 12:53:32 I do think there's a role for government. 12:53:37 help people who cannot help themselves 12:53:46 we need to recognize in Washington. 12:54:12 to drugs . government can spend money and should 12:54:22 a sense of purpose in people's lives. That happens when a fellow neighbor. what can I do to help you. 12:54:54 a child whose mother is . imagine what kind of life that could be growing up in this society 12:55:08 I know there's somebody there who can provide love. 12:55:19 today. I had the honor of meeting Jerry. I want my fellow (clapping) 12:55:44 inspiration. grand rapids Michigan. 12:56:01 program to call one out in churches in the area. 12:56:11 I said last night we could save our society, one heart one soul, one conscious at a time 12:56:29 I urge you to mentor, I urge those who are addicted.. 12:56:37 a better American is a compassionate America 12:56:47 and I am confident it will happen 12:56:58 a better America is one in which our Health care systems work. 12:57:10 the system is called Medicare. its important. 12:57:22 Medicare hadn't changed. it stuck in the past 12:57:30 medicine, I urged the congress last night to make sure the Medicare system flows as promised. 12:57:55 the way things are. shouldn't change 12:58:05 however Medicare must be more flexible.. 12:58:14 Medicare must be available to seniors in a variety of forms 12:58:23 the congress has got a good. is based upon trusting each member of congress. 12:58:41 I believe it is very important for seniors. members of the senate have 12:58:59 if it's good enough for the congress, its good enough for the senior citizens in America 12:59:14 any good plan provides options and any good plan makes sure that seniors who cannot afford .. 12:59:33 there is a substantial increase in Medicare funding. a reform and strengthening. 12:59:51 our promised seniors in America 13:00:09 we want health care to be accessible. 13:00:19 too many law suites against docs and hospitals. 13:00:35 to practice preventative medicine 13:00:51 out of the practice of medicine. 13:00:59 an it's a problem, I visited states where it's a real problems, I've had doctors. 13:01:21 I'm being sued so much my premiums are out of sight. 13:01:38 access to care because there's fewer providers 13:01:47 this is a federal issue 13:01:51 Medicare costs more, Medicaid costs more 13:01:57 we need a national federal medical liability policy 13:02:15 we can get one but I need your help 13:02:20 you need to write your senators and make it clear to them 13:02:30 a judicial system that works, we need reasonable caps 13:02:46 doesn't ruin the health care for citizens all across our country 13:02:57 domestic policy is. and I spend a lot of time on it 13:03:10 there is nothing more important than protecting the people. 13:03:25 to make sure that people understood that distance between September 11th . 13:03:46 ware has not ended. 13:03:51 we are doing everything 13:04:18 than every before, the FBI's whole culture has changed 13:04:29 will prevent danger from happening 13:04:37 we are on alert, we know that there is an enemy that still lurks,,, and there is 13:04:52 they just don't value life like we do, 13:05:04 everybody counts.. 13:05:10 everybody has worth 13:05:13 and they just don't do it that way 13:05:20 they kill in the name of false ideology. 13:05:30 we are chasing them down one by one and bringing them to justice. 13:05:47 make no mistake about it, we are slowly but surely dismantling their. 13:06:35 Unfortunately for them 13:06:49 needs our presence to make sure these remnants of Al Qaeda 13:07:02 our coalition is still strong. the doctrine that says either you are with us or with the enemy.. that still exists 13:07:18 we are sharing intelligence. when they pop their heads up we are getting them one by one 13:07:45 it doesn't matter how long its going to take, slowly but surely. 13:08:08 we didn't go into Afghanistan as . we went in as liberators 13:08:24 we liberated people from one of the most barbaric regimes. 13:08:39 we're building highways. we are strong in our might 13:08:52 every body matters, every body has worth in the eyes of the American people.. Every body counts 13:09:20 it's a moral nation, a great nation, we have a chance to use our abilities to help cure that epidemic that plagues a group of people 13:09:46 this time tragedy. 13:09:51 great humanitarian cause, a cause beyond.. 13:10:04 to help the people. we can make a huge difference. in the lives of thousands of human beings 13:10:22 thank God for America and our generosity as. would say 13:10:41 a might is needed in the world the make the word a peaceful place 13:10:59 the war on terror extends beyond just a shadowy. the war on terror involves Saddam Hussein because of the nature and history of Saddam Hussein. he has terrorized his own people, his own neighborhood 13:11:35 because of Al Qaeda connections. we have to deal with him before it is too late 13:12:47 the thought of containing somebody like Saddam Hussein 13:12:59 changed the situation, changed strategic outlook for this country. we are not protected by oceans, the war is here 13:13:24 there is a reason why the UN asked Saddam Hussein to disarm. and the reason why is because he is dangerous. 13:14:06 peace, how to achieve the peace . 13:14:25 to deal with Saddam Hussein, I hope we can deal with this peacefully. 13:15:03 by 15-0 vote in the security council. 13:15:20 we wish them well but the role is not to play hide and seek 13:15:30 there's 108 inspectors running around the country. being misled by a person who has made history .The role of the inspectors is to watch Iraq disarm. 13:16:07 started getting rid of weapons of mass destruction 13:16:23 it is clear that he is not disarming 13:16:31 I understand the terrible price of war. 13:16:38 but I gotta tell you something, I thought long and hard about this. 13:16:50 it's a risk not worth taking. 13:17:00 insist that this dangerous man disarm 13:18:37 and when we do . 13:19:21 but most of all we uphold our values. is the value of freedom 13:19:52 as I said last night. they are God's gift to humanity 13:20:02 this is a great nation, America is a strong nation 13:20:11 America is a nation that is willing to serve causes bigger than ourselves 13:20:23 challenges at home, challenges abroad 13:20:33 history has called the US to action and we will not let history down 13:20:43 Thank you all for coming and God Bless. 13:20:58 Bush walks away from podium and waves. 13:21:18 POTUS walks off stage
trooper crashes into tractor trailer 2005
A MICHIGAN STATE POLICE TROOPER CRASHED INTO THE REAR OF A TRACTOR TRAILER IN A PURSUIT THAT LED OFFICERS THROUGH SEVERAL CITIES. THE CHASE STARTED IN YPSILANTI AND ENDED IN MONROE. POLICE WERE CHASING A SUSPECT WHO HAD OUTSTANDING ARREST WARRANTS. WHILE EXITING ON AN OFF-RAMP, THE CAR BEING CHASED HIT A POLICE CRUSIER THAT THEN SMASHED INTO THE TRACTOR TRAILER. THE POLICE WERE ABLE TO STOP THE DRIVER BY FORCING HIM INTO A SPINOUT. THE TROOPER HITTTING THE TRAILER WAS NOT SERIOUSLY INJURED.
PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"
[PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"] [MUSKEGON, MICH USA] [PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX] September 13, 2004 PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH" IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX RS 20/ X83/ Slugged: 1045 WH MI X83 10:45:53 air force one arrival at event 10:52:29 chanting "four more years" 10:56:02 President bush walks out of AF1 (view blocked by audience) President Bush Remarks 10:57:43 said come to Muskegon and I said okay, see if you can get some people to show up. Listen, I'm here to ask for the vote 10:58:10 I'm here to tell you I have a reason to ask for the vote and we're going to do it a little differently today, I'm going to talk to our fellow citizens about health care.making the world a safer place 10:58:37 before we get started on issues that matter.there's an issue that matters to me, and that is that I hope I can get your help.that means registering people to vote 10:58:59 step one is to remind your friends and your neighbors that we have an obligation 10:59:12 and step.and 10:59:25 and stronger place and a better place when you put dick cheney and me back in office 10:59:39 pull out to ms ("four more years") 10:59:51 perhaps. so laura will be the first lady for four more years. So I said will you marry me, she said fine 11:00:16 just as long as I don't have to give any political speeches, good thing she didn't hold me.she's a genuine, kind, compassionate person.and I love her dearly, she sends her best. 11:00:47 she's out campaigning today, I want to thank my friend Peter Hoestra.and diane thanks for coming, he is a highly respected member of congress 11:01:12 I look forward to working with him to strengthen our 11:01:25 that the world changed .and I look forward to working with you pete.great that you've been selected 11:01:48 I put up the signs and make the phone calls.thank you for what you're going to do over the next few weeks (audio raised slightly) 11:02:16 listen, most people in America agree with my philosophy that the role of govt.is to say what can we do to help you, not tell you what to do and that's the fundamental difference in this campaign 11:02:44 systems of govt must change with a changing world.think about the work force, when our dads and granddads.today the work force has changed a lot of people have more than one job 11:03:15 most massive change in the work force has been women. Women who used to stay at home.haven't reflected this change. Pension planned were designed for yesterday 11:03:39 if you're a baby boomer you don't have to worry about social security.they're going to take away your social security check, it's the most tired, pathetic way to campaign 11:04:05 and baby boomers are fine, we're in good shape.because they're a few lower payer-iners 11:04:26 take some of their own taxes and set aside a personal savings account 11:04:41 this will help people when they have their own personal savings accounts.the worker training programs were designed for yesterday.we ought to promote a lifetime of working for 11:05:06 don't change with them to make sure that people can work.we're going to talk about health care that needs to be changed and modernized. The tax code needs to be changed, it's complicated. 11:05:31 it's a complicated mess, that's what it is. America spent about 6 billion hours filling out.special interest loopholes 11:05:51 to simplify the tax code...it'll help the American worker, it'll help the American family 11:06:09 what I'm telling you is that I recognize the changing world in which we live.by the way one of the biggest changes we have 11:06:27 high productivity increases.a shovel to a mechanized digger. Or from a manual typewriter.our economy to have sustained growth 11:06:56 therefore I put out a plan to make sure.when you're out gathering the vote make sure you remind people what we've been though 11:07:25 about the economy and then we had a recession, the first ¾ of my presidency were declared a recession.handed to us and then we had some corporate scandals and that affected the 11:07:57 affects economic growth, there should be no question today that we will not tolerate dishonesty in the boardrooms of America and then September 11th came and it hurt us 11:08:28 some interesting, not interesting, but some very important lessons we learned form that day.this economy of ours is strong and it's getting stronger 11:09:01 now their pockets in you state.and keep them in place as opposed to resorting to the old 11:09:21 one of the key aspects is to make sure the health care system works.in order to make sure the job base expands in America we need an energy policy that makes us less dependent on foreign sources 11:09:51 I submitted a plan to the united states congress and it's stuck.recognizes technology is going to change 11:10:06 hopefully within a decade people will be driving hydrogen powered.on clean coal technology so we can use 11:10:25 is that someday when we walk in.we're growing more corn then ever and 11:10:40 as ways to diversify our energy supply, I think we ought to be using technology to spend and advance 11:11:01 that congress must pass in order to make us less dependent on foreign sources 11:11:13 the farm economy is strong here, it's strong in Michigan and it's strong around the world 11:11:29 what it's like to be able to sell a product grown here in America.overseas 11:11:43 you're likely to get the product you want at a better price and a better quality.china, you treat us the way we treat you because 11:12:09 one of the reasons we overcame these obstacles is because of well timed tax cuts 11:12:34 we're helping our small business owners, you know 90 percent.well good, there you are, then you understand where tax relief is 11:12:53 and when you provide tax relief from small businesses and that's what's happening here in America 11:13:10 we've got to do something about these frivolous lawsuits.so they're able to hire and we must not raise taxes in order to keep this 11:13:31 we've got to keep your taxes low and that's an issue in this campaign 11:13:40 over 2 trillion dollars in new federal spending.that's a lot and they said, how are you going to pay for it, he said, oh don't worry about it, we're going to tax the rich 11:14:04 guess who's going to get stuck, yeah. we're not going to let him win 11:14:16 pull out-applause, cheers 11:14:22 hold on for a second, a couple of other things, we've got a lot of work, I appreciate the cheering 11:14:40 if you run up the top two brackets on individual.now, why in the heck would you want to tax small businesses just as the economy is beginning to grow 11:15:05 thirdly you've heard the rhetoric, tax the rich, you've heard that before.and you get stuck with the bill, raising taxes is wrong right now, and we're not going to let him to get away with it 11:15:36 let me talk about health care, we're going to talk about health care.you've already had enough from me already (no), I'm just looking for an affirmation.to make health care available and affordable 11:16:18 way to make sure that doctors keep practicing medicine, I believe health care decisions.in Washington dc 11:16:41 we have a difference of opinion in this campaign.massive complicated blue print to have our govt take over 11:17:14 says his plan would cost the taxpayers 1.5 trillion in new.but he can't pay for it unless he raises your taxes. Today we're going to talk about a difference of opinion, it starts with, what would you expect from a senator from Massachusetts 11:18:00 we're going to talk about a way to make sure health 11:18:08 quick pull out to ms 11:18:15 I believe we have a duty to our seniors (slow push to bush) 11:18:29 plus I went up to Washington to fix problems, I said if I'm fortunate enough.not to pass them off to future presidents and future generations 11:18:52 medicine was modernizing and Medicare wasn't.for heart surgery 11:19:04 from being needed in the first place, that didn't make any sense, that didn't make any sense for our seniors.today, it will help you with the cost of drugs, starting in 2005 we'll have preventative 11:19:32 to have. be giving preventative screenings in Medicare and in 2006 prescription drugs will be available 11:20:05 junk lawsuits that are running up the cost of medicine. 11:20:17 available and affordable health care.we've got to do something about lawsuits, make no mistake about it 11:20:33 litigious society, that means that means there's a lot of lawsuits, I'm not even a lawyer and I know the word litigious 11:20:57 because of the defensive medicine being practiced by docs.and it costs the tax payer 11:21:15 this is a national problem that.it's stuck in the United States senate, it passed in the house.the trial lawyers are powerful 11:21:38 I like to remind people you can't be pro doctor, pro patient and pro trial lawyer at the same time. You have to make a choice. my opponent made his choice and he put him on the ticket. I made my choice 11:22:14 we've got to modernize health care (bush seated) 11:22:26 save a lot of money by using technology.we need to expand the government health care 11:22:44 to encourage families.for low income children, it makes sense to make sure.health care is available we need to expand community health centers 11:23:10 I made a promise by the way when I was running, these things make sense.rather than an emergency center 11:23:31 every poor county in America ought to have a community health center discussion on health care 11:23:50 Tom Lufkin from Muskegon Family Health Center 11:26:19 POTUS: (ms, push to bush).and the idea is to make sure that preventative health care is available 11:26:44 love their neighbor like they'd like to be loved yourself.one way to make sure health care is available 11:27:06 I want to thank you for coming tom, another way to make sure health care is available.here's the problem for small business 11:27:25 to spread risk, that's the problem, they're in the midst.try to get a bid 11:27:37 stand alone entity, big companies are able to pool risk because of their size.so they can get the same discounts that big companies get 11:28:06 David Pray-on his small business in Grand Rapids 11:28:40 POTUS-10 that's a small company.he was telling me on AF1 that he has some problems with health care 11:28:58 David Pray 11:29:12 POTUS- they've got a plan here in Michigan where they can pool together.but 11:29:26 Pray 11:29:52 POTUS- so here's what we're talking about, this guy is a responsible guy.the problem is the system is so designed that he can't really do his job because he's unable to pool risk (push to ts) 11:30:20 what we're suggesting is that David be able to pool with companies.not be able to put his employees in the same system as David (pull out) 11:30:51 would mean that a lot of mandates.would not be imposed upon the small businesses and means that more people can bind together 11:31:36 another way, see I've got a strategy to make sure health care is available and affordable 11:31:54 we're going to make sure small businesses are able to afford.I'm going to talk about a very interesting idea called health savings accounts 11:32:14 and helps us hold down the cost of health care.an innovative idea that became the law of the land as a result of the Medicare.first start w/ the name 11:32:42 man-offlobe plumbing ? 11:32:57 POTUS. It's the heart and soul.I'm giving you time to warm up 11:33:11 man 11:33:44 POTUS. HSA, here it is, you buy a high deductible.I think it's 11:34:04 what is your deductible.the insurance company will take care of the cost 11:34:16 most of the 11:34:23 the company is now p9utting in the money to pay for routine 11:34:50 man 11:35:00 POTUS. we're trying to simplify what sounds like a complicated issue.if you spend 2,000 dollars in the year, 1500 of that rolls over for the next year, it's your money 11:35:35 think about a system by the way. 11:36:15 man 11:36:36 POTUS- these work, I'm telling you they work, they make a lot of sense 11:36:48 and health care is more manageable because the decision making is between the patient and the doc 11:37:05 we're going to move people from private health insurance 11:37:19 who do you trust, we trust the people. 11:37:41 another man-ms, bush and others on stage, bush listening 11:38:13 POTUS- would you care to clarify why you're mad at me 11:38:23 man-I'm just mad it wasn't available to me 11:38:35 POTUS- you've got an account up and running 11:38:47 man 11:39:02 POTUS- there is a marketplace in America (push to ts of bush) 11:39:15 your consumers, shop.puts a lot of money in there that you call your own money 11:39:28 is they contribute to the health savings account and he's out shopping 11:39:41 is to encourage people to go into the marketplace 11:39:53 but nevertheless they do the same things.generic drugs quicker to the market, the Medicare bill helps do that 11:40:21 and generics are going to move quicker.it's an interesting idea, remember, my idea is to protect you as best you can 11:40:39 but in fact it is manufactured in another country.sounds good that they may be able to help us 11:40:57 I'm going to make sure that you're safe because all you need to do is get a batch of drugs that is manufactured elsewhere 11:41:15 so I'm interested in knowing whether or not we can make sure you're safe, that's a duty we have in the federal govt 11:41:30 encourage the consumer to be a price in the market.by speeding up the generic drugs 11:41:59 we've thought through this very carefully, it's common sense.my solemn judgment, not right for the American people 11:42:17 it will be costly, it would lead to rationing of healthcare.let me talk to you about making America a safer place on terrorism 11:42:44 that you cannot negotiate with these people, that you cannot hope for the best.with an ideology of hate 11:43:09 to shake our will, to shake the conscience of the free world.chase them down overseas so we don't have to face them here at home (applause) 11:43:37 thank you, got a little more work to do though, got some things on my mind, we'll have a chance to do the whole "four more years" thing.I gotta tell you 11:44:05 but the only reason to look backwards is to see how best to lead us forward.lets put him back in there, he's got some good ideas 11:44:26 making sure that families are strong, making sure that systems.and he's got a plan and a vision to make the world a better place 11:44:45 we must use all.people who hide in caves and people who lurk in the dark corners 11:45:04 in order to share intelligence and people will use law enforcement.and that's why it's important for our military to be transformed 11:45:25 America is safer, I laid our a new doctrine saying if you harbor a terrorist you are just as guilty.easy for people to understand and mean what he says. I meant what I said to the taliban 11:45:57 they ignored what we said and that's why they're not longer in power 11:46:06 and as a result of a great united states military.Afghanistan has been liberated from a barbaric group of people, we're safer for it 11:46:29 they were training thousands of people in Afghanistan.way before September 11th 11:46:43 I strongly disagree with that sentiment, they were planning and plotting way before September 11th, by staying on the offensive 11:47:06 now think about Afghanistan for a second, not only is the taliban out. 11:47:33 you know, it just wasn't all that long ago that young girls weren't allowed to go to school 11:47:55 you can imagine the terrible resentment, it's a hopeless society, that's how terrorists are able to recruit 11:48:10 one that promotes hope, you know their moms were dragged. 11:48:37 think, about this, tell your friends and neighbors. freedom is moving rapidly through that country, 10 million citizens forty percent of them who are 11:49:13 I can't remember. I suspect some probably said that these people can't be free 11:49:27 I'm just guessing there were some people who were pessimistic 11:49:43 in other words one of the lessons from September 11th were oceans no longer protect us 11:50:05 and the country could say that makes sense to deal with that.but September 11th changed that equation and therefore when we see a country we must deal with 11:50:33 looking at intelligence that said he was a threat.we had been to war 11:50:44 shooting at our pilots.he had harbored terrorist 11:50:53 abu nadal and his organization was in iraq, zarqawi is still in iraq.he's the guy who beheaded people.saddam Hussein paid the families of suiciders 11:51:24 and they looked at the, they agreed, they looked at the intelligence I looked at 11:51:39 and they authorized the use of force, my opponent, he looked at the very same intelligence my demonstration looked at and he voted yes 11:52:02 we must try all avenues to solve a problem, understand the grave decision of sending men and women into harms way 11:52:22 and so I went to the united nations in hopes that we could solve this problem diplomatically.reminding people of the world we lived in after September 11th 11:52:47 you disarm, disclose, disarm or face serious consequences, I believe when you say something you ought to mean 11:53:09 you're going to vote to authorize force, you better mean it.but saddam Hussein ignored the demands.diplomacy had been tried for 11:53:29 wasn't interested in compiling with the demands of the free world 11:53:39 resolution after resolution and they weren't interested.systematically deceived the 11:53:54 take the word of a madman or take action to defend this country, given that option I will defend America every time 11:54:21 it's hard work in Afghanistan and Iraq 11:54:58 .that's why a year ago I went to congress and proposed an 87 billion dollar supplemental 11:55:16 troops and harms way, as a matter of fact, support was so strong that only 12 voted against.2 of the 12 were my opponent and his running mate 11:55:41 and didn't vote to fund the troops. 11:56:13 nothing complicated about supporting our troops in combat. (applause) 11:56:36 couple of other things I want to share with you and then I've got to move on down the road on the bus, the bus tour 11:57:02 tell you a couple of other things. 11:57:43 he knows.make the world a more peaceful place 11:57:56 we will stay the course so they can develop an army and a police force 11:58:10 so they can do the hard work so they can step up so they can help the reconstruction efforts 11:58:21 as quickly as possible and then they can come home.I believe liberty can transform the world 11:58:40 I believe that's going to happen, children who grow up in a peaceful 11:58:59 I tell people.prime minister koizumi of Japan 11:59:09 and have dinner and we had very interesting meaningful discussions about peace 11:59:27 sworn enemy of America, thousands lost their lives because of the Japanese.there was a lot of skeptics and you can understand why 11:59:48 sworn enemy can become a friend. 12:00:00 today Japan is a friend. We did the hard work after world war II 12:00:12 today I sit down at a table with prime minister Koizumi.by the way there are now five voices telling him he needs to 12:00:37 I talk to prime minister 12:01:11 feeding the hungry.I believe this united states of America must use its great wealth and generosity 12:01:32 lives have been changed because of the pandemic of HIV/AIDS 12:01:42 to help those who suffer. I believe all these things of course we'll continue 12:03:02 end of event 12:03:26 bush gladhanding 12:08:35 bush departs
MEAT TRUCK CHASE AND CRASH 2005
POLICE SAY THREE ARMED AND MASKED MEN STORMED INTO A LIVONIA, MICHIGAN MEAT FACTORY AND MADE OFF WITH THEIR STOLEN MEAT TRUCK AFTER PISTOL WHIPPING SOME EMPLOYEES. AFTER ONE OF THE EMPLOYEES ESCAPED AND CALLED 9-11, THE CHASE WAS ON. AS YOU CAN SEE FROM THIS AMAZING VIDEO TAPE TAKEN FROM TWO DIFFERENT POLICE CRUISERS, THE MEAT TRUCK HAD NO INTENTION OF PULLING OVER. THAT'S WHEN POLICE USED A MANEUVER TO END THE CHASE IN A HURRY BY BUMPING THE MEAT TRUCK IN THE BACK AND FORCING THE TRUCK TO ROLLOVER ON ITS SIDE. POLICE THEN TOOK BILLY BINGHAM INTO CUSTODY. POLICE ARE STILL SEARCHING FOR HIS ACCOMPLICES.
BANK ROBBERY HIGH SPEED CHASE/DASHCAM 2005
BANK ROBBER BACKS HIS CAR UP TO DOOR OF BANK, GOES IN AND ROBS THE JOINT. BUT BECAUSE HE BACKED UP, ALL THE BANK EMPLOYEES COULD CLEARLY SEE HIS CAR'S LICENSE PLATE NUMBER AND THEY QUICKLY CALLED IT IN MAKING IT EASY FOR COPS TO CATCH UP TO THIS CROOK. HIGH SPEED CHASE ENSUES AND SUSPECT ENDS UP CRASHING HIS CAR IN A SPECTACULAR CAUGHT ON TAPE SPECTACLE!
PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"
[PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"] [MUSKEGON, MICH USA] [PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX] September 13, 2004 PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH" IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX RS 20/ X83/ Slugged: 1045 WH MI X83 10:45:53 air force one arrival at event 10:52:29 chanting "four more years" 10:56:02 President bush walks out of AF1 (view blocked by audience) President Bush Remarks 10:57:43 said come to Muskegon and I said okay, see if you can get some people to show up. Listen, I'm here to ask for the vote 10:58:10 I'm here to tell you I have a reason to ask for the vote and we're going to do it a little differently today, I'm going to talk to our fellow citizens about health care.making the world a safer place 10:58:37 before we get started on issues that matter.there's an issue that matters to me, and that is that I hope I can get your help.that means registering people to vote 10:58:59 step one is to remind your friends and your neighbors that we have an obligation 10:59:12 and step.and 10:59:25 and stronger place and a better place when you put dick cheney and me back in office 10:59:39 pull out to ms ("four more years") 10:59:51 perhaps. so laura will be the first lady for four more years. So I said will you marry me, she said fine 11:00:16 just as long as I don't have to give any political speeches, good thing she didn't hold me.she's a genuine, kind, compassionate person.and I love her dearly, she sends her best. 11:00:47 she's out campaigning today, I want to thank my friend Peter Hoestra.and diane thanks for coming, he is a highly respected member of congress 11:01:12 I look forward to working with him to strengthen our 11:01:25 that the world changed .and I look forward to working with you pete.great that you've been selected 11:01:48 I put up the signs and make the phone calls.thank you for what you're going to do over the next few weeks (audio raised slightly) 11:02:16 listen, most people in America agree with my philosophy that the role of govt.is to say what can we do to help you, not tell you what to do and that's the fundamental difference in this campaign 11:02:44 systems of govt must change with a changing world.think about the work force, when our dads and granddads.today the work force has changed a lot of people have more than one job 11:03:15 most massive change in the work force has been women. Women who used to stay at home.haven't reflected this change. Pension planned were designed for yesterday 11:03:39 if you're a baby boomer you don't have to worry about social security.they're going to take away your social security check, it's the most tired, pathetic way to campaign 11:04:05 and baby boomers are fine, we're in good shape.because they're a few lower payer-iners 11:04:26 take some of their own taxes and set aside a personal savings account 11:04:41 this will help people when they have their own personal savings accounts.the worker training programs were designed for yesterday.we ought to promote a lifetime of working for 11:05:06 don't change with them to make sure that people can work.we're going to talk about health care that needs to be changed and modernized. The tax code needs to be changed, it's complicated. 11:05:31 it's a complicated mess, that's what it is. America spent about 6 billion hours filling out.special interest loopholes 11:05:51 to simplify the tax code...it'll help the American worker, it'll help the American family 11:06:09 what I'm telling you is that I recognize the changing world in which we live.by the way one of the biggest changes we have 11:06:27 high productivity increases.a shovel to a mechanized digger. Or from a manual typewriter.our economy to have sustained growth 11:06:56 therefore I put out a plan to make sure.when you're out gathering the vote make sure you remind people what we've been though 11:07:25 about the economy and then we had a recession, the first ? of my presidency were declared a recession.handed to us and then we had some corporate scandals and that affected the 11:07:57 affects economic growth, there should be no question today that we will not tolerate dishonesty in the boardrooms of America and then September 11th came and it hurt us 11:08:28 some interesting, not interesting, but some very important lessons we learned form that day.this economy of ours is strong and it's getting stronger 11:09:01 now their pockets in you state.and keep them in place as opposed to resorting to the old 11:09:21 one of the key aspects is to make sure the health care system works.in order to make sure the job base expands in America we need an energy policy that makes us less dependent on foreign sources 11:09:51 I submitted a plan to the united states congress and it's stuck.recognizes technology is going to change 11:10:06 hopefully within a decade people will be driving hydrogen powered.on clean coal technology so we can use 11:10:25 is that someday when we walk in.we're growing more corn then ever and 11:10:40 as ways to diversify our energy supply, I think we ought to be using technology to spend and advance 11:11:01 that congress must pass in order to make us less dependent on foreign sources 11:11:13 the farm economy is strong here, it's strong in Michigan and it's strong around the world 11:11:29 what it's like to be able to sell a product grown here in America.overseas 11:11:43 you're likely to get the product you want at a better price and a better quality.china, you treat us the way we treat you because 11:12:09 one of the reasons we overcame these obstacles is because of well timed tax cuts 11:12:34 we're helping our small business owners, you know 90 percent.well good, there you are, then you understand where tax relief is 11:12:53 and when you provide tax relief from small businesses and that's what's happening here in America 11:13:10 we've got to do something about these frivolous lawsuits.so they're able to hire and we must not raise taxes in order to keep this 11:13:31 we've got to keep your taxes low and that's an issue in this campaign 11:13:40 over 2 trillion dollars in new federal spending.that's a lot and they said, how are you going to pay for it, he said, oh don't worry about it, we're going to tax the rich 11:14:04 guess who's going to get stuck, yeah. we're not going to let him win 11:14:16 pull out-applause, cheers 11:14:22 hold on for a second, a couple of other things, we've got a lot of work, I appreciate the cheering 11:14:40 if you run up the top two brackets on individual.now, why in the heck would you want to tax small businesses just as the economy is beginning to grow 11:15:05 thirdly you've heard the rhetoric, tax the rich, you've heard that before.and you get stuck with the bill, raising taxes is wrong right now, and we're not going to let him to get away with it 11:15:36 let me talk about health care, we're going to talk about health care.you've already had enough from me already (no), I'm just looking for an affirmation.to make health care available and affordable 11:16:18 way to make sure that doctors keep practicing medicine, I believe health care decisions.in Washington dc 11:16:41 we have a difference of opinion in this campaign.massive complicated blue print to have our govt take over 11:17:14 says his plan would cost the taxpayers 1.5 trillion in new.but he can't pay for it unless he raises your taxes. Today we're going to talk about a difference of opinion, it starts with, what would you expect from a senator from Massachusetts 11:18:00 we're going to talk about a way to make sure health 11:18:08 quick pull out to ms 11:18:15 I believe we have a duty to our seniors (slow push to bush) 11:18:29 plus I went up to Washington to fix problems, I said if I'm fortunate enough.not to pass them off to future presidents and future generations 11:18:52 medicine was modernizing and Medicare wasn't.for heart surgery 11:19:04 from being needed in the first place, that didn't make any sense, that didn't make any sense for our seniors.today, it will help you with the cost of drugs, starting in 2005 we'll have preventative 11:19:32 to have. be giving preventative screenings in Medicare and in 2006 prescription drugs will be available 11:20:05 junk lawsuits that are running up the cost of medicine. 11:20:17 available and affordable health care.we've got to do something about lawsuits, make no mistake about it 11:20:33 litigious society, that means that means there's a lot of lawsuits, I'm not even a lawyer and I know the word litigious 11:20:57 because of the defensive medicine being practiced by docs.and it costs the tax payer 11:21:15 this is a national problem that.it's stuck in the United States senate, it passed in the house.the trial lawyers are powerful 11:21:38 I like to remind people you can't be pro doctor, pro patient and pro trial lawyer at the same time. You have to make a choice. my opponent made his choice and he put him on the ticket. I made my choice 11:22:14 we've got to modernize health care (bush seated) 11:22:26 save a lot of money by using technology.we need to expand the government health care 11:22:44 to encourage families.for low income children, it makes sense to make sure.health care is available we need to expand community health centers 11:23:10 I made a promise by the way when I was running, these things make sense.rather than an emergency center 11:23:31 every poor county in America ought to have a community health center discussion on health care 11:23:50 Tom Lufkin from Muskegon Family Health Center 11:26:19 POTUS: (ms, push to bush).and the idea is to make sure that preventative health care is available 11:26:44 love their neighbor like they'd like to be loved yourself.one way to make sure health care is available 11:27:06 I want to thank you for coming tom, another way to make sure health care is available.here's the problem for small business 11:27:25 to spread risk, that's the problem, they're in the midst.try to get a bid 11:27:37 stand alone entity, big companies are able to pool risk because of their size.so they can get the same discounts that big companies get 11:28:06 David Pray-on his small business in Grand Rapids 11:28:40 POTUS-10 that's a small company.he was telling me on AF1 that he has some problems with health care 11:28:58 David Pray 11:29:12 POTUS- they've got a plan here in Michigan where they can pool together.but 11:29:26 Pray 11:29:52 POTUS- so here's what we're talking about, this guy is a responsible guy.the problem is the system is so designed that he can't really do his job because he's unable to pool risk (push to ts) 11:30:20 what we're suggesting is that David be able to pool with companies.not be able to put his employees in the same system as David (pull out) 11:30:51 would mean that a lot of mandates.would not be imposed upon the small businesses and means that more people can bind together 11:31:36 another way, see I've got a strategy to make sure health care is available and affordable 11:31:54 we're going to make sure small businesses are able to afford.I'm going to talk about a very interesting idea called health savings accounts 11:32:14 and helps us hold down the cost of health care.an innovative idea that became the law of the land as a result of the Medicare.first start w/ the name 11:32:42 man-offlobe plumbing ? 11:32:57 POTUS. It's the heart and soul.I'm giving you time to warm up 11:33:11 man 11:33:44 POTUS. HSA, here it is, you buy a high deductible.I think it's 11:34:04 what is your deductible.the insurance company will take care of the cost 11:34:16 most of the 11:34:23 the company is now p9utting in the money to pay for routine 11:34:50 man 11:35:00 POTUS. we're trying to simplify what sounds like a complicated issue.if you spend 2,000 dollars in the year, 1500 of that rolls over for the next year, it's your money 11:35:35 think about a system by the way. 11:36:15 man 11:36:36 POTUS- these work, I'm telling you they work, they make a lot of sense 11:36:48 and health care is more manageable because the decision making is between the patient and the doc 11:37:05 we're going to move people from private health insurance 11:37:19 who do you trust, we trust the people. 11:37:41 another man-ms, bush and others on stage, bush listening 11:38:13 POTUS- would you care to clarify why you're mad at me 11:38:23 man-I'm just mad it wasn't available to me 11:38:35 POTUS- you've got an account up and running 11:38:47 man 11:39:02 POTUS- there is a marketplace in America (push to ts of bush) 11:39:15 your consumers, shop.puts a lot of money in there that you call your own money 11:39:28 is they contribute to the health savings account and he's out shopping 11:39:41 is to encourage people to go into the marketplace 11:39:53 but nevertheless they do the same things.generic drugs quicker to the market, the Medicare bill helps do that 11:40:21 and generics are going to move quicker.it's an interesting idea, remember, my idea is to protect you as best you can 11:40:39 but in fact it is manufactured in another country.sounds good that they may be able to help us 11:40:57 I'm going to make sure that you're safe because all you need to do is get a batch of drugs that is manufactured elsewhere 11:41:15 so I'm interested in knowing whether or not we can make sure you're safe, that's a duty we have in the federal govt 11:41:30 encourage the consumer to be a price in the market.by speeding up the generic drugs 11:41:59 we've thought through this very carefully, it's common sense.my solemn judgment, not right for the American people 11:42:17 it will be costly, it would lead to rationing of healthcare.let me talk to you about making America a safer place on terrorism 11:42:44 that you cannot negotiate with these people, that you cannot hope for the best.with an ideology of hate 11:43:09 to shake our will, to shake the conscience of the free world.chase them down overseas so we don't have to face them here at home (applause) 11:43:37 thank you, got a little more work to do though, got some things on my mind, we'll have a chance to do the whole "four more years" thing.I gotta tell you 11:44:05 but the only reason to look backwards is to see how best to lead us forward.lets put him back in there, he's got some good ideas 11:44:26 making sure that families are strong, making sure that systems.and he's got a plan and a vision to make the world a better place 11:44:45 we must use all.people who hide in caves and people who lurk in the dark corners 11:45:04 in order to share intelligence and people will use law enforcement.and that's why it's important for our military to be transformed 11:45:25 America is safer, I laid our a new doctrine saying if you harbor a terrorist you are just as guilty.easy for people to understand and mean what he says. I meant what I said to the taliban 11:45:57 they ignored what we said and that's why they're not longer in power 11:46:06 and as a result of a great united states military.Afghanistan has been liberated from a barbaric group of people, we're safer for it 11:46:29 they were training thousands of people in Afghanistan.way before September 11th 11:46:43 I strongly disagree with that sentiment, they were planning and plotting way before September 11th, by staying on the offensive 11:47:06 now think about Afghanistan for a second, not only is the taliban out. 11:47:33 you know, it just wasn't all that long ago that young girls weren't allowed to go to school 11:47:55 you can imagine the terrible resentment, it's a hopeless society, that's how terrorists are able to recruit 11:48:10 one that promotes hope, you know their moms were dragged. 11:48:37 think, about this, tell your friends and neighbors. freedom is moving rapidly through that country, 10 million citizens forty percent of them who are 11:49:13 I can't remember. I suspect some probably said that these people can't be free 11:49:27 I'm just guessing there were some people who were pessimistic 11:49:43 in other words one of the lessons from September 11th were oceans no longer protect us 11:50:05 and the country could say that makes sense to deal with that.but September 11th changed that equation and therefore when we see a country we must deal with 11:50:33 looking at intelligence that said he was a threat.we had been to war 11:50:44 shooting at our pilots.he had harbored terrorist 11:50:53 abu nadal and his organization was in iraq, zarqawi is still in iraq.he's the guy who beheaded people.saddam Hussein paid the families of suiciders 11:51:24 and they looked at the, they agreed, they looked at the intelligence I looked at 11:51:39 and they authorized the use of force, my opponent, he looked at the very same intelligence my demonstration looked at and he voted yes 11:52:02 we must try all avenues to solve a problem, understand the grave decision of sending men and women into harms way 11:52:22 and so I went to the united nations in hopes that we could solve this problem diplomatically.reminding people of the world we lived in after September 11th 11:52:47 you disarm, disclose, disarm or face serious consequences, I believe when you say something you ought to mean 11:53:09 you're going to vote to authorize force, you better mean it.but saddam Hussein ignored the demands.diplomacy had been tried for 11:53:29 wasn't interested in compiling with the demands of the free world 11:53:39 resolution after resolution and they weren't interested.systematically deceived the 11:53:54 take the word of a madman or take action to defend this country, given that option I will defend America every time 11:54:21 it's hard work in Afghanistan and Iraq 11:54:58 .that's why a year ago I went to congress and proposed an 87 billion dollar supplemental 11:55:16 troops and harms way, as a matter of fact, support was so strong that only 12 voted against.2 of the 12 were my opponent and his running mate 11:55:41 and didn't vote to fund the troops. 11:56:13 nothing complicated about supporting our troops in combat. (applause) 11:56:36 couple of other things I want to share with you and then I've got to move on down the road on the bus, the bus tour 11:57:02 tell you a couple of other things. 11:57:43 he knows.make the world a more peaceful place 11:57:56 we will stay the course so they can develop an army and a police force 11:58:10 so they can do the hard work so they can step up so they can help the reconstruction efforts 11:58:21 as quickly as possible and then they can come home.I believe liberty can transform the world 11:58:40 I believe that's going to happen, children who grow up in a peaceful 11:58:59 I tell people.prime minister koizumi of Japan 11:59:09 and have dinner and we had very interesting meaningful discussions about peace 11:59:27 sworn enemy of America, thousands lost their lives because of the Japanese.there was a lot of skeptics and you can understand why 11:59:48 sworn enemy can become a friend. 12:00:00 today Japan is a friend. We did the hard work after world war II 12:00:12 today I sit down at a table with prime minister Koizumi.by the way there are now five voices telling him he needs to 12:00:37 I talk to prime minister 12:01:11 feeding the hungry.I believe this united states of America must use its great wealth and generosity 12:01:32 lives have been changed because of the pandemic of HIV/AIDS 12:01:42 to help those who suffer. I believe all these things of course we'll continue 12:03:02 end of event 12:03:26 bush gladhanding 12:08:35 bush departs
DON’T LEAVE YOUR CAR RUNNING 2006
MAN STEALS A TRUCK AFTER HIS OWN VEHICLE BREAKS DOWN AND LEADS COPS ON A HIGH SPEED CHASE. AFTER CATCHING UP WITH THE STOLEN VEHICLE THE TRUCK REFUSES TO PULL OVER. AT ONE POINT, THE VEHICLE HITS ANOTHER CAR AND WHEN HE TRIES TO EXIT THE SLIPPERY RAIN AND SNOW COVERED OFF RAMP, THE SUSPECT ROLLS THE TRUCK! OFFICERS CHASE HIM AND WITH THE HELP OF A TASER, THEY NAB THE BAD GUY. THE SUSPECT WAS NOT INJURED. HE WAS CHARGED WITH AUTO THEFT, FLEEING AND ELUDING, RESISTING ARREST AND DRIVING ON A SUSPENDED LICENSE. SUSPECT WAS ARRESTED IN THE PAST ON UNARMED ROBBERY CHARGES AND RECEIVING AND CONCEALING STOLEN PROPERTY. HE WAS ALSO ON PROBATION FOR A 2005 CHARGE OF FLEEING AND ELUDING IN A DIFFERENT COUNTY.
PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"
[PRESIDENT BUSH PARTICIPATES IN "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE"] [MUSKEGON, MICH USA] [PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX] September 13, 2004 PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH" IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX RS 20/ X83/ Slugged: 1045 WH MI X83 10:45:53 air force one arrival at event 10:52:29 chanting "four more years" 10:56:02 President bush walks out of AF1 (view blocked by audience) President Bush Remarks 10:57:43 said come to Muskegon and I said okay, see if you can get some people to show up. Listen, I'm here to ask for the vote 10:58:10 I'm here to tell you I have a reason to ask for the vote and we're going to do it a little differently today, I'm going to talk to our fellow citizens about health care.making the world a safer place 10:58:37 before we get started on issues that matter.there's an issue that matters to me, and that is that I hope I can get your help.that means registering people to vote 10:58:59 step one is to remind your friends and your neighbors that we have an obligation 10:59:12 and step.and 10:59:25 and stronger place and a better place when you put dick cheney and me back in office 10:59:39 pull out to ms ("four more years") 10:59:51 perhaps. so laura will be the first lady for four more years. So I said will you marry me, she said fine 11:00:16 just as long as I don't have to give any political speeches, good thing she didn't hold me.she's a genuine, kind, compassionate person.and I love her dearly, she sends her best. 11:00:47 she's out campaigning today, I want to thank my friend Peter Hoestra.and diane thanks for coming, he is a highly respected member of congress 11:01:12 I look forward to working with him to strengthen our 11:01:25 that the world changed .and I look forward to working with you pete.great that you've been selected 11:01:48 I put up the signs and make the phone calls.thank you for what you're going to do over the next few weeks (audio raised slightly) 11:02:16 listen, most people in America agree with my philosophy that the role of govt.is to say what can we do to help you, not tell you what to do and that's the fundamental difference in this campaign 11:02:44 systems of govt must change with a changing world.think about the work force, when our dads and granddads.today the work force has changed a lot of people have more than one job 11:03:15 most massive change in the work force has been women. Women who used to stay at home.haven't reflected this change. Pension planned were designed for yesterday 11:03:39 if you're a baby boomer you don't have to worry about social security.they're going to take away your social security check, it's the most tired, pathetic way to campaign 11:04:05 and baby boomers are fine, we're in good shape.because they're a few lower payer-iners 11:04:26 take some of their own taxes and set aside a personal savings account 11:04:41 this will help people when they have their own personal savings accounts.the worker training programs were designed for yesterday.we ought to promote a lifetime of working for 11:05:06 don't change with them to make sure that people can work.we're going to talk about health care that needs to be changed and modernized. The tax code needs to be changed, it's complicated. 11:05:31 it's a complicated mess, that's what it is. America spent about 6 billion hours filling out.special interest loopholes 11:05:51 to simplify the tax code...it'll help the American worker, it'll help the American family 11:06:09 what I'm telling you is that I recognize the changing world in which we live.by the way one of the biggest changes we have 11:06:27 high productivity increases.a shovel to a mechanized digger. Or from a manual typewriter.our economy to have sustained growth 11:06:56 therefore I put out a plan to make sure.when you're out gathering the vote make sure you remind people what we've been though 11:07:25 about the economy and then we had a recession, the first ? of my presidency were declared a recession.handed to us and then we had some corporate scandals and that affected the 11:07:57 affects economic growth, there should be no question today that we will not tolerate dishonesty in the boardrooms of America and then September 11th came and it hurt us 11:08:28 some interesting, not interesting, but some very important lessons we learned form that day.this economy of ours is strong and it's getting stronger 11:09:01 now their pockets in you state.and keep them in place as opposed to resorting to the old 11:09:21 one of the key aspects is to make sure the health care system works.in order to make sure the job base expands in America we need an energy policy that makes us less dependent on foreign sources 11:09:51 I submitted a plan to the united states congress and it's stuck.recognizes technology is going to change 11:10:06 hopefully within a decade people will be driving hydrogen powered.on clean coal technology so we can use 11:10:25 is that someday when we walk in.we're growing more corn then ever and 11:10:40 as ways to diversify our energy supply, I think we ought to be using technology to spend and advance 11:11:01 that congress must pass in order to make us less dependent on foreign sources 11:11:13 the farm economy is strong here, it's strong in Michigan and it's strong around the world 11:11:29 what it's like to be able to sell a product grown here in America.overseas 11:11:43 you're likely to get the product you want at a better price and a better quality.china, you treat us the way we treat you because 11:12:09 one of the reasons we overcame these obstacles is because of well timed tax cuts 11:12:34 we're helping our small business owners, you know 90 percent.well good, there you are, then you understand where tax relief is 11:12:53 and when you provide tax relief from small businesses and that's what's happening here in America 11:13:10 we've got to do something about these frivolous lawsuits.so they're able to hire and we must not raise taxes in order to keep this 11:13:31 we've got to keep your taxes low and that's an issue in this campaign 11:13:40 over 2 trillion dollars in new federal spending.that's a lot and they said, how are you going to pay for it, he said, oh don't worry about it, we're going to tax the rich 11:14:04 guess who's going to get stuck, yeah. we're not going to let him win 11:14:16 pull out-applause, cheers 11:14:22 hold on for a second, a couple of other things, we've got a lot of work, I appreciate the cheering 11:14:40 if you run up the top two brackets on individual.now, why in the heck would you want to tax small businesses just as the economy is beginning to grow 11:15:05 thirdly you've heard the rhetoric, tax the rich, you've heard that before.and you get stuck with the bill, raising taxes is wrong right now, and we're not going to let him to get away with it 11:15:36 let me talk about health care, we're going to talk about health care.you've already had enough from me already (no), I'm just looking for an affirmation.to make health care available and affordable 11:16:18 way to make sure that doctors keep practicing medicine, I believe health care decisions.in Washington dc 11:16:41 we have a difference of opinion in this campaign.massive complicated blue print to have our govt take over 11:17:14 says his plan would cost the taxpayers 1.5 trillion in new.but he can't pay for it unless he raises your taxes. Today we're going to talk about a difference of opinion, it starts with, what would you expect from a senator from Massachusetts 11:18:00 we're going to talk about a way to make sure health 11:18:08 quick pull out to ms 11:18:15 I believe we have a duty to our seniors (slow push to bush) 11:18:29 plus I went up to Washington to fix problems, I said if I'm fortunate enough.not to pass them off to future presidents and future generations 11:18:52 medicine was modernizing and Medicare wasn't.for heart surgery 11:19:04 from being needed in the first place, that didn't make any sense, that didn't make any sense for our seniors.today, it will help you with the cost of drugs, starting in 2005 we'll have preventative 11:19:32 to have. be giving preventative screenings in Medicare and in 2006 prescription drugs will be available 11:20:05 junk lawsuits that are running up the cost of medicine. 11:20:17 available and affordable health care.we've got to do something about lawsuits, make no mistake about it 11:20:33 litigious society, that means that means there's a lot of lawsuits, I'm not even a lawyer and I know the word litigious 11:20:57 because of the defensive medicine being practiced by docs.and it costs the tax payer 11:21:15 this is a national problem that.it's stuck in the United States senate, it passed in the house.the trial lawyers are powerful 11:21:38 I like to remind people you can't be pro doctor, pro patient and pro trial lawyer at the same time. You have to make a choice. my opponent made his choice and he put him on the ticket. I made my choice 11:22:14 we've got to modernize health care (bush seated) 11:22:26 save a lot of money by using technology.we need to expand the government health care 11:22:44 to encourage families.for low income children, it makes sense to make sure.health care is available we need to expand community health centers 11:23:10 I made a promise by the way when I was running, these things make sense.rather than an emergency center 11:23:31 every poor county in America ought to have a community health center discussion on health care 11:23:50 Tom Lufkin from Muskegon Family Health Center 11:26:19 POTUS: (ms, push to bush).and the idea is to make sure that preventative health care is available 11:26:44 love their neighbor like they'd like to be loved yourself.one way to make sure health care is available 11:27:06 I want to thank you for coming tom, another way to make sure health care is available.here's the problem for small business 11:27:25 to spread risk, that's the problem, they're in the midst.try to get a bid 11:27:37 stand alone entity, big companies are able to pool risk because of their size.so they can get the same discounts that big companies get 11:28:06 David Pray-on his small business in Grand Rapids 11:28:40 POTUS-10 that's a small company.he was telling me on AF1 that he has some problems with health care 11:28:58 David Pray 11:29:12 POTUS- they've got a plan here in Michigan where they can pool together.but 11:29:26 Pray 11:29:52 POTUS- so here's what we're talking about, this guy is a responsible guy.the problem is the system is so designed that he can't really do his job because he's unable to pool risk (push to ts) 11:30:20 what we're suggesting is that David be able to pool with companies.not be able to put his employees in the same system as David (pull out) 11:30:51 would mean that a lot of mandates.would not be imposed upon the small businesses and means that more people can bind together 11:31:36 another way, see I've got a strategy to make sure health care is available and affordable 11:31:54 we're going to make sure small businesses are able to afford.I'm going to talk about a very interesting idea called health savings accounts 11:32:14 and helps us hold down the cost of health care.an innovative idea that became the law of the land as a result of the Medicare.first start w/ the name 11:32:42 man-offlobe plumbing ? 11:32:57 POTUS. It's the heart and soul.I'm giving you time to warm up 11:33:11 man 11:33:44 POTUS. HSA, here it is, you buy a high deductible.I think it's 11:34:04 what is your deductible.the insurance company will take care of the cost 11:34:16 most of the 11:34:23 the company is now p9utting in the money to pay for routine 11:34:50 man 11:35:00 POTUS. we're trying to simplify what sounds like a complicated issue.if you spend 2,000 dollars in the year, 1500 of that rolls over for the next year, it's your money 11:35:35 think about a system by the way. 11:36:15 man 11:36:36 POTUS- these work, I'm telling you they work, they make a lot of sense 11:36:48 and health care is more manageable because the decision making is between the patient and the doc 11:37:05 we're going to move people from private health insurance 11:37:19 who do you trust, we trust the people. 11:37:41 another man-ms, bush and others on stage, bush listening 11:38:13 POTUS- would you care to clarify why you're mad at me 11:38:23 man-I'm just mad it wasn't available to me 11:38:35 POTUS- you've got an account up and running 11:38:47 man 11:39:02 POTUS- there is a marketplace in America (push to ts of bush) 11:39:15 your consumers, shop.puts a lot of money in there that you call your own money 11:39:28 is they contribute to the health savings account and he's out shopping 11:39:41 is to encourage people to go into the marketplace 11:39:53 but nevertheless they do the same things.generic drugs quicker to the market, the Medicare bill helps do that 11:40:21 and generics are going to move quicker.it's an interesting idea, remember, my idea is to protect you as best you can 11:40:39 but in fact it is manufactured in another country.sounds good that they may be able to help us 11:40:57 I'm going to make sure that you're safe because all you need to do is get a batch of drugs that is manufactured elsewhere 11:41:15 so I'm interested in knowing whether or not we can make sure you're safe, that's a duty we have in the federal govt 11:41:30 encourage the consumer to be a price in the market.by speeding up the generic drugs 11:41:59 we've thought through this very carefully, it's common sense.my solemn judgment, not right for the American people 11:42:17 it will be costly, it would lead to rationing of healthcare.let me talk to you about making America a safer place on terrorism 11:42:44 that you cannot negotiate with these people, that you cannot hope for the best.with an ideology of hate 11:43:09 to shake our will, to shake the conscience of the free world.chase them down overseas so we don't have to face them here at home (applause) 11:43:37 thank you, got a little more work to do though, got some things on my mind, we'll have a chance to do the whole "four more years" thing.I gotta tell you 11:44:05 but the only reason to look backwards is to see how best to lead us forward.lets put him back in there, he's got some good ideas 11:44:26 making sure that families are strong, making sure that systems.and he's got a plan and a vision to make the world a better place 11:44:45 we must use all.people who hide in caves and people who lurk in the dark corners 11:45:04 in order to share intelligence and people will use law enforcement.and that's why it's important for our military to be transformed 11:45:25 America is safer, I laid our a new doctrine saying if you harbor a terrorist you are just as guilty.easy for people to understand and mean what he says. I meant what I said to the taliban 11:45:57 they ignored what we said and that's why they're not longer in power 11:46:06 and as a result of a great united states military.Afghanistan has been liberated from a barbaric group of people, we're safer for it 11:46:29 they were training thousands of people in Afghanistan.way before September 11th 11:46:43 I strongly disagree with that sentiment, they were planning and plotting way before September 11th, by staying on the offensive 11:47:06 now think about Afghanistan for a second, not only is the taliban out. 11:47:33 you know, it just wasn't all that long ago that young girls weren't allowed to go to school 11:47:55 you can imagine the terrible resentment, it's a hopeless society, that's how terrorists are able to recruit 11:48:10 one that promotes hope, you know their moms were dragged. 11:48:37 think, about this, tell your friends and neighbors. freedom is moving rapidly through that country, 10 million citizens forty percent of them who are 11:49:13 I can't remember. I suspect some probably said that these people can't be free 11:49:27 I'm just guessing there were some people who were pessimistic 11:49:43 in other words one of the lessons from September 11th were oceans no longer protect us 11:50:05 and the country could say that makes sense to deal with that.but September 11th changed that equation and therefore when we see a country we must deal with 11:50:33 looking at intelligence that said he was a threat.we had been to war 11:50:44 shooting at our pilots.he had harbored terrorist 11:50:53 abu nadal and his organization was in iraq, zarqawi is still in iraq.he's the guy who beheaded people.saddam Hussein paid the families of suiciders 11:51:24 and they looked at the, they agreed, they looked at the intelligence I looked at 11:51:39 and they authorized the use of force, my opponent, he looked at the very same intelligence my demonstration looked at and he voted yes 11:52:02 we must try all avenues to solve a problem, understand the grave decision of sending men and women into harms way 11:52:22 and so I went to the united nations in hopes that we could solve this problem diplomatically.reminding people of the world we lived in after September 11th 11:52:47 you disarm, disclose, disarm or face serious consequences, I believe when you say something you ought to mean 11:53:09 you're going to vote to authorize force, you better mean it.but saddam Hussein ignored the demands.diplomacy had been tried for 11:53:29 wasn't interested in compiling with the demands of the free world 11:53:39 resolution after resolution and they weren't interested.systematically deceived the 11:53:54 take the word of a madman or take action to defend this country, given that option I will defend America every time 11:54:21 it's hard work in Afghanistan and Iraq 11:54:58 .that's why a year ago I went to congress and proposed an 87 billion dollar supplemental 11:55:16 troops and harms way, as a matter of fact, support was so strong that only 12 voted against.2 of the 12 were my opponent and his running mate 11:55:41 and didn't vote to fund the troops. 11:56:13 nothing complicated about supporting our troops in combat. (applause) 11:56:36 couple of other things I want to share with you and then I've got to move on down the road on the bus, the bus tour 11:57:02 tell you a couple of other things. 11:57:43 he knows.make the world a more peaceful place 11:57:56 we will stay the course so they can develop an army and a police force 11:58:10 so they can do the hard work so they can step up so they can help the reconstruction efforts 11:58:21 as quickly as possible and then they can come home.I believe liberty can transform the world 11:58:40 I believe that's going to happen, children who grow up in a peaceful 11:58:59 I tell people.prime minister koizumi of Japan 11:59:09 and have dinner and we had very interesting meaningful discussions about peace 11:59:27 sworn enemy of America, thousands lost their lives because of the Japanese.there was a lot of skeptics and you can understand why 11:59:48 sworn enemy can become a friend. 12:00:00 today Japan is a friend. We did the hard work after world war II 12:00:12 today I sit down at a table with prime minister Koizumi.by the way there are now five voices telling him he needs to 12:00:37 I talk to prime minister 12:01:11 feeding the hungry.I believe this united states of America must use its great wealth and generosity 12:01:32 lives have been changed because of the pandemic of HIV/AIDS 12:01:42 to help those who suffer. I believe all these things of course we'll continue 12:03:02 end of event 12:03:26 bush gladhanding 12:08:35 bush departs
TEENS STEAL CAR/CHASE (2005)
TWO MICHIGAN TEENS SPARKED A WILD CHASE WITH MICHIGAN POLICE. APPARENTLY, A 15-YEAR-OLD WAS AT THE WHEEL OF A STOLEN CAR. POLICE CHASED THE CAR THROUGH THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THE CHASE FINALLY ENDED WHEN A STATE TROOPER RAMMED THE CAR INTO THE FRONT YARD OF A NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE. POLICE QUICKLY CAPTURED THE TWO SUSPECTS WHO TRIED TO FLEE ON FOOT. THE PASSENGER IN THE CAR WAS WANTED ON FELONY CHARGES. BOTH OF THE TEENS WERE ARRESTED.
UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1700 - 1800
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House meets for legislative business. Votes will be postponed until 3:30 p.m. A Quorum will be called for at approximately 3:30 p.m. The House Floor will be cleared at approximately 5:00 p.m. in order to provide time for a security sweep of the House Chamber prior to the President's State of the Union Address. The House will reconvene at 8:45 p.m. in joint session with the Senate for the purpose of receiving a State of the Union Address from the President of the United States. 17:00:00.9 for so long she was simply known as the wife of dr. martin luther king, but she was so much more. oftentimes, we hear of the many great men who led the civil rights movement, but it was women who were in the heart and soul of that movement. i'm reminded that in the city 17:00:20.3 of cleveland there were several ministers involved with dr. king, another doctor otis moss, another mipster, another daughter of a minister, carol 17:00:34.8 hoover, ultimately became head of the chamber of commerce in the city of cleveland. carol hoover gave me my only opportunity to sit in a living room and have a long 17:00:49.5 conversation with mrs. king. the thing i remark about that opportunity was she was very soft spoke gls -- spoken, regal in her style and helping me 17:01:05.4 understand my role in public life. i will never forget that opportunity that carol hoover gave me and i will never forget mrs. coretta scott king. if only we had a few more women like coretta scott king who handle tragedy so very well, 17:01:21.8 but stood up, continued to raise a family, and helped us lift up her wonderful, wonderful husband. as we celebrate the life of this great woman, let us continue to remember the work that she did. 17:01:37.1 let us encourage our children to understand what she went through in order to be such great leader and let us continue to pray for all of her family. i yield back the balance of my time. thank you. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i 17:01:58.0 would like now to yield to the distinguished gentle lady from the district of columbia, mrs. eleanor homes norton who has distinguished herself in the -- 17:02:14.8 eleanor homes norton who has distinguished herself in the law and appeared in the supreme court a number -- on a number of occasions on behalf of civil rights issues. 17:02:30.2 the speaker pro tempore: how much time? mr. conyers: i yield her two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. holmes norton: i come to the floor to speak of coretta 17:02:52.9 scott king, the woman coretta, the friend. i hope that we will remember coretta as i'm sure she wanted to be remembered, as a movement 17:03:07.5 woman, fully engaged from the outset in the work of her husband except it was their work. king himself said that i did not bring coretta to this work. 17:03:21.0 she was there. these two people found themselves these southerners who went north to be edge kated because alone in the north with few blacks and whites who believed as they did, they were 17:03:37.5 fully at one with one another. coretta scott king did not come to the movement by marriage. she once herself said i was married to the movement as well as to martin. she, therefore, is not like 17:03:54.3 most widows of great men. of course she carried on her legacy, but anyone who watched out ceaselessly and magnificently she worked for the essence of his legacy, nonviolence and universal human 17:04:15.5 rights will, of course, understand that coretta scott king deserves to be remembered in justice for her own extraordinary work. i cannot help but rep coretta, the friend. 17:04:26.7 the friend who i would golly gag on the phone and laugh and talk about any old thing, not about the movement, but any old thing, particularly in the 19 70's and 1980's at the height of her movement work. the last time we spoke we sat 17:04:46.2 underneath the lincoln memorial in those rooms preparing to go up unveil the marker where king gave his first speech. 17:04:58.6 may she be remembered for herself and her great work. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield the balance of our time to mr. arturo davis of montgomery, alabama, who in closing, will yield perhaps 17:05:20.2 some -- as much of his time as he can to the gentlelady from georgia where mrs. coretta scott king resided for so many years. i yield to the distinguished 17:05:33.8 gentleman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 2 1/2 minutes. mr. davis: may i inquire how much time is remaining in the debate >> the speaker pro tempore: 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from 17:05:49.3 michigan. mr. davis: you mentioned i was born in montgomery. coretta scott king was born in marion, the heart of my congressional district. i'm honored to stand here today as the person who represents 17:06:04.9 some of her family in the state of alabama. i only met her once as a younger member of the institution and someone not around to participate in the glorious days of the movement. i only met her once, at congressional black caucus in 2002, i was in awe, mr. 17:06:21.8 conyers, because when you grow up in the state of alabama coretta scott king is a heroine and has a very, very special place all over this country. when she was born in marion in 1929, she could not have -- her 17:06:39.2 parents could not have conceived and as she grew into young womanhood couldn't concede the person representing her home would be an 17:06:54.3 african-american. it would not have crossed her mind. when she formed her partnership with martin luther king, i wonder if they anticipated they would accomplish what they did, the holiday, the king center, the civil rights act the voting 17:07:10.1 rights act. they were big dreamers, but i don't know if they could have seen those things. that is the first aspect of coretta scott king we are to acknowledge today. she had an opportunity to see herself and her country transformed in ways that were 17:07:25.9 inconceivable. and she lived to see it. she lived to tell about it. the second point i want to make is every time i saw her on television as a young man, every time i saw her i was always struck by the power of 17:07:41.5 her quiet dignity. i mention that, mr. speaker, because we live in an age because our side thinks we have to outzhao shout the other side, they think they have to outshout the other side. what this wonderful woman appreciated is there is a power 17:07:57.5 and force to quiet, persuasive 17:08:05.3 argument. it meant in the 1990's arguing for fair welfare policies. she kept updating the legacy. 17:08:16.5 as she kept updating the legacy, she freshened and put her own touch on that. i conclude with that observation. my colleague from ohio was so right, my colleague from the district was so right. this woman was not a backstage 17:08:31.6 figure, she was a co-an cor -- 10 additional seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. sensenbrenner: i yield another minute to mr. davis. 17:08:47.8 mr. davis: thank you, mr. sensenbrenner, for yielding. she was a co-anchor and co-pillar of this movement. i yield my remaining time to the gentlelady from georgia, 17:09:03.2 ms. mckinney. the speaker pro tempore: mr. speaker, how much time is remaining. mr. sensenbrenner: how much time would the gentlelady from georgia want? ms. mckinney: i would like five minutes. 17:09:20.9 mr. sensenbrenner: i yield an additional five minutes. ms. mckinney: unanimous consent to extend my remarks. i would like to extend my condolences to martin king iii, 17:09:38.5 yolanda, dexter and bernice king and the entire king family. i wush shocked and saddened this morning when i heard the news as well. i had the opportunity to speak this year at the martin luther king ceremony that is held 17:09:55.3 annually at ebenezer church. for the first time in many, many years our queen mother, ms. coretta scott king was not there with us personally at the church, but she was looking at the proceedings and the 17:10:12.2 ceremony on television. one thing is fairly clear from the proceedings of the house today and that is that the king family is loved by this body, by these members, by the 17:10:29.3 american people, by the african-american community, in particular, and the progressive community in general. because it was the king family and their sacrifices that moved our country forward. they moved america forward. and so i am so proud to 17:10:47.5 represent stone mountain, georgia, that same stone mountain, georgia, that dr. king spoke of in 1963, but today it is represented by an african-american congresswoman. it is represented by me. 17:11:00.9 this country can change. this country's leaders can change. this country can rise to its highest ideals if we have the will to do so. and dr. king and mrs. king and the king family continue to 17:11:18.3 shine the light on america finding that will to do the best that it cowl do, to be the best that -- that it could do, to be the best that it could be. i would like to yield my reing time to my sister from the 17:11:40.0 virgin islands. mrs. christiansen: i will be very brief and associate myself with the accolades that have given before. i rise, mr. speaker, to bring the condolences of the people of the virgin islands and the 17:11:55.4 people of the caribbean to this wonderful woman, coretta scott king. a woman of courage, a woman of strength, a woman of compassion and a woman of history. she worked side by side with 17:12:15.6 her husband the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. and we are forever grateful for both of their sacrifice. i might ask i have unanimous consent to revise and extend my 17:12:28.6 remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sensenbrenner: the gentlewoman from georgia controls the time. the gentlewoman from three minutes remaining. 17:12:44.6 ms. mckinney: i would like to yield to my sister colleague from california, ms. juanita millender-mcdonald. ms. millender-mcdonald: i would like to thank the ranking member and the chairman for the 17:13:00.0 time aallotted to a icon, a woman of great distinction, grace, and courage. one whom i have known for a long time, she was my a.k.a. we met many times to talk about women, women's sufficient 17:13:20.2 randall, sexual exploitation and human up dignities. -- human indignities. as i heard about her passing i couldn't help reflect about the many times we spent and the courage and strength i drew 17:13:36.5 from her because this woman showed us so much. so much class, so much leadership and so much strength in moments of tragedy. and this is why i come together with my friends from across the aisle and on both sides to talk 17:13:53.7 about the legacy of mrs. coretta scott king, the amplely named first lady of the civil -- ambley named first lady of the civil rights mufte. she chose to help others 17:14:10.0 without regard for self. coretta scott king was her husband's most ardent supporter during his darkest days and most shining triumphs. she spent the years after dr. king's tragic assassination as 17:14:25.9 the beacon of life toward equality and equal rights for women and all americans fighting alongside her husband through blessed years of their marriage, coretta scott king faced hardships, derisions and 17:14:46.5 fiscal violence. -- physical violence. when someone attempted to end her life and her husband's life 17:14:55.7 was on a crusade. they sent a bomb into their home. the bomb didn't injure her or her child but she could have ended her involvement on that particular issue at that time. 13 years later, her husband was brutally murdered in his quest 17:15:13.7 for a social revolution. mrs. king stood strong only days later and let -- led thousands of people marching in her husband's honor. the world is a better place, mr. speaker, because she was a giant of a woman, a crusader 17:15:30.5 for justice, and a courageous woman in the face of enormous adversity and tragedy. coretta scott king campaigned tirelessly wherever she saw oppression or injustice. she celebrated dr. king's 17:15:47.7 legacy and created one of her own, women's rights groups, people who fight against hunger, unemployment, disenfranchisement and racism owe her a debt of gratitude. she embraced her husband's method of peaceful resistance 17:16:03.0 and applied it to her crusade against the violence that corrupts our nation. coretta scott king was an activist, an icon, a great wife, and a mother. america was so influenced by her, mr. speaker. 17:16:18.5 she will continue to live in our memory and our spirit as we further her work of nonviolence. thank you so much. i yield back. mr. sensenbrenner: mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 17:16:37.1 gentleman reserves the balance of his time until tomorrow. pursuant to the order of the house of today, further proceedings on the resolution will be postponed. pursuant to section 703 of the social security act, 42 u.s.c., 903 note, the order of the house of december 18, 2005, and 17:16:55.2 upon the recommendation of the minority leader, the chair announces that the speaker, on january 18, 2006, appointed the following member on the part of the house to the social security advisory board for a term of six years. 17:17:10.7 the clerk: mrs. barbara kanellly of connecticut. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to 20 u.s.c. 2103-b and the order of the house of december 18, 2005, the chair announces that the speaker, on 17:17:25.7 january 23, 2006, made the following appointments from private life to the board of trustees of the american folk life center in the library of congress on the part of the house for a term of six years. the clerk: appointed, mr. 17:17:43.9 charlie seaman, spring creek, nevada, and reappointed mrs. kay kaufman charlemaye of 17:17:59.5 texas. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of december 18, 2005, the chair announces that on january 23, 2006, the speaker appointed 17:18:08.2 the following members on the part of the house to the national surface transportation policy and revenue study commission. the clerk: mr. jack l. shannondorff, chevy chase, 17:18:23.5 maryland, mr. matthew k. rose, west lake, texas. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 12838-b-3 of the floyd d. spence national defense authorization act for fiscal year 2001, 22 u.s.c., 7002, amended by division p of 17:18:42.2 the consolidated appropriations resolution 2003, 22 u.s.c., 6901, and the order of the house of december 18, 2005, the chair announces that on january 17:19:00.8 20, 2006, the speaker appointed the following members on the part of the house to the united states-china economic and security review commission for terms to expire december 31, 2007. 17:19:14.2 the clerk: mr. peter t.r. brooks, springfield, virginia, and ms. kerry houston, great falls, virginia. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following three communications. the clerk: the honorable the 17:19:28.2 speaker, house of representatives, sir, this is to notify you formally pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives that i have been served with a subpoena issued by the district court for the district of columbia for documents. i will make the determinations required by rule 8. 17:19:45.1 signed, sincerely, bart stupak, member of congress. the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir, this is to notify you formally pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives that i have been served with a criminal subpoena issued by the 17:20:01.4 circuit court for the 16th judicial circuit of de kalb county, illinois, for testimony. after consultation with the office of general counsel, i have determined that compliance with the subpoena is consistent with the precedents and privileges of the house. 17:20:17.4 signed sincerely, bonni walsh, casework director for j. dennis hastert, speaker of the house. the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir, this is to noifer you formally pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives 17:20:32.7 that i have been served with a criminal subpoena issued by the superior court of the district of columbia for testimony. after consultation with the office of general counsel, i have determined that compliance with the subpoena is consistent with the precedents and privileges of the house. 17:20:49.2 signed sincerely, derek scott, salesclerk, office supplies service, u.s. house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence requested for mr. lynch of massachusetts before 5:00 p.m. today, mr. gary miller of 17:21:05.4 california for today, and mr. neal of massachusetts before 5:00 p.m. today. the speaker pro tempore: the requests are granted. the chair desires to make an announcement. after a consultation among the speaker, the majority and 17:21:24.4 minority leaders, and with their consent and approval, the chair announces that tonight when the two houses meet in joint session to hear an address by the president of the united states, only the doors immediately opposite the speaker and those on his left and right will be opened. 17:21:39.8 no one will be allowed on the floor of the house who does not have the privileges of the house or of the house floor. due to the large attendance that is 5e79ed, the chair feels that the rule -- that is 17:21:55.6 anticipated, the chair feels that the rule regarding the privileges of the floor must be strictly adhered to. children of members will not be permitted on the floor and the cooperation of all members is requested. the practice of reserving seats 17:22:12.1 prior to the joint session by placards will not be allowed. members may reserve their seats by physical presence only following the security sweep of the chamber. 17:22:31.3 pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until approximately 8:40 important the purpose of receiving in joint session the president of the united states.
trooper crashes into tractor trailer 2005
A MICHIGAN STATE POLICE TROOPER CRASHED INTO THE REAR OF A TRACTOR TRAILER IN A PURSUIT THAT LED OFFICERS THROUGH SEVERAL CITIES. THE CHASE STARTED IN YPSILANTI AND ENDED IN MONROE. POLICE WERE CHASING A SUSPECT WHO HAD OUTSTANDING ARREST WARRANTS. WHILE EXITING ON AN OFF-RAMP, THE CAR BEING CHASED HIT A POLICE CRUISER THAT THEN SMASHED INTO THE TRACTOR TRAILER. THE POLICE WERE ABLE TO STOP THE DRIVER BY FORCING HIM INTO A SPINOUT. THE TROOPER HITTING THE TRAILER WAS NOT SERIOUSLY INJURED.
Bush / Health care event in Muskegon,
September 13, 2004 PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH "FOCUS ON HEALTH CARE W/ PRESIDENT BUSH" IN MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN- STIX RS20/ X83/ Slugged: 1045 WH MI X83 10:45:53 air force one arrival at event 10:52:29 chanting "four more years" 10:56:02 President bush walks out of AF1 (view blocked by audience) President Bush Remarks 10:57:43 said come to Muskegon and I said okay, see if you can get some people to show up. Listen, I'm here to ask for the vote 10:58:10 I'm here to tell you I have a reason to ask for the vote and we're going to do it a little differently today, I'm going to talk to our fellow citizens about health care.making the world a safer place 10:58:37 before we get started on issues that matter.there's an issue that matters to me, and that is that I hope I can get your help.that means registering people to vote 10:58:59 step one is to remind your friends and your neighbors that we have an obligation 10:59:12 and step.and 10:59:25 and stronger place and a better place when you put dick cheney and me back in office 10:59:39 pull out to ms ("four more years") 10:59:51 perhaps. so laura will be the first lady for four more years. So I said will you marry me, she said fine 11:00:16 just as long as I don't have to give any political speeches, good thing she didn't hold me.she's a genuine, kind, compassionate person.and I love her dearly, she sends her best. 11:00:47 she's out campaigning today, I want to thank my friend Peter Hoestra.and diane thanks for coming, he is a highly respected member of congress 11:01:12 I look forward to working with him to strengthen our 11:01:25 that the world changed .and I look forward to working with you pete.great that you've been selected 11:01:48 I put up the signs and make the phone calls.thank you for what you're going to do over the next few weeks (audio raised slightly) 11:02:16 listen, most people in America agree with my philosophy that the role of govt.is to say what can we do to help you, not tell you what to do and that's the fundamental difference in this campaign 11:02:44 systems of govt must change with a changing world.think about the work force, when our dads and granddads.today the work force has changed a lot of people have more than one job 11:03:15 most massive change in the work force has been women. Women who used to stay at home.haven't reflected this change. Pension planned were designed for yesterday 11:03:39 if you're a baby boomer you don't have to worry about social security.they're going to take away your social security check, it's the most tired, pathetic way to campaign 11:04:05 and baby boomers are fine, we're in good shape.because they're a few lower payer-iners 11:04:26 take some of their own taxes and set aside a personal savings account 11:04:41 this will help people when they have their own personal savings accounts.the worker training programs were designed for yesterday.we ought to promote a lifetime of working for 11:05:06 don't change with them to make sure that people can work.we're going to talk about health care that needs to be changed and modernized. The tax code needs to be changed, it's complicated. 11:05:31 it's a complicated mess, that's what it is. America spent about 6 billion hours filling out.special interest loopholes 11:05:51 to simplify the tax code...it'll help the American worker, it'll help the American family 11:06:09 what I'm telling you is that I recognize the changing world in which we live.by the way one of the biggest changes we have 11:06:27 high productivity increases.a shovel to a mechanized digger. Or from a manual typewriter.our economy to have sustained growth 11:06:56 therefore I put out a plan to make sure.when you're out gathering the vote make sure you remind people what we've been though 11:07:25 about the economy and then we had a recession, the first ¾ of my presidency were declared a recession.handed to us and then we had some corporate scandals and that affected the 11:07:57 affects economic growth, there should be no question today that we will not tolerate dishonesty in the boardrooms of America and then September 11th came and it hurt us 11:08:28 some interesting, not interesting, but some very important lessons we learned form that day.this economy of ours is strong and it's getting stronger 11:09:01 now their pockets in you state.and keep them in place as opposed to resorting to the old 11:09:21 one of the key aspects is to make sure the health care system works.in order to make sure the job base expands in America we need an energy policy that makes us less dependent on foreign sources 11:09:51 I submitted a plan to the united states congress and it's stuck.recognizes technology is going to change 11:10:06 hopefully within a decade people will be driving hydrogen powered.on clean coal technology so we can use 11:10:25 is that someday when we walk in.we're growing more corn then ever and 11:10:40 as ways to diversify our energy supply, I think we ought to be using technology to spend and advance 11:11:01 that congress must pass in order to make us less dependent on foreign sources 11:11:13 the farm economy is strong here, it's strong in Michigan and it's strong around the world 11:11:29 what it's like to be able to sell a product grown here in America.overseas 11:11:43 you're likely to get the product you want at a better price and a better quality.china, you treat us the way we treat you because 11:12:09 one of the reasons we overcame these obstacles is because of well timed tax cuts 11:12:34 we're helping our small business owners, you know 90 percent.well good, there you are, then you understand where tax relief is 11:12:53 and when you provide tax relief from small businesses and that's what's happening here in America 11:13:10 we've got to do something about these frivolous lawsuits.so they're able to hire and we must not raise taxes in order to keep this 11:13:31 we've got to keep your taxes low and that's an issue in this campaign 11:13:40 over 2 trillion dollars in new federal spending.that's a lot and they said, how are you going to pay for it, he said, oh don't worry about it, we're going to tax the rich 11:14:04 guess who's going to get stuck, yeah. we're not going to let him win 11:14:16 pull out-applause, cheers 11:14:22 hold on for a second, a couple of other things, we've got a lot of work, I appreciate the cheering 11:14:40 if you run up the top two brackets on individual.now, why in the heck would you want to tax small businesses just as the economy is beginning to grow 11:15:05 thirdly you've heard the rhetoric, tax the rich, you've heard that before.and you get stuck with the bill, raising taxes is wrong right now, and we're not going to let him to get away with it 11:15:36 let me talk about health care, we're going to talk about health care.you've already had enough from me already (no), I'm just looking for an affirmation.to make health care available and affordable 11:16:18 way to make sure that doctors keep practicing medicine, I believe health care decisions.in Washington dc 11:16:41 we have a difference of opinion in this campaign.massive complicated blue print to have our govt take over 11:17:14 says his plan would cost the taxpayers 1.5 trillion in new.but he can't pay for it unless he raises your taxes. Today we're going to talk about a difference of opinion, it starts with, what would you expect from a senator from Massachusetts 11:18:00 we're going to talk about a way to make sure health 11:18:08 quick pull out to ms 11:18:15 I believe we have a duty to our seniors (slow push to bush) 11:18:29 plus I went up to Washington to fix problems, I said if I'm fortunate enough.not to pass them off to future presidents and future generations 11:18:52 medicine was modernizing and Medicare wasn't.for heart surgery 11:19:04 from being needed in the first place, that didn't make any sense, that didn't make any sense for our seniors.today, it will help you with the cost of drugs, starting in 2005 we'll have preventative 11:19:32 to have. be giving preventative screenings in Medicare and in 2006 prescription drugs will be available 11:20:05 junk lawsuits that are running up the cost of medicine. 11:20:17 available and affordable health care.we've got to do something about lawsuits, make no mistake about it 11:20:33 litigious society, that means that means there's a lot of lawsuits, I'm not even a lawyer and I know the word litigious 11:20:57 because of the defensive medicine being practiced by docs.and it costs the tax payer 11:21:15 this is a national problem that.it's stuck in the United States senate, it passed in the house.the trial lawyers are powerful 11:21:38 I like to remind people you can't be pro doctor, pro patient and pro trial lawyer at the same time. You have to make a choice. my opponent made his choice and he put him on the ticket. I made my choice 11:22:14 we've got to modernize health care (bush seated) 11:22:26 save a lot of money by using technology.we need to expand the government health care 11:22:44 to encourage families.for low income children, it makes sense to make sure.health care is available we need to expand community health centers 11:23:10 I made a promise by the way when I was running, these things make sense.rather than an emergency center 11:23:31 every poor county in America ought to have a community health center discussion on health care 11:23:50 Tom Lufkin from Muskegon Family Health Center 11:26:19 POTUS: (ms, push to bush).and the idea is to make sure that preventative health care is available 11:26:44 love their neighbor like they'd like to be loved yourself.one way to make sure health care is available 11:27:06 I want to thank you for coming tom, another way to make sure health care is available.here's the problem for small business 11:27:25 to spread risk, that's the problem, they're in the midst.try to get a bid 11:27:37 stand alone entity, big companies are able to pool risk because of their size.so they can get the same discounts that big companies get 11:28:06 David Pray - on his small business in Grand Rapids 11:28:40 POTUS 10 that's a small company.he was telling me on AF1 that he has some problems with health care 11:28:58 David Pray 11:29:12 POTUS- they've got a plan here in Michigan where they can pool together. but 11:29:26 Pray 11:29:52 POTUS- so here's what we're talking about, this guy is a responsible guy. the problem is the system is so designed that he can't really do his job because he's unable to pool risk (push to ts) 11:30:20 what we're suggesting is that David be able to pool with companies.not be able to put his employees in the same system as David (pull out) 11:30:51 would mean that a lot of mandates.would not be imposed upon the small businesses and means that more people can bind together 11:31:36 another way, see I've got a strategy to make sure health care is available and affordable 11:31:54 we're going to make sure small businesses are able to afford.I'm going to talk about a very interesting idea called health savings accounts 11:32:14 and helps us hold down the cost of health care.an innovative idea that became the law of the land as a result of the Medicare.first start w/ the name 11:32:42 man- offlobe plumbing ? 11:32:57 POTUS. It's the heart and soul. I'm giving you time to warm up 11:33:11 man 11:33:44 POTUS. HSA, here it is, you buy a high deductible.I think it's 11:34:04 what is your deductible.the insurance company will take care of the cost 11:34:16 most of the 11:34:23 the company is now p9utting in the money to pay for routine 11:34:50 man 11:35:00 POTUS. we're trying to simplify what sounds like a complicated issue.if you spend 2,000 dollars in the year, 1500 of that rolls over for the next year, it's your money 11:35:35 think about a system by the way. 11:36:15 man 11:36:36 POTUS- these work, I'm telling you they work, they make a lot of sense 11:36:48 and health care is more manageable because the decision making is between the patient and the doc 11:37:05 we're going to move people from private health insurance 11:37:19 who do you trust, we trust the people. 11:37:41 another man-ms, bush and others on stage, bush listening 11:38:13 POTUS- would you care to clarify why you're mad at me 11:38:23 man-I'm just mad it wasn't available to me 11:38:35 POTUS- you've got an account up and running 11:38:47 man 11:39:02 POTUS- there is a marketplace in America (push to ts of bush) 11:39:15 your consumers, shop.puts a lot of money in there that you call your own money 11:39:28 is they contribute to the health savings account and he's out shopping 11:39:41 is to encourage people to go into the marketplace 11:39:53 but nevertheless they do the same things.generic drugs quicker to the market, the Medicare bill helps do that 11:40:21 and generics are going to move quicker.it's an interesting idea, remember, my idea is to protect you as best you can 11:40:39 but in fact it is manufactured in another country.sounds good that they may be able to help us 11:40:57 I'm going to make sure that you're safe because all you need to do is get a batch of drugs that is manufactured elsewhere 11:41:15 so I'm interested in knowing whether or not we can make sure you're safe, that's a duty we have in the federal govt 11:41:30 encourage the consumer to be a price in the market.by speeding up the generic drugs 11:41:59 we've thought through this very carefully, it's common sense.my solemn judgment, not right for the American people 11:42:17 it will be costly, it would lead to rationing of healthcare.let me talk to you about making America a safer place on terrorism 11:42:44 that you cannot negotiate with these people, that you cannot hope for the best.with an ideology of hate 11:43:09 to shake our will, to shake the conscience of the free world.chase them down overseas so we don't have to face them here at home (applause) 11:43:37 thank you, got a little more work to do though, got some things on my mind, we'll have a chance to do the whole "four more years" thing.I gotta tell you 11:44:05 but the only reason to look backwards is to see how best to lead us forward.lets put him back in there, he's got some good ideas 11:44:26 making sure that families are strong, making sure that systems.and he's got a plan and a vision to make the world a better place 11:44:45 we must use all.people who hide in caves and people who lurk in the dark corners 11:45:04 in order to share intelligence and people will use law enforcement.and that's why it's important for our military to be transformed 11:45:25 America is safer, I laid our a new doctrine saying if you harbor a terrorist you are just as guilty.easy for people to understand and mean what he says. I meant what I said to the taliban 11:45:57 they ignored what we said and that's why they're not longer in power 11:46:06 and as a result of a great united states military.Afghanistan has been liberated from a barbaric group of people, we're safer for it 11:46:29 they were training thousands of people in Afghanistan.way before September 11th 11:46:43 I strongly disagree with that sentiment, they were planning and plotting way before September 11th, by staying on the offensive
ARCTIC CIRCLE GLOBAL WARMING 2005 #3
Tape 3 - Barrow Alaska / Thursday 07/21/05 Harry Brower Interview Craig(whale guy interview) bad interview Kirsten ? interview and b-roll of experiment T A P E T H R E E HARRY BROWER - LOCAL WAHLING CAPTAIN - INTERVIEW HE'S WEARING SHADES AND LOW TALKING AND WINDY SOUND - SUBSISTENCE RESEARCH COORDINATOR...DOCUMENTING SUBSISTENCE RESOURCES.... INTERVIEWED IN FRONT OF THE WHALE JAWS DISPLAY "ICE CHANGING - AS I WAS GROWING UP ICE USED TO COME RIGHT UP TO THE BEACH AND PILE UP TEN TWENTY FEET HIGH IN EARLY FALL AND NOW WE DON'T EVEN SEE THAT ANY MORE WE HAVE A LOT OF OPEN WATER "ANIMALS THAT HAVE BEEN EFFECTED AND THE PERMAFROST A LOT MORE ESPODED - A LOT MORE NOTICALE UP NORTH AT POINT BARROW "COULD BE GOOD FOR THE WHALES BUT MIGHT BE HARD FOR THE HUNTERS BECUASE OF THE ICE CONDIITONS WERE FACED WITH TODAY... THE ICE CONDITIONS ARE MUCH THINNER OVER THE COURSE OF WINTER - THE ICE ACCUMULATION IS NOT MUCH AS IT USED TO BE IN EARLIER YEARS - IN THE 70S AND EARLY 80S - ICE WAS MUCH HEAVIER AT THAT TIME IT CREATES AN ACCESS PROBLEM FOR US TO GET OUT AN TRAVEL ON THE ICE ...THE ICE IS MUCH THINNER AND WE CAN'T STAY OUT FOR LONG PERIODS OF TIME - HAVE TO COME BACK ON SHORE WHENEVER A CHANGE IN THE WIND CONSITIONS OR THE OCEAN CURRENTS IN TERMS OF HABITAT USE AND FEEDING - MRE OPEM WATER FOR THEM TO TRAVEL ONE - BETTER FOR THE WHALES - THAT'S MY THOUGHT ANYWAY HUNTING INLAND IS DIFFERENT - USUALLOY SET GILL NETS UNDERNEATH THE ICE - BUT THAT'S LATER IN THE FALL SO I'M NOT SURE IF IT'S BAD BUT WE'RE GOING THROUGH THE DIFFERENT CHANGES... WE'RE NOT ABLE CATCH AS MUCH FISH AS WE LIKE TO IN THE FALL... POLAR BEARS START SWIMMING ON TOWARD SHORE WE HAD DIFFERENT OBSERVATIONSFOR THE PAST THREE OR FOUR YEARS - WE'VE HAD POLAR BEARS ENDING UP ON GRAVEL ISLANDS AND NEAR THE POINT - ONCE THE ICE RECEDES OUT COUPLE HUNDRED MILES THERE'S NO ICE IN BETWEEN SO THEY'RE HAVING TO SWIM ALL THE WAY TO SHORE... AND WE'VE FOUND COPLE OF EM DROWNED OR DEAD - JUST WASHED UP - BECAUSE THERE'S NO ICE FOR THEM TO REST ON - THEY EVENTUALLY GET CAUGHT IN A STORM OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT AND END UP BEING DROWNED... THEY ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE ICE AND THE ICE IS RETREATING THAT'S BASICALLY WHERE THEY LIVE - HUNTING AND TRAVERSING OVER THE ICE OUT IN THE OCEAN - THEY EAT A LOT OF THE FAT FROM THE CARCASSES AND STUFF LIKE THAT... THERE'S BEEN A LOT OF DISCUSSIONS AND RESERACHERS COMING OUT TO BARROW AND THEY'RE MAKING PROJECTIONS AS TO WHAT IT'S GOING TO LOOK LIKE IN TEN TWELVE FIFTY YEARS AND THOSE PROJECTIONS ARE NOT TOO FAVORABLE FOR PEOPLE IN THE ARCTIC - REMAINS TO BE SEEN YET TAK TOPS AND T-SHIRTS - GONNA GET WARMER EROSION - BEACH EROSION - FACED WITH IT TODAY... SPENT A LOT OF MONEY REFURBISHING THE ROADS THAT ARE WASHED OUT - THE BUILDINGS ARE SAGGING AND SWAYING BECAUSE THE PERMAFROST MELTING - IF THE PILINGS AREN'T DEEP ENOUGH IT'LL EFFECT THE BUILDINGS DEFINITELY - 0750 WALK AND TALK THROUGH BASC BLDGS - - - - INTERVIEW WITH CRAIG GEORGE WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST WITH WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT OF THE NORHT SLOPE BURROUGH - HE ALSO WORKS WITH BASC ON DIFFERENT PROJECTS SITTING AT HIS COMPUTER I'VE LIVED HERE THIRTY YEARS AND DONE A LOT OF WORK ON THE ICE POPULATION BIOLOGY ESTIMATE BOWHEADS THAT MIGRATE - LEARNED A LOT ABOUT THE SE ICE AND THE HUNT - AND WE DO THE POST MORTEMS ON THE WHALES - AND WORK WITH THE HUNTERS CLOSELY ON THAT - THE KEY TO OUR SUCCESS IS WORKING WITH THE NATIVE HUNTERS CLOSELY ON THESE PROJECTS HERE'S A MIGRATING BOWHEAD IN A LEAD SYSTEM THE BOWHEADS ARE MIGRATING OUT TO THEBEARING PAST POINT BARROW TO THE EAST INTO THE CANADIAN WATERS THE TECHNIQUE IS TI STILL HUNT - HERE IN BARROW WHERE THEY STILL USE THE SKIN BOATS - AND THEY SET UP CAMPS ALONG THE ICE AND THEY'RE WAITING FOR THE BOWHEADS TO MIGRATE TYPICALLY WITHIN ABOUT A UNDRED YARDS OF THE ICE EDGE - NOW THIS IS ALREADY THREE MILES OFF SHORE SO THEY LAUNCH THE BOAT AND USE A HAND TRHOWN HARPOON ON THE ANILNA HERE'S A SHTO FO A BOWHEAD MOVING THROUGH A NARROW LEAD - YOU NEED MORE HERE'S A MORE OPEN WATER HUNTERS IN A BOAT CHASING DOWN A WHALE - TYPICALLY PRETTY CLOSE TO SHORE USUALLY NOT A PURSUIT THEN WHEN THEY'RE SUCCESSFUL - TWENTY YEARS BACK - TOWING IN THE WHALE - THEY PUT A BIG HEAVY STRAP ON THE FLUKES - SET UP A LOCK AND TACKLE - GEAR INTRODUCED BY YANKEE HUNTERS 120 YEARS AGO - GET ALL HANDS ON THE LINE AND START HAULING - EVEN LARGE ANIMALS YOU CAN SEE THE SCARS FROM ICE COLLISIONS THIS IS THE EYE GOT A GIGANTIC HEAD - LAYING IN ITS SIDE - BLOWHOLE HERE WHALE'S UP AND THEY BEGIN THE BUTHCHERIN PULL OFF BLUBBER FIRST AND THEN THE MUSCLE THE DIVISION OF THE WHALE IS COMPLICATED DIFFERENT PORTIONS TO DIFFERENT CREWS AND DIFFERENT FEASTS - ORGAN MEATS DIVISION PRETTY COMPLICATED SERIES OF TRADITIONAL RULES THEY USE TO DIVIDE UP THE ANIMAL... DIFFERENT PORTIONS KEPT FOR DIFFERENT FEASTS... THE ORGAN MEATS SAVED FOR CERTAIN FUNCTIONS ITS FAIRLY CIMPLICATED WE'VE BEEN LOOKING AT THE AMOUNT OF FAT - AT THE BLUBBER - 30 YEARS OF DATA ON BODY CONDITION INDEX IT LOOKS LIKE THESE ARE GOOD INDICATORS OF GENERAL HEALTH IF THE MOST LARGE CETACEANS OIF THEY'RE IN GOOD CONDITION HAVE A LOT OF BODY FAT PRODUCE A LOT OF CALVES IN THE ABSENSE OF THAT SKIP A NUMBER OF YEARS...AS WITH NORTH ATLANTIC GREY WHALES WE THINK WE CAN SEE AND EFFECT BETWEEN HEAVY ICE YEARS AND LIGHTER ICE YEARS - AND LIGHTER ICE YEARS SLIGHTLY BETTER CONDITION - AND RECENT YEARS CALVING IS GOING WELL SPECIFICALLY FOR BOWHEADS HEAVY ICE YEARS THERE'S SOME INDICATIONS FOR OTHER ANIMALS THOSE ARE TOUGH CONDITIONS PRODUCTIVITY WAS LOW.. REPRODUCTIVE FAILURES MODERATE ICE CONDITION IS PROBABLY WHAT THESE ANIMALS MOST HIGHLY ADAPTED TO IN RECENT YEARS THE SEA ICE IS WITHDRAWING TWO OR THREE HUNNDRED MILES FROM THE COAST OR FURTHER... THE HARD EVIDENCE IS A LITTLE UNCLEAR... WE'RE STILL LOOKING AT VARIOUS LINES OF EVIDENCE TO SEE IF WE CAN FIGURE OUT BUT LOOKS LIKE CORRELATION BETWEEN ICE RETREAT AND OEPNING VAST AREAS AND MELT OUT OF SEA ICE AND RELEASING ICE ALGEAS - GIVE IN THIS ANIMAL HIGHER CALVING AND REPRODUCTIVE 1824 FOR THESE WHALES, INITIALLY, THERE HASN'T BEEN A NEGATIVE RESPONSE AND THERE MAY IN FACT BE SOME POSTIVE RESPONSES.... 1850 OUR GUESS IS THAT INITIALLY THERE MAY BE BETTER FEEDING OPPORTUNITIES BUT IF THE ICE RETREATS FURTHER - THIS IS AN ICE ADDAPTED ANIMAL VERY SLOW BREEDERS LATE WITH SEXUAL MATURITY - LIVING 150 YEARS OR SO - SO EVEYTHTHING IS KIND OF SLOWED DOWN IN BOWHEADS - VERY POOER COMPETITIORS WITH OTHER CETACEANS - SO OTHER SPECIES OF WHALES MOVE IN OR CHANGES IN PREY TYPES I THINK THEY'LL DO POORLY - PLUS IF SHIPPING LANES MORE IN WE ALREAEDY KNOW THAT RIGHT WHALES ARE DO POORLY IN TERMS OF AVOIDING SHIPS AND VESSELS THAT MAKE US EAST COAST PROBLEMS WITH N ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALES KILLED AND NET ENTAGLEMENT AND IF FISHING INDUSTRY MOVES NORTH - WHICH IT'S DOING AND CRAB INDUSTRY MOVES NORTH THAT AINT GOOD EITHER WE'VE SEEN A NUMBER OF ANUMALS WITH CRAB GEAR WRAPPED ARND THEM FLIPPERS AND FLUKES AND GAPE OF MOUTH AND ARGUABLY THE THINK THAT KILLS MOST WHALES WORKWIDE IS FISHING ENTABGLEMENT... SO THE POINT IS THAT INITIALLY THERE MAY BE A SMALL BENEFITR TO THE POPULATION BUT IN THE LONG TERM AN ICE ADAPTED CETACEAN LIKE THIS ONE IS PROBABLY NOT GOING TO DO VERY WELL FOR A WHILE HOST OF REASONS IF THERE'S COMPETITIORS FROM OTHER WHALE ESPECIES, IF THERE'S SHIFTS IN THE TYPE OF PREY THEY PREFER - IT WON'T BE GOOD FOR BOWHEADS... Q ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF OMINOUS DON'T KNOW NEW KINDS OF UNCERTAINTIES... SURE IF THERE'S A MAJOR CHANGE IN HABITAT HERE THEY CAN'T THEY WON'T DO WELL THESE ARE SLOW BREEDERS AND THEY ARE NOT THE KIND OF ANIMAL THAT CAN ADAPT QUICKLY TO CHANGE... THIS IS SOME OF THE POPULATION WORK WE'VE DONE 2410 POINTS TO GRAPH THAT'S A STEADY RISING LINE:S THE RATE OF INCREASE OF POPULATION OVER THE CINE 78 SO OVER THIS PERIOD OF WARMING THEY'VE DONE PRETTY WELL - ... HIGHEST CALF PRODUCTION - BUT AGAIN WHERE THIS CURVE IS GOING TO GO IN THE FUTURE IS ANYONE'S GUESS... THIS IS A SCHEMATIC OF THE SEA ICE HERE - HERE'S THE SHORE-FAST ICE AND THE HUNTERS ARE OUT HERE... ALONG ICE EDGE NEAR ACTIVE FLAW ZONE P THE HUNTERS ARFE SEEING AND WE ARE THAT THERE'S LESS MULTI-YEAR ICE AND THIS WHOLE SYSTEM ISN'T AS STABLE AS IT WAS - SO WE'RE HAVING TROUBLE DOING OUR WHALE COUNTS OFF THE EDGE... SO WE'RE EXPLORING WHOLE NEW WAY TO CONT THAT DON'T REQUIRE CAMPING ON THE ICE... THE STABILITY AND THICKNESS FO THE SHORE-FAST ICE... THE CHARACTER IS CHAINGING - LESS MULTI-YEAR ICE THAT WE SAW IN THE OLD DAYS... OF THIS TOUGH OLD ICE - LIKE CONCRETE... NOW ITS NOT GOT BIG CHUNKS OF MULTI YEAR... NOT THAT SHORE FAST IS THINNER BUT NOT AS STABLE AS IT WAS - IT'S CHANING, YEAH IT'S DEFINITLY CHANING IN THE OLD DAYS IT WAS DAMN COLD IN THE SPRING - WE HAD THIRTY OR FORTY BELOW INTO MAY AND WE DON'T WEE THAT NOW... 2744 NOW IT'S TYPICALLY NOT THE CASE... A LOT OF VARIATION BUT IN SOME YEARS HASN'T REQUIRED ANY TRAIL BUILDING AND THE TEMPERATURES AHVE BEEN FAIRLY MILD... - - - - 2800 KIRSTIN SKADBERG STEPS OUT OF SHED TO SHOW US HER COMPLEX INSTURMENT... "SO OUT IN THE ISLAND IT WILL RUN EITHER ON A WIND GENERATOR OR A GAS GENERATOR - RRIGHT NOW JUST PLUGGED INT AC KNEELS DOWN TO WORK ON HER INSTURMENT THERE 2850 WORKS ON IT SOME MORE - "ONE OF THE BIG PROBLEMS WORKING OUTSIDE IS ACTUALLY TRYING TO SEE THE MONOTOIR OF THE COMPUTER SOME OF THE BAD ONES YOU HAVE TO USE YOUR COAT AND MAKE A TENT... THIS ONE DESIGNED TO BE USED OUTSIDE SO NOT SO BAD... WE COULD USE THIS TO CUT TO BRITT DOING THAT VERY THING AT HER TOWER ON THE ISLAND 2930 COMES OUT OF DOOR AGAIN... STOOPS DOWN TO WORK ON HER INSTRUMENTS... WATER EXCHANGE WOBBLES INTO GLASS TUBE ETC... PUTS PARTS TOGETHER... 3036 CU SHE AADJUSTS WIRES AND TIGHTENS ETC 3135 GLASS TUBES AND WATER COMES OUT... HUM OF MOTOR... 3218 PAN UP FROM LAPTOP TO HERE FIDLLING WITH IT ALL SHE GETS A TOOL AND GOES IN AND FIXES IT... 3302 "ALRIGHT - THAT'S PRETTY CLOSE" 3345 "THAT DATA ON THAT SCREEN IS COMING FROM THIS INSTURMENT RIGHT HERE WHICH IS AN INFRARED GAS ANALYSER..." 335O "HA! NOW! NOW IT SHOULD BE WORKING.' GETS UP FROM FIXING IT... 3420 THIS SYSTEM RIGHT IS GOING TO MEASURE THE CONCENTRATIONT OF CO2 IN THE WATER NEAR THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TOWER I HAVE ON COOPER ISLAND... SO 3437 THE EDDY COAVRIENCE CARBON DIOXID FLUX DIRECTLY SDSU ECOLOGY DOCTORAL (ATMOSPHERIC SCINECE) 3620 THE OCEANS ARE THE BIGGEST SINK OF CARBIN ON THE PLANET - OF CO2 3628 THEY TAKE UP MORE CO2 THAN ANY POTHER SURFACE ON THE PLANET... L I N E - THERE ARE STILL PIECES OF THE PUZZLE TO PUT TOGETHER - SUCH AS HOW MUCH CO2 THE OCEANS TAKE UP... AND KIRSTIN SKADBERG IS WORKING ON THAT...VITAL KNOWLEDGE WE WILL NEED IN THE SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS... 3645 THE WORLD'S OCEANS TAKE UP MORE CARBON DIOXIDE OUT OF THE ATMOSPHERE... 3710 THE WORLD'S OCEANS TAKE UP A LOT OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 - PROBABLY IT'S THE BIGGEST SURFACE ON THE PLANET FOR TAKING UP CO2 - SO WHAT I'M INTERESTED IN IS UNDERSTANDING WHICH PARTS OF THE OCEAN TAKE UP MORE COS - OR GIVE OFF CO2 - AND SO IT TURNS OUT, BECUASE ARCTIC WATER IS COLD - THAT - CO2 DISSOLVES WELL IN COLD WATER AND IT PROBABLY IS A LOCATION THAT A LOT OF CO2 IS TAKEN OUT OF THE ATMOSPHERE... 3745 THIS INSTRUMENT SYSTEM IS MEASUREING THE CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE WATER... SO IF I KNOW THE CONCENTARTION OF CO2 IN THE WATER - AND I KNOW THE CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE AIR - THEN I CAN MAKE A GUESS AT HOW MUCH CO2 IS EITHER GOING INTO THE OCEAN FROM THE AIR, OR INTO THE AIR FROM THE OCEAN. 3810 IF WE WANT TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN IN THE FUTURE WITH CO2 IN THE ATMOSPHERE - AND CO2 IS A GREENHOUSE GAS, SO THE MORE CO2 THAT'S IN THE ATMOSPHERE, THE WARMER THE PLANET GETS... THEN WE HAVE TO UNDERSTGAND WHAT SURFACES ARE TAKING IT UP AND WHAT SURFACES AR GIVING IT OFF - CO2. 3840 AS THE OCEAN CHANGES, THEN IT'S ABILITY TO TAKE UP CO2 ALSO CHANGES - SO IF WE WANT TO UDNERSATND HOW THE OCEAN IS GOING TO TAKE UP CO2 IN THE FUTURE - HOW MUCH IT'S GONNA TAKE UP, IS IT GONNA GIVE IT OFF - HOW WILL THAT CHANGE. WE HAVE TO UNDERSTAND SOEMTHING ABOUT HOW THE SYSTEM WORKS - SO HOW MUCH IS DISSOLVED, HOW THAT CHANGES WITH TEMPERATURE, HOW THAT CHANGES WITH SLAINITY, HOW THAT CHANGES FROM THE ARCTIC TO SAN DIEGO - OR WHATEVER - SO LOOKING AT THIS NOW GOIVES US AN IDEA OF WHAT'S HAPPENING NOW - AND THEN LOOKING AT IT OVER TIME WHICH IS WHAT I HOPE TO DO - WILL HELP US, IT'S JUST ONE MORE PIECE OF THE PUZZLE - OF UNDERSTANDING THIS COMPLICATED PICTURE OF HOW IS CO2 FLUX - HOW IS THE EXCHANGE OF CO2 INTO THE ATMOSPHERE CHANGIING WITH TIME AND HOW IS THAT GOING TO EFFECT GLOBAL WARMING... BBOFFCAM - SO THIS HELPING US PREDICT HOW GLOBAL WARMING IS GOING TO HAPPEN 3942 EXACTLY AND THAT'S THE KEY WORD - PREDICTION. I THINK REALLY WHAT MOST OF US ARE TRYING TO DO IN CLIMATE SCIENCE IS UNDERSTAND IN THE FUTURE HOW COLD THINGS CHANGE. Q GW IS CHALLENGING US TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE WORLD THAN WE KNEW BEFORE 4000 IT DOES AND IT'S ALSO ILLUSTRATING THE IDEA THAT EVERYTHING IS INTERCONNECTED. SO HERE WE ARE IN THE ARCTIC - THERE AREN'T A LOAD OF CARS UP HERE DRIVING AROUND, BUT YET THE IMPACT FROM ALL THE BEHAVIOR THAT WE DO IN THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER COUNTRIES IS IMPACTING THIS PLACE. 4030 IT DOESN'T SPREAD EVENLY EVERYWHERE - THERE IS A HIGHER CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE NORHTERN HEMISPHERE BECAUSE THERE IS MORE LAND IN THE NORHTERN HEMISPHERE AND MORE PEOPLE DRIVING CARS IN TH ENORHTERN HEMISPHERE... 4055 A TOWER WITH SOME INSTRUMENTS - MEASUREING SIMILAR TO WHAT 4115 WHAT WE ON COOPER ISLAND IS A TOWER WITH INSTURMENTS - ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ISLAND - THE REASON LOCATED THERE BECASE PREVAILING WINDS FROM THE NORTHESAST SO WE WANT THE WIND TO HIT THE OCEAN AND THEN HIT THE INSTRUMENTS - SO TAHT GIVES US A SENSE OF THE CO2 EXCHANGE BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE WATER... SO WHILE THAT TOWER IS MEASUREING THE CO2 IN THAT AT WAY, THIS INSTURMENT WILL MEASURE THE CO2 EXCHANGE BY MEASUREING THE WATER - AND THEN THOSE TWO CAN BE COMPARED TO VAIDATE THE RESULTS THAT WE GET. 4210 SO THAT ONE'S MEASUREING AIR THIS ONES MEASUREING WATER BUT THEY SHOULD GIVE AUS A SIMILAR ESTIMATE OF HOW CO2 IS MOVING BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE WATER THERE... 4235 WE KNOW THAT IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC, CO2 IS TAKEN UP - PART OF THAT IS BECAUSE THE WATER'S COLD, AND MORE CO2 CAN DISSOLVE IN COLD WATER JUST AS IN A GLASS OF SODA - AS IT WARMS UP, ALL THE CORBONATION GOES AWAY...SO I THINK THAT WHAT I'LL FIND IS THAT THE CO2 IS BEING TAKEN UP BY THE OCEAN THERE NEAR COOPER ISLAND... 4310 I TEACH TOO AND PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN THIS STUFF AND PEOPLE KNOW SOMETHING ABOUT IT AND CARE AND ASK GOOD QUESTIONS AND EVEN IF NOT CHOOSE WORTH THEIR TIME 4340 DO YOU FEEL A SENSE OF RESENTMENT THAT YOU'VE GOT THIS PROBLEM LEFT TO YOU BY THE LAST GENERATION? 4345 NOT SO MUCH BECAUSE I THINK NOW IS WHEN WE'RE STARTING TO UDNERSTAND REALLY THAT IT'S A PROBLME SO I CAN'T BALME SOMEBODY FOR DOING SOMETHING THAT THEY DIDN'T KNOW THEY WERE DOING, BUT IF THIS GENERATION DOESN'T DO SOMETHING, THEN THE NEXT GENERATION DOES NEED TO BLAME US, BECUASE NOW WE'RESTARTING TO UNDERSTAND WHAT'S HAPPENING... 4500 WHAT WE HAVE ON COOPER ISALND IS A TOWER - A METAL STRUCTURE - THAT HAS TWO INSTURMENTS LOCATED ABOUT TWO METERS ABOVE THE SAND, SO IT'S ON EHT EBEACH, IT'S ON EHTE NORTH SIDE FOT HE ISLAND, THERE AREN'T A LOT OF WAVES TYPILCALLY SO THE WATER DOESN'T COEM VERY FAR UP ON THE BEACH SO I'M ABLE TO PUT THE TOWER FAIRLY CLOSE TO THE WATER WHICH IS GOD BECAUSE THE LESS LAND THERE IS BETWEEN THE WATER AND MY TOWER, THE MORE OF MY SIGNAL COMING TO MY INSTRUMENTS IS COMING FROM THE WATER...SO THE ELEVATION OF THE INSTURMENTS ABOVE SEA LEVEL IS ABOUT SEVEN METERS, WHICH MEANS THAT WE HAVE A CERTAIN SIZE OF AN AREA THAT WE ARE SO WE HAVE A CERTAIN SIZE OF AREA THAT WE ARE MONITORING IN THE OCEAN, AND ACTUALLY UNLESS THE WIND COEMS FROM RIGHT SIDE I CAN'T USE DATA - SO WHAT WE DID PUT IT IN A LOCATION WEHRE MOST TIME PASSING OVER OCEAN AND MY INSTURMENTS... 4611 I'M MEASUREING THE AMOUNT OF CARBONDIOXIDE IN THE AIR AND THE AMOUNT OF WATER IN THE AIR - AND WHEN WE COMING THAT WITH THE DIRECTION THE WIND IS BLOWING WE CAN AN ESTIMATE OF THE AMOUNT OF CO2 BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE SURFACE BELOW IT, AND IN THIS CASE THE SURFACE BELOW IT IS THE OCEAN. 4648 WE WANTED TO FACE THE PREVAILING WIND - ON THE ISLAND GET WIND FROM OCEAN AND WE'RE COOPERATING WITH GEORGE DIVOKY WHO IS STUDYING GUILLEMOTS THERE, AND HIS HELP HAS PRETTY MUCH BEEN INVALUABLE...I MEAN HE WORKS ON THE TOWER AND COLLABORATES WITH US EVERYDAY... 4722 HIS LOCAL KNOWLEDGE WAS WHAT I USED ABOUT WHERE TO PUT THE TOWER - GET WIND FROM RIGHT PLACE - DEPENDED - AND HE'S BEEN GREAT AND REALLY IS EXCITED 4810 AS A SCIENTIST IF ANYTHING YOU SEE THE COMPLEXITY MORE, AND SO IT BECOMES MORE OF A PUZZLE, THERE'S MORE PARTS TO TRY TO UNDERSTAND. IF I'M IN THE PUBIC I MIGHT THINK OH WELL IT LOOKS LIKE THE RESEARCH SHOWS THAT THE GLOBAL TEMPERATURE IS INCREASING - AND THAT'S TRUE - BUT AS A SCIENTIST I HAVE TO LOOK AT IT FROM ALL THESE DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW: THE TEMPERATURE'S INCREASING IN THIS ARE, BUT DECREASING IN THIS AREA - THE AVERAGE IS INCREASING BUT WHY IS THAT HAPPENING, HOW IS THAT GOING TO CHANGE IN THE FUTURE...SO IT'S A BIG PROBLEM, BUT IT'S A DIFFERENT LOOK TO THE PROBLEM, BECUASE IT BECOMES A BIG PUZZLE - AT THEAT POINT - I THINK. IT'S BEYOND JUST WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP PUTTING CO2 IN THE AIR. IT'S HOW CAN I UNDERSTAND THIS WHOLE SYSTEM AND FIGURE OUT WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN IN TEN YEARS, OR A HUNDRED YEARS, OR A THOUSAND, YEARS. 4903 WHEN YOU MODEL A SITUATION AND TRY TO MAKE A GUESS AOUT WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN IN THE FUTURE - MOST OF OUR MODELS ARE PROBABLISTIC WHICH MEANS THAT WE THINK WITH SOME PROBABLITY THIS MIGHT HAPPEN OR WITH SOME PROBABILITY THAT MIGHT HAPPEN AND SO IF WE HAVE A 70 PERCENT PROBABILITY THE TEMPERTURE MIGHT INCREASE WE HAVE A THIRTY PRECENT PRPBABILITY THAT IT'S NOT - AND SO WE HAVE TO WORK WITH ALL THESE DIFFERENT POSSIBILITIES FOR THE FUITURE BECASE WE DON'T KNOW FOR SURE WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN. 4940 WELL, IF SOMEBODY SAID TO YOU THERE'S A 90% CHANCE THAT THERE'S GOING TO BE A DOWNPOUR WHEN YOU WALK OUT OF YOUR HOUSE, DO YOU THINK YOU MIGHT BRING A RAINCOAT? MOST PEOPLE MIGHT THINK ABOUT IT PRETTY SERIOUSLY. BUT WHEN WE SAY THERE'S A 90% CHANCE THERE WE COULD HAVE THE NEXT, YOU KNOW, ICE AGE OR SOMETHING, PEOPLE GO AW YEAH IT'S JUST A GUESS - BUT IT'S NOT NECESSARILY ANY LESS REAL OF A POSSIBILITY. 5020 WE JUST DON'T TALK TO EACH OTHER - SOME SCIENTISTS ARE SO FOCUSED ON THEIR WORK AND GETTING GOOD RESEARCH, WHICH IS IMPORTANT, THAT THEY DON'T TAKE THE TIME TO EXPLAIN WHAT THEY'RE SEEING IN TERMS THAT PEOPLE CAN UNDERSTAND - AND THAT'S SOMETHING I DO SEE SICENTIST WORKING ON - I THINK A LOT OF SCIENTISTS ARE STARTING TO REALIZE THAT IF WE DON'T MAKE WHAT WE'RE DOING ACCESSIBLE TO PEOOPLE IN SOME CASES WE MAY AS WELL NOT DO IT. IN SOME INSTANCES PUBLIC AND STUDENTS ARE TRYNG - BUT THERE WILL ALWAYS BE SOME PEOPLE WHO CARE MORE ABOUT BEING COMFORTALE THAN THEY DO ABOUT DOING THE RIGHT THING OR IMPROVING OR AT LEAST NOT RUINING THE PLANET FOR THE NEXT GENERATION, AND i DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO ABOUT THOSE PEOPLE. I MEAN I THINK WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE PEOPLE LIKE THAT. Q EXPECT GLOBAL WEARM INCRASE OVER THE NEXT 30 40 YEARS 5225 YEAH. I THINK IT WILL. I DON'T KNOW THAT FOR A FACT, BUT i THINK THE CHANCES ARE THAT IT WILL AND IT'S GONNA HAVE SOME LARGE IMPACTS THAT WILL BE UNDENIABLE - WITHIN THE LIFETIMES OF PEOPLE THAT ARE ALIVE TODAY... 5135 (MOST DRAMATIC CHANGES?) WELL THAT'S A TOUGH QEUSTION BECAUSE THE TIME FRAMEIS AN ISSUE, AND THAT'S THE HARD PART, WHEN YOU TALK ABOUT PROBABLITITES YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT COMPBINATION OF THOSE DIFFERENT THINGS WILL HAPPEN AND HOW THOSE WILL IMPACT EACH OTHER. BUT I THINK THINGS LIKE SEA LEVEL RISE - WELL THAT'S ALREADY HAPPENING - WE'RE ALREADY SEEING THAT, SO I THINK WE'RE GOING TO CONTINUE TO SEE THAT AND AT SOME POINT THE STATE OF FLORIDA - IF THE WATER LEVEL ROSE A FOOT A LOT OF FLORIDA WILL BE UNDERWATER, AND THEN I THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE WOULD CARE, YOU KNOW. 5320 ANOTGHER BIG ONE THAT'S ALREADY HAPPENING TOO IS THE CHANGE IN THE RANGE OFDIFFERNT SPECIES... SO I THINK WE'RE GONNA SEE ANIMALS SO I THINK WE'RE GONNA SEE ANIMALS POPPING UP IN AREAS WHERE THEY DIDN'T BEFORE... AND DISAPPEARING FROM AREAS THAT THEY NOW INHABIT AND I THINK THAT'S ANOTHER ONE THAT PEOPLE WILL NOTICE... BECAUSE ONCE IT STARTS IMPACTING PEOOPLE'S LIVES - LIKE HEY WE USED TO GO FISHING FOR THSIE AND THAT ONE TYPE OF FISH ISN'T THERE ANYT MORE - THOSE CHANGES ARE HAPPEING NOW, SO I THINK WE'RE GOING TO CONTINUE TO SEE THOSE. Q YOU DON'T HAVE AN END OF THE WORLD FEELING ABOUT THIS A NO, NOT AT ALL, NOT AT ALL, AND I'LL TELL YOU WHY - I THINK HUMAN BEINGS ARE EXTREMELY ADAPTIVE AND CLEVER, AND IT'S KIND OF AN ENCOURAGING THING TOO - I THINK THAT IF PEOPLE DECIDE THAT THEY CARE ABOUT THIS, THAT WE'LL FIGURE OUT A WAY TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT, AND I DO HAVE FAITH IN THAT - SO I THINK THAT'S ONE OF THE REASON THAT THIS WORK IS EXCITING, IS THAT YOU HAVE THIS SENSE THAT IF YOU DID COME UP WITH A GOOD IDEA, YOU COULD SHOW POEPLE HEY LOOK, HERE'S SOME EVIDENCE, THIS HAPPENING, AND PEOPLE SAID HEY YOU KNOW WHAT WE CARE - THAT YOU REALLY COULD MAKE A CHANGE. (SMILES) YOU GENERATION SOUNDS LIKE IT'S READY TO WORK ON IT WELL, I AM. 5340 CLOSEUP CH20 ANALYZER... 5420 KIRSTEN SKADBERG WLAKS ALONG OUTDOORS TALKING W/ BB BB SO YOU DON'T FEEL LIKE YOU'RE IN A TOTAL PANIC ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING NO I DON'T BECAUSE I THINK THAT IF ANYTHING MAJOR HAPPENS, IT WILL HAPPEN GRADUALLY ENOUGH THAT WE'LL HAVE A CHANCE THAT WE'LL HAVE A CHANCE TO THINK ABOUT HOW TO HANDLE IT. BB NOT TOO ABRUPT - KS WELL, IT COULD BE ABRUPT - BUT, BUT YEAH, I THINK IT WILL...BUT TOO I MEAN HUMANS ARE REALLY GOOD AT FIGURING OUT SOLUTIONS TO THINGS. (******PAUSE HERE - THEY WALK OFF CAMERA AT "HUMANS ARE REALLY GOOD..." AND WE'RE LEFT LOOKING AT FASCINATING SHOT OF BIG OLD BOAT HIGH ON CRADLE - GOES REALLY WELL WITH THE THOUGHT SHE JUST PRESENTED. THEN OFF CAMERA HER VOICE CONTINUES:) SO I HAVE FAITH. ONCE WE SCIENTISTS... ONCE WE ECOLOGISTS FIGURE OUT WHAT'S HAPPENING, I THINK THE ENGINEERS WILL JUMP IN AND HELP US OUT. 5510 KS SO I GUESS I HAVE FAITH THAT ONCE WE ECOLOGISTS FIGURE OUT WHAT'S GOING ON THE ENGINEERS WILL BE ABLE TO JUMP IN AND COME UP WITH A SOLUTION - FOR HOW TO FIX IT. 5525 Q DELUSION WE CAN FIX IT - WE'VE DONE IT THIS TIME... WELL YOU KNOW WHAT THOUGH - IF THAT'S TRUE, THEN WHY WORRY ABOUT IT - I MEAN IF WE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT THEN LET'S DO IT. IF WE CAN'T, I'M NOT GOING TO SPEND THE REST OF MY DAYS WORRYING ABOU TIT. I'M JUST GOING TO DO WHAT I CAN. BB BUT THE TRUTH IS WE DON'T KNOW YET AT ALL. KS WE DON'T KNOW. NO. THAT'S TRUE. AND I THINK AS LONG AS WE - I DON'T THINK THERE'S A VERY GOOD CASE FOR SAYING THERE'S NOTHING WE CAN DO ABOUT IT - AT THIS POINT. THERE'S LOTS OF THINGS WE CAN DO ABOUT IT. BB IN ADDITION TO CUTTING THE EMISSIONS KS YEAH - WELL I MEAN, THERE'S LOTS OF BEHAVIORS THAT WE COULD CHANGE - WE CAN STOP CONSUIMNG SO MUCH STUFF AND STOP DRIVING OUR SUVs SO MKUCH AND YOU KNOW START PAYING ATTENTION TO WHAT'S GOING ON IN THE REST OF THE WORLD - THAT WOULD BE A GOOD START I THINK. 5620 A LOT OF MY KNOWLEDGE SOMES FROM READING PAPERS ABOUT IT AND LISTENING TO LECTURES ABOUT IT, NOT WELL I USED TO PLAY IN GIANT SNOWDRIFTS WHEN I WAS A KID AND THEY'RE NOT THERE ANY MORE - BUT THAT IS ALSO TRUE. BUT I DO THINK WHEN I WAS A KIDS THERE WAS MOUNTAINS OF SNOW EVERY YEAR IN MICHIGAN, WE HAD HUGE SNOWDRFITS - I GUESS I WAS ALSO SMALLER BUT IT DEFINITELY IS CHANGING, I THINK. WORST CASE SCENARIO... TO ME JUST PERSONALLY ONE OF THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS WILL BE WATCHING ANIMAL SPECIES DISAPPEAR... BUT THAT'S JUST SOMETHING THAT'S IMPORTANT TO ME PERSONALLY - ASIDE FROM THE FACT THAT THINGS ARE INTERCONNECTED AND WE DON'T KNOW WHAT COULD HAPPEN IF JUST ONE SPECIES GOES EXTINCT... I THINK JUST KNOWING THAT THOSE THINGS ARE PRECIOUS AND BEING LOST IS PRETTY DEPRESSING. BB DO YOU THINK THIS WILL BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR NATIONS TO LEARN ABOUT COOPERATING WITH EACH OTHER? KS 5735 OH THEY HAVE TO. I MEAN THERE'S NO CHOICE. IF WE'RE GONNA CONFROINT THIS ISSUE WE HAVE TO COOPERATE. END OF TAPE THREE
ARCTIC 2005 FIELD TAPE SD DUB
Tape 3 - Barrow Alaska / Thursday 07/21/05 Harry Brower Interview Craig(whale guy interview) bad interview Kirsten ? interview and b-roll of experiment T A P E T H R E E HARRY BROWER - LOCAL WAHLING CAPTAIN - INTERVIEW HE'S WEARING SHADES AND LOW TALKING AND WINDY SOUND - SUBSISTENCE RESEARCH COORDINATOR...DOCUMENTING SUBSISTENCE RESOURCES.... INTERVIEWED IN FRONT OF THE WHALE JAWS DISPLAY "ICE CHANGING - AS I WAS GROWING UP ICE USED TO COME RIGHT UP TO THE BEACH AND PILE UP TEN TWENTY FEET HIGH IN EARLY FALL AND NOW WE DON'T EVEN SEE THAT ANY MORE WE HAVE A LOT OF OPEN WATER "ANIMALS THAT HAVE BEEN EFFECTED AND THE PERMAFROST A LOT MORE ESPODED - A LOT MORE NOTICALE UP NORTH AT POINT BARROW "COULD BE GOOD FOR THE WHALES BUT MIGHT BE HARD FOR THE HUNTERS BECUASE OF THE ICE CONDIITONS WERE FACED WITH TODAY... THE ICE CONDITIONS ARE MUCH THINNER OVER THE COURSE OF WINTER - THE ICE ACCUMULATION IS NOT MUCH AS IT USED TO BE IN EARLIER YEARS - IN THE 70S AND EARLY 80S - ICE WAS MUCH HEAVIER AT THAT TIME IT CREATES AN ACCESS PROBLEM FOR US TO GET OUT AN TRAVEL ON THE ICE ...THE ICE IS MUCH THINNER AND WE CAN'T STAY OUT FOR LONG PERIODS OF TIME - HAVE TO COME BACK ON SHORE WHENEVER A CHANGE IN THE WIND CONSITIONS OR THE OCEAN CURRENTS IN TERMS OF HABITAT USE AND FEEDING - MRE OPEM WATER FOR THEM TO TRAVEL ONE - BETTER FOR THE WHALES - THAT'S MY THOUGHT ANYWAY HUNTING INLAND IS DIFFERENT - USUALLOY SET GILL NETS UNDERNEATH THE ICE - BUT THAT'S LATER IN THE FALL SO I'M NOT SURE IF IT'S BAD BUT WE'RE GOING THROUGH THE DIFFERENT CHANGES... WE'RE NOT ABLE CATCH AS MUCH FISH AS WE LIKE TO IN THE FALL... POLAR BEARS START SWIMMING ON TOWARD SHORE WE HAD DIFFERENT OBSERVATIONSFOR THE PAST THREE OR FOUR YEARS - WE'VE HAD POLAR BEARS ENDING UP ON GRAVEL ISLANDS AND NEAR THE POINT - ONCE THE ICE RECEDES OUT COUPLE HUNDRED MILES THERE'S NO ICE IN BETWEEN SO THEY'RE HAVING TO SWIM ALL THE WAY TO SHORE... AND WE'VE FOUND COPLE OF EM DROWNED OR DEAD - JUST WASHED UP - BECAUSE THERE'S NO ICE FOR THEM TO REST ON - THEY EVENTUALLY GET CAUGHT IN A STORM OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT AND END UP BEING DROWNED... THEY ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE ICE AND THE ICE IS RETREATING THAT'S BASICALLY WHERE THEY LIVE - HUNTING AND TRAVERSING OVER THE ICE OUT IN THE OCEAN - THEY EAT A LOT OF THE FAT FROM THE CARCASSES AND STUFF LIKE THAT... THERE'S BEEN A LOT OF DISCUSSIONS AND RESERACHERS COMING OUT TO BARROW AND THEY'RE MAKING PROJECTIONS AS TO WHAT IT'S GOING TO LOOK LIKE IN TEN TWELVE FIFTY YEARS AND THOSE PROJECTIONS ARE NOT TOO FAVORABLE FOR PEOPLE IN THE ARCTIC - REMAINS TO BE SEEN YET TAK TOPS AND T-SHIRTS - GONNA GET WARMER EROSION - BEACH EROSION - FACED WITH IT TODAY... SPENT A LOT OF MONEY REFURBISHING THE ROADS THAT ARE WASHED OUT - THE BUILDINGS ARE SAGGING AND SWAYING BECAUSE THE PERMAFROST MELTING - IF THE PILINGS AREN'T DEEP ENOUGH IT'LL EFFECT THE BUILDINGS DEFINITELY - 0750 WALK AND TALK THROUGH BASC BLDGS - - - - INTERVIEW WITH CRAIG GEORGE WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST WITH WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT OF THE NORHT SLOPE BURROUGH - HE ALSO WORKS WITH BASC ON DIFFERENT PROJECTS SITTING AT HIS COMPUTER I'VE LIVED HERE THIRTY YEARS AND DONE A LOT OF WORK ON THE ICE POPULATION BIOLOGY ESTIMATE BOWHEADS THAT MIGRATE - LEARNED A LOT ABOUT THE SE ICE AND THE HUNT - AND WE DO THE POST MORTEMS ON THE WHALES - AND WORK WITH THE HUNTERS CLOSELY ON THAT - THE KEY TO OUR SUCCESS IS WORKING WITH THE NATIVE HUNTERS CLOSELY ON THESE PROJECTS HERE'S A MIGRATING BOWHEAD IN A LEAD SYSTEM THE BOWHEADS ARE MIGRATING OUT TO THEBEARING PAST POINT BARROW TO THE EAST INTO THE CANADIAN WATERS THE TECHNIQUE IS TI STILL HUNT - HERE IN BARROW WHERE THEY STILL USE THE SKIN BOATS - AND THEY SET UP CAMPS ALONG THE ICE AND THEY'RE WAITING FOR THE BOWHEADS TO MIGRATE TYPICALLY WITHIN ABOUT A UNDRED YARDS OF THE ICE EDGE - NOW THIS IS ALREADY THREE MILES OFF SHORE SO THEY LAUNCH THE BOAT AND USE A HAND TRHOWN HARPOON ON THE ANILNA HERE'S A SHTO FO A BOWHEAD MOVING THROUGH A NARROW LEAD - YOU NEED MORE HERE'S A MORE OPEN WATER HUNTERS IN A BOAT CHASING DOWN A WHALE - TYPICALLY PRETTY CLOSE TO SHORE USUALLY NOT A PURSUIT THEN WHEN THEY'RE SUCCESSFUL - TWENTY YEARS BACK - TOWING IN THE WHALE - THEY PUT A BIG HEAVY STRAP ON THE FLUKES - SET UP A LOCK AND TACKLE - GEAR INTRODUCED BY YANKEE HUNTERS 120 YEARS AGO - GET ALL HANDS ON THE LINE AND START HAULING - EVEN LARGE ANIMALS YOU CAN SEE THE SCARS FROM ICE COLLISIONS THIS IS THE EYE GOT A GIGANTIC HEAD - LAYING IN ITS SIDE - BLOWHOLE HERE WHALE'S UP AND THEY BEGIN THE BUTHCHERIN PULL OFF BLUBBER FIRST AND THEN THE MUSCLE THE DIVISION OF THE WHALE IS COMPLICATED DIFFERENT PORTIONS TO DIFFERENT CREWS AND DIFFERENT FEASTS - ORGAN MEATS DIVISION PRETTY COMPLICATED SERIES OF TRADITIONAL RULES THEY USE TO DIVIDE UP THE ANIMAL... DIFFERENT PORTIONS KEPT FOR DIFFERENT FEASTS... THE ORGAN MEATS SAVED FOR CERTAIN FUNCTIONS ITS FAIRLY CIMPLICATED WE'VE BEEN LOOKING AT THE AMOUNT OF FAT - AT THE BLUBBER - 30 YEARS OF DATA ON BODY CONDITION INDEX IT LOOKS LIKE THESE ARE GOOD INDICATORS OF GENERAL HEALTH IF THE MOST LARGE CETACEANS OIF THEY'RE IN GOOD CONDITION HAVE A LOT OF BODY FAT PRODUCE A LOT OF CALVES IN THE ABSENSE OF THAT SKIP A NUMBER OF YEARS...AS WITH NORTH ATLANTIC GREY WHALES WE THINK WE CAN SEE AND EFFECT BETWEEN HEAVY ICE YEARS AND LIGHTER ICE YEARS - AND LIGHTER ICE YEARS SLIGHTLY BETTER CONDITION - AND RECENT YEARS CALVING IS GOING WELL SPECIFICALLY FOR BOWHEADS HEAVY ICE YEARS THERE'S SOME INDICATIONS FOR OTHER ANIMALS THOSE ARE TOUGH CONDITIONS PRODUCTIVITY WAS LOW.. REPRODUCTIVE FAILURES MODERATE ICE CONDITION IS PROBABLY WHAT THESE ANIMALS MOST HIGHLY ADAPTED TO IN RECENT YEARS THE SEA ICE IS WITHDRAWING TWO OR THREE HUNNDRED MILES FROM THE COAST OR FURTHER... THE HARD EVIDENCE IS A LITTLE UNCLEAR... WE'RE STILL LOOKING AT VARIOUS LINES OF EVIDENCE TO SEE IF WE CAN FIGURE OUT BUT LOOKS LIKE CORRELATION BETWEEN ICE RETREAT AND OEPNING VAST AREAS AND MELT OUT OF SEA ICE AND RELEASING ICE ALGEAS - GIVE IN THIS ANIMAL HIGHER CALVING AND REPRODUCTIVE 1824 FOR THESE WHALES, INITIALLY, THERE HASN'T BEEN A NEGATIVE RESPONSE AND THERE MAY IN FACT BE SOME POSTIVE RESPONSES.... 1850 OUR GUESS IS THAT INITIALLY THERE MAY BE BETTER FEEDING OPPORTUNITIES BUT IF THE ICE RETREATS FURTHER - THIS IS AN ICE ADDAPTED ANIMAL VERY SLOW BREEDERS LATE WITH SEXUAL MATURITY - LIVING 150 YEARS OR SO - SO EVEYTHTHING IS KIND OF SLOWED DOWN IN BOWHEADS - VERY POOER COMPETITIORS WITH OTHER CETACEANS - SO OTHER SPECIES OF WHALES MOVE IN OR CHANGES IN PREY TYPES I THINK THEY'LL DO POORLY - PLUS IF SHIPPING LANES MORE IN WE ALREAEDY KNOW THAT RIGHT WHALES ARE DO POORLY IN TERMS OF AVOIDING SHIPS AND VESSELS THAT MAKE US EAST COAST PROBLEMS WITH N ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALES KILLED AND NET ENTAGLEMENT AND IF FISHING INDUSTRY MOVES NORTH - WHICH IT'S DOING AND CRAB INDUSTRY MOVES NORTH THAT AINT GOOD EITHER WE'VE SEEN A NUMBER OF ANUMALS WITH CRAB GEAR WRAPPED ARND THEM FLIPPERS AND FLUKES AND GAPE OF MOUTH AND ARGUABLY THE THINK THAT KILLS MOST WHALES WORKWIDE IS FISHING ENTABGLEMENT... SO THE POINT IS THAT INITIALLY THERE MAY BE A SMALL BENEFITR TO THE POPULATION BUT IN THE LONG TERM AN ICE ADAPTED CETACEAN LIKE THIS ONE IS PROBABLY NOT GOING TO DO VERY WELL FOR A WHILE HOST OF REASONS IF THERE'S COMPETITIORS FROM OTHER WHALE ESPECIES, IF THERE'S SHIFTS IN THE TYPE OF PREY THEY PREFER - IT WON'T BE GOOD FOR BOWHEADS... Q ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF OMINOUS DON'T KNOW NEW KINDS OF UNCERTAINTIES... SURE IF THERE'S A MAJOR CHANGE IN HABITAT HERE THEY CAN'T THEY WON'T DO WELL THESE ARE SLOW BREEDERS AND THEY ARE NOT THE KIND OF ANIMAL THAT CAN ADAPT QUICKLY TO CHANGE... THIS IS SOME OF THE POPULATION WORK WE'VE DONE 2410 POINTS TO GRAPH THAT'S A STEADY RISING LINE:S THE RATE OF INCREASE OF POPULATION OVER THE CINE 78 SO OVER THIS PERIOD OF WARMING THEY'VE DONE PRETTY WELL - ... HIGHEST CALF PRODUCTION - BUT AGAIN WHERE THIS CURVE IS GOING TO GO IN THE FUTURE IS ANYONE'S GUESS... THIS IS A SCHEMATIC OF THE SEA ICE HERE - HERE'S THE SHORE-FAST ICE AND THE HUNTERS ARE OUT HERE... ALONG ICE EDGE NEAR ACTIVE FLAW ZONE P THE HUNTERS ARFE SEEING AND WE ARE THAT THERE'S LESS MULTI-YEAR ICE AND THIS WHOLE SYSTEM ISN'T AS STABLE AS IT WAS - SO WE'RE HAVING TROUBLE DOING OUR WHALE COUNTS OFF THE EDGE... SO WE'RE EXPLORING WHOLE NEW WAY TO CONT THAT DON'T REQUIRE CAMPING ON THE ICE... THE STABILITY AND THICKNESS FO THE SHORE-FAST ICE... THE CHARACTER IS CHAINGING - LESS MULTI-YEAR ICE THAT WE SAW IN THE OLD DAYS... OF THIS TOUGH OLD ICE - LIKE CONCRETE... NOW ITS NOT GOT BIG CHUNKS OF MULTI YEAR... NOT THAT SHORE FAST IS THINNER BUT NOT AS STABLE AS IT WAS - IT'S CHANING, YEAH IT'S DEFINITLY CHANING IN THE OLD DAYS IT WAS DAMN COLD IN THE SPRING - WE HAD THIRTY OR FORTY BELOW INTO MAY AND WE DON'T WEE THAT NOW... 2744 NOW IT'S TYPICALLY NOT THE CASE... A LOT OF VARIATION BUT IN SOME YEARS HASN'T REQUIRED ANY TRAIL BUILDING AND THE TEMPERATURES AHVE BEEN FAIRLY MILD... - - - - 2800 KIRSTIN SKADBERG STEPS OUT OF SHED TO SHOW US HER COMPLEX INSTURMENT... "SO OUT IN THE ISLAND IT WILL RUN EITHER ON A WIND GENERATOR OR A GAS GENERATOR - RRIGHT NOW JUST PLUGGED INT AC KNEELS DOWN TO WORK ON HER INSTURMENT THERE 2850 WORKS ON IT SOME MORE - "ONE OF THE BIG PROBLEMS WORKING OUTSIDE IS ACTUALLY TRYING TO SEE THE MONOTOIR OF THE COMPUTER SOME OF THE BAD ONES YOU HAVE TO USE YOUR COAT AND MAKE A TENT... THIS ONE DESIGNED TO BE USED OUTSIDE SO NOT SO BAD... WE COULD USE THIS TO CUT TO BRITT DOING THAT VERY THING AT HER TOWER ON THE ISLAND 2930 COMES OUT OF DOOR AGAIN... STOOPS DOWN TO WORK ON HER INSTRUMENTS... WATER EXCHANGE WOBBLES INTO GLASS TUBE ETC... PUTS PARTS TOGETHER... 3036 CU SHE AADJUSTS WIRES AND TIGHTENS ETC 3135 GLASS TUBES AND WATER COMES OUT... HUM OF MOTOR... 3218 PAN UP FROM LAPTOP TO HERE FIDLLING WITH IT ALL SHE GETS A TOOL AND GOES IN AND FIXES IT... 3302 "ALRIGHT - THAT'S PRETTY CLOSE" 3345 "THAT DATA ON THAT SCREEN IS COMING FROM THIS INSTURMENT RIGHT HERE WHICH IS AN INFRARED GAS ANALYSER..." 335O "HA! NOW! NOW IT SHOULD BE WORKING.' GETS UP FROM FIXING IT... 3420 THIS SYSTEM RIGHT IS GOING TO MEASURE THE CONCENTRATIONT OF CO2 IN THE WATER NEAR THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TOWER I HAVE ON COOPER ISLAND... SO 3437 THE EDDY COAVRIENCE CARBON DIOXID FLUX DIRECTLY SDSU ECOLOGY DOCTORAL (ATMOSPHERIC SCINECE) 3620 THE OCEANS ARE THE BIGGEST SINK OF CARBIN ON THE PLANET - OF CO2 3628 THEY TAKE UP MORE CO2 THAN ANY POTHER SURFACE ON THE PLANET... L I N E - THERE ARE STILL PIECES OF THE PUZZLE TO PUT TOGETHER - SUCH AS HOW MUCH CO2 THE OCEANS TAKE UP... AND KIRSTIN SKADBERG IS WORKING ON THAT...VITAL KNOWLEDGE WE WILL NEED IN THE SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS... 3645 THE WORLD'S OCEANS TAKE UP MORE CARBON DIOXIDE OUT OF THE ATMOSPHERE... 3710 THE WORLD'S OCEANS TAKE UP A LOT OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 - PROBABLY IT'S THE BIGGEST SURFACE ON THE PLANET FOR TAKING UP CO2 - SO WHAT I'M INTERESTED IN IS UNDERSTANDING WHICH PARTS OF THE OCEAN TAKE UP MORE COS - OR GIVE OFF CO2 - AND SO IT TURNS OUT, BECUASE ARCTIC WATER IS COLD - THAT - CO2 DISSOLVES WELL IN COLD WATER AND IT PROBABLY IS A LOCATION THAT A LOT OF CO2 IS TAKEN OUT OF THE ATMOSPHERE... 3745 THIS INSTRUMENT SYSTEM IS MEASUREING THE CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE WATER... SO IF I KNOW THE CONCENTARTION OF CO2 IN THE WATER - AND I KNOW THE CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE AIR - THEN I CAN MAKE A GUESS AT HOW MUCH CO2 IS EITHER GOING INTO THE OCEAN FROM THE AIR, OR INTO THE AIR FROM THE OCEAN. 3810 IF WE WANT TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN IN THE FUTURE WITH CO2 IN THE ATMOSPHERE - AND CO2 IS A GREENHOUSE GAS, SO THE MORE CO2 THAT'S IN THE ATMOSPHERE, THE WARMER THE PLANET GETS... THEN WE HAVE TO UNDERSTGAND WHAT SURFACES ARE TAKING IT UP AND WHAT SURFACES AR GIVING IT OFF - CO2. 3840 AS THE OCEAN CHANGES, THEN IT'S ABILITY TO TAKE UP CO2 ALSO CHANGES - SO IF WE WANT TO UDNERSATND HOW THE OCEAN IS GOING TO TAKE UP CO2 IN THE FUTURE - HOW MUCH IT'S GONNA TAKE UP, IS IT GONNA GIVE IT OFF - HOW WILL THAT CHANGE. WE HAVE TO UNDERSTAND SOEMTHING ABOUT HOW THE SYSTEM WORKS - SO HOW MUCH IS DISSOLVED, HOW THAT CHANGES WITH TEMPERATURE, HOW THAT CHANGES WITH SLAINITY, HOW THAT CHANGES FROM THE ARCTIC TO SAN DIEGO - OR WHATEVER - SO LOOKING AT THIS NOW GOIVES US AN IDEA OF WHAT'S HAPPENING NOW - AND THEN LOOKING AT IT OVER TIME WHICH IS WHAT I HOPE TO DO - WILL HELP US, IT'S JUST ONE MORE PIECE OF THE PUZZLE - OF UNDERSTANDING THIS COMPLICATED PICTURE OF HOW IS CO2 FLUX - HOW IS THE EXCHANGE OF CO2 INTO THE ATMOSPHERE CHANGIING WITH TIME AND HOW IS THAT GOING TO EFFECT GLOBAL WARMING... BBOFFCAM - SO THIS HELPING US PREDICT HOW GLOBAL WARMING IS GOING TO HAPPEN 3942 EXACTLY AND THAT'S THE KEY WORD - PREDICTION. I THINK REALLY WHAT MOST OF US ARE TRYING TO DO IN CLIMATE SCIENCE IS UNDERSTAND IN THE FUTURE HOW COLD THINGS CHANGE. Q GW IS CHALLENGING US TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE WORLD THAN WE KNEW BEFORE 4000 IT DOES AND IT'S ALSO ILLUSTRATING THE IDEA THAT EVERYTHING IS INTERCONNECTED. SO HERE WE ARE IN THE ARCTIC - THERE AREN'T A LOAD OF CARS UP HERE DRIVING AROUND, BUT YET THE IMPACT FROM ALL THE BEHAVIOR THAT WE DO IN THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER COUNTRIES IS IMPACTING THIS PLACE. 4030 IT DOESN'T SPREAD EVENLY EVERYWHERE - THERE IS A HIGHER CONCENTRATION OF CO2 IN THE NORHTERN HEMISPHERE BECAUSE THERE IS MORE LAND IN THE NORHTERN HEMISPHERE AND MORE PEOPLE DRIVING CARS IN TH ENORHTERN HEMISPHERE... 4055 A TOWER WITH SOME INSTRUMENTS - MEASUREING SIMILAR TO WHAT 4115 WHAT WE ON COOPER ISLAND IS A TOWER WITH INSTURMENTS - ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ISLAND - THE REASON LOCATED THERE BECASE PREVAILING WINDS FROM THE NORTHESAST SO WE WANT THE WIND TO HIT THE OCEAN AND THEN HIT THE INSTRUMENTS - SO TAHT GIVES US A SENSE OF THE CO2 EXCHANGE BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE WATER... SO WHILE THAT TOWER IS MEASUREING THE CO2 IN THAT AT WAY, THIS INSTURMENT WILL MEASURE THE CO2 EXCHANGE BY MEASUREING THE WATER - AND THEN THOSE TWO CAN BE COMPARED TO VAIDATE THE RESULTS THAT WE GET. 4210 SO THAT ONE'S MEASUREING AIR THIS ONES MEASUREING WATER BUT THEY SHOULD GIVE AUS A SIMILAR ESTIMATE OF HOW CO2 IS MOVING BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE WATER THERE... 4235 WE KNOW THAT IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC, CO2 IS TAKEN UP - PART OF THAT IS BECAUSE THE WATER'S COLD, AND MORE CO2 CAN DISSOLVE IN COLD WATER JUST AS IN A GLASS OF SODA - AS IT WARMS UP, ALL THE CORBONATION GOES AWAY...SO I THINK THAT WHAT I'LL FIND IS THAT THE CO2 IS BEING TAKEN UP BY THE OCEAN THERE NEAR COOPER ISLAND... 4310 I TEACH TOO AND PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN THIS STUFF AND PEOPLE KNOW SOMETHING ABOUT IT AND CARE AND ASK GOOD QUESTIONS AND EVEN IF NOT CHOOSE WORTH THEIR TIME 4340 DO YOU FEEL A SENSE OF RESENTMENT THAT YOU'VE GOT THIS PROBLEM LEFT TO YOU BY THE LAST GENERATION? 4345 NOT SO MUCH BECAUSE I THINK NOW IS WHEN WE'RE STARTING TO UDNERSTAND REALLY THAT IT'S A PROBLME SO I CAN'T BALME SOMEBODY FOR DOING SOMETHING THAT THEY DIDN'T KNOW THEY WERE DOING, BUT IF THIS GENERATION DOESN'T DO SOMETHING, THEN THE NEXT GENERATION DOES NEED TO BLAME US, BECUASE NOW WE'RESTARTING TO UNDERSTAND WHAT'S HAPPENING... 4500 WHAT WE HAVE ON COOPER ISALND IS A TOWER - A METAL STRUCTURE - THAT HAS TWO INSTURMENTS LOCATED ABOUT TWO METERS ABOVE THE SAND, SO IT'S ON EHT EBEACH, IT'S ON EHTE NORTH SIDE FOT HE ISLAND, THERE AREN'T A LOT OF WAVES TYPILCALLY SO THE WATER DOESN'T COEM VERY FAR UP ON THE BEACH SO I'M ABLE TO PUT THE TOWER FAIRLY CLOSE TO THE WATER WHICH IS GOD BECAUSE THE LESS LAND THERE IS BETWEEN THE WATER AND MY TOWER, THE MORE OF MY SIGNAL COMING TO MY INSTRUMENTS IS COMING FROM THE WATER...SO THE ELEVATION OF THE INSTURMENTS ABOVE SEA LEVEL IS ABOUT SEVEN METERS, WHICH MEANS THAT WE HAVE A CERTAIN SIZE OF AN AREA THAT WE ARE SO WE HAVE A CERTAIN SIZE OF AREA THAT WE ARE MONITORING IN THE OCEAN, AND ACTUALLY UNLESS THE WIND COEMS FROM RIGHT SIDE I CAN'T USE DATA - SO WHAT WE DID PUT IT IN A LOCATION WEHRE MOST TIME PASSING OVER OCEAN AND MY INSTURMENTS... 4611 I'M MEASUREING THE AMOUNT OF CARBONDIOXIDE IN THE AIR AND THE AMOUNT OF WATER IN THE AIR - AND WHEN WE COMING THAT WITH THE DIRECTION THE WIND IS BLOWING WE CAN AN ESTIMATE OF THE AMOUNT OF CO2 BETWEEN THE AIR AND THE SURFACE BELOW IT, AND IN THIS CASE THE SURFACE BELOW IT IS THE OCEAN. 4648 WE WANTED TO FACE THE PREVAILING WIND - ON THE ISLAND GET WIND FROM OCEAN AND WE'RE COOPERATING WITH GEORGE DIVOKY WHO IS STUDYING GUILLEMOTS THERE, AND HIS HELP HAS PRETTY MUCH BEEN INVALUABLE...I MEAN HE WORKS ON THE TOWER AND COLLABORATES WITH US EVERYDAY... 4722 HIS LOCAL KNOWLEDGE WAS WHAT I USED ABOUT WHERE TO PUT THE TOWER - GET WIND FROM RIGHT PLACE - DEPENDED - AND HE'S BEEN GREAT AND REALLY IS EXCITED 4810 AS A SCIENTIST IF ANYTHING YOU SEE THE COMPLEXITY MORE, AND SO IT BECOMES MORE OF A PUZZLE, THERE'S MORE PARTS TO TRY TO UNDERSTAND. IF I'M IN THE PUBIC I MIGHT THINK OH WELL IT LOOKS LIKE THE RESEARCH SHOWS THAT THE GLOBAL TEMPERATURE IS INCREASING - AND THAT'S TRUE - BUT AS A SCIENTIST I HAVE TO LOOK AT IT FROM ALL THESE DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW: THE TEMPERATURE'S INCREASING IN THIS ARE, BUT DECREASING IN THIS AREA - THE AVERAGE IS INCREASING BUT WHY IS THAT HAPPENING, HOW IS THAT GOING TO CHANGE IN THE FUTURE...SO IT'S A BIG PROBLEM, BUT IT'S A DIFFERENT LOOK TO THE PROBLEM, BECUASE IT BECOMES A BIG PUZZLE - AT THEAT POINT - I THINK. IT'S BEYOND JUST WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP PUTTING CO2 IN THE AIR. IT'S HOW CAN I UNDERSTAND THIS WHOLE SYSTEM AND FIGURE OUT WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN IN TEN YEARS, OR A HUNDRED YEARS, OR A THOUSAND, YEARS. 4903 WHEN YOU MODEL A SITUATION AND TRY TO MAKE A GUESS AOUT WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN IN THE FUTURE - MOST OF OUR MODELS ARE PROBABLISTIC WHICH MEANS THAT WE THINK WITH SOME PROBABLITY THIS MIGHT HAPPEN OR WITH SOME PROBABILITY THAT MIGHT HAPPEN AND SO IF WE HAVE A 70 PERCENT PROBABILITY THE TEMPERTURE MIGHT INCREASE WE HAVE A THIRTY PRECENT PRPBABILITY THAT IT'S NOT - AND SO WE HAVE TO WORK WITH ALL THESE DIFFERENT POSSIBILITIES FOR THE FUITURE BECASE WE DON'T KNOW FOR SURE WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN. 4940 WELL, IF SOMEBODY SAID TO YOU THERE'S A 90% CHANCE THAT THERE'S GOING TO BE A DOWNPOUR WHEN YOU WALK OUT OF YOUR HOUSE, DO YOU THINK YOU MIGHT BRING A RAINCOAT? MOST PEOPLE MIGHT THINK ABOUT IT PRETTY SERIOUSLY. BUT WHEN WE SAY THERE'S A 90% CHANCE THERE WE COULD HAVE THE NEXT, YOU KNOW, ICE AGE OR SOMETHING, PEOPLE GO AW YEAH IT'S JUST A GUESS - BUT IT'S NOT NECESSARILY ANY LESS REAL OF A POSSIBILITY. 5020 WE JUST DON'T TALK TO EACH OTHER - SOME SCIENTISTS ARE SO FOCUSED ON THEIR WORK AND GETTING GOOD RESEARCH, WHICH IS IMPORTANT, THAT THEY DON'T TAKE THE TIME TO EXPLAIN WHAT THEY'RE SEEING IN TERMS THAT PEOPLE CAN UNDERSTAND - AND THAT'S SOMETHING I DO SEE SICENTIST WORKING ON - I THINK A LOT OF SCIENTISTS ARE STARTING TO REALIZE THAT IF WE DON'T MAKE WHAT WE'RE DOING ACCESSIBLE TO PEOOPLE IN SOME CASES WE MAY AS WELL NOT DO IT. IN SOME INSTANCES PUBLIC AND STUDENTS ARE TRYNG - BUT THERE WILL ALWAYS BE SOME PEOPLE WHO CARE MORE ABOUT BEING COMFORTALE THAN THEY DO ABOUT DOING THE RIGHT THING OR IMPROVING OR AT LEAST NOT RUINING THE PLANET FOR THE NEXT GENERATION, AND i DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO ABOUT THOSE PEOPLE. I MEAN I THINK WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE PEOPLE LIKE THAT. Q EXPECT GLOBAL WEARM INCRASE OVER THE NEXT 30 40 YEARS 5225 YEAH. I THINK IT WILL. I DON'T KNOW THAT FOR A FACT, BUT i THINK THE CHANCES ARE THAT IT WILL AND IT'S GONNA HAVE SOME LARGE IMPACTS THAT WILL BE UNDENIABLE - WITHIN THE LIFETIMES OF PEOPLE THAT ARE ALIVE TODAY... 5135 (MOST DRAMATIC CHANGES?) WELL THAT'S A TOUGH QEUSTION BECAUSE THE TIME FRAMEIS AN ISSUE, AND THAT'S THE HARD PART, WHEN YOU TALK ABOUT PROBABLITITES YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT COMPBINATION OF THOSE DIFFERENT THINGS WILL HAPPEN AND HOW THOSE WILL IMPACT EACH OTHER. BUT I THINK THINGS LIKE SEA LEVEL RISE - WELL THAT'S ALREADY HAPPENING - WE'RE ALREADY SEEING THAT, SO I THINK WE'RE GOING TO CONTINUE TO SEE THAT AND AT SOME POINT THE STATE OF FLORIDA - IF THE WATER LEVEL ROSE A FOOT A LOT OF FLORIDA WILL BE UNDERWATER, AND THEN I THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE WOULD CARE, YOU KNOW. 5320 ANOTGHER BIG ONE THAT'S ALREADY HAPPENING TOO IS THE CHANGE IN THE RANGE OFDIFFERNT SPECIES... SO I THINK WE'RE GONNA SEE ANIMALS SO I THINK WE'RE GONNA SEE ANIMALS POPPING UP IN AREAS WHERE THEY DIDN'T BEFORE... AND DISAPPEARING FROM AREAS THAT THEY NOW INHABIT AND I THINK THAT'S ANOTHER ONE THAT PEOPLE WILL NOTICE... BECAUSE ONCE IT STARTS IMPACTING PEOOPLE'S LIVES - LIKE HEY WE USED TO GO FISHING FOR THSIE AND THAT ONE TYPE OF FISH ISN'T THERE ANYT MORE - THOSE CHANGES ARE HAPPEING NOW, SO I THINK WE'RE GOING TO CONTINUE TO SEE THOSE. Q YOU DON'T HAVE AN END OF THE WORLD FEELING ABOUT THIS A NO, NOT AT ALL, NOT AT ALL, AND I'LL TELL YOU WHY - I THINK HUMAN BEINGS ARE EXTREMELY ADAPTIVE AND CLEVER, AND IT'S KIND OF AN ENCOURAGING THING TOO - I THINK THAT IF PEOPLE DECIDE THAT THEY CARE ABOUT THIS, THAT WE'LL FIGURE OUT A WAY TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT, AND I DO HAVE FAITH IN THAT - SO I THINK THAT'S ONE OF THE REASON THAT THIS WORK IS EXCITING, IS THAT YOU HAVE THIS SENSE THAT IF YOU DID COME UP WITH A GOOD IDEA, YOU COULD SHOW POEPLE HEY LOOK, HERE'S SOME EVIDENCE, THIS HAPPENING, AND PEOPLE SAID HEY YOU KNOW WHAT WE CARE - THAT YOU REALLY COULD MAKE A CHANGE. (SMILES) YOU GENERATION SOUNDS LIKE IT'S READY TO WORK ON IT WELL, I AM. 5340 CLOSEUP CH20 ANALYZER... 5420 KIRSTEN SKADBERG WLAKS ALONG OUTDOORS TALKING W/ BB BB SO YOU DON'T FEEL LIKE YOU'RE IN A TOTAL PANIC ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING NO I DON'T BECAUSE I THINK THAT IF ANYTHING MAJOR HAPPENS, IT WILL HAPPEN GRADUALLY ENOUGH THAT WE'LL HAVE A CHANCE THAT WE'LL HAVE A CHANCE TO THINK ABOUT HOW TO HANDLE IT. BB NOT TOO ABRUPT - KS WELL, IT COULD BE ABRUPT - BUT, BUT YEAH, I THINK IT WILL...BUT TOO I MEAN HUMANS ARE REALLY GOOD AT FIGURING OUT SOLUTIONS TO THINGS. (******PAUSE HERE - THEY WALK OFF CAMERA AT "HUMANS ARE REALLY GOOD..." AND WE'RE LEFT LOOKING AT FASCINATING SHOT OF BIG OLD BOAT HIGH ON CRADLE - GOES REALLY WELL WITH THE THOUGHT SHE JUST PRESENTED. THEN OFF CAMERA HER VOICE CONTINUES:) SO I HAVE FAITH. ONCE WE SCIENTISTS... ONCE WE ECOLOGISTS FIGURE OUT WHAT'S HAPPENING, I THINK THE ENGINEERS WILL JUMP IN AND HELP US OUT. 5510 KS SO I GUESS I HAVE FAITH THAT ONCE WE ECOLOGISTS FIGURE OUT WHAT'S GOING ON THE ENGINEERS WILL BE ABLE TO JUMP IN AND COME UP WITH A SOLUTION - FOR HOW TO FIX IT. 5525 Q DELUSION WE CAN FIX IT - WE'VE DONE IT THIS TIME... WELL YOU KNOW WHAT THOUGH - IF THAT'S TRUE, THEN WHY WORRY ABOUT IT - I MEAN IF WE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT THEN LET'S DO IT. IF WE CAN'T, I'M NOT GOING TO SPEND THE REST OF MY DAYS WORRYING ABOU TIT. I'M JUST GOING TO DO WHAT I CAN. BB BUT THE TRUTH IS WE DON'T KNOW YET AT ALL. KS WE DON'T KNOW. NO. THAT'S TRUE. AND I THINK AS LONG AS WE - I DON'T THINK THERE'S A VERY GOOD CASE FOR SAYING THERE'S NOTHING WE CAN DO ABOUT IT - AT THIS POINT. THERE'S LOTS OF THINGS WE CAN DO ABOUT IT. BB IN ADDITION TO CUTTING THE EMISSIONS KS YEAH - WELL I MEAN, THERE'S LOTS OF BEHAVIORS THAT WE COULD CHANGE - WE CAN STOP CONSUIMNG SO MUCH STUFF AND STOP DRIVING OUR SUVs SO MKUCH AND YOU KNOW START PAYING ATTENTION TO WHAT'S GOING ON IN THE REST OF THE WORLD - THAT WOULD BE A GOOD START I THINK. 5620 A LOT OF MY KNOWLEDGE SOMES FROM READING PAPERS ABOUT IT AND LISTENING TO LECTURES ABOUT IT, NOT WELL I USED TO PLAY IN GIANT SNOWDRIFTS WHEN I WAS A KID AND THEY'RE NOT THERE ANY MORE - BUT THAT IS ALSO TRUE. BUT I DO THINK WHEN I WAS A KIDS THERE WAS MOUNTAINS OF SNOW EVERY YEAR IN MICHIGAN, WE HAD HUGE SNOWDRFITS - I GUESS I WAS ALSO SMALLER BUT IT DEFINITELY IS CHANGING, I THINK. WORST CASE SCENARIO... TO ME JUST PERSONALLY ONE OF THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS WILL BE WATCHING ANIMAL SPECIES DISAPPEAR... BUT THAT'S JUST SOMETHING THAT'S IMPORTANT TO ME PERSONALLY - ASIDE FROM THE FACT THAT THINGS ARE INTERCONNECTED AND WE DON'T KNOW WHAT COULD HAPPEN IF JUST ONE SPECIES GOES EXTINCT... I THINK JUST KNOWING THAT THOSE THINGS ARE PRECIOUS AND BEING LOST IS PRETTY DEPRESSING. BB DO YOU THINK THIS WILL BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR NATIONS TO LEARN ABOUT COOPERATING WITH EACH OTHER? KS 5735 OH THEY HAVE TO. I MEAN THERE'S NO CHOICE. IF WE'RE GONNA CONFROINT THIS ISSUE WE HAVE TO COOPERATE. END OF TAPE THREE
United States Senate 1400-1500
THE SENATE The Senate meets for 1 hour of morning business followed by the start of up to 20 hours of debate on 2 stem cell bills. 14:15:08.6 quorum call: a senator: mr. president? 14:17:31.9 the presiding officer: the senator from kansas. mr. brownback: mr. president, i ask further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brownback: mr. president, i rise to start the discussion on this side regarding stem cells, regarding the major hope 14:17:48.7 and promise of stem cells, stem cell research and adult stem cells, cord blood, amniotic fluid. and i want to start off with a story. 14:18:02.9 i want to start off with the story of a patient, david fahey, got a picture of him here. david fagey lives in florida. he suffered from end stages heart disease. he spaoefrpbsed short -- experienced shortness of breath, tiredness and inability to 14:18:21.4 concentrate in a normal fashion. over two years ago his cardiologist indicated that he should go to hospice, saying he had no other options. and i would be provided plenty of morphine to ease my way into a transitional state was the statement of his treating 14:18:38.4 physician. hospice does provide great service, but david learned about adult stem cell treatments through a company called theravite. when i saw david last year, he just returned from his first 14:18:51.4 stem cell treatment. he just returned from his second one a matter of weeks ago, just this week, and we got a progress report from him about this amazing work that's taking place, this therapy that's occurred with adult stem cells. listen to david's letter. 14:19:07.0 it's really impressive and it's very interesting. "i am one of seven people in the world who have experienced two stem cell therapies. susan and i have just returned from bangkok, thailand, after 45 days of adult stem cell cardiac treatment and rehabilitation, 14:19:23.1 the absolute cutting-edge of technology." one has to wonder why he's in bangkok for that. "utilization of my own stem cells reinjected into my heart allowed the reshaping and refunctioning of my heart from a life-threatening situation to a 14:19:40.5 nearly normal heart function today. my stem cell treatment last year, i went from a life expectancy of one day to 90 days to at least one year. the second stem cell treatment has jump-started me into a range of normal function. 14:19:55.9 i reasonably can expect a normal life expectancy which is approximately 10 to 15 more years. i can't tell you how great it is 14:20:04.8 to be back in the greatest country in the world, the united states of america. the whether is fabulous in florida," he writes. it is wonderful to sleep in my own soft bed. i am in awe of the creator who amazingly engineered us to have our own warranty toolbox with us 14:20:22.6 at all times -- our own stem cells. does not check out our politics, race, religion or gender. some of the diseases, in addition to heart diseases, which can be treated, in 2000, 2008 and 2009 are the following" 14:20:37.7 he's saying projected into the future, blindness, macular degeneration, diabetes, stroke and parkinson's disease, paralysis of any part of the body, including back, hand or legs, renal failure. he continues, "being one of the world's longest-living renal 14:20:55.6 transplant recipients of 23 years, i can't tell you how thrilled i am for others that they may not have to endure the hellish torture of renal failure. this reasonable treatment is in the immediate future. it is an absolutely wonderful time to be alive. 14:21:12.8 the only letter or designation i would like to have behind my name is david fogey, alive. there is a technology to soup up our cells, i would support 14:21:30.5 embryonic cells but they have 100% certain side effective growing tumors. our own adult stem cells do not. best wishes and great health be with you." this opens a revolutionary door 14:21:45.0 of opportunity to improve the quality of life like it has for me and cut the spiraling cost of health care in the u.s.a." he ends his letter this way. "on my way to costco without cane or wheelchair for 30 minutes shopping. 14:22:00.1 walk. i remain sincerely yours, david fogey, ph.d. and ahraoeufplt" -- and alive." that's a good way to start this discussion of these miraculous stem cells. they're beautiful. 14:22:15.4 they're working, and 72 different maladies. fogey has had treatments using two. the problem is he's had to go to bangkok, thailand, for both of 14:22:32.4 them, instead of the united states. adult stem cell therapies, no ethical problems, no ethical questions, his own stem cells. yet, he's had to travel to bangkok because we don't seem to have enough research funding to be able to support this sort of research into areas that are 14:22:49.0 giving cures, treatments, i want to say -- emphasize treatments, not cures -- to people, to give them an enthusiastic life, to give them a chance to live and to sign off. david fogey, ph.d., and alive. 14:23:07.3 and ahraoeufplt we've now found these amazing stem cells not only in cord blood, which thanks to my colleague from iowa, who worked with me and many others, we established cord blood 14:23:21.5 banking. and we're now -- and i just checked these numbers before we came over here -- at the end of 2006 there had been 10,000 cord blood transplants to unrelated donors. got those numbers from the new york blood center, which was responsible for 2,500 of those 14:23:37.2 units. that's 10,000 people probably alive that wouldn't be, maybe some in other ways and shapes. but still it's taking place. we now need to bank amniotic fluid. we just found in recent research, i want to show this 14:23:53.4 chart as well. some of my colleagues may have missed this. this came out in jama, february 28, 2007. stem cells obtained from amniotic fluid. this is the fluid surrounding the child in the womb. amniotic fluid derived stem 14:24:12.0 cells can be coaxed to become muscle, bone, fat, blood, vessel, nerve and liver cells. amniotic flood cells, stem cells might be capable of repairing damaged tissues resulting from conditions such as diabetes, 14:24:30.8 alzheimer's disease and stroke. i would hope one of the next effort we take on in banking, is banking amniotic fluid that's been traditionally thrown away. it may hold the promise of incredible cures t.'s a great source of stem cells, very 14:24:47.7 malleable. the pluripotent stem cells that are taking place that are in this as well. that may be another one we can join together. there's much news to celebrate on the stem cell front. this being one, and the placenta, i believe, they are 14:25:01.7 finding a rich source of these 14:25:06.2 pluripotent, malleable stem cells as well, another throw-away, if you will. that is an area that we're going to be able to find and probably use more and more into the future for these very malleable pluripotent stem cells that we 14:25:20.6 can create -- not create, but use for additional amazing cures. i want to recognize the work of my colleagues who are on the other side of this debate: senator specter from pennsylvania, senator harkin 14:25:36.8 from iowa. many others have pushed for a long time in these areas, and many good has happened. in the cord blood banking, that's gone very well. the adult stem cell research, that work has gone fabulously, as i just read in this opening story of a gentleman just back 14:25:55.0 from bangkok, although he wished these treatments were taking place in the united states rather than in thailand. much good has happened. we have two major barriers. the first one, i believe, to be an insurmountable barrier. and that first one being what is 14:26:13.7 the human embryo. if it is a person, as we've discussed many times, then it's entitled to human dignity and should be treated in a dignified fashion and not researched or taxpayer dollars used to 14:26:27.7 research and destroy it. if it's property, it can be done with as its master chooses. we've discussed and debated this many, many times. obviously here the effort would be to treat the youngest of human beings as property, to be researched on, to be destroyed 14:26:46.1 with the use of federal taxpayer dollars. and yet, if you follow that debate on forward, at what point in time does the human embryo then become a person? because we know if you allow it to grow, at some point and time under everybody's definition, it 14:27:03.3 becomes a person entitled to protection and human dignity. yet, we're saying here, at the earliest phases we are going to treat it as property and with federal taxpayer dollars we are going to pay to destroy it and to research on it. and that is the obstacle that 14:27:20.5 cannot be overcome. because we believe in human dignity. we believe as a society in human dignity. and so our debate which we've had multiple sets of time, sets of different debates on this 14:27:36.5 here, continues today. the central question will be: will we sanction the destruction of nascent human life with federal taxpayer dollars? that's the central issue. will we divert taxpayer dollars from adult stem cell research, which is working, in the case of 14:27:53.4 dr. david fogey and send these dollars to fund speculative research that likely will never produce any patient treatments? that's the second question with it. i mentioned the first to be an insurmountable one. 14:28:06.1 the second one, i think, is one of wisdom. should we be funding something that is working or should we be speculating on something that is not and is producing indeed tumors? and i will back that up with a number of research papers. 14:28:21.3 these are the two central questions. these are the two questions we'll be debating throughout this period of time. i doubt that there is much surprise left on the vote, on how the votes will take place. it is an important debate. it does frame much of what we move forward with in this 14:28:37.4 country and in places around the world. but these are the two central questions. will we sanction the destruction of nascent human life with federal taxpayer dollars? will we divert taxpayer dollars from adult stem cell research which is working and send these 14:28:53.7 dollars to fund speculative research that likely will never produce any patient treatments? central to this debate is the issue of how we treat our fellow man. we would all agree, i hope, that individuals should be treated 14:29:09.5 with respect. we would agree that we should avoid prejudices. we would agree that each individual has an inalienable right to life. my colleagues, my colleague from iowa, myself, the presiding officer, those around, those 14:29:25.7 watching, would all agree that we each have an inalienable right to life, to live. we all hold thu for the new burn -- hold this through the newborn for the eldest members of our 14:29:43.6 society. but when does that life begin, a question that has vexed this body for some period of time. does it begin at birth? does it begin before birth? when? biology tells us that life begins much earlier than birth. 14:29:59.7 and here i want to read from an 14:30:04.4 human embryology textbook. it says this -- quote -- "although life is a continuous process, fertilization is a critical landmark because under ordinary circumstances a new genetically distinct human 14:30:20.4 organism is thereby formed."n such definitions are helpful in clarifying that human life does begin at the embryonic phase. indeed, myself and my colleague from iowa and the presiding 14:30:36.6 officer began at the embryonic phase whether the embryo comes the old fashioned way, or as a product of various scientific methods, supplement as scnt human cloning. with the scientific fact in hand we evaluate the facts in light 14:30:52.4 of our ethical framework. for instance, we know the human embryo is a human life. then, the question is, how should we treat it? human life has immeasurable value. 14:31:05.9 from the youngest to the oldest human beings are ends in themselves. it is wrong to use any human as a means to an en. any time throughout human history when we have done otherwise we have regretd it. -- regretted it. 14:31:23.5 our value as people is intrinsic. i might say, i am a pro life my whole life. i believe all life is sacred. beautiful. unique. from a loving god frrks 14:31:38.8 beginning to end, it is true here, it is true in the womb, true of the child in darfur, true of the lady in poverty. it simply is true. yes, we want to help people and treat people who have medical conditions. but we must not trample upon any human to achieve such an end. 14:31:58.1 this is because human beings are distinct and unique amongst all creation. i would note here, ronald reagan 14:32:13.6 had a very folksy way of defining whether there was human life and whether it should be protected in his 1983 essay on abortion and the conscience of a nation. he put it in a very common sense 14:32:28.8 way: "anyone who doesn't feel sure whether we are talking about a second human life should clearly give life the benefit of the doubt. if you don't know whether a body is alive or dead, you would never bury it." i think this consideration 14:32:44.7 should be enough for all of us to insist on protecting the unborn. another common sense folksy way but it hits the point. will we do what is ethical with respect to the fellow man? that is a central question of this debate. 14:32:59.8 during this debate some will argue we should proceed with ethical embryonic stem cell research and i distinguish between broke and the unquestionably ethical alternatives which we can talk about with respect to embryonic stem cell research, though, 14:33:17.2 embodied in the guidelines of the stem cell research enhancement act, s. 5, how is it possible to ethically do something that is completely unethical? destroy another human life, innocent human life for research 14:33:35.5 purposes? arguments that the bill provide ethical guidelines, though well ended are misplaced. the ethics of s. 5 have nothing to do with protecting innocent life from destruction. they will fund with taxpayer 14:33:50.1 dollars, the destruction of innocent human life. the ethics of s. 5 have to do with the process of how you donate young human embryos for destruction. mr. president, we have had this debate before. we had it on the floor on this 14:34:05.8 issue. we have had it before regarding other issues. we had it with the fetal tissue research from abortions. here i take the body back to 1991, a coalition for research freedom in a letter signed by 14:34:21.3 prominent patient advocacy groups advocating embryonic stem cell research today, were advocating fetal tissue research in 1991. they wrote this: "fetal tissue transplantation research is widely recognized as one of the 14:34:36.6 most promising research avenues for such disease and debill -- disabilities as parkinson's, alzheimer, diabetes, leukemia, spinal cord injuries and many other chronic health 14:34:52.9 conditions." doesn't that sound familiar? congress, responding to the emotional outcry with 14:35:01.2 legislation to provide funding for unethical research, research that can only take place with the trampling of the rights of a fellow human. that was 1991. those were the promises. that was the move forward by this body. 14:35:19.9 that was pushed on forward. we know what happened. it was on the front page of "the new york times" in 2001. a new stove -- the news story began: carefully controlled study that striked to treat parkinson's disease by implanting cells from aborted 14:35:38.1 fetuses failed to show a benefit but also revealed a disastrous side effect scientists report. in 15% of patients, the cells grew too well. churning out so much of a chemical that controls movement 14:35:52.3 that the patients jerked uncontrollably." the story continues: "they chew constantly. their fingers go up and down, wrists flex and the patients writhe and twist, jerk their 14:36:09.0 heads and fling their arms about." "it was tragic, catastrophic," a real nightmare and we can't selectively turn it off. a man was so badly affected -- (inaudible) 14:36:47.3 (inaudible) 14:36:55.5 mr. president, the pattern 14:37:40.5 repeats itself. a double tragedy. human life is destroyed. second, the patient will likely be harmed. there remain no embryonic human treatments or applications despite 25 years of models and a 14:37:58.0 decade of work of human embryonic stem cells. let me repeat that: 25 years of embryonic work in animal models there are no human treatments and a decade of work with human embryonic stem cells, no 14:38:13.0 treatments. what we have learned about embryonic stem cells they are good at forming tumors. scientific literature abounds with such stories. an example is published last year, early diabetes. 14:38:31.6 you can find the expression of the demonstration when the cells are differentiated between tumors and this is just one example. 14:38:47.7 i point this out because this was the same result we saw taking place with fetal tissue research. it was that tumors were formed. that's what took place. >> and several of the articles, 14:39:15.3 now, are push accomplished articles on the formation of tumors by embryonic stem cells. i note in this one on the insulin g's and this was in the publication "stem cells" 14:39:31.8 published august 2, 2006. and another one, published in july, on the 24th of 2006 -- excuse me, april 6th of 2006. and they still noted there, as 14:39:48.3 well, the potential for teratoma development in the stem cells after prolonged differentiation and in that there are a series of articles, here, including a 14:40:03.6 neuro chemical 2006 june, and they were noting frequent tumor-related deaths in transplanted animals taking place in that one. and here's one, stem cells of 14:40:18.7 june 2006, and they note that grass grafted with human embryonic stills predifferentiated in vitro developed severe purports -- tumors. 14:40:33.3 the literature is full of that word. these are developing tumors. i note that in stem cells, a publication of june 2006, 70% of mice, they derived the cells and 14:41:01.6 they developed tumors, 70% of them. i have a series of these publications, all noting that the stem cell therapy in animals produced tumors. strange. 14:41:15.7 that's what we found took lace in fetal tissue research when we were dealing with an older set of cells that were developed. now when we back it up to a younger set of stem cells or cells that we wr using, we see -- that we are using, we see the same feature, forming 14:41:37.9 teratomas, or tumors. in some cases almost every circumstance. that is what we found them. we fine the same thing now. very consistent on the research. i had, for anyone interested, 17 14:41:54.3 different examples of the formation of teratomas by embryonic stem cell work in laboratory animals. mr. president, let us not go down the road of unethical 14:42:08.5 speculative research. i am sure the research is interesting but the government needs to pursue what is best for americans suffering from disease and injuries. that's what our standard should be. we have an enormous ethical hurdle of killing young human life for this research purpose, 14:42:23.5 and we have an area that needs more funding in the adult stem cell cord blood, amniotic fluid and that money is diverted to other place -- and that money is diverted to other places. and now let's move from the ethical to the practical 14:42:39.3 question: should we put millions or billions of dollars into interesting speculative research on tumor-forming embryonic stem cells or should we put our money where we are already getting strong results with adult stem cell work, cord blood, amniotic fluid and other areas where there is no ethical 14:42:57.6 problem? adult stem cells have no ethical strines attached. you can get them from an adult patient without causing harm, you can harvest them from the rich cord blood, and as noted in the journal of american medical association of march 7 of 24 year they can be obtained from 14:43:13.4 amniotic fluid without causing harm to the unborn child. defying the naysayers which many said this could or would not work, there are now many confirmed adult pluripotent stem cells, pluripotent cells can 14:43:28.1 form a number of different type of cell tripes previously thought to only exist in embryos can turn into any cell in the body. here, i want to show first, a chart of the areas that were having treatments taking place 14:43:46.8 by adult stem cell therapy. i want to hold this up. i don't think this is a complete set of areas but 72 current human -- in humans -- clinical applications using adult stem cells. 14:44:01.3 blood conditions, auto emmiewp, bladder disease, cancer, cardiovascular, liver disease, neuro degenerative, wounds and injuries, ocul ax r -- occular, you can see the list of 72 14:44:19.2 different areas treated with adult stem cells. in humans, in human trials, and i will hold this up for my colleagues and will provide this no any offices that would like, an inch thick binder "new reasons for hope -- recent developments published since 14:44:36.3 congress stem cell debate and vote of 2006 and the adult stem cell research and other alternatives to embryonic stem cell work and research. this is from june of 2006 to march of 2007. here are the number of additional areas that we have gotten successful work taking 14:44:55.2 place in each of those. i want to though this as the 14:45:01.1 folder, a fold are i have shown before. this is recent advances in adult stem cell research and other alternatives to cloning and embryonic stem cell research, a binder 4" thick, full of the front pages, just the first pages, of the research if these 14:45:16.8 fields of what's taking place, that needs to be more. there needs to be more taking place to get more of the cures, to get more people like david fagey treated.n i would point out as well if people want 14:45:32.4 to go to the web site of clinicaltrials.gov and pull up the latest trials and studies of places that are recruiting patients or are filled and no longer recruiting. it pulls up 1,422 studies currently ongoing. 14:45:48.8 this is the first of 50 pages from clinicaltrial.government of the various -- clinicaltrial.gov of the clinical uses and trials of adult stem cell that are going on right now. let's look at the money chart on this. 14:46:04.4 and i want to note for my colleagues, there presently is no prohibition against anybody developing new embryonic stem cell lines legally. i mean, if a group, a private group, if a state wants to develop a new embryonic stem cell line, they can. 14:46:21.2 the limitation is on federal taxpayer dollars of use of those in research areas on newly established embryonic stem cell lines. but if a private group wants to develop an embryonic stem cell line, if a states want to develop an embryonic stem cell 14:46:37.1 research -- embryonic stem cell line, they can do that, they can do that now. let's look at the funding that's going on to embryonic stem cell research, both human and nonhuman. in fy 2006, the last year that we have full data for, human embryonic stem cell research, 14:46:53.6 $37.8 million, nonhuman embryonic stem cell research, $110.4 million. from 2002-2006, human embryonic stem cell research, $132 million. nonhuman, $481 million. total, $613.79 million in embryonic stem cell research. 14:47:12.2 $613.9 million. we're putting in a lot of money into embryonic stem cell research and still the scoreboard on this of where we're getting humans treated after $613.9 million, stem cell research, human applications, 14:47:28.0 adult, we have 72 treatment areas. with binders full of information, with 1,422 study trials. we have zero on the embryonic, after 25 years of knowing about this, of ten years of knowing 14:47:43.6 about it in humans. and after $613 million of funding. now, after some period of time, shouldn't we say and think that wouldn't it be better if dr. david fahey is being treated 14:48:00.8 in the united states instead of thailand and we had more of that work that's getting him treated taking place here rather than in other places around the world? and wouldn't it be better to take the $613 million that can yield more of this, of treatments, if that's what we're 14:48:16.5 after -- if we're after treatments -- wouldn't it be better to take that $613 million and say, let's put more in adult research, adult stem cell research, where it's yielding results? doesn't that just make sense? isn't that the right thing to do? 14:48:33.0 where we have all of this that's producing results. and after 25 years, we don't have anything here. that's not fair to say. i'm sure we have a number of interesting research information that's come up through that 14:48:51.7 research of that $613 million. i'm sure there is -- has been useful research that involves the destruction of a young human life. i want to note, before people 14:49:17.2 watching this think okay, you've got a cure for me in the adult stem cell area, i want to make sure i put forward that many of these are in clinical trials today. not all of these are widely available yet. however, there has been success in all of these areas using adult stem cells. for some of these treatments, 14:49:32.7 adult stem cells were the main component. in others, adult stem cells were the part that helped the main component to work. all of these are real and legitimate. on the eve of last summer's bioethical debate, some scientists took it upon themselves to criticize this list by publishing a letter in 14:49:50.0 "the journal of science." in january of this year, "science" published the response to this initial letter and it reads in part, and i want to put 14:49:57.8 this forward because i think it's important that we put forward here the context of the adult stem cell treatment that has yielded so many human treatments today. but i want to make sure to put this -- this context forward. in their letter adult stem cell 14:50:14.2 treatments for diseases -- i'm quoting from this letter in "science," -- "s. smith eta.l. claim we misrepresented a list of treatments benefiting patients but it is the letter's author who represent our and the published literature dismissing 14:50:30.3 the many scientists and patients who have shown the benefits of stem cells. we have stated that adult stem cell applications have helped, benefited and improved patient conditions. smith et al. repeatedly notes patient improvement from these cells. so they agreed. 14:50:45.2 we've never stated that these treatments are generally available, cures or fully tested in all required phases of clinical trials and approved by the u.s. food and drug administration. some studies do not require prior f.d.a. approval. and even the nine supposedly fully approved treatments acknowledged by smith e tal. 14:51:03.0 would not be considered cures or generally available to the public at this stage of research. insist theans no benefit is real -- insistence that no benefit is real until after f.d.a. approval is misplaced. such approval is not a medical standard to evaluate patient benefit but an's determination 14:51:18.9 that benefits outweigh risks in a broad class of patients. patients use an evidentiary standard. our list of 72 applications is come piled from peer-reviewed articles -- compiled from peer-reviewed articles" -- 14:51:32.9 that's part of what i just showed people in the binder -- "documents observable and measurable benefit to patients, a necessary step towards formal f.d.a. approval, and what is expected of new, cutting-edge medical applications." end of quote from that letter. as this debate moves forward, i look forward to sharing the 14:51:50.2 stories of some of the real patients who've benefited from ethical adult stem cell research. and i want to note, we need more patients treated. we have more patients that need treatment. we have an area of high yield of federal dollar investment of 14:52:05.5 where it should go, and we don't have the ethical barriers and we should be putting that money there. 72-0. that's the score. there are at least 72 human treatments and applications using adult stem cells. there are no human treatments 14:52:21.7 with embryonic stem cells and with the rate of tumor formation, which i previously noted, none seem to be on the horizon. this is acknowledged by some scientists. notably, "science" carried a piece in 2005 which the authors note -- quote -- "the clinical 14:52:38.2 benefits of the research are years or maybe decades away. this is a message that desperate families and patients will not want to hear." and yet we do have a message that desperate families and patients do want to hear and that is that we have treatments 14:52:53.7 on the horizon and we do in the adult and cord blood and amniotic fluid. we need the research money to do it. a harvard stem cell research, david shiwitz wrote in a 2005 14:53:11.1 "washington post" op-ed -- quote -- "while stem cell advocates have helped voters connect embryonic stem cell research with compelling images of patients who might one day benefit from treatment, such therapies are unlikely to emerge soon enough to benefit most 14:53:25.3 current proponents. scientists must do a better job of articulating the limitations of our existing knowledge, taking care to emphasize not only the ultimate therapeutic potential of these cells but also how far we are from achieving such therapies. which road will we choose? 14:53:44.1 will we choose the ethical adult stem cell road that both holds great promise and is currently producing treatments? or will we choose the unethical embryonic stem cell road that tramples on human dignity and has produced tumors to date? 14:54:06.9 that is the point of the discussion. mr. president, this is not just an academic discussion nor is it just a policy discussion. it's involving real people. 14:54:18.5 i showed you one person that was a real person. i started off with talking about david fagey who is excited about being alive. let me show you another one, jackie rabone. a paraplegic. i met jackie last year. 14:54:35.1 she's continued to improve. i want to share her story with you. she lives in central illinois. she had come to d.c. last year with her mother and sister because she wanted to tout her successful adult stem cell treatment. the courage of jackie and many 14:54:49.4 others like her truly is amazing. three years earlier as an active 16-year-old, she was paralyzed in an automobile accident. 14:54:58.5 as the car was flipping multiple times, jackie was thrown from the vehicle and landed on her back on a country road. her dreams of earning a volleyball scholarship to college were shattered. in a letter sent to me last 14:55:11.9 year, jackie wrote this: "that day changed my outlook. my future aspirations and my complete life. before the accident, i was a very active 16-year-old. i played volleyball in school and was very good. i had hopes of going to college on a volleyball scholarship. 14:55:28.7 i truly was living a nightmare after this tragedy. i really thought my life was over. i couldn't imagine not playing volleyball anymore, jumping on my trampoline with my young nephew, chasing after my niece or just taking a walk around my small community. 14:55:44.1 not only does something like this change the victim but it also disrupts and seriously affects your family. i spent a little over a month in the hospital. i had back surgery to stabilize my back. i had a fracture of the t-12 area which made me a paraplegic. i have no feeling below the 14:56:00.9 belly button. hi to learn to become independent again. i had to lesh to dress, eat, transfer from place to place -- learn to dress, eat, transfer from place to place and take care of my personal hygiene and toiletry issues. it was very difficult and i struggled with these once simple task. 14:56:15.8 after i accomplished these, i was released and allowed to come home. i would simply told, 'you'll never walk again.' that was my prognosis." she continues, "i got back to school a few months later and that was another adjustment. everything looks and works differently when you're sitting in a wheelchair. 14:56:31.3 hi to deal with a lot of depression and sadness. but i tried to continue with my life the best way that i could. i truly believe that my faith got me through. if it wasn't for this amazing love of god and my strong will and determination, i don't know if i could have proceeded with 14:56:46.9 what my life had become. but i have great determination along with the comforting faith. i didn't intend on giving up that easily. i wanted to give life another opportunity with my new lifestyle." mr. president, can you imagine 14:57:02.3 the anguish of being a 16-year-old, your whole life in front of you and then being confronted that sort of tragedy? jackie was very fortunate, however. blessed to have so many people who were looking out for her. her pastor saw a pbs show called 14:57:20.1 "the miracle cell" about a procedure called olefactory few coases transplantation being done in portugal by dr. carlos lima. portugal. the work involved transplanting adult stem cells from spinal 14:57:33.2 cord patients' own sinus area into their spinal cord at the initial injury sight. this gave jackie real hope. continuing her letter, she wrote this: "i listened to amazing recovery of returned sensation, even the ability to walk again with continued rehab from others 14:57:49.7 having this surgery. i remember thinking, that's my chance. i knew i wanted to pursue this possibility for me. my mom and i started researching this procedure on the internet and collected as much information as we could. we discovered a spinal cord injury institute getting ready to open in detroit, michigan, that summer. 14:58:05.7 this institute was closely associated with dr. lima. we called to see if we could get an appointment to go and meet dr. steve hinderer and ask about the procedure in-depth and inquire about my chances of getting it done. i did go to detroit and was told that i could well be a good candidate. 14:58:21.2 i was given the guidelines and criteria for having this done. after many months of additional testing, x-rays, et cetera, i was accepted. this was very exhilarating for me. i had read about the success stories of the individuals that had gone before me. their various success stories gave me so much hope. 14:58:38.1 i had so much support from my family, friends, church, community and surrounding areas to raise the $50,000 needed to have this surgery. without this overwhelming support, i could not have gone forward with this incredible opportunity. i went to portugal in october 2005." 14:58:56.0 again, portugal and not the united states, for this adult stem cell therapy. "i had the procedure done on october 29. my experience in portugal was not all pleasant. my mom and hi to deal with with the language barrier and the unfamiliar culture. i returned to the states on 14:59:09.8 november 5. i rested at home for a few weeks, then went to detroit to the institute for aggressive rehabilitation. rehab was very tiring and indeed very congresssive. it was an exhausting experience but a very rewarding one. it was there that i took my first steps on the parallel bars. 14:59:26.8 i was up. my progress since undergoing the surgery has been amazing. i have a lot of hip movement, some tingling and heffiness in my legs. i have continued with my rehab regime at home. i have leg braces that were for 14:59:43.7 it me. i can walk on parallel bars and i began walking with a walker. i am up and on my feet again. that's the most satisfying feeling. unless you've been confined in a 14:59:57.6 wheelchair for an extended amount of time, you can't really know how rewarding it is to be standing again. this brings me to the ongoing debate over adult stem cell research. i did not think a lot about this issue before the accident, but
SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE HEARING ON BIG OIL COMPANIES 1100
Senate Finance Committee hearing on Oil and Gas Tax Incentives and Rising Energy Prices with John Watson, chairman and CEO of Chevron, Marvin Odum, US President of Shell, H. Lamar McKay, Chairman and President of BP, James Mulva, Chairman and CEO of ConocoPhillips and Rex Tillerson, chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil 11:00:02 SEN. JAY ROCKEFELLER: AND TALK ABOUT HAVING TO MOVE OVERSEAS, ET CETERA. 11:00:05 HOW MUCH PROFIT ON A BARREL OF OIL DO YOU HAVE TO MAKE TO NOT 11:00:11 BE NEEDFUL OF THESE SUBSIDIES THAT WE THINK YOU DON'T NEED BUT 11:00:16 YOU SAY YOUR LIFE DEPENDS ON? AT SOME POINT, YOU KNOW, YOU 11:00:26 WOULDN'T NEED THE SUBSIDIES. I THINK YOU'RE THERE ALREADY. 11:00:29 BUT YOU DON'T. SO AT WHAT POINT DO YOU THINK 11:00:31 YOU DON'T NEED THESE SUBSIDIES? AS WE'VE DESCRIBED, WE DON'T 11:00:36 RECEIVE SUBSIDIES, SENATOR. WHAT WE DO REQUIRE IS A 11:00:39 REASONABLE RETURN ON OUR INVESTED CAPITAL. 11:00:41 AND I WOULD TELL YOU THAT I DON'T THINK THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 11:00:43 WANT SHARED SACRIFICE. I THINK THEY WANT SHARED 11:00:45 PROSPERITY. AND WHAT WE HAVE TO -- 11:00:49 OH -- WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER -- 11:00:50 LOVELY STATEMENT. BUT DO YOU UNDERSTAND HOW OUT OF 11:00:54 TOUCH THAT IS? WE DON'T GET TO SHARED 11:00:58 PROSPERITY UNTIL WE GET TO SHARED SACRIFICE. 11:01:01 UNABLE TO WORK TODAY BECAUSE WE CAN'T RECEIVE DRILLING 11:01:05 PERMITS OR THERE ARE LEASES NOT BEING MADE AVAILABLE. 11:01:07 THEY FEEL THAT. WHAT ABOUT THE FACT THAT IN 11:01:10 THE CASE OF EXXON MOBIL THAT YOUR EFFECTIVE FEDERAL TAX RATE 11:01:18 IS 3% LOWER THAN WHAT THE AVERAGE INDIVIDUAL FEDERAL TAX 11:01:23 RATE IS? DOES THAT MEAN ANYTHING TO YOU? 11:01:26 WELL, FIRST, SENATOR, I WANT TO ASSURE YOU, I'M NOT OUT OF 11:01:30 TOUCH, AT ALL. AND WE DO UNDERSTAND THE BIG 11:01:32 PICTURE, AND WE UNDERSTAND THE ENORMOUS CHALLENGES CONFRONTING 11:01:36 THE AMERICAN PEOPLE WITH RESPECT TO THIS ENORMOUS DEFICIT THAT 11:01:40 HAS TO BE DEALT WITH. AND ULTIMATELY IT'S GOT TO BE 11:01:42 DEALT WITH IN A VERY LARGE WAY. AND SO I'LL JUST ACKNOWLEDGE 11:01:46 THAT WE ARE WELL AWARE OF THAT. MY EFFECTIVE UNITED STATES 11:01:52 INCOME TAX RATE ON MY UNITED STATES INCOME FROM 2005 TO 2010 11:01:56 WAS 32%. NOW, IF YOU LOOK AT ANY 11:02:02 INDIVIDUAL YEAR, IT COULD BE AS LOW AS A SINGLE DIGIT, AS HIGH 11:02:05 AS 38% TO 39%. BECAUSE WE DON'T SETTLE OUR 11:02:09 TAXES IN -- FOR THAT YEAR IN THAT YEAR. 11:02:12 WE HAVE TAX FILINGS THAT ARE OPEN FOR MULTIPLE YEARS. 11:02:16 AS WE RESOLVE ISSUES WITH THE IRS, THEY ARE RECOGNIZED IN THE 11:02:20 YEAR WE FILE. SOME IN SOME AREAS WHEN OUR 11:02:23 TAXES APPEAR LOW, WE HAVE RECOGNIZED CLOSING OF ISSUES 11:02:27 WHERE WE OVERPAY. AND I UNDERSTAND. 11:02:30 BUT STILL YOU UNDERSTAND THE AVERAGE AMERICAN'S FEELING THAT 11:02:35 OVER BETWEEN 2008 AND 2010, YOUR EFFECTIVE TAX RATE WAS ABOUT 11:02:42 17%. AND THEIRS WAS ABOUT 20%? 11:02:45 FROM 2005 TO 2010, OUR EFFECTIVE TAX RATE IS RIGHT AT 11:02:48 32%. THAT LEADS ME TO THE NEXT 11:02:52 ROUND OF QUESTIONS. WE HAVE THOSE. 11:02:56 THANK YOU, SENATOR. SENATOR? 11:03:05 THANK YOU, CHAIRMAN. THIS REALLY IS ABOUT OUR 11:03:08 PRIORITIES AS A COUNTRY. AND IN A TIME OF TREMENDOUS 11:03:12 CHALLENGES AND DEFICITS, WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO REVIEW 11:03:15 EVERYTHING. AND TAXPAYERS ARE EXPECTING US 11:03:21 TO ASK TOUGH QUESTIONS AND DETERMINE PRIORITIES AND LOOK AT 11:03:24 WHAT'S NEEDED AND NOT NEEDED. WORK, DOESN'T WORK. 11:03:27 THAT'S OUR JOB. AND WHEN WE LOOK AT THE FACT 11:03:31 THAT IT WAS 1916 WHEN ONE OF THESE TAX SUBSIDIES THAT WE'RE 11:03:35 TALKING ABOUT REPEALING WAS PUT INTO PLACE. 11:03:38 DEDUCTION FOR INTANGIBLE DRILLING AND DEVELOPMENT COSTS 11:03:42 AND IT WAS ROUGHLY $15 TO $17 A BARREL FOR OIL AT THAT TIME. 11:03:47 I'M SURE YOU WOULD AGREE THAT THINGS HAVE CHANGED SINCE THEN. 11:03:51 AND IT'S VERY APPROPRIATE TO LOOK AT WHETHER OR NOT WHEN WE 11:03:54 WERE DEVELOPING THEN AND CREATING THE INDUSTRIAL 11:03:57 REVOLUTION, WHICH WE'RE VERY PROUD TO HAVE LED IN MICHIGAN. 11:04:01 WHETHER OR NOT NOW WHEN YOU FAST FORWARD IT'S NOT $17 IT'S $100 11:04:05 OR MORE AND WE'RE IN A VERY DIFFERENT POSITION IN TERMS OF 11:04:10 SUCCESS IN CORPORATE PROFITS. DOES IT MAKES SENSE FOR 11:04:14 TAXPAYERS TO SUBSIDIZE WHAT YOU'RE DOING? 11:04:16 NOT THAT WE DON'T WANT YOU TO BE SUCCESSFUL. 11:04:19 DOES IT MAKE SENSE FOR TAXPAYERS TO SUBSIDIZE WHAT YOU'RE DOING. 11:04:21 AND ESSENTIALLY FOLKS IN MICHIGAN FEEL LIKE THEY'RE 11:04:24 GETTING HIT TWICE. PAYING THE HIGH PRICE AT THE 11:04:27 PUMP, THERE'S NOT ENOUGH COMPETITION WHERE THEY CAN 11:04:30 CHOOSE NOT TO PAY YOUR PRICES. AND AT THE SAME TIME, THEY'RE 11:04:32 TURNING AROUND AND PAYING OUT OF POCKET, AS WELL. 11:04:34 AND SO PEOPLE ARE EXTREMELY CONCERNED WHEN WE HAVE TO MAKE 11:04:40 CHOICES ABOUT WHETHER OR NOT THESE SUBSIDIES ARE WORKING 11:04:44 RIGHT NOW. AND SO THE QUESTION I WOULD HAVE 11:04:46 WHEN WE LOOK AT THE FACT THAT -- YOU JUST LOOK AT THE LAST THREE 11:04:49 MONTHS AND THE CORPORATE PROFITS TOGETHER THAT ALL OF YOU HAVE 11:04:55 MADE, THE HIGHEST CORPORATE PROFITS I THINK EVER, AND THE 11:04:58 FACT THAT THE TAXPAYER SUBSIDIES ARE 1% TO 2% OF THAT PROFIT. 11:05:06 AND THAT'S THE REALITY. IT'S 1% TO 2% OF ALL YOUR 11:05:10 PROFITS. AND YOU'RE NOW SAYING IN LIGHT 11:05:12 OF MASSIVE DEFICITS, AND YOU HAVE MASSIVE PROFITS, THAT 11:05:15 TAXPAYERS SHOULD KEEP PROVIDING 1% TO 2% OF YOUR PROFITS OR 11:05:21 YOU'RE GOING TO RAISE GAS PRICES AGAIN. 11:05:23 SO MY QUESTION IS THE OPPOSITE. AND I'D LIKE EACH OF YOU TO 11:05:28 ANSWER. WHAT WOULD IT TAKE IN LEVEL OF 11:05:31 TAXPAYER SUBSIDIES FOR YOU TO BRING OUR GAS PRICES DOWN? 11:05:37 WELL, FIRST, IT'S NOT A SUBSIDY, IT'S A LEGITIMATE TAX 11:05:41 DEDUCTION. AND I THINK, AGAIN, IMPORTANT 11:05:42 QUESTION IS WHAT IS NECESSARY TO DEVELOP ADDITIONAL SUPPLY IN 11:05:50 THIS COUNTRY? WHAT WOULD IT TAKE? 11:05:53 IT'S 1% TO 2% RIGHT NOW. WHAT DO WE HAVE TO PAY YOU -- 11:05:58 THE DRILLING COST STRUCTURE IS STRUCTURED TO INCENTIVIZE AND 11:06:02 HELP PEOPLE GO OUT AND INVEST IN THE NEXT INCREMENTAL BARREL OF 11:06:05 SUPPLY. AND IN THIS COUNTRY, TODAY THAT 11:06:08 IS LARGELY COMING FROM THE SHALE RESOURCES. 11:06:13 I APPRECIATE THAT. WELL, I'M TRYING TO ANSWER 11:06:15 YOUR QUESTION. IF YOU DON'T WANT THE 11:06:20 INCREMENTAL SUPPLY, YOU MAKE THE TAX STRUCTURE HIGHER AND IT 11:06:23 DOESN'T GET DEVELOPED. THE 1% TO 2% WE'RE TALKING 11:06:26 ABOUT -- IT'S A BIG DEAL FOR TAXPAYERS, BY THE WAY. 11:06:29 WHEN WE'RE LOOKING AT A COLLEAGUE -- WANTING TO 11:06:34 ELIMINATE MEDICARE AS WE KNOW IT. 11:06:37 AND WE HAVE TO MAKE CHOICES HERE. 11:06:39 CERTAINLY NOT GOING TO SUPPORT THAT. 11:06:40 THE QUESTION IS, WHAT'S EFFECTIVE? 11:06:41 WHAT WORKS? IT'S REALLY NOT CREDIBLE TO SAY 11:06:48 THAT YOU'RE GOING TO RAISE GAS PRICES SIMPLY BECAUSE WE ARE 11:06:52 ASKING YOU TO FORGO 1% TO 2% OF YOUR PROFIT. 11:06:57 BUT IF YOU ARE SAYING THAT, AND YOU'RE GOING TO RAISE OUR 11:07:00 PRICES, AND RIGHT NOW THERE'S NOT ENOUGH COMPETITION, WE'RE 11:07:04 HELD HOSTAGE. NOT ENOUGH COMPETITION FOR US TO 11:07:06 DEAL WITH THAT. WE TAKE AWAY 1% OR 2% OF YOUR 11:07:11 PROFITS. AND YOU'RE SAYING THAT WILL 11:07:13 CAUSE US TO RAISE OUR PRICES AGAIN. 11:07:15 WHAT WILL GET YOU TO LOWER IN TERMS OF THE SUBSIDY. 11:07:18 IF TAKING AWAY 1% TO 2% WILL CAUSE YOU TO RAISE PRICES, GIVE 11:07:23 YOU 4%, 5%? HOW MUCH MORE DO WE HAVE TO GIVE 11:07:26 YOU? WE DID NOT -- I DID NOT SAY 11:07:29 WE WOULD BE RAISING PRICES AT THE PUMP. 11:07:35 I DIDN'T REALLY HEAR ANYONE ELSE -- 11:07:37 THERE WAS A -- IT REALLY IS ABOUT -- IF WE 11:07:41 WANT TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM BY GETTING SOME MORE SUPPLY 11:07:43 DEVELOPED, WHICH ALSO IN THIS COUNTRY WILL GENERATE ADDITIONAL 11:07:47 REVENUES FOR THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND WILL RELIEVE THE 11:07:52 PRICE PRESSURE IN THE YEAR TO COME. 11:07:54 THAT'S THE ROLE THAT THE TAX STRUCTURE PLAYS. 11:07:56 I UNDERSTAND THAT, AND BEFORE MY TIME RUNS OUT. 11:08:00 I'M NOT BEING DISRESPECTFUL, BUT LET ME JUST SAY, WE HAVE TO 11:08:04 DECIDE WHERE IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE PLACE TO INVEST 11:08:08 TAXPAYER DOLLARS THAT ARE VERY HARD TO COME BY RIGHT NOW? 11:08:14 PEOPLE IN MY STATE WANT US TO STRETCH EVERY SINGLE DOLLAR AND 11:08:18 LOOK FOR THE MOST EFFECTIVE AND NEEDED SUPPORT IN SUBSIDY. 11:08:21 AND VERY QUICKLY, WHAT, YOU KNOW, HOW MUCH DO WE HAVE TO 11:08:26 GIVE YOU IN ADDITIONAL TAX SUBSIDIES IN ORDER TO BRING 11:08:28 PRICES DOWN? SENATOR, WE'RE NOT -- WE'RE 11:08:32 NOT ASKING FOR TAX SUBSIDIES OR INCENTIVES. 11:08:34 WHAT WE'RE ASKING FOR IS ACCESS TO PUT OUR PEOPLE BACK TO WORK 11:08:39 WITH THE OPPORTUNITY TO START DRILLING ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE. 11:08:42 BY DRILLING, MORE DRILLING, WE WILL CREATE JOBS AND WE WILL 11:08:46 CREATE MORE SUPPLY. THAT'S THE BEST THING WE CAN DO. 11:08:49 I APPRECIATE THAT. AND WE'RE HOPING THAT THE 60 11:08:53 MILLION ACRES YOU'VE GOTTEN IN LEASE YOU'LL BE ABLE TO DO THAT 11:08:57 MORE. I'M SORRY, MR. CHAIRMAN, I KNOW 11:08:58 I'M OUT OF TIME. IF THE ANSWER COULD BE VERY 11:09:04 BRIEF. WE'RE NOT ASKING FOR 11:09:07 SUBSIDIES, ANY INCREASE IN TAXES WILL NOT BE CONSISTENT WITH 11:09:12 INCREASING INVESTMENT FOR ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 11:09:15 THE CURRENT -- 15 SECONDS. 15. 11:09:22 THE CURRENT U.S. TAX STRUCTURE IS COMPETITIVE. 11:09:25 THAT'S A GOOD THING, CHANGING THAT WILL DRIVE INVESTMENT AWAY, 11:09:28 THAT'S A FACT. IF I COULD LEAVE ONE POINT IN 11:09:31 TIME POINT WITH THE ENTIRE COMMITTEE IT'S THAT TO LOOK 11:09:37 WITH -- TO CREATE THE ADDITIONAL REVENUE INTO THE FEDERAL 11:09:40 GOVERNMENT, WHICH WILL HELP WITH THE LONG-TERM DEFICIT ISSUE. 11:09:42 THAT'S THE REAL OPPORTUNITY. SENATOR NELSON? 11:09:47 GOOD MORNING, GENTLEMEN. THE AMERICAN CONSUMER NATURALLY 11:09:56 IS QUITE CONCERNED WHEN THEY GO TO THE PUMP AND PUMP GAS. 11:10:02 AND WHAT THEY'RE CONCERNED ABOUT IS THEY SEE THE PRICE OF THE 11:10:07 BARREL OF OIL GOING UP. AND SEE THE PRICE OF THE GALLON 11:10:15 OF GAS THEY'RE PUMPING GO UP. AND THEN WHEN THAT PRICE OF 11:10:18 BARREL OF OIL STARTS COMING DOWN, THEY DON'T SEE THE 11:10:29 LOWERING OF THAT PRICE THEY'RE PAYING PER GALLON AT THE PUMP. 11:10:34 AND SO THEY NOTICE THAT BACK IN 2008 THAT THE PRICE SHOT UP TO 11:10:44 $147 A BARREL AND WHILE THEY'RE PUMPING GAS, IT RAISES TO $4 A 11:10:52 GALLON, AND NOW THEY SEE THE PRICE AT AROUND $100 A BARREL, 11:10:59 AND THEY'RE STILL PAYING $4 AT THE PUMP. 11:11:06 SO I WANT TO ASK THAT QUESTION ON BEHALF OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 11:11:09 THAT ARE PUMPING GAS IN THEIR CARS. 11:11:19 WELL, IT'S A QUESTION OF THE SUPPLY CHAIN. 11:11:22 IT TAKES THE AVERAGE TIME FOR CRUDE OIL PRODUCED OVERSEAS TO 11:11:27 REACH AMERICAN REFINERIES SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 30 DAYS AND 45 11:11:32 DAYS, THAT'S TRANSIT TIME. YOU HAVE OIL IN THE REFINERY 11:11:35 ALREADY BOUGHT AND PAID FOR AT SOME PRICE, YOU HAVE GASOLINE 11:11:38 AND PRODUCTS THAT ARE IN INVENTORY THAT HAVE ALREADY BEEN 11:11:40 BOUGHT AND PAID FOR AT SOME PRICE, WHICH ULTIMATELY 11:11:44 DELIVERED OR THE YOUR LOCAL SERVICE STATION WHERE THE 11:11:46 CONSUMER PULLS UP TO THE PUMP AND BUYS IT. 11:11:48 SO WHEN THE PRICE CHANGES ON THAT RAW MATERIAL IN CRUDE OIL, 11:11:52 THAT PRICE HAS TO MAKE ITS WAY THROUGH THAT WHOLE SUPPLY CHAIN. 11:11:54 NOW, WHEN THE PRICE IS GOING UP, THE RETAILER WHO OWNS THE 11:11:59 STATION AND OPERATES ON A VERY, VERY THIN CASH FLOW, AND THE 11:12:05 VAST MAJORITY OF SERVICE STATIONS ARE NOT OWNED BY US, 11:12:08 INDIVIDUAL BUSINESS OWNERS OR DISTRIBUTORS. 11:12:10 THEY HAVE TO THINK ABOUT WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN TO MY CASH FLOW 11:12:13 AS THIS PRICE MOVES THROUGH. SO THEY DO BEGIN TO PRICE UP IN 11:12:17 ADVANCE OF THE ACTUAL HIGHER COST OF BARRELS GETTING TO THEM 11:12:20 IN ORDER TO ENSURE THEY'VE GOT SUFFICIENT CASH FLOW TO BUY THE 11:12:24 NEXT TANKER WAGON THAT HAS TO DELIVER. 11:12:27 SO THAT'S WHY GOING UP -- AS MOST BUSINESS PEOPLE DO, THEY'RE 11:12:31 GOING TO CHASE IT A LITTLE FASTER ON THE WAY UP. 11:12:36 AND COMING DOWN, THEY HAVE TO RECOVER WHAT THEY'VE SPENT. 11:12:41 UNTIL THOSE ACTUAL BARRELS MAKE THEIR WAY THROUGH THE SYSTEM, 11:12:44 THROUGH THE PUMP, THE CONSUMER'S NOT GOING TO SEE IT. 11:12:47 AND TYPICALLY, THAT MAY TAKE SOMEWHERE BETWEEN TWO OR THREE 11:12:52 WEEKS. I ANTICIPATED THAT THAT WOULD 11:12:55 BE THE ANSWER. AND I APPRECIATE THAT. 11:12:57 BUT THE PERSON THAT'S PUMPING THE GAS IS SAYING, WAIT A 11:13:01 MINUTE, TODAY I'M PAYING $4 FOR A GALLON OF GAS AND OIL IS 11:13:07 SELLING AT $100 A BARREL, BUT THREE YEARS AGO I WAS PAYING $4 11:13:12 FOR A GALLON OF GAS AND OIL WAS SELLING AT $147 A BARREL. 11:13:18 WHY? WELL, THE $147 PRICE DIDN'T 11:13:27 LAST VERY LONG. AND YOU REMEMBER WHAT HAPPENED 11:13:29 SHORTLY AFTER. IT PLUMMETED TO THE $30s. 11:13:35 THAT IS THE NATURE. IT IS THE NATURE OF THIS 11:13:38 COMMODITY WHICH HAS AN EXTREME AMOUNT OF VOLATILITY IN IT. 11:13:42 WHY IT MOVES IN THAT WIDE OF RANGE, WE COULD HAVE AN ENTIRE 11:13:45 HEARING ON THAT SUBJECT. AND I WOULD SAY THAT THERE'S 11:13:50 A PART TO THE SPECULATION THAT ADDS TO THAT OF PEOPLE WHO DON'T 11:13:55 USE THE OIL. BUT MR. McKAY, LET ME REGISTER A 11:14:03 DIFFERENCE OF OPINION WITH BP. YOU ALL IN YOUR FINANCIAL REPORT 11:14:09 IN THE FOURTH QUARTER OF LAST YEAR ANNOUNCED THAT THE GULF OIL 11:14:14 SPILL RESPONSE COSTS WERE GOING TO BE APPROXIMATELY $41 BILLION, 11:14:19 AND THAT YOU REPORTED A TAX CREDIT OF ALMOST $12 BILLION. 11:14:29 NOW, FOR ACTIVITIES THAT CAUSED SUCH HARM, DOES IT NOT SEEM 11:14:37 WRONG THAT YOU WOULD TAKE AS A TAX CREDIT, LESSENING YOUR 11:14:43 TAXES, DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR ON THE PAYMENTS THAT YOU'RE PAYING OUT 11:14:46 TO MAKE PEOPLE'S LIVES RIGHT? LET ME FIRST JUST COMMENT 11:14:55 THAT WE PLEDGED ALL ALONG TO MEET EVERY COMMITMENT UNDER THE 11:14:59 LAW WITH THE ACCIDENT AND THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE 11:15:04 ACCIDENT. THE $41 BILLION IS A FINANCIAL 11:15:08 CHARGE. WE DID NOT TAKE A $12 BILLION 11:15:10 CREDIT. WE WILL BE FOLLOWING THE LAW, 11:15:15 FOLLOWING THE TAX CODE IN TERMS OF WRITING ALL STANDARD BUSINESS 11:15:19 EXPENSES AS THEY OCCUR. SO YOU CONSIDER THESE A 11:15:23 STANDARD BUSINESS, EXPENSES THAT YOU THINK THAT MORALLY YOU'RE 11:15:26 ENTITLED TO TAKE AS A TAX CREDIT? 11:15:28 THE ONES THAT ARE UNDER THE TAX CODE AS STANDARD BUSINESS 11:15:34 EXPENSES, YES. AND WE WILL NOT WRITE ALL THINGS 11:15:36 THAT ARE NOT UNDER THE STANDARD BUSINESS EXPENSES. 11:15:39 YOU KNOW, IT'S INTERESTING THAT THE BOEING COMPANY, WHEN 11:15:41 THEY HAD THOSE KIND OF PAYMENTS, THEY DIDN'T TAKE THEM AS A TAX 11:15:45 CREDIT. IT WAS ALSO WHAT WAS THE OTHER 11:15:52 COMPANY? GOLDMAN SACHS? 11:15:54 SAME THING. THEY DID NOT BECAUSE OF THE 11:15:59 SENSITIVITY, THE WRONG DOING THAT OCCURRED. 11:16:03 SURELY THE GULF OIL SPILL WAS AS A RESULT OF WRONG DOING. 11:16:09 AND YET YOU WANT TO CLAIM THAT AS A TAX CREDIT. 11:16:11 NOW, I JUST WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT I RESPECTFULLY DISAGREE 11:16:14 WITH YOUR POSITION. AND I WOULD URGE THE CHAIRMAN 11:16:18 AND THE RANKING REMEMBER TO CONSIDER AS WE -- HE MAY BE 11:16:23 ENTITLED THIS UNDER THE LAW. BUT THAT DOESN'T MAKE IT RIGHT. 11:16:29 AND I WOULD ASK RESPECTIVELY TO THE CHAIRMAN THAT WE CONSIDER 11:16:33 CHANGING THE LAW TO FOLLOW THE EXAMPLE SET BY BOEING AND 11:16:37 GOLDMAN SACHS. WELL, SENATOR, WE CERTAINLY 11:16:45 WILL CONSIDER IT. ANY REQUEST MADE. 11:16:54 YES, THANK YOU VERY MUCH. GENTLEMEN, THANK YOU FOR JOINING 11:16:56 US TODAY. ABOUT A MONTH AGO SITTING RIGHT 11:17:02 IN THE MIDDLE THERE, THE MAN WHO USED TO BE THE CHAIRMAN OF THE 11:17:08 FEDERAL RESERVE. WE WERE TALKING ABOUT DEFICIT 11:17:12 REDUCTION AND ASKING A GROUP OF REALLY SMART PEOPLE WHAT THEY 11:17:15 THOUGHT WE OUGHT TO BE DOING. AND I THINK IT WAS HIM WHO SAID 11:17:20 THE GORILLA IN THE ROOM ARE HEALTH CARE COSTS. 11:17:28 HE SAID THAT'S THE 800-POUND GORILLA IN THE ROOM. 11:17:31 AND I FOLLOWED UP HIS COMMENT BY SAYING, WELL, WITH RESPECT TO 11:17:35 HEALTH CARE COSTS, CONTAINMENT, AND GETTING THE BETTER RESULT OF 11:17:38 LESS MONEY, WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE? AND I DON'T KNOW MUCH ABOUT 11:17:41 THAT. BUT HE SAID AS A LAYPERSON, I 11:17:43 WOULD JUST SAY THIS, FIND OUT WHAT WORKS AND DO MORE OF THAT. 11:17:48 THAT'S WHAT HE SAID. FIND OUT WHAT WORKS, DO MORE OF 11:17:52 THAT. DEMOCRATIC SENATORS OVER AT THE 11:17:55 WHITE HOUSE YESTERDAY WITH THE REPUBLICANS AND THE PRESIDENT. 11:18:01 AND I SHARED WITH HIM THE COMMENTS, WHICH I THINK ARE NOT 11:18:05 ONLY APPROPRIATE FOR HEALTH CARE, BUT REALLY FOR THE WAY WE 11:18:09 SPEND MONEY ALL THROUGHOUT THE GOVERNMENT. 11:18:11 AND MY OWN VIEW IS -- AND I SHARED THIS. 11:18:16 I SAID I THINK WE NEED TO LOOK IN EVERY NOOK AND CRANNY OF THE 11:18:22 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. ALL OUR DOMESTIC PROGRAMS, 11:18:24 DEFENSE PROGRAMS, ENTITLEMENT PROGRAMS, TAX EXPENDITURES AND 11:18:28 REALLY ASK THIS QUESTION. THERE'S A WAY TO GET BETTER 11:18:30 RESULTS FOR LESS MONEY OR BETTER RESULTS FOR MAYBE THE SAME 11:18:34 AMOUNT OF MONEY. AND WE NEED TO CHANGE OUR 11:18:37 CULTURE AND GOVERNMENT. AND THAT IS TO FOCUS ON A 11:18:43 CULTURE -- FROM SPENDTHRIFT TO A CULTURE OF THRIFT. 11:18:46 WHEN IT COMES TO TAX EXPENDITURES, WE NEED TO DO THE 11:18:49 SAME THING. AND THERE IS A STRONG BELIEF IN 11:18:54 THIS COUNTRY. YOU'VE CERTAINLY HEARD IT HERE 11:18:57 TODAY THAT SOME OF THE TAX EXPENDITURES THAT RELATE TO YOUR 11:19:00 INDUSTRY DON'T NECESSARILY GET THE BEST RESULT, THE AMOUNT OF 11:19:03 MONEY THAT'S BEING LOST TO THE TREASURY. 11:19:06 WE'RE GOING TO VOTE ON LEGISLATION, I THINK, AUTHORED 11:19:14 BY SENATOR MENENDEZ. BUT LATER THIS YEAR, WE'LL BE 11:19:18 VOTING ON AN EFFORT TO TRY TO TRIM THE BUDGET OVER THE NEXT 11:19:23 TEN YEARS AND LARGELY ON THE SPENDING SIDE. 11:19:25 MAYBE $3 OF SPENDING FOR EVERY $1 OF REVENUE. 11:19:30 ENTITLEMENTS WILL BE ON THE TABLE. 11:19:32 DEFENSE SPENDING, TAX EXPENDITURES ON THE TABLE. 11:19:36 AND I WOULD SAY TO YOU THAT WHEN THE VOTE OCCURS NEXT WEEK AND WE 11:19:41 DON'T GET 60 VOTES, THAT SHOULDN'T BE THE END OF THIS 11:19:44 CONVERSATION. AND WE SHOULD CONTINUE TO HAVE A 11:19:47 CONVERSATION SO WE CAN FIGURE OUT HOW DO WE GET A BETTER 11:19:50 RESULT FOR LESS MONEY? REALLY HOW DO WE GET A BETTER 11:19:52 BANG FOR THE TAXPAYER'S DOLLAR. AND YOUR INDUSTRY NEEDS TO BE 11:19:59 INVOLVED IN THAT, AS WELL. IF I WERE IN YOUR BUSINESS -- I 11:20:02 DON'T PRETEND TO BE OR UNDERSTAND IT ESPECIALLY WELL, 11:20:05 BUT I WOULDN'T CONSIDER MYSELF AN OIL COMPANY. 11:20:08 AND I WOULD CONSIDER MYSELF AN ENERGY COMPANY. 11:20:10 AND MY BELIEF IS THAT WHAT YOU DO, MOST OF YOU DO THAT. 11:20:13 AND I WOULD LIKE TO YOU TO TALK TO US ABOUT THE EFFORTS YOU'RE 11:20:19 UNDERTAKING IN YOUR COMPANIES TO MOVE US TOWARD SOURCES OF ENERGY 11:20:24 THAT IMPAIR HEALTH LESS THAN OIL DOES. 11:20:27 THAT ENABLE US TO COME UP WITH TWO TECHNOLOGIES THAT WE CAN 11:20:33 SELL AND MANUFACTURE AROUND THE WORLD. 11:20:35 GO DOWN THE LIST. AND DO YOU WANT TO GO FIRST AND 11:20:38 JUST TELL US WHAT YOU'RE DOING TO HELP US? 11:20:42 TO DEVELOP RENEWABLES, NONPOLLUTING FORMS OF ENERGY, 11:20:45 AND WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP YOU THERE? 11:20:48 WELL, I AGREE WHOLE HEARTEDLY ON YOUR COMMENTS ON THE DEFICIT. 11:20:55 AND ALL OF THESE THINGS WE'RE TALKING ABOUT TODAY SHOULD BE ON 11:20:57 THE TABLE IN COMPREHENSIVE TAX REFORM. 11:21:01 AS TO WHAT WE'RE DOING IN DEVELOPING ALTERNATIVE FUELS. 11:21:05 AND WE HAVE CONCENTRATED PRINCIPALLY ON TRANSPORTATION 11:21:09 FUELS, THAT'S WHAT WE KNOW BEST. WE'RE NOT INTO WINDMILLS, WE'RE 11:21:14 NOT IN SOLAR, BUT WE ARE IN TRANSPORTATION FUELS BUSINESS. 11:21:17 AS WE'VE EVALUATED ALL THE VARIOUS TECHNOLOGIES AVAILABLE 11:21:20 OUT THERE FOR ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS, THE ONE 11:21:23 THAT WE BELIEVE HAS THE MOST PROMISE, ALTHOUGH IT IS MANY 11:21:27 YEARS AWAY IS TO CAPTURE BIOFUELS FROM ALGAS. 11:21:35 AND WE HAVE COMMITTED $600 MILLION WITH A COMPANY, THEY 11:21:41 HAVE CONSIDERABLE EXPERTISE IN MAPPING GENOMES. 11:21:44 BECAUSE ULTIMATELY WE THINK WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO 11:21:48 SYNTHESIZE THE TYPE OF ALGAE. WE'VE GOT TO TAKE THIS TO SCALE 11:21:54 AND DELIVERED AT A COST THAT THE CONSUMER CAN AFFORD. 11:21:58 SO WE THINK THERE'S A LOT OF PROMISE IN THE ALGAE SPACE, BUT 11:22:02 IT IS A LONG, LONG ROAD AHEAD OF US. 11:22:05 THANK YOU, PLEASE. THANK YOU. 11:22:07 WE CONTINUE TO RAMP UP OUR SPENDING ON RESEARCH AND 11:22:11 DEVELOPMENT FOR ALTERNATIVES. AND WE SIMILARLY HAVE A PROGRAM. 11:22:16 I WOULD SAY, THOUGH, FOSSIL FUELS HAS AND WILL CONTINUE TO 11:22:22 REPRESENT MORE THAN 80% OF THE ENERGY THAT'S REQUIRED AROUND 11:22:25 THE WORLD. ONE OF THE KEY THINGS THAT'S 11:22:28 VERY IMPORTANT FOR OUR COUNTRY IS NATURAL GAS. 11:22:32 IT'S BEEN OVER THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS, TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS 11:22:35 THAT WE'RE BLESSED WITH A GREAT DEAL OF NATURAL GAS. 11:22:41 WE ARE REALLY APPLYING A LOT OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. 11:22:45 HOW WE CAN DEVELOP NATURAL GAS EVEN CLEANER AND MORE 11:22:50 EFFICIENTLY. AND WE THINK THE COUNTRY'S WELL 11:22:52 BLESSED WITH THESE RESOURCES. THANKS. 11:22:57 QUICKLY, WE THINK OF OIL AND GAS AS THE MAIN DRIVER IN OUR 11:23:02 BUSINESS, BUT ON TOP OF THAT, IN INCREMENTAL TO THAT, ALTERNATIVE 11:23:07 ENERGY. QUICK NUMBERS, WE'VE INVESTED $7 11:23:10 BILLION OVER THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS, MOST OF IT IN THE U.S., 11:23:14 AROUND WIND, BIOFUELS, SOLAR, AND THEN CARBON SEQUESTRATION, 11:23:25 AND ITS BUSINESS. IT'S DIFFICULT, BUT IT'S 11:23:28 GROWING. YES, SIR? 11:23:29 WELL, WE DO ABSOLUTELY CONSIDER OURSELVES AN ENERGY 11:23:32 COMPANY. AND I WOULD TELL YOU AS A 11:23:34 COMPANY INTERNALLY, WE WANT TO BE THE MOST INNOVATIVE AND 11:23:37 COMPETITIVE ENERGY COMPANY IN THE WORLD. 11:23:40 THAT'S THE PERSPECTIVE WE TAKE. WE'VE BEEN IN ALL THE BUSINESSES 11:23:42 THAT HAVE BEEN MENTIONED WHEN SOLAR, HYDROGEN, AND OTHERS -- 11:23:45 THE ONE THAT IS EMERGING FOR US IS BIOFUEL. 11:23:50 WE HAVE JUST RECENTLY FORMED A $12 BILLION JOINT VENTURE AROUND 11:23:55 CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCING LARGE SCALE AMOUNTS OF BIOFUELS 11:23:59 AS WELL AS ADDING TO THAT THE INTENSE IS RESEARCH AND 11:24:03 DEVELOPMENT WE'VE BEEN DOING TO TAKE THAT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. 11:24:07 IT'S EXCITING STUFF, AND WE WERE TALKING ABOUT USING ENZYMES IN 11:24:16 ANOTHER TECHNOLOGY THAT GOES STRAIGHT FROM A BIO MASS TO A 11:24:20 GASOLINE OR DIESEL EQUIVALENT. SO IT'S AN EXCITING BUSINESS. 11:24:23 IN ADDITION TO SOME OF THE COMMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN MADE 11:24:26 HERE, WE'RE THE LARGEST PRODUCER OF RENEWABLES THANKS TO OUR 11:24:30 BUSINESS. AND WE TOO AREN'T MAKING 11:24:37 INVESTMENTS IN ADVANCE BIOFUELS. ONE OPPORTUNITY THAT I THINK IS 11:24:43 OUT THERE DURING THIS TRANSITION PHASE IS ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND 11:24:47 INVESTMENTS. WE HAVE AN ENERGY EFFICIENCY 11:24:49 COMPANY THAT GOES IN AND MAKES INVESTMENTS IN EDUCATIONAL 11:24:53 INSTITUTIONS AND ELSEWHERE TO REDUCE ENERGY CONSUMED. 11:24:57 I THINK THAT'S A BIG OPPORTUNITY. 11:24:58 AND IT'S A NEAR TERM OPPORTUNITY ACROSS THIS COUNTRY. 11:25:01 THANK YOU, SENATOR. THANK YOU VERY MUCH. 11:25:03 YEAH. A COUPLE OF US HAVE FOLLOW-UP 11:25:05 QUESTIONS HERE. YOU MENTIONED COMPREHENSIVE TAX 11:25:08 REFORM. THAT'S YOUR STRONGLY FAVORED TAX 11:25:14 REFORM. I DON'T THINK THERE'S ANYONE 11:25:15 HERE WHO DOESN'T DISAGREE WITH THAT. 11:25:18 BUT THAT'S EASY TO SAY. THE QUESTION IS, WHAT DO WE MEAN 11:25:20 BY COMPREHENSIVE TAX REFORM? AND BEFORE I ASK YOU WHAT YOU 11:25:28 MEAN, THE GENERAL FEELING IS THE LOWER THE RATE, BROADER THE BASE 11:25:33 BOTH IN CORPORATE AND INDIVIDUAL. 11:25:35 THAT STORY SEEMS TO BE A TREND. ON THE INDIVIDUAL SIDE, WHAT WE 11:25:39 DID IN 1986. AND THE CORPORATE SIDE, LOWERED 11:25:42 THE RATE, WE HAD THE HIGHEST CORPORATE RATE IN THE WORLD. 11:25:46 AND LOWER IT, BE MORE COMPETITIVE, BUT BROADEN THE 11:25:49 BASE, TRY TO FIND A WAY TO DO THIS IN A REVENUE NEUTRAL WAY. 11:25:53 BUT BY DEFINITION, IF WE'RE DOING THAT, LOWERING THE RATE 11:25:56 AND BROADENING THE BASE, WE'RE STARTING TO CUT BACK ON SOME 11:26:01 INCENTIVES. WHETHER IT'S BIOFUELS, SOLAR, 11:26:05 GEOTHERMAL, YOU NAME IT. OR SOME OF THE INCENTIVES YOU 11:26:09 HAVE. YOUR GENERAL ADVICE TO US, I'D 11:26:11 LIKE TO ASK ALL FIVE OF YOU. AS WE PURSUED TAX REFORM, DOES 11:26:16 THAT MEAN TO YOU THAT MAYBE WE SHOULD LOWER THE RATE, BUT ALSO 11:26:21 CUT BACK ON SOME OF THE CREDITS, E 11:26:27 EXCLUSIONS, DEDUCTIONS, SO-CALLED TAX EXPENDITURES. 11:26:31 BECAUSE BY DEFINITION YOU HAVE TO OTHERWISE YOU'RE GOING TO 11:26:33 LOSE A LOT OF REVENUE. AND THAT'S HARD TO DO IN THIS 11:26:38 BIG DEFICIT. WELL, SENATOR, I WOULD 11:26:41 SUPPORT ALL OF THAT. WHEN I SAID COMPREHENSIVE TAX 11:26:44 REFORM, I THINK EVERYTHING FOR EVERYBODY EVERYWHERE HAS TO BE 11:26:46 ON THE TABLE. AND SO IF YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT 11:26:50 SECTION 199, REPEAL IT FOR EVERYBODY. 11:26:53 ACROSS THE BOARD, GONE. AND YOU'RE GOING TO BROADEN THE 11:26:55 TAX BASE. AND IF THAT'S COUPLED WITH THE 11:26:58 LOWERING OF THE INCOME TAX RATE, AND I JUST USED 199 BECAUSE 11:27:02 THERE'S A WHOLE HOST AS YOU WELL KNOW OF ELEMENTS TO OUR TAX CODE 11:27:05 THAT IS VERY COMPLEX I THINK SIMPLIFYING THE TAX CODE -- 11:27:13 SOME DO, SOME DON'T. SOME DO, SOME DON'T. 11:27:17 AND WHEN THE GOVERNMENT WANTS -- WE'RE CREATING ADDITIONS TO THE 11:27:24 COUNTRY. WE'VE GOT TO GROW OUT OF THIS 11:27:26 DEFICIT PROBLEM. WE'VE GOT TO MAKE IT MORE 11:27:28 ATTRACTIVE FOR PEOPLE TO INVEST, CREATE REVENUES, BROADEN THAT 11:27:31 BASE. AND THAT'S WHERE THE LOWERING OF 11:27:33 GENERATES WOULD BE PRODUCTIVE. YOU GO ALONG WITH SCALING 11:27:37 BACK A LOT OF THE TAX EXPENDITURES -- 11:27:40 ACROSS ALL BUSINESSES. NOT JUST OURS. 11:27:42 AND IN THE FOREIGN TAX CODE, IT NEEDS AN OVERHAUL, AS WELL. 11:27:46 AND THE ONLY PRINCIPLES I TEND TO LIVE BY IS MAKE THE UNITED 11:27:51 STATES A MORE ATTRACTIVE PLACE FOR INVESTMENT, DO NOT HARM 11:27:55 AMERICAN COMPETITIVENESS OVERSEAS, BECAUSE THAT BRINGS 11:27:58 ENORMOUS BENEFITS AND WEALTH BACK TO THIS COUNTRY. 11:28:01 AND KEEP THE PLAYING FIELD LEVEL WITHIN INDUSTRIES. 11:28:04 SO THAT EVERYONE COMPETES. WE LOVE TO COMPETE. 11:28:08 I MEAN, THAT IS WHAT WE THRIVE ON IS COMPETITION. 11:28:16 COMPLETELY AGREE. MAKE IT SIMPLER, IN A WAY THAT'S 11:28:20 CONSISTENT FOR EVERYONE. AND CERTAINTY WILL PROMOTE 11:28:28 INVESTMENT. AND I THINK ADDITIONAL REVENUES 11:28:29 AND WILL CERTAINLY HELP WITH RESPECT TO APPOINTMENT. 11:28:34 DO YOU AGREE THAT CORPORATE TAX REFORMS WILL BE REVENUE 11:28:36 NEUTRAL? YES. 11:28:37 THANK YOU. I AGREE, AS WELL. 11:28:41 ANYTHING THAT CAN INCREASE COMPETITIVENESS FOR THE U.S. IN 11:28:45 TERMS OF INVESTMENT, I THINK WOULD BE GOOD, AND I AGREE WITH 11:28:48 ALL THE COMMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN MADE, THE SIMPLER, THE BETTER, 11:28:52 THE MORE PREDICTABLE, THE BETTER, AND THE JOB NUMBER ONE 11:28:55 IS TO GET INVESTMENT UP. BUT THE WAGE INCREASE 11:29:00 COMPETITIVENESS IN YOUR VIEW IS -- 11:29:03 WELL, IS EXACTLY AS WE'VE BEEN SAYING. 11:29:06 IF THE OVERALL TAX RATE GOES DOWN AND IS BROADENED AND SOME 11:29:09 OF THE COMPLEXITY IS TAKEN OUT, THAT SHOULD AID. 11:29:16 AS YOU WELL KNOW, THE UNITED STATES, MUCH BUSINESS INCOME NOW 11:29:24 IS NO LONGER CORPORATE INCOME, BUT IT'S INDIVIDUAL INCOME 11:29:32 TAXES, WHICH HAVE TO BE LOOKED AT, NOT CORPORATE. 11:29:35 WHICH GREATLY COMPLICATES THIS QUESTION. 11:29:37 I MEAN, WE HAVE MORE PASS THROUGH BUSINESS INCOME IN THIS 11:29:43 COUNTRY I THINK ON A PROPORTIONATE BASIS BY FAR THAN 11:29:46 ANY OTHER COUNTRY. AND THAT'S A RECENT TREND. 11:29:48 YOU MIGHT WANT TO CONSIDER BEING FASTER, BUT AS I GO DOWN THE 11:29:54 LIST -- I'M GLAD THE TERM STABILITY 11:29:56 AND PREDICTABILITY CAME UP BECAUSE THAT'S VERY IMPORTANT. 11:29:58 SO I THINK COMPREHENSIVE REFORM WITH EVERYTHING ON THE TABLE, 11:30:01 YES, I AGREE WITH THE COMMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN MADE. 11:30:04 WITH THE DRIVING POLICY ELEMENT BEING INSURE U.S. 11:30:08 COMPETITIVENESS. I AGREE WITH THE COMMENTS 11:30:09 THAT HAVE BEEN MADE. I WOULD ONLY HOPE OVER TIME IT 11:30:12 WOULD RAISE MORE REVENUE BECAUSE IT'LL PROMOTE GROWTH AND I THINK 11:30:15 THAT'S WHAT WE'RE TRYING TO ACHIEVE. 11:30:18 JUST ON YOUR COMMENT ABOUT -- BECAUSE YOUR POINT ABOUT PASS 11:30:23 THROUGH AND SUBCHAPTER PARTNERSHIPS IS AN IMPORTANT 11:30:27 ONE. BECAUSE AS YOU POINT OUT, SO 11:30:30 MANY OF SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE BUSINESSES ARE STRUCTURED UNDER 11:30:33 THE TAX CODES. AGAIN, IN COMPREHENSIVE TAX 11:30:37 REFORM, THE CORPORATE TAX CODE BUT ALSO THE INDIVIDUAL TAX CODE 11:30:40 WILL HAVE TO DEAL WITH THAT. AND ONCE THAT IS STRUCTURED, 11:30:44 THEN ALLOW THOSE ENTITIES TO CHECK THE BOX ON WHICH DO THEY 11:30:48 WANT TO FILE? THEY DON'T FILE UNDER THE 11:30:52 CORPORATE TAX CODE TODAY BECAUSE IT IS NOT ADVANTAGEOUS FOR THEM 11:30:54 TO DO SO. BUT IF THAT'S RESTRUCTURED, THEY 11:30:58 MAY FIND THE CORPORATE TAX CODE TO BE MORE BENEFICIAL THAN 11:31:01 HAVING TO FILE UNDER THE INDIVIDUAL TAX CODE. 11:31:03 MINOR POINT HERE. NOT SO MINOR. 11:31:09 YOUR PERSPECTIVE. I THINK YOU WOULD AGREE THAT 11:31:13 YOUR COMPANY -- ALL COMPANIES SHOULD GET A TAX CREDIT FOR -- 11:31:22 FOREIGN TAXES PAID TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 11:31:25 AND THAT'S THE GENERAL RULE IN THE TAX CREDIT. 11:31:27 THE GENERAL RULE TOO IS THAT YOU DON'T GET A CREDIT FOR 11:31:29 ROYALTIES. IF YOUR INCOME TAX PAID IN THAT 11:31:33 COUNTRY BUT NOT ROYALTY. I THINK THE QUESTION HERE IS 11:31:41 CHARACTERIZING THAT PAYMENT. IS IT ROYALTY OR IS IT TAX 11:31:43 PAYMENT? AND I THINK THE GOAL HERE UNDER 11:31:51 DUAL CAPACITY IS TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COMPANY, YOUR COMPANY, 11:31:55 ANY COMPANY PROPERLY GETS THAT TAX CREDIT WHEN IT'S A PAYMENT 11:32:02 OF INCOME TAXES. BUT NOT AS A ROYALTY PAYMENT. 11:32:05 AND TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHAT ACTUALLY IS ROYALTY AND ACTUALLY 11:32:10 INCOME TAXES. AND THAT MAY HAVE SOMETHING TO 11:32:12 DO WITH THE LAW, I DON'T KNOW. BUT ROYAL CONTRACT FOR 11:32:21 INDIVIDUAL, ALL COMPANIES THAT MIGHT MAKE A PROFIT. 11:32:23 SO WE'RE TRYING TO DO THE RIGHT THING BY SEPARATING WHAT IS A 11:32:28 ROYALTY FROM WHAT IS PROPERLY A TAX PAYMENT. 11:32:31 THAT'S THE GOAL HERE. WELL, AND I APPRECIATE THE 11:32:34 RECOGNITION OF THAT. AND DON'T DISAGREE WITH ANY OF 11:32:38 WHAT YOU SAID, SENATOR. AND IT IS THE COMPLEXITIES OF 11:32:41 DEALING WITH THE FOREIGN -- THE HOST COUNTRY'S TAX SYSTEM AND 11:32:45 HOW IS IT CHARACTERIZED, PAYMENTS THAT WE'RE REQUIRED TO 11:32:51 MAKE TO THEM AND HOW IT FITS UNDER THE U.S. TAX CODE. 11:32:53 IT IS A DIFFICULT TASK. BUT AS I SAID, IT'S ONE THAT WE 11:32:56 MUST PROVE TO THE IRS THAT, YOU KNOW, THEY ARE LEGITIMATE INCOME 11:33:02 TAXES, NOT ROYALTIES. SO I UNDERSTAND THE CHALLENGE. 11:33:04 THE ALTERNATIVE IS TO GO TO A DIFFERENT SYSTEM WHICH I KNOW WE 11:33:09 TALK WITH YOUR STAFF AND OTHERS HAVE TALKED ABOUT GOING TO A 11:33:12 SYSTEM OF FOREIGN TAX CODE THAT IS MORE IN LINE WITH WHAT MOST 11:33:16 OF THE REST OF THE WORLD HAS WHICH WOULD BE A TERRITORIAL 11:33:19 SYSTEM. AND THEN, AGAIN, IT'S GETTING 11:33:21 THAT SYSTEM STRUCTURED SO THAT IT DOESN'T VIOLATE THAT 11:33:26 PRINCIPLE OF MINE WHICH IS DON'T STRUCTURE IT SUCH THAT AMERICAN 11:33:29 COMPANIES ARE AT A DISADVANTAGE OF THEIR COMPETITORS OVERSEAS. 11:33:32 AND I THINK THAT IS ACHIEVABLE. AS WITH ALL THINGS, THE DEVIL'S 11:33:37 IN THE DETAILS. BUT WE HAVE -- I THINK WE HAVE A 11:33:40 WAY TO MOVE TO A SYSTEM LIKE THAT. 11:33:44 AND THAT SIMPLIFIES A LOT OF THE COMPLEXITIES THAT EXIST IN OUR 11:33:48 CURRENT TAX CODE. BEFORE I PASS ON, THIS IS 11:33:51 GOING TO BE INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT. 11:33:52 IT IS. WITHOUT QUESTION. 11:33:54 AND EVERYBODY INVOLVED. AND EFFORTS TO REDUCE OUR 11:34:02 DEFICITS, IT'S GOT TO BE SHARED. EVERYBODY'S GOING TO HAVE TO 11:34:06 GIVE IN A LITTLE BIT FOR THE GREATER GOOD. 11:34:09 SENATOR HATCH? WELL, THANK YOU, MR. 11:34:13 CHAIRMAN. MR. CHAIRMAN, YESTERDAY ON THE 11:34:17 FLOOR, SENATORS SPOKE ABOUT THE LEGISLATION THAT WAS QUITE 11:34:24 CRITICAL. SO I ASK THE STATEMENTS BE PUT 11:34:26 IN THE RECORD. NO OBJECTION. 11:34:28 I WOULD LIKE TO COMMENT ON A FEW ITEMS BEFORE I GO INTO THE 11:34:31 SECOND ROUND OF QUESTIONS. MY FRIEND IN NEW YORK IMPLIED 11:34:37 THAT THE TAX INCENTIVES WE'RE DISCUSSING TODAY WAS A KEY 11:34:40 FACTOR IN REDUCING OUR $1 TRILLION PLUS DEFICIT. 11:34:45 MY FRIEND FROM MARYLAND MADE A SIMILAR POINT. 11:34:50 NOBODY IS ARGUING THE NUMBER IS INSIGNIFICANT. 11:34:52 WHAT WE'RE WORRIED ABOUT IS THE REMOVAL OF THESE INCENTIVES, 11:35:00 WHAT THE EFFECT OF THAT WOULD BE. 11:35:04 THE TESTIMONY IS CLEAR. REMOVING THESE INCENTIVES IS 11:35:08 GOING TO DRIVE PRODUCTION OFFSHORE, IT'S THAT SIMPLE. 11:35:13 AND THAT'S WHAT'S BEEN SAID HERE TODAY. 11:35:16 BUT I'LL TELL YOU, THERE WERE SPENDING CUTS PROPOSED BY DR. 11:35:22 COBURN OF SIMILAR SIZE WHO IS A MEMBER OF OUR COMMITTEE THAT 11:35:25 WERE REJECTED OUT OF HAND BY MY FRIENDS ON THE OTHER SIDE. 11:35:29 THOSE SPENDING CUTS, ANOTHER VERSION OF SHARED SACRIFICE TO 11:35:33 USE YOUR TERMS DID NOT INVOLVE STUDENT LOANS, DIDN'T INVOLVE 11:35:37 LOW-INCOME FOLKS, THEY DIDN'T INVOLVE INFRASTRUCTURE 11:35:41 INVESTMENT. HERE'S AN EXAMPLE. 11:35:45 DR. COBURN PROPOSED SELLING FEDERAL BUILDINGS THAT ARE 11:35:50 VACANT. THAT PROPOSAL WAS DOGGEDLY 11:35:52 OPPOSED AS REASONABLE AS IT IS BY MY FRIENDS ON THE OTHER SIDE. 11:35:58 AND THAT PROPOSAL INVOLVED $80 BILLION. 11:36:02 SO LET'S MAKE NO BONES ABOUT IT. WE, YOU KNOW, THERE'S TWO SIDES 11:36:07 TO WHAT'S HAPPENING HERE. LET ME JUST ASK YOU THIS, MR. 11:36:14 TILLERSON. COMBINING ALL THE U.S. COMPANIES 11:36:16 INTO ONE LARGE COMPANY -- IF YOU TOOK ALL FIVE OF YOU AND ALL 11:36:19 U.S. COMPANIES, NOT JUST THE FIVE OF YOU, BUT ALL OF THEM 11:36:25 INTO ONE LARGE COMPANY AND COMBINED THEM ALL, THAT WOULD 11:36:28 GIVE THAT COMPANY CONTROL OVER ONLY 6% OF THE WORLD'S OIL, AS I 11:36:35 UNDERSTAND IT -- 6% OF THE GLOBAL OIL PRODUCTION, AND 11:36:39 CONTROL OVER LESS THAN 2% OF GLOBAL OIL RESERVES. 11:36:43 AND YES, WE REQUIRE THEM TO GO OUT INTO THE WORLD OF TITANIC 11:36:46 NATIONALLY OWNED OIL COMPANIES AND STILL PROVIDE US WITH A 11:36:53 CONTINUALLY LARGE SUPPLY OF OIL. LET ME SHOW YOU THIS CHART. 11:36:56 U.S. COMPANIES HAVE A WEE LITTLE SLIVER THERE. 11:37:00 THAT'S 1.4%. LOOK AT THE OPEC NATIONS. 11:37:05 BEGINNING WITH SAUDI ARABIA OIL COMPANY, IRAQ NATIONAL OIL 11:37:10 COMPANY, KUWAIT, RIGHT ON DOWN THE LINE. 11:37:12 HERE'S WHERE WE ARE. WE'RE THIS SMALL LITTLE SLIVER 11:37:17 HERE. ALL THESE OTHERS ARE OPEC 11:37:23 COMPANIES. OPEC NATIONS THAT OWN THOSE 11:37:26 PRODUCTION FACILITIES. I GUESS WHAT I'M ASKING YOU IS 11:37:35 YOU'RE THE BIG FIVE AMERICAN COMPANIES, AM I WRONG ON THE 11:37:39 SMALL SLICE OF PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION THAT 11:37:45 IS LISTED ON THESE CHARTS? MR. TILLERSON? 11:37:49 NO, I THINK THOSE NUMBERS LOOK ABOUT TO MY RECOLLECTION, 11:37:54 AS WELL, WE DO NOT REPRESENT AN ENORMOUS HOLDING OF THE RESERVES 11:37:57 OR THE PRODUCTION. I WOULD SAY THIS, THOUGH, THAT 11:38:01 WE DO REPRESENT AN ENORMOUSLY IMPORTANT PARTICIPANT IN THE 11:38:05 GLOBAL ENERGY SUPPLIES. AND WE DO WORK IN A NUMBER OF 11:38:07 THE OPEC COUNTRIES. BUT YOU DON'T OWN ALL OF 11:38:12 THESE? NO, NO, WHAT YOU HAD WOULD 11:38:14 REPRESENT OUR SHARE OF WHAT WE -- 11:38:18 AND THAT'S THAT LITTLE SLICE OF THAT OVERALL PIE. 11:38:21 YES. MR. ODOM, DID I HEAR YOU 11:38:24 CORRECTLY, YOU WERE READY TO SPEND $700 MILLION IN THE GULF 11:38:27 ON ENOUGH DOMESTIC ENERGY PRODUCTION TO POWER MORE THAN 11:38:29 600,000 VEHICLES A DAY? AND I BELIEVE YOU ALSO SAID THAT 11:38:36 YOU INVESTED $3.7 BILLION TO DEVELOP IN ALASKA. 11:38:41 NOW, IS YOUR TESTIMONY THAT SHELL HAS SPENT OVER $4 BILLION 11:38:44 TO PRODUCE DOMESTIC OIL, BUT THAT THE ONLY THING STANDING IN 11:38:46 YOUR WAY IS GOVERNMENT REFUSING T 11:38:53 TO ALLOW YOU TO GO AHEAD? THE CASE IS EMPHASIZED BY 11:38:56 WHAT'S HAPPENING IN ALASKA. WE ARE PRECISELY AT SOMETHING 11:38:58 AROUND $3.5 BILLION IN. ABOUT FIVE TO SIX YEARS NOW INTO 11:39:03 TRYING TO DRILL IN ALASKA. AND HAVE YET TO BE ABLE TO DO SO 11:39:06 BECAUSE OF THE PERMITTING SITUATION AND OVERALL 11:39:09 COORDINATION OF THE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES. 11:39:12 AND WHAT I'VE TRIED TO EMPHASIZE EARLIER IS THE IMPACT OF 11:39:14 SOMETHING LIKE THAT. SO, AGAIN, THE STUDIES THROUGH 11:39:17 THE UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA INDICATE THAT DEVELOPING THAT 11:39:20 PART OF THE INDUSTRY COULD BE 750,000 BARRELS A DAY ON A 11:39:26 LONG-TERM MULTI-DECADE BASIS. OVER -- 11:39:29 $3.5 BILLION -- AND YOU CAN'T GET THE PERMITS TO DO WHAT YOU 11:39:34 KNOW IS THERE. IT DOESN'T REFLECT WELL ON 11:39:36 THE U.S., I'M AFRAID, IN TERMS OF DRAWING INVESTMENT AND BEING 11:39:40 KPETIVE IN THIS BUSINESS. ONE OF THE FIRST ACTS OF 11:39:44 SECRETARY SALAZAR WAS TO DRAW 77 ONSHORE LEASES IN UTAH AFTER 11:39:50 YEARS OF JUMPING THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL HOOPS. 11:39:51 AND WE FINALLY GOT THERE. IT WAS AN AGREEMENT THROUGH THE 11:39:57 GOVERNOR. AFTER THEY'D BEEN STUDIED, 11:39:58 AUCTIONED OFF, AND PAID FOR. IT WAS ONE OF THE STRONGEST 11:40:03 ANTI-OIL SIGNALS HE COULD'VE SENT TO THE OIL INDUSTRY. 11:40:06 COULD YOU ELABORATE ON YOUR EXPERIENCE OR ANY OF THE REST OF 11:40:10 YOU IF YOU CARE TO? WELL, AGAIN -- 11:40:13 AND WOULD YOU ALSO ANSWER THIS QUESTION BEFORE WE FINISH. 11:40:19 ASSUMING THIS LEGISLATION PASSES, THE LEGISLATION, WILL 11:40:24 THAT BRING DOWN PRICES OF OIL AT THE PUMP? 11:40:27 OR IS THIS THE BIG CHARADE? YOU DON'T HAVE TO USE MY TERMS. 11:40:32 BUT ANSWER THAT FOR ME. WHY ARE WE DOING THIS? 11:40:35 WHY ARE WE PUTTING YOU AT A DISADVANTAGE WHEN YOU'RE THAT 11:40:41 LITTLE SMALL SLICE OF THE OVERALL PIE. 11:40:46 AND YOU'RE COMPETING AGAINST NATIONS THAT HAVE OIL COMPANIES. 11:40:52 THEY'RE NATIONALIZED OIL COMPANIES. 11:40:53 GO AHEAD. WELL, I THINK, YOU KNOW, THE 11:41:02 COMPETITIVE AT THIS POINT IS RIGHT. 11:41:03 THE CHART IS ACCURATE FROM MY INFORMATION, AS WELL. 11:41:06 I THINK THE THING WE HAVE TO BE CAREFUL NOT TO LOSE IN THE CHART 11:41:08 IS WHAT I CALLED EARLIER THIS ENORMOUS OPPORTUNITY THAT EXISTS 11:41:12 IN THE U.S. WE HAVE A TREMENDOUS NUMBER OF 11:41:15 RESOURCES. WE CAN IMPACT THE ENERGY 11:41:18 BALANCE. WHY DON'T YOU DO IT, THEN? 11:41:20 WELL, IT'S A MATTER OF ACCESS. 11:41:22 A MATTER OF GETTING THE PERMITS. 11:41:25 WHICH GOES FAR BEYOND THE LIMITED PART OF THE CONVERSATION 11:41:29 TODAY. I THINK TO LOOK AT A REAL ENERGY 11:41:32 POLICY THAT PROVIDES THIS INDUSTRY WITH ACCESS TO THOSE 11:41:35 RESOURCES, WE COULD HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE 11:41:38 ECONOMY, DEFICIT, TRADE BALANCE, AND ENERGY SECURITY OF THIS 11:41:41 COUNTRY. I'D LIKE TO KNOW IF ANY OF 11:41:43 YOU BELIEVE THAT THIS BILL WILL HELP DECREASE PRICES AT THE 11:41:50 PUMP? NO. 11:41:51 NO. NO. 11:41:53 NO. AND BY THE WAY, I KNOW SOME 11:41:58 PEOPLE ARE A LITTLE UPSET I'VE TAKEN THIS TIME. 11:42:02 I'VE SAT HERE WHILE EVERY DEMOCRAT HAS TAKEN CONSIDERABLE 11:42:05 EXTRA TIME U. I'M THE ONLY ONE ON THE REPUBLICAN SIDE BECAUSE 11:42:08 EVERYBODY HAD TO GO TO THE WHITE HOUSE. 11:42:10 I WOULD HOPE I COULD BE GRANTED A LITTLE MORE TIME. 11:42:13 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. I JUST HAVE ONE QUESTION, BUT I 11:42:16 ALSO WANT TO NOTE WHERE WE ARE AT THIS POINT. 11:42:21 2 1/2 HOURS INTO THE HEARING. GENTLEMEN, YOU ALL HAVE DONE AS 11:42:25 MAJOR OIL COMPANIES A DRAMATIC ABOUT FACE THIS MORNING. 11:42:28 IN 2005, ALL OF YOU -- YOU WERE THERE. 11:42:31 ALL OF YOU SAID YOU DID NOT NEED TAX INCENTIVES TO DRILL FOR OIL. 11:42:37 AND TODAY YOU'VE COME TO SAY YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE THEM WHEN OIL 11:42:41 IS AT $100 A BARREL. I THINK THAT POSITION DEFIES 11:42:45 COMMON SENSE, AND CERTAINLY EVEN ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION. 11:42:50 YOU'RE EVEN DOING BETTER NOW THAN YOU WERE IN 2005. 11:42:52 SO THIS DEBATE IS GOING TO GO FORWARD. 11:42:54 SO I JUST WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT FOLKS WHO ARE PAYING ATTENTION 11:42:59 TO THIS PICK UP ON THAT AS WE WRAP UP. 11:43:02 AND ONE LAST QUESTION TO YOU, MR. McKAY BECAUSE OF SOME OF THE 11:43:05 COMMENTS YOU'VE MADE. AND THAT'S THE TAX CREDIT THAT 11:43:08 EXISTS FOR BLENDING ETHANOL. AS YOU KNOW, YOU ALL ARE 11:43:13 REQUIRED TO IMPLEMENT THE FEDERAL STANDARDS. 11:43:20 YOUR TESTIMONY SAYS AND I QUOTE, BP IS ALREADY ONE OF THE LARGEST 11:43:23 BLENDERS OF ETHANOL IN THE NATION. 11:43:26 SO MY QUESTION, MR. McKAY, IS WHY SHOULD OIL COMPANIES -- NOT 11:43:30 JUST YOURS, BUT ALL OF THE OIL COMPANIES BE GETTING $6 BILLION 11:43:35 A YEAR IN TAX CREDITS FOR COMPLYING WITH AN EXISTING LAW 11:43:39 TO BLEND ETHANOL? THAT LAW WAS INTRODUCED TO 11:43:45 GET ETHANOL AS A BIOFUEL INTO THE FUEL MIX INTO THE U.S., 11:43:49 WHICH IT'S BEEN VERY SUCCESSFUL AS AN INCENTIVE TO DO THAT. 11:43:52 WE'RE NOT OPPOSED TO THAT TRANSITIONAL INCENTIVE BEING 11:43:56 PHASED OUT. WE THINK IT'S IMPORTANT FOR 11:44:00 TRANSITIONAL INCENTIVES FOR SECOND GENERATION BIOFUELS. 11:44:02 THAT'S CONSTRUCTIVE. AND I'M GLAD WE'RE NOTING THAT 11:44:05 AS WE -- CHAIRMAN, YOU AND I HAVE TALKED ABOUT THIS. 11:44:08 THERE'S NO QUESTION IN TERMS OF ENERGY POLICY THAT OFTEN YOU 11:44:12 NEED AN INCENTIVE TO GET SOMETHING OFF THE GROUND. 11:44:15 CLEARLY WHAT MR. McKAY IS TALKING ABOUT IS THAT INCENTIVE 11:44:18 MADE SOME SENSE AT THE BEGINNING, IT DOESN'T MAKE SENSE 11:44:22 NOW AND IT'S INVOLVING $6 BILLION. 11:44:25 AND MR. McKAY, I THINK IT'S CONSTRUCTIVE YOU SAID YOU'D BE 11:44:32 WILLING TO PHASE IT OUT. IT'S A GOOD POINT. 11:44:37 THIS COMMITTEE SHOULD AND WE WILL LOOK AT THE EFFECTIVENESS 11:44:42 OF ALL THE TAX EXPENDITURES, ALL THE INCENTIVES TO SEE WHICH ONES 11:44:46 ARE MORE EFFECTIVE THAN OTHERS. AND MAYBE WE CAN GET RID OF A 11:44:50 FEW OF THEM. I'M SURE SOME OF YOU DON'T KNOW 11:44:55 THIS, IT'S A DIFFICULT QUESTION FOR ALL OF US. 11:44:59 THERE ARE ABOUT 141 TAX PROVISIONS THAT EXPIRE EVERY 11:45:02 YEAR OR EVERY 18 MONTHS. WE CALL THEM DIVISIONS. 11:45:05 THEY'RE A NIGHTMARE. IT MAKES NO SENSE TO GO BACK AND 11:45:09 REINVENT. 141 TIMES EVERY 18 MONTHS, 11:45:15 THEY'VE GOT TO BE PAID FOR AND IT'S MADDENING. 11:45:19 AND SO WE WILL BE LOOKING AT A LOT OF THESE PROVISIONS AND 11:45:23 OTHERS. I'D LIKE TO ELIMINATE A LOT OF 11:45:26 THOSE OR MAKE THEM PERMANENT SO IT'S NOT A LOT OF UNCERTAINTY 11:45:32 SURROUNDING. SENATOR? 11:45:40 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. LET ME CONCUR IN YOUR COMMENTS 11:45:43 IN REGARDS TO TAX REFORM. I CAN ASSURE YOU THERE'S GREAT 11:45:47 INTEREST IN MAKING OUR TAX CODE MORE COMPETITIVE AND 11:45:51 PREDICTABLE. I THINK PREDICTABILITY IS 11:45:53 EXTREMELY IMPORTANT FOR INVESTORS. 11:45:54 AND WE'VE GOT TO GIVE YOU THE ABILITY TO GET INVESTORS KNOWING 11:45:57 WHAT THE GROUND RULES ARE. SO WE AGREE ON THAT. 11:46:02 I WANT TO MAKE ONE RESPONSE TO SENATOR HATCH. 11:46:05 NUMBERS HERE, $4 BILLION AS I UNDERSTAND IT EQUALS ABOUT 3% OF 11:46:12 THE PROFITS OF THE FIVE COMPANIES. 11:46:15 MOST OF THESE PROFITS ARE GOING BACK TO THE SHAREHOLDERS. 11:46:18 SO I JUST DON'T SEE THE IMPACT THAT SENATOR HATCH IS REFERRING 11:46:25 TO ON EITHER JOBS OR ANY OF THE ISSUES THAT YOU BRING UP. 11:46:30 I JUST THINK THE MATH IS PRETTY -- 11:46:33 MY POINT IS THAT -- AND I THINK THEY'RE MAKING THE POINT 11:46:36 IS THAT IF YOU'RE GOING TO DO THIS, YOU SHOULD TREAT THEM 11:46:40 FAIRLY ALONG WITH ALL THE OTHER COMPANIES THAT RECEIVE CERTAIN 11:46:43 TAX EXPENDITURES. I'VE GOT TO AGREE WE'VE GOT TO 11:46:48 DO TAX REFORM, AND THAT INCLUDES LOOKING AT EVERYTHING. 11:46:55 NOT JUST BECAUSE THEY'RE AN INDUSTRY PEOPLE HATE -- 11:46:58 LET ME BRING IT BACK TO THE POINT THAT'S BEEN USED HERE. 11:47:03 I UNDERSTAND THE BUSINESS IS TAKING -- TAKING THE TAX 11:47:07 PROVISIONS THAT ARE THERE ARE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF IT. 11:47:10 THAT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY. IF YOU DIDN'T DO THAT, YOU WOULD 11:47:12 HAVE PROBLEMS WITH YOUR SHAREHOLDERS. 11:47:14 BUT UNDERSTAND WHY WE THINK THAT THIS IS EITHER UNWARRANTED 11:47:19 INCENTIVES OR SUBSIDIES. PARTICULARLY SECTION 199. 11:47:25 SECTION 199 WAS A RESPONSE TO DEALING WITH THE FACT THAT OUR 11:47:29 CORPORATE TAXES ARE NOT ORDER ADJUSTED VERSUS EUROPE'S AND 11:47:37 OTHER COUNTRIES TAXES ARE FOREIGN ADJUSTED. 11:47:41 WE DID SOMETHING TO HELP OUR FOREIGN SALES. 11:47:43 THAT WAS THE GENESIS OF SECTION 199. 11:47:45 AND WE WANTED TO BE ABLE TO COMPENSATE FOR THE FACT THAT OUR 11:47:50 FOREIGN COMPETITORS HAD AN ADVANTAGE OVER U.S. 11:47:53 MANUFACTURERS ON THE WAY THAT TAXES WERE HANDLED AT THE 11:47:54 BORDER. NOW, MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT IN 11:48:00 YOUR INDUSTRY, THERE MORE IMPORTED PRODUCT THAN EXPORTED 11:48:04 PRODUCT. SO IT DOESN'T MAKE A LOT OF 11:48:06 SENSE FOR YOU TO GET A TAX ADVANTAGE ON THE PHILOSOPHY OF 11:48:12 WHAT THIS BILL WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED FOR. 11:48:15 THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION RULED THE PROVISIONS OUT OF 11:48:17 COMPLIANCE AND WE HAD TO GO TO A GENERAL MANUFACTURING PROVISION. 11:48:24 AND THAT'S HOW THIS CAME ABOUT. WELL, ON TWO FRONTS, WE HAVE 11:48:30 QUESTIONS AS TO WHETHER THIS IS A REASONABLE TAX ADVANTAGE TO 11:48:33 THE OIL INDUSTRY. IT'S NOT TRADITIONAL 11:48:38 MANUFACTURING. AND IT'S NOT THE TYPE OF EXPORT 11:48:44 ACTIVITY THAT WAS DISADVANTAGED BY THE CORPORATE STRUCTURE TO 11:48:49 HAVE A PRODUCT ENTER THE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE. 11:48:53 I JUST THINK WE HAVE TO GET TO THE RATIONALE, THIS IS THE 11:49:00 SINGLE SOURCE OF REVENUES WE'RE TALKING ABOUT TODAY. 11:49:02 THAT HAS ITS GENESIS ON HELPING UNITED STATES MANUFACTURERS GET 11:49:07 A PRODUCT INTO THE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE, WHICH IS NOT 11:49:14 CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE PRODUCT THAT YOU ARE BASICALLY INVOLVED 11:49:17 WITH. YOU IMPORT THE CRUDE, AS I 11:49:20 UNDERSTAND IT, THE FINAL PRODUCT IS MOSTLY DOMESTIC, I'M SURE 11:49:25 SOME HITS THE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE. 11:49:28 BUT IT'S CERTAINLY NOT THE TARGET WHY THIS PARTICULAR TAX 11:49:32 PROVISION WAS PUT IN THE TAX CODE. 11:49:34 ANYONE DISAGREE WITH THAT? WELL, IF YOU WANT TO REPEAL 11:49:41 IT, REPEAL IT FOR EVERYONE. I'M NOT SURE THAT THE COFFEE 11:49:44 ROASTERS ARE GROWING COFFEE HERE AND EXPORTING COFFEE. 11:49:47 I'M NOT SURE THAT THE NEWSPAPER COMPANIES ARE EXPORTING 11:49:53 DOMINANTLY THEIR NEWSPAPERS. I DON'T DISAGREE WITH YOUR 11:49:58 COMMENT OR YOUR PREMISE. MY ONLY POINT IS, IF YOU WANT TO 11:50:02 GET RID OF IT. GET RID OF IT ACROSS THE BOARD. 11:50:05 I DON'T DISAGREE WITH THE POINT DISAGREE WITH THE 11:50:08 POINT. NOT JUST ONE OR TWO 11:50:10 COMPANIES. THERE'S COMPANIES THAT THIS 11:50:12 IS ROUGH JUSTICE. IT REALLY HELPS THEM. 11:50:13 I WOULD RATHER DO IT DIRECTLY LIKE WE DID WITH FOREIGN SALES. 11:50:17 I'D LIKE TO REFORM OUR TAX CODE SO WE HAVE A COMPETITIVE BASE. 11:50:22 IF WE CAN DO THAT, THAT'S MY FIRST CHOICE. 11:50:23 IF WE CAN'T DO IT, WE SHOULD TAILOR IT MORE TO ITS PURPOSE OF 11:50:27 HELPING EXPORTERS WHO MANUFACTURE IN THE UNITED 11:50:29 STATES. AND MY ONLY PRINCIPLE THAT I 11:50:32 ASK YOU NOT TO VIOLATE IS, DO NOT TREAT COMPANIES WITHIN THE 11:50:37 SAME INDUSTRY DIFFERENT AND DO NOT TREAT INDUSTRIES ON YOUR 11:50:40 PRINCIPLE OF EXPORTS DIFFERENTLY. 11:50:42 WELL, WE'VE GOT -- IT'S TOUGH SOMETIMES TO DRAW A LINE AND I 11:50:48 UNDERSTAND THE POINT YOU'RE RAISING. 11:50:50 ALL I'M POINTING OUT IS THAT THAT'S WHY SOME OF US LOOK AT 11:50:53 THE SECTION 199 AS IT RELATES TO THE OIL INDUSTRY AS EITHER AN 11:50:59 UNJUSTIFIED INCENTIVE OR AS A SUBSIDY BECAUSE WE DON'T BELIEVE 11:51:03 IT IS THE ORIGINAL INTENT TO BENEFIT YOUR TYPE OF ACTIVITIES. 11:51:07 AND I JUST REALLY WANT TO PUT THAT ON THE RECORD. 11:51:11 I VERY MUCH APPRECIATE YOUR RESPONSE. 11:51:12 THANK YOU, SENATOR. I WANT TO REPEAT BUT THEN 11:51:17 EXPAND A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WHAT I SAID EARLIER. 11:51:20 I REALLY DO BELIEVE THAT YOU'RE OUT OF TOUCH. 11:51:23 I DO BELIEVE THAT, MR. TILLERSON DOESN'T. 11:51:27 THAT DOESN'T MEAN YOU'RE NOT GOOD PEOPLE, THAT YOU DON'T 11:51:29 PARTICIPATE IN YOUR COMMUNITIES, THAT YOU DON'T DO HELPFUL 11:51:35 THINGS, ALONG WITH THE WORK THAT YOU HAVE TO DO. 11:51:39 BUT I THINK THAT THE MAIN REASON THAT YOU'RE OUT OF TOUCH, 11:51:42 PARTICULARLY WITH RESPECT TO AMERICANS AND THE SACRIFICES 11:51:46 THAT WE'RE HAVING TO LOOK AT HERE IN TERMS OF TRYING TO 11:51:50 BALANCE, OR COME EVEN CLOSES TO BALANCING A BUDGET, IS THAT YOU 11:51:56 NEVER LOSE. YOU'VE NEVER LOST. 11:51:57 YOU ALWAYS PREVAIL. YOU ALWAYS PREVAIL IN THE HALLS 11:52:01 OF CONGRESS. AND YOU DO THAT FOR A WHOLE 11:52:04 VARIETY OF REASONS, BECAUSE OF YOUR LOBBYISTS, BECAUSE OF 11:52:07 FRIENDS, BECAUSE OF ALL THE PLACES WHERE YOU DO BUSINESS. 11:52:11 AND I DON'T REALLY KNOW ANY OTHER BUSINESS THAT NEVER LOSES, 11:52:16 THAT ALWAYS FAILS TO DO AS WELL AS YOU DO. 11:52:19 AND THEN I THINK ONE OF THE PROBLEMS -- AND YOU CAN'T HELP 11:52:23 THIS IN A WAY -- IS THE SIZE, JUST THE SIZE, OF THE AMOUNT OF 11:52:28 MONEY YOU TAKE IS REALLY HARD FOR AVERAGE PEOPLE IN WEST 11:52:33 VIRGINIA TO EVEN COME CLOSE TO UNDERSTANDING. 11:52:36 THEY DON'T THINK THAT THAT CAN BECOME BY IN THE REGULAR OF THE 11:52:40 ORDER OF THE WAY THE WORLD TREATS THEM. 11:52:44 THEY'RE ALWAYS IN THE PROCESS OF LOSING. 11:52:48 EVERYTHING IS ON UPHILL BATTLE. SO MY VIEW OF MY WORK IN WEST 11:52:54 VIRGINIA IS THAT -- WHICH IS MOSTLY MOUNTAINOUS, 96% 11:52:59 MOUNTAINOUS, IS THAT I'M HOLDING ON TO A HUGE BOULDER, NOT TOO 11:53:04 HUGE, WITH BOTH HANDS AND TRYING TO PUSH IT UPHILL. 11:53:08 IT'S EVERY DAY I FEEL THAT. AND I LOVE THAT FEELING. 11:53:13 BUT I KNOW IF I TAKE ONE HAND OFF, I AND BOULDER DISAPPEAR 11:53:19 INTO THE ETHER, I GUESS THE OPPOSITE OF THE ETHER. 11:53:26 THE GULGE. SO THAT THEN LEADS ME TO SAY -- 11:53:31 THIS IS MY OPINION, BUT I REALLY BELIEVE IT. 11:53:38 I'VE JUST NEVER SEEN AN INDUSTRY SO CONSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL. 11:53:41 I THINK YOU ALL HAVE A GREAT SENSE OF ASSURANCE AS YOU'RE 11:53:45 SITTING THERE, MORE SO THAN USUAL, AND WE HAVE STEEL PEOPLE 11:53:49 OR AUTOMOBILE PEOPLE OR OTHER KINDS OF PEOPLE THERE, YOU HAVE 11:53:53 A GREAT SENSE OF ASSURANCE. I DON'T THINK YOU FEEL 11:53:56 THREATENED BY ANYTHING THAT'S GOING ON HERE AND I DON'T 11:53:59 NECESSARILY KNOW YOU HAVE ANY REASON TO FEEL THREATENED 11:54:01 BECAUSE OF THE WAY VOTES LINE UP IN THIS PRESENT CONGRESS. 11:54:09 BUT I YEARN FOR ONE OF YOU TO SEE WHAT AVERAGE PEOPLE ARE 11:54:17 GOING THROUGH AND TO FIGURE OUT SOME WAY IN YOUR MIND, WHAT CAN 11:54:21 I DO AS A VERY, VERY LARGE AND PROFITABLE COMPANY, TO MAKE SURE 11:54:29 THAT THAT BAD THING DOESN'T HAPPEN TO THAT PERSON, LOSING 11:54:33 HEALTH INSURANCE OR LOSING UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE OR ALL -- 11:54:38 I MEAN, THE ENDLESS NUMBER OF THINGS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO WORRY 11:54:41 ABOUT EVERY SINGLE DAY. YOU DON'T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT 11:54:43 THOSE. NONE OF YOU TOOK A COMMERCIAL 11:54:48 AIRPLANE TO COME HERE. "DON'T BLAME YOU FOR THAT. 11:54:50 YOU HAVE THE MONEY TO HAVE PLANES. 11:54:53 BUT OUR PEOPLE DON'T. AND SO I WANT TO JUST SORT OF 11:54:57 STIPULATE THAT AND THEN SAY ONE MORE THING. 11:55:00 THE GREATEST DANGER TO THIS COUNTRY RIGHT NOW, OTHER THAN 11:55:02 THE DEFICIT, IN TERMS OF NATIONAL SECURITY, IS SOMETHING 11:55:07 CALLED CYBER SECURITY. WE'RE WRITING A BILL ON THE 11:55:12 COMMERCE COMMITTEE AND THE HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE IS 11:55:17 PARTICIPATING IN THAT WHICH COMES UP WITH A SOLUTION WHICH I 11:55:19 HOPE WE CAN PASS THIS YEAR. THERE'S AN ENORMOUS AMOUNT OF 11:55:26 WORK THAT COMPANIES AND EXPENSE THAT COMPANIES HAVE TO GO TO WHO 11:55:31 ARE ARE BEING ATTACKED ALREADY, P 11:55:37 . PENTAGON I THINK IS HIT MAYBE A 11:55:40 MILLION TIMES A DAY BY PEOPLE HACKING IN, GETTING SECRETS, NOT 11:55:45 JUST WIKILEAKS BUT ANYONE CAN DO THAT. 11:55:47 SO HOW DO THEY DEFEND THEMSELVES? 11:55:49 WELL, THEY HAVE TO GO TO ALL KIND OF SECURITY MEASURES. 11:55:51 AND YOU KNOW I MET WITH MOST OF THEM YESTERDAY, PARTICULARLY THE 11:55:55 BIGGER ONES. I SAID, YOU KNOW, YOU'RE GOING 11:55:57 TO HAVE TO BEARER THAT EXPENSE. THE GOVERNMENT CAN'T DO THAT FOR 11:56:01 YOU. WE DON'T HAVE THE MONEY TO DO 11:56:02 THAT FOR YOU BECAUSE THIS IS GOING TO GO ON FOR THE NEXT 50 11:56:05 OR 100 YEARS. WE'LL BE FACING THESE PROBLEMS. 11:56:08 THEY DIDN'T OBJECT TO THAT. IN FACT, THEY SAID, WE THINK 11:56:11 THAT'S THE RIGHT THING, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE. 11:56:14 WE SHOULD HAVE TO PAY MORE, WE SHOULD HAVE TO DIG INTO OUR 11:56:16 PROFITS TO MAKE OURSELVES MORE SECURE. 11:56:21 SO THAT'S WHY, YOU KNOW, I JUST -- WHEN YOU TALK ABOUT R & 11:56:32 D, YOUR EXPENSES ARE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR 11:56:35 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES, SOMEBODY ELSE, IS WHY I THINK 11:56:37 IT'S WRONG OF YOU TO SAY THAT BECAUSE IT JUST ISN'T SO MUCH OF 11:56:43 THAT EXPLORATION HAS ALREADY BEEN DONE. 11:56:44 I THINK THAT'S A COST THAT YOU COULD ABSORB SO EASILY AND STILL 11:56:51 DO VERY WELL. BUT NOT ONCE DURING THIS HEARING 11:56:55 HAVE I HEARD ANY SEMBLANCE OF A WILLINGNESS TO SHARE, UNLESS 11:57:02 EVERY OTHER COMPANY ALSO HAS TO, WHICH IS BUILDING UP THE DEFENSE 11:57:05 THAT IT CAN'T HAPPEN. WELL, PUTTING IT MORE SIMPLY, I 11:57:09 HAVEN'T HEARD ANYBODY TALK ABOUT WHAT THEY'RE DOING, WHAT THEY 11:57:11 WOULD BE WILLING TO DO, TO SHARE IN OUR BUDGET PROBLEMS AND IN 11:57:17 THE TOTAL CONCEPT OF WHAT KEEPS AMERICA TOGETHER. 11:57:20 AND THAT IS A SENSE OF FAIRNESS, THAT EVERYBODY HAS TO LOSE AT 11:57:25 SOME TIME. EVERYBODY HAS TO GIVE SOMETHING 11:57:27 UP FOR US TO BE A REAL COUNTRY. AND DO ANY OF YOU HAVE ANY 11:57:36 THINGS, SO LONG AS EVERY OTHER COMPANY DOES IT, TOO, THAT YOU 11:57:43 COULD GIVE UP, THINGS YOU COULD JUST STOP DOING, BREAKS THAT YOU 11:57:48 NOW GET THAT YOU WOULDN'T GET AS A WAY OF HELPING? 11:57:55 SENATOR, VERY MUCH APPRECIATE THE COMMENTS THAT YOU'RE MAKING. 11:57:59 I CAN ONLY REPRESENT HOW WE AS A COMPANY FEEL. 11:58:04 I DON'T KNOW HOW THE OTHERS DO. BUT WE FEEL LIKE WE'RE 11:58:08 CONSTRAINED AND RESTRICTED FROM OUR OPPORTUNITIES. 11:58:10 WE FEEL WE'RE IN A NOBLE INDUSTRY THAT PROVIDES THE 11:58:13 ENERGY THAT HAS DEVELOPED THIS COUNTRY INTO WHAT IT IS AND ITS 11:58:17 STANDARD OF LIVING AND WE'RE CONSTRAINED FROM WHAT WE FEEL 11:58:20 THAT WE ARE PART OF THE ENERGY SOLUTION FOR THIS COUNTRY. 11:58:26 WE'RE CONSTRAINED, SHACKLES ON US. 11:58:29 WE'RE READY TO INVEST. WE'RE READY TO DO FOR MORE. 11:58:32 YOU'VE HEARD TODAY. SO IT'S NOT A QUESTION OF 11:58:34 LOOKING FOR INCENTIVES. WE'RE LOOKING FOR -- GIVE US -- 11:58:38 PUT US BACK TO WORK. OPEN UP -- GIVE US ACCESS TO THE 11:58:41 LAND. LET US START DRILLING. 11:58:43 PUT OUR PEOPLE BACK TO WORK AND WE'LL DEVELOP -- 11:58:46 I'M WAY PAST MY TIME, BUT CAN I JUST SAY THAT, YOU KNOW, WE 11:58:52 FEEL CONSTRAINED, WE CAN'T DO WHAT WE WANT TO DO, MAYBE YOU'RE 11:58:58 RIGHT AND MAYBE YOU'RE WRONG. I THINK YOU'RE WRONG.
United States House of Representatives 1000-1100
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House meets for legislative business. Ten One Minutes per side Last votes expected between 9:00 & 10:00 p.m. Veto Override on the Conference Report on H.R. 1591- U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Health and Iraq Accountability Act. H.R. 1429 - Improving Head Start Act of 2007 (Rep. Kildee - Education and Labor) (Subject to a Rule) H.R. 1867 - National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2007 (Rep. Baird - Science and Technology) (Subject to a Rule) Postponed Suspension Vote (1 bill): 1) H.Res.243 - Calling on the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to immediately and unconditionally release Father Nguyen Van Ly, Nguyen Van Dai, Le Thi Cong Nhan, and other political prisoners and prisoners of conscience, and for other purposes (Rep. Smith (NJ) - Foreign Affairs) 10:02:47.9 the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the chaplain. chaplain coughlin: lord god, who speaks wisdom to the 10:02:59.3 brokenhearted and heals the wounds of nations, when any of us comes to an impasse and becomes paralyzed with fear or confusion, by prophetic call you bid us to turn to you with renewed faith. 10:03:15.6 lord, speak your word and help leaders of government and judges in courts to look beyond self-interest as if this were the path for another's good. and while in dialogue seeking 10:03:31.2 the full circumference of facts , let a new light arise in their midst which draws all to a deeper common ground. which will grant us surface of security and truth and pave a 10:03:48.1 course to justice and peace. which always reflects your image and will last now and forever. amen. the speaker: the chair has 10:04:02.1 examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge to the flag will be 10:04:19.3 led by the gentleman from ohio, mr. kucinich. mr. kucinich: thank you, madam speaker. please join me in pledging to the flag which embodies our nation's highest ideals. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty 10:04:34.2 and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will 10:04:50.6 receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the messenger: madam speaker. the speaker: mr. secretary. the secretary: i'm directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker: the chair will 10:05:25.6 entertain up to 10 one minutes on each side. the gentleman from illinois. mr. emanuel: to address the house for one minute. 10:05:41.2 the list of republicans under investigation or resigning in this administration in disgrace keeps growing. this morning "the washington post" reported julia mcdonald, the deputy assistant secretary of the interior department, resigned just as she was being investigated for changing 10:05:58.9 scientific reports. i wish this was an isolated 10:06:06.4 case in the bush administration . this morning "the new york times" reported the department of commerce inspector general faces three separate investigations into the conduct of his office. scott block, the special counsel at the justice department, is being investigated for the management of his office. 10:06:20.8 lucita doan being investigated for the politicization of the offices. sue ellen woolridge at justice stepped down. davis sabian, o.m.b. had to 10:06:38.2 step down. all have had their conduct scrutinized. it is time for a fact and justifies why this congress is doing its job of oversight and accountability and bringing 10:06:49.9 people's professional conduct in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. mchenry: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mchenry: thank you, madam speaker. i rise to join with millions across our nation who applaud the supreme court's recent decision to ban -- to uphold 10:07:07.8 the ban on partial-birth abortion. partial-birth abortion is unrivaled in its gruesome brutality. there is no question it's caused the vicious destruction of viable living, breathing babies whose only crime is inconvenience. 10:07:22.1 the court's decision is a victory in the quest to restore the dignity of human life. no longer will the most vulnerable and innocent among us be subject to such cruelty as partial-birth abortion. it's also a victory for the constitution, mr. speaker. which liberal activist judges have demeaned for far too long. 10:07:40.8 it's encouraging to see the court's decision move towards our founders' vision, a vision rooted in the commitment to not only protect but also respect human life. while this is a step forward, it is only one victory in a 10:07:55.7 longer struggle to assure that the abolition of abortion altogether is achieved. let us not ever forget our responsibility to hold the basic sanctity granted to us by our maker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:08:10.1 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. mr. kucinich: request permission to address the house, revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kucinich: the president's veto will stand but now what will we stand for? we say we want the war to end. 10:08:29.6 but will we give the president the money to continue the war? we say we want our troops home. but will we continue to support the occupation? we know that u.s. contractors have been stealing from u.s. 10:08:45.8 taxpayers and iraqi government, but will we leave our troops in iraq to protect them? we know oil has had a lot to do with this war, but will we let this president get away with attempting to privatize iraq's 10:09:02.3 oil well shall shall -- wealth in the name of reconciliation? we can still change course. we can deny the administration funds to continue the war. we can bring our troops home, we can stabilize iraq with international security force, once we end the occupation. 10:09:18.3 that's exactly what h.r. 1234 is about. and it's time that we started to look for alternatives which reflect this nation's highest aspirations. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from 10:09:31.6 pennsylvania. mr. pitts: to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pitts: mr. speaker, anyone who was alive at the time will always remember the collapse of the berlin wall. with the soviet block crumbling, the western world rejoiced as freedoms spread to 10:09:48.2 populations once thought hopelesslyly -- hopelessly in the grip of communist -- communism. unfortunately recent actions seem to be giving new life to old communist ghost. police squads crushing the 10:10:04.6 kremlin's decenters. advocates of freedom and transparency silenced. cultural figures detained. the recent backsliding in russia should be cause for alarm for all freedom-loving people. 10:10:18.9 as the kremlin's power expands, freedom for the russian people sha rinks. this was wrong during the -- shrinks. this was wrong during the cold war and wrong now. it is time the free nations of the world take a stand against this trend. start demanding more from mr. putin and russia's leaders. i yield back. 10:10:36.5 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. cohen: request one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cohen: i want to talk, mr. speaker, today about a gentleman who was an army specialist, evan caradine jr. 10:10:53.9 he would have been 36 years old today if he lived. he was from my hometown of memphis, tennessee, where we have lost nine veterans. he joined the army to provide a 10:11:04.6 wetter life -- better life for his family. he graduated from high school and worked his way up to being manager of a restaurant. he had a wife and four children. three years ago to this day army specialist died. 10:11:22.7 he was in a convoy in baghdad that was hit by an i.e.d. three years ago. three days before his death he called his wife and he said, there was a change. she said there was a change in 10:11:36.5 his voice. he said it's getting worse over here. it's not getting better. since then nearly 3,000 more soldiers have died. army specialist carradine jr. said something three years and 10:11:53.1 three days ago that's still true. it's getting worse over here not better. let's not have more deaths. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. 10:12:09.5 speaker. imagine my beloved st. louis cardinals playing the much despised chicago cubs. the cardinals are are up by five finishing the top of the ninth. is this a cause for celebration? is this a cause for victory? no. unbelievable as it may seem, 10:12:26.2 the cubbies score five runs in the bottom of the ninth to throw the games into extra innings. there the score remains until 1:00 a.m. five innings later. however at the top of the 15th the cardinals fail to field a batter. the entire team has left the stadium. 10:12:41.4 it seems that they are more worried about next day's 1:00 p.m. game at home than finishing the game at hand. who wins? we know it's the team that stays on the field. arbitrary deadlines and a date certain accept defeat before the conclusion of the contest. it is our national security 10:12:58.5 interest that continue to take the field and support a moderate arab state. leaving prior assures a loss for us and victory for our opponents which will lead to another extremist islamic state. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. 10:13:14.0 the gentleman from texas. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, the president can veto our plan for a safe, orderly phased redeployment from iraq, but he cannot veto reality. 10:13:29.7 our troops are coming home. it's just a question of how much blood and money will be spent before they do. if the president had listened to the generals, we would never have invaded iraq in the first place. each day of this unnecessary tragedy demonstrates the wisdom 10:13:47.6 of general schwarzkopf that we would become like a dinosaur in a tar pit. had he listened to the generals, the president would have deployed enough troops to get the job done. instead he rejected the advice of general shinseki and allowed 10:14:03.5 the violence to spiral and unguarded weapons heaps became i.e.d.'s. if the president had listened to the generals, he would now be redeploying our troops instead of sending more inadequately protected for longer repeat tours of duty. 10:14:18.5 had he listened to the generals, our veterans would be getting the quality care that they have earned and deserved. but in this administration, generals who disagree with the president earn a new title -- retired. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. 10:14:35.4 mr. kirk: i ask unanimous consent to address the house. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kirk: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the conyers-kirk local law enforcement hate crimes prevention act. we know that a hate crime can ignite group on group violence 10:14:49.7 that can completely overwhelm a small suburban police department. in 2005, the f.b.i. recorded 7,000 hate crimes in our country, 168 in the state of illinois, and two in my congressional district, one in 10:15:06.5 wheeling and one in pallentine. for us we remember a tragic night in 1999 when ben min smith, a member of a white supremacist group, gunned down the northwestern university basketball coach in front of two kids. 10:15:20.9 why? because he was black. . smith continued his hunting spree shooting orthodox jews coming home from synagogue. these were hate crimes, crimes 10:15:37.4 designed to tear a community apart, crimes designed to commit and isolate a sigma tiesed members because of the color of their skin or the religion they practice. 10:15:51.1 i urge my colleagues to back the hate crimes bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without 10:16:04.3 objection. >> yesterday, the supplemental bill provides our soldiers everything the president asked for and more. it's a bill supported by the american people, this congress and military experts who believe it's time to change the course of the war in iraq. 10:16:18.7 the president's response, a veto. the president's action last night shows not only his stubbornness and his inability to work with others, it also demonstrates that he refuses to change the status quo. the president refuses to give 10:16:34.1 our troops, this congress or the american people any timelines as to when this war will end or under what conditions he will finally bring our troops home. mr. speaker, the president says that things are getting better in iraq, but that's simply not true. 10:16:48.8 last month was one of the deadliest months for american troops in iraq. 104 soldiers were killed. it's time for a new course. it's time for the president to sit down and work with this congress so we can finally produce the change that will end this war. 10:17:05.8 i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from minnesota. >> i request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> last night the president did what he said he was going to do 10:17:22.2 for weeks now. he vetoed the democrat supplemental that was loaded with pork, provided the enemy with an ill-conceived exit strategy. as the president said last night, mr. speaker, congress passed the bill that substitutes the judgment of politicians for 10:17:39.0 the judgment of our military commanders. i couldn't agree with him more. and that's why i oppose this supplemental. and that's exactly why he vetoed it. we must not, as a nation, be invested in defeat. again, i repeat. we must not as a nation be 10:17:55.8 invested in defeat. unilateral surrender may be the democrats' plan but it may not lead to a safer america. now that the veto has taken place, it's simply unacceptable for the democrat leaders to delay any further the funding 10:18:09.4 that our american troops deserve. let's pass a clean iraq supplemental, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa. >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the 10:18:25.7 house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> even after losing 3,100 american lives and spending billions of taxpayers' dollars after declaring mission accomplished four years ago, the bush administration continues to demand an open-ended commitment 10:18:43.0 of american troops in iraq. last night president bush refused to change a course when he vetoed a bill that was supported by congress, retired military generals and the american people. this put an end to the end 10:18:57.9 consistent with our national security needs. even secretary gates reiterated last month that congressional debate was helpful. he delivered the message to the iraqi government that the clock is ticking on u.s. operations there. 10:19:11.8 president bush's veto yesterday lets the iraqi government off the hook and shows the president plans to keep our troops there indefinitely. mr. speaker, the days of rubber stamping the president's war proposals are long over. the president is going to have to learn to work with the 10:19:27.4 democratic leadership on this congress so that we can find a way out of iraq soon and so we can provide our troops with the resources they need. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. poe: request permission to address the house for one 10:19:44.7 minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: now that the media side shows is over for the iraqi surrender group and the president vetoed the day of surrender bill yesterday and properly so, congress needs to get on with the business of funding our troops. failure to fund our troops not 10:20:00.5 only will affect our troops there but it will affect the iraqi security forces, the national guard and, of course, our reserves. that first bill may have funded some of the troops but it had the pork and beans pro-vision. the peanut farmers and the 10:20:18.1 spinach farmers. eliminate that and have a clean bill to support our troops. no more complaining. send them the money they need. this reminds me the same problem that stonewall jackson had with the army when they were 10:20:34.9 complaining about the war. he said, send more troops, no more questions. and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new hampshire. >> permission to address the house for one minute. yesterday, president bush called 10:20:50.8 the timetable a prescription for chaos and confusion. that timetable was a responsible road map out of iraq. the president has caused chaos 10:21:02.5 and confusion for four long years, replacing one general after another when the general disagrees with the policy. what has the president given us? he's given us the largest deficit in history. he's cut back from domestic programs to pay for this war. 10:21:19.5 he's weakened the military. 88% of the national guard is prepared to go to war. he's neglected our own people, and he's destroyed iraq's economy, their social fabric. people are leaving iraq, fleeing from the chaos the president has 10:21:34.6 caused for four long years. we had a responsible road map. the president should have signed it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. price: i ask unanimous 10:21:49.7 consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. price: yesterday the majority party sent a plan for fail aure to the president and the president did the write thing, he sent it back. it's now time for congress to pass a funding bill that supports their mission. 10:22:08.2 the majority party has done nothing, nothing but delay the delivery of tools and resources to our troops in the field while outlining a very specific and dangerous blueprint for defeat. let's stop wasting time. let's stop trying to rewrite the constitution and the role of the 10:22:24.6 commander in chief. we have a choice. the majority can continue to play these partisan games or we can get down to work. we have that choice. the brave men and women in our armed forces do not. let's honor their sacrifice with leadership rather than political partisanship. 10:22:40.3 the american people are watching, and so are our allies and our enemies around the world. we have a choice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. sires: request perm -- question permission to address 10:22:59.2 the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sires: president bush said that our mission in iraq was accomplished. can you imagine that? four years later it is clear that this was one of the many miscalculations on the bush 10:23:15.0 administration part. over the past four years we've lost more than 3,000 additional troops. tens of thousands more have been injured. and hundreds of billions of u.s. taxpayers' dollars have been spent. now a dangerous civil war has been waged with no end in sight. the american military did its 10:23:31.7 job. military experts agree there is no military solution to the war in iraq. that is why this congress approved an mother-in-law supplemental bill last week -- approved an emergency supplemental bill last week. american troops are not going to 10:23:48.0 be there indefinitely. mr. speaker, president bush was wrong four years ago. he's wrong now. it's time for the president to work with this congress to come up with a plan to end this war. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:24:02.9 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> one of our greatest responsibilities is our dependence on middle east oil. and we need to advance home 10:24:24.3 grown renewable energy resources. this week i will introduce the energy through independence through biodiesel act, creating this will help the scales 10:24:38.2 necessary to america america the leader in re-- necessary to make america the leader in renewable resources. it will demand the clean air act to require that all diesel fuels sold contains a 2% industry 10:24:53.7 average. 55 billion gallons of diesel was consumed in 2005. and a 2% standard will create a 1.1 billion gallon market. this will spur the necessary investments and facilities and technological advancements needed in this alternative fuel 10:25:09.3 industry. i urge my colleagues to commit to diversifying our supply and less our dependence on foreign industry and support this act. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota. 10:25:24.8 >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, four years ago today, president bush landed for a photo opportunity in front of a banner that said mission accomplished and declared an end to major combat in iraq. 10:25:41.2 four years later this president refuses to discuss the reality of a military mission that's entered its fifth year. yesterday the president has vetoed the second bill. he called it a prescription for chaos and confusion. i ask, how is that different from what we have now? 10:25:56.3 he refuses to even hold the iraqis accountable for making 10:26:03.3 economic or diplomatic reforms that he promised and they promised to make. what exactly is the president waiting for? now that the president's rejected our legislation, he has the responsibility to tell the american people how many more years does he expect us to stay. 10:26:17.0 do you think it will be five, maybe 10? and what exactly do the ground conditions look like in order to have us beginning to withdraw? wishful thinking, political talking points and rigid ideology do not make good foreign policy. this president was wrong when he declared an end of combat 10:26:33.7 operations. and he's been consistently wrong about every single thing in iraq. it's time that this president works with the new congress, elected by the majority of the american people so that we can bring about a change to this war and truly secure america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:26:49.4 gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from oklahoma. ms. fallin: question permission to address the house for one minute. mr. speaker, this is a difficult time for our nation. we are all war weary. we're all heart broken over any loss of life, and we're all 10:27:04.3 concerned about the cost of the war. all americans, republicans, democrats and, yes, the president, want this war over as soon as possible. it's time to stop the political games and put the needs of our men and our women defending our nation first. 10:27:19.3 the people of america want a solution to bring the troops home, but not at the expense of jeopardizing the safety and the future of our nation. as a nation we must make a strong commitment and a decoration to the world that the united states will defend itself and will not tolerate terrorism. 10:27:37.1 nor will we coddle terrorists or surrender or appease them. the commander in chief vetoed a bill which sought to micromanage the war, tie the hands of our generals. 10:27:50.3 congress must uphold the president's veto, set aside the cut and run attitude, the loser attitude for good. where is the pride for the defense of our nation, the liberty and the freedoms that thousands of men and women have given their lives for in earlier years? thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:28:08.0 time of the gentlewoman has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. i would remind our guests in the gallery that any expression of favor or disfavor with what is said on the floor is a violation of the rules. 10:28:24.9 the gentleman from new jersey. mr. payne: thank you, mr. speaker. over this past week, five more american soldiers were killed in iraq bringing the number killed in april to over 100 u.s. soldiers. it was the deadliest month for american soldiers this year. 10:28:41.3 sadly, the total number of americans killed now stand at 3,351, along with thousands of innocent iraqi men, women and children. the reality is on the ground that our brave soldiers continue to face day in and day out, stand in stark contrast to 10:28:59.9 president bush's pronouncement four years ago that major combat operations were over. if was over four years ago, what have our troops been fighting the last four years? it's indeed our mission was 10:29:15.3 accomplished four years ago as the banner behind the president on that aircraft carrier proclaimed. what are our troops still doing in iraq? if our president wants to bring this to a just conclusion, he should work with congress 10:29:29.8 instead of just vetoing our funding bill as he did. it's now up to the president to decide if he will support accountability for iraqis' benchmarks for success, a new direction in iraq or we cannot stay this course. 10:29:44.7 i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from florida. >> i request that i address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, under current law, military pay rates must be reasonably 10:30:02.3 comparable to those in the private sector with similar skills, education and experience. unfortunately, due to budgetary constraints over the years, the military pay increase has not always met this criteria, and a pay gap was created. 10:30:17.1 . this gap is not only unfair to our brave men and women in uniform, it also has raised retention and readiness concerns. for this reason i have introduced h.r. 2027, the military pay improvement act 10:30:33.4 which would give them a minimum of 3.5%. our nation's brave men and women in uniform have fought gallantly to ensure the continued safety, security, and prosperity of this great nation. 10:30:49.0 i believe it is unacceptable that we task these men and women with extraordinary responsibilities, especially during war times, and cannot compensate them accordingly. 10:31:01.2 the debt we owe them for their sacrifices can never be repaid. however my bill will take a small step in the right direction to show our appreciation for their valor. thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all my colleagues to co-sponsor the bill. appreciate it. 10:31:14.6 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the seener, house of representatives. madam, pursuant to clause 5-a -4-a of rule 10 of the rules of 10:31:30.8 the house of representatives, i designate the following members to be available for service on investigative subcommittees of the committee on standards of official conduct during the 110th congress. the honorable rod bishop, the monyash marshall blackburn, the 10:31:46.3 honorable andrew crenshaw, the honorable lincoln diaz-balart, the honorable phil english, the honorable tom latham, the honorable frank lucas, the honorable sue myrick, the honorable mike simpson, and the honorable greg walden. 10:32:04.3 sincerely, john a. bane letter -- boehner, republican leader. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 349 and ask for its 10:32:18.7 immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 47, house resolution 349, resolved that at any time after the adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 10:32:34.5 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill h.r. 1867, to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2008, 2009, and 2010, for the national science foundation and 10:32:51.2 for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be 10:33:06.8 confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. it shall be in order under -- 10:33:23.7 in order to consider as an original bill for purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on science and technology now printed in the bill. all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are 10:33:37.6 waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in the portion of the 10:33:52.9 congressional record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule 18, and except pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate. each amendment so printed may be offered only by the member who caused it to be printed or his designee and shall be 10:34:08.1 considered as read. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the 10:34:24.1 committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. 10:34:40.6 section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1867, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to 10:34:54.1 such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for one hour. mrs. matsui: for the purpose of debate only, i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from washington, mr. hastings, winding which i yield 10:35:10.2 myself such time as i may consume. -- pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. matsui: during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on h.res. 349 and insert extraneous 10:35:30.8 material into the record. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, this rule permits the house to consider the national science foundation authorization act of 2007. this important legislation would be considered under an open rule with a preprinting 10:35:47.4 requirement. allowing any member to submit changes or improvements to the bill. chairman gordon, chairman baird, ranking member hall, ranking member ehlers, and the science and technology committee have put together an 10:36:01.9 excellent product and look forward to an open and constructive debate. i am proud that today's debate will shine a light on the national science foundation. the national science foundation is truly one of the federal government's greatest 10:36:14.9 accomplishments. it features a rich tradition that has supported talented young investigators, made america the world leader in basic science and renovation, and laid the ground-work for the nation's economic strength. this also represents another 10:36:31.5 important step in the implementation of the innovation agenda. by boosting scientific research and development, moving the nation toward a clean energy economy, promoting broadband deployment, and supporting small business entrepreneurs, 10:36:48.4 the innovation agenda will keep our promise to maintain and strengthen america's competitiveness and leadership in the global economy. at present the national science foundation supports research and education activities at 10:37:04.4 over 2,000 universities, colleges, k through 12 schools, and research institutions throughout the country. it is unique among our federal research enterprises in that n.s.f. supports scientists and engineers across all disciplines. 10:37:19.7 in a given year n.s.f. will support about 200,000 scientists, engineers, teachers, and students. that is why n.s.f. funding has led to groundbreaking research in such varied fields as genetics, computer science, 10:37:37.3 information technology, nanotechnology, and climate change. by way of example in my district n.s.f. funds the u.c. davis center for biofoe tonic science and technology. the center features dynamic and 10:37:54.1 innovative research that harnesses light to facile at this time revolutionary advances in biomedical science. the potential applications for medical research and treatment are are groundbreaking and will offer hope to thousands of our 10:38:08.9 constituents. that is the kind of research n.s.f. supports. i'd also like to point out that n.s.f. resources are distributed on a competitive peer review basis. so an objective process allows for only the most worthy 10:38:23.6 proposal to receive funding. this is the best kind of investment the federal government can make because a return on this investment is tremendous. by stimulating innovative research, we create educational opportunities for promising 10:38:39.2 students and drive cutting-edge research throughout the country. there is no better way to fuel the economy and create quality jobs. that is why the national science foundation has broad and bipartisan support in 10:38:53.1 congress. this re-authorization provides $21 billion at n.s.f. for fiscal years 2008 through 2010. in doing so, it keeps us on the path to double national science foundation funding by 2017. 10:39:10.6 this was a key recommendation of the highly respected national accounting report on u.s. competitiveness, rising above the gathering storm. and this boost is urgently needed. 10:39:24.4 since today n.s.f. can only fund about a quarter of the grant proposals that are submitted. the bill also creates a pilot program targeted at new investigators so we can bring more talented young people into scientific research fields. and it directs n.s.f. to 10:39:41.9 facilitate public-private partnerships, a proven method to leveraging federal investment and bolstering american competitiveness. finally, this re-authorization bill is on the agency's legacy of promoting math and science 10:39:56.5 education by including the provisions of h.r. 362, the 10,000 teacher, 10 million minds math and science scholarship act, which the house passed last week. with that i thank the science committee once again for this excellent legislation. 10:40:11.8 i look forward to a robust debate on this bill. and i hope we can work with the senate to get it on the president's desk in short order. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:28.1 mr. speaker, i thank the gentlelady from california for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. hastings: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:43.8 mr. speaker, the national science foundation plays an important role in making sure that our nation is a global leader in the fields of science and engineering. this federal agency provides critical support for researchers, educators, and students in science, technology, engineering, and 10:41:00.9 mathematics. specifically federal support allows the american scientists to pursue high risk, high return fields that increase our nation's competitiveness and scientific knowledge, and ensures we are able to attract the brightest minds to our colleges and universities. 10:41:15.4 one area in which the national science foundation is supporting u.s. leadership is in the sciences -- in the sciences is in the laser interferamoter observatory 10:41:29.5 program. the ligo program which operates and observatory in central washington in my district is trying to detect for the first time the existence of gravitational waves which have been sought by physicists around the world since they were theorized by albert einstein. 10:41:45.5 their discovery would lead to a greater understanding of the makeup of the universe and help solidify our nation's lead in the fields of physics and astrophysics. the president's fiscal year 2008 budget provides for the expansion of lyingo and nearly bubbles funding for the 10:42:02.8 observatory to allow for more advanced research. i'm leezed -- pleased that the national science foundation authorization act supports this proposed expansion. the program is not only an important investment in our nation's science capability, but it also has been an 10:42:18.9 instrument of learning for local communities. the ligo's observatory was recently awarded one of the first ever science education advocate awards by the washington state leadership and assistance science education reform. 10:42:33.5 a partnership of public schools and science institutions. ligo is an excellent example of the national science foundation's dedication to funding world class research while also helping to grow students' interest in the science. mr. speaker, if america is to 10:42:49.7 continue to lead the world in science and the pursuit of knowledge, funding for the national science foundation is essential. the underlying legislation authorizes the national science foundation for three years at strong levels needed to maintain and strengthen 10:43:05.8 research through the foundation. but, mr. speaker, i am once again disappointed that the democrat majority has once again missed an opportunity to provide consideration for the national science foundation act under an open rule that would allow all members of the house 10:43:21.5 to come to the floor and offer amendments during consideration of the bill. the national science foundation was last authorized in 2002 and at that time the republican majority allowed the bill to be considered under a truly open rule. i'm disappointed the democrat 10:43:38.1 majority has pledged a new era of openness, but so far has not lived up to their commitment. instead it frankly has tried to change the definition of what an open rule is. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:43:54.9 gentleman from washington reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i inquire of the gentleman from washington if he has any remaining speakers. mr. hastings: i have no requests for time. if the gentlelady is prepared to yield back, i'll yield back. mrs. matsui: i have some closing remarks. 10:44:10.1 would you like to -- mr. hastings: i've made remarks. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i'm very much looking forward to the upcoming debate on the national science foundation re-authorizing this rule 10:44:26.9 allows. in discussing the various programs initiatives at n.s.f. we'll demonstrate how the federal government can effectively drive scientific discovery and innovation. the importance of the national science foundation and its mission must not be underestimated. 10:44:41.5 while america has been blessed with abundant natural resources, it is innovative spirit of our citizens that has driven this nation's leadership and global economy. throughout our history, we have been willing to experiment, to take risk, to constantly redefine what is possible. 10:44:59.1 that tradition has given us a competitive advantage over other countries that has created prosperity for the nation. improving the quality of life for all our constituents. as members know well, our leadership in the global economy is at risk today. we face rising threats from 10:45:14.7 countries like india and china, we have also failed to make the necessary invetsments in education, science, and research and development to maintain the foundation of knowledge that has served us so well in the past. . this re-authorization chase 10:45:30.8 great strides to remedy that neglect. most importantly to double n.s.f. funding over the next 10 years. we demonstrate that ensuring the nation's competitiveness as a high priority. the importance we place on 10:45:47.3 competitiveness will be demonstrated against and again. with that i look forward to today's debate and continuing to move forward on measures like this that will boleser innovation and compet i have -- 10:46:00.4 bolster innovation and competitiveness. i urge a yes vote and move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. all time has now expired. without objection, the previous 10:46:13.7 question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the ayes have it, the resolution is agreed to and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. 10:46:55.1 10:47:08.5 the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek recognition? 10:47:13.9 ms. sutton: i ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 350. resolved, that at anytime after the adoption of this resolution, the speaker may, pursuant to 10:47:29.3 clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union, to authorize appropriations for the national institute of standards and technology for fiscal years 10:47:44.8 2008, 2009 and 2010, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be confined 10:48:01.8 to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered under amendment under the five-minute rule. 10:48:16.5 it shall be considered as original bill for purpose of the amendment under the five-minute rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee of science and technology now printed in the bill. the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. 10:48:32.5 all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are waived except those arising out of clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be 10:48:48.6 in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall 10:49:03.7 be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent and shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject for division of the question in the house or in 10:49:19.0 the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 under rule 21. after conclusion of the consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as 10:49:34.3 may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to 10:49:51.4 final passage without intervening motions except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1868, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of 10:50:06.0 the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized for one hour. ms. sutton: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purpose of debate only, 10:50:21.2 i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. sessions. all time yielded during consideration of the bill is for debate only. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i also ask unanimous consent that all members may be given 10:50:40.0 five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks on house resolution 350. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. sutton: h.r. 350 provides consideration for h.r. 186867 -- 10:50:57.5 1867 under a structured rule. 10:51:00.3 it provides one hour of general debate to be controlled by the chairman and the ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. the rule makes in order five amendments printed in the rules committee report, each with 10 minutes of debate. the rule also provides one 10:51:17.0 motion to recommit with or without instructions. mr. speaker, i speak today in support of house resolution 350 and h.r. 1868, the technology, manufacturing and stimulation 10:51:33.8 fact. the united states commerce department's national institute of standards and technology strives to promote u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness through the 10:51:49.0 advancement of measurement, standards, science and technology. through numerous individual laboratories, the nist makes important scientific contributions to numerous scientific fields. 10:52:05.3 this bill will enhance the important mission putting the nisto a path to double its budget by the year 2017. with additional funding. the nist will continue to make important contributions to public safety, industrial 10:52:21.7 competitiveness and economic growth. this bill also alindicates funding for the manufacturing extension partnership, also known as m.e.p. these m.e.p. programs will leverage federal, state, local and private investments to 10:52:37.3 stimulate new manufacturing processes and technologies. these new processes and technologies are a key component for ensuring manufacturers have the tools to compete effectively and efficiently against overseas 10:52:54.3 manufacturers. the m.e.p. program has proven remarkably effective in my home state of ohio where small and mid-sized manufacturers face limited budgets, in-house expertise and access to the 10:53:09.5 newest technologies. m.e.p. assistance provided training, expertise and services tailored to the critical needs of ohio's small and mid-sized manufacturers have made a big difference. through this assistance, manufacturers in ohio have 10:53:25.0 increased productivity, achieved higher profits and remained competitive by providing the latest and most efficient technologies, processes and business practices. in 2006, as a direct result of m.e.p. assistance, my state 10:53:41.5 enjoyed over $150 million of new investment and over $500 million in increased or retained sales. companies in ohio participating in the m.e.p. reported cost savings of over $100 million. through the continued funding of 10:53:58.2 this vital program, we can bring these vast benefits to even more small manufacturers across the country. finally and very importantly, this bill allocates funding for the new technology innovation program, which funds high-risk, 10:54:16.2 high-reward, pre-competitive technology development by small and medium-sized companies. the goal of this program is to accelerate the development of technologies that will have a broad economic impact on our technology market. 10:54:32.2 harvard professor daniel bell once said, quote, technology, like art, is a soaring exercise of human imagination, end quote. it is through the national institute of standards and technology, the manufacturing extension partnership, and the technology innovation program 10:54:48.7 that technology is given the wind that it needs to soar. even more importantly, through this bill, small and mid-sized manufacturers will be given the support they need to compete with larger competitors in overseas businesses. 10:55:03.4 this bill will not only provide assistance to american companies, like the 1,773 companies in ohio that were helped by the manufacturing extension partnership, but it will also create a stronger and more vibrant american technology industry. 10:55:19.3 this is a good bill, and it deserves our support. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: good morning, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of promoting technological innovation, 10:55:38.2 bolesering the strength of our manufacturing industry, and contributing to the overall global competitiveness of american business. however, i simply cannot support the closed rule process brought forward today by the democrat majority that prevents all but one republican amendment from 10:55:53.9 being considered by the house. 10:55:58.9 -- this rule represents a substantial break by recent precedent because a comprehension of this report that was brought to the rules committee, the republican 10:56:11.0 majority provided the house with a completely open rule for its consideration. i know this, mr. speaker, because i had the privilege of managing that rule for our majority. and the democrat minority's position was then aptly handled by the chairman of the rules committee, my good friend, 10:56:29.6 chairwoman louise slaughter. unfortunately, chairwoman slaughter has forgotten the merits of providing the house with an open rules process, because today the committee that she chairs has provided the house with a closed process. through a restrictive rule, not 10:56:45.5 an open rule, even using the more len yant definition of an open rule currently being employed by the democrat leadership, it is a modified 10:56:59.7 open rule. i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record to have a copy of this rule which provided for consideration of h.r. 2733, to remind the majority that nist re-authorization is -- it's 10:57:17.5 possible to do this under an open process. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sessions: despite my objection to the rule, i do support the underlying legislation which makes a number of positive changes to an institution with a long history of helping to keep america globally competitive. 10:57:35.9 since its inception in 1901, the national institute of standards and technology has worked diligently to achieve its mission of promoting u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement, science, standards 10:57:52.6 and technology in ways that enhances economic security and improve the quality of life. by focusing on its core mission of stimulating innovation, fostering industrial competition and competitiveness and improving quality of life, the 10:58:09.7 nist has become a valuable component in the ongoing struggle that the united states faces to remain globally competitive. this legislation authorizes appropriations for nist for the 10:58:24.7 next three years. most notably, doubling the federal government's investment in fiscal science research as proposed by president bush's american competitiveness initiative. and this increased investment will yield real world benefits 10:58:41.3 across the number of diverse sectors, including development standards for bulletproof vests for military and law enforcement, chemical and biological protection equipment for first responders and measurement standards vital to 10:58:57.7 leading edge industries, like nanotechnology and next generation solar cells that will help america increase its energy independence. this legislation strengthens oversight by requiring the nist director to submit annual 10:59:15.6 problematic planning documents to congress ensuring that the nist budget is -- their budget is spent on activities that meet the needs of american industry, and that the increased funds, which the nist is being 10:59:29.8 entrusted with, are spent wisely. this legislation also takes steps to ensure the continued viability of the workhouses of the american economy. small and medium-sized manufacturers. 10:59:45.0 by re-authorizing the manufacturing extension partnership program, congress will help countless domestic manufacturers to improve their manufacturing process, reduce waste, and to train workers to use new equipment. mr. speaker, i do appreciate the
United States House of Representatives 1000-1100
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House meets for legislative business. Ten One Minutes per side Last votes expected between 9:00 & 10:00 p.m. Veto Override on the Conference Report on H.R. 1591- U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Health and Iraq Accountability Act. H.R. 1429 - Improving Head Start Act of 2007 (Rep. Kildee - Education and Labor) (Subject to a Rule) H.R. 1867 - National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2007 (Rep. Baird - Science and Technology) (Subject to a Rule) Postponed Suspension Vote (1 bill): 1) H.Res.243 - Calling on the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to immediately and unconditionally release Father Nguyen Van Ly, Nguyen Van Dai, Le Thi Cong Nhan, and other political prisoners and prisoners of conscience, and for other purposes (Rep. Smith (NJ) - Foreign Affairs) 10:02:47.9 the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the chaplain. chaplain coughlin: lord god, who speaks wisdom to the 10:02:59.3 brokenhearted and heals the wounds of nations, when any of us comes to an impasse and becomes paralyzed with fear or confusion, by prophetic call you bid us to turn to you with renewed faith. 10:03:15.6 lord, speak your word and help leaders of government and judges in courts to look beyond self-interest as if this were the path for another's good. and while in dialogue seeking 10:03:31.2 the full circumference of facts , let a new light arise in their midst which draws all to a deeper common ground. which will grant us surface of security and truth and pave a 10:03:48.1 course to justice and peace. which always reflects your image and will last now and forever. amen. the speaker: the chair has 10:04:02.1 examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge to the flag will be 10:04:19.3 led by the gentleman from ohio, mr. kucinich. mr. kucinich: thank you, madam speaker. please join me in pledging to the flag which embodies our nation's highest ideals. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty 10:04:34.2 and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will 10:04:50.6 receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the messenger: madam speaker. the speaker: mr. secretary. the secretary: i'm directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker: the chair will 10:05:25.6 entertain up to 10 one minutes on each side. the gentleman from illinois. mr. emanuel: to address the house for one minute. 10:05:41.2 the list of republicans under investigation or resigning in this administration in disgrace keeps growing. this morning "the washington post" reported julia mcdonald, the deputy assistant secretary of the interior department, resigned just as she was being investigated for changing 10:05:58.9 scientific reports. i wish this was an isolated 10:06:06.4 case in the bush administration . this morning "the new york times" reported the department of commerce inspector general faces three separate investigations into the conduct of his office. scott block, the special counsel at the justice department, is being investigated for the management of his office. 10:06:20.8 lucita doan being investigated for the politicization of the offices. sue ellen woolridge at justice stepped down. davis sabian, o.m.b. had to 10:06:38.2 step down. all have had their conduct scrutinized. it is time for a fact and justifies why this congress is doing its job of oversight and accountability and bringing 10:06:49.9 people's professional conduct in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. mchenry: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mchenry: thank you, madam speaker. i rise to join with millions across our nation who applaud the supreme court's recent decision to ban -- to uphold 10:07:07.8 the ban on partial-birth abortion. partial-birth abortion is unrivaled in its gruesome brutality. there is no question it's caused the vicious destruction of viable living, breathing babies whose only crime is inconvenience. 10:07:22.1 the court's decision is a victory in the quest to restore the dignity of human life. no longer will the most vulnerable and innocent among us be subject to such cruelty as partial-birth abortion. it's also a victory for the constitution, mr. speaker. which liberal activist judges have demeaned for far too long. 10:07:40.8 it's encouraging to see the court's decision move towards our founders' vision, a vision rooted in the commitment to not only protect but also respect human life. while this is a step forward, it is only one victory in a 10:07:55.7 longer struggle to assure that the abolition of abortion altogether is achieved. let us not ever forget our responsibility to hold the basic sanctity granted to us by our maker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:08:10.1 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. mr. kucinich: request permission to address the house, revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kucinich: the president's veto will stand but now what will we stand for? we say we want the war to end. 10:08:29.6 but will we give the president the money to continue the war? we say we want our troops home. but will we continue to support the occupation? we know that u.s. contractors have been stealing from u.s. 10:08:45.8 taxpayers and iraqi government, but will we leave our troops in iraq to protect them? we know oil has had a lot to do with this war, but will we let this president get away with attempting to privatize iraq's 10:09:02.3 oil well shall shall -- wealth in the name of reconciliation? we can still change course. we can deny the administration funds to continue the war. we can bring our troops home, we can stabilize iraq with international security force, once we end the occupation. 10:09:18.3 that's exactly what h.r. 1234 is about. and it's time that we started to look for alternatives which reflect this nation's highest aspirations. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from 10:09:31.6 pennsylvania. mr. pitts: to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pitts: mr. speaker, anyone who was alive at the time will always remember the collapse of the berlin wall. with the soviet block crumbling, the western world rejoiced as freedoms spread to 10:09:48.2 populations once thought hopelesslyly -- hopelessly in the grip of communist -- communism. unfortunately recent actions seem to be giving new life to old communist ghost. police squads crushing the 10:10:04.6 kremlin's decenters. advocates of freedom and transparency silenced. cultural figures detained. the recent backsliding in russia should be cause for alarm for all freedom-loving people. 10:10:18.9 as the kremlin's power expands, freedom for the russian people sha rinks. this was wrong during the -- shrinks. this was wrong during the cold war and wrong now. it is time the free nations of the world take a stand against this trend. start demanding more from mr. putin and russia's leaders. i yield back. 10:10:36.5 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. cohen: request one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cohen: i want to talk, mr. speaker, today about a gentleman who was an army specialist, evan caradine jr. 10:10:53.9 he would have been 36 years old today if he lived. he was from my hometown of memphis, tennessee, where we have lost nine veterans. he joined the army to provide a 10:11:04.6 wetter life -- better life for his family. he graduated from high school and worked his way up to being manager of a restaurant. he had a wife and four children. three years ago to this day army specialist died. 10:11:22.7 he was in a convoy in baghdad that was hit by an i.e.d. three years ago. three days before his death he called his wife and he said, there was a change. she said there was a change in 10:11:36.5 his voice. he said it's getting worse over here. it's not getting better. since then nearly 3,000 more soldiers have died. army specialist carradine jr. said something three years and 10:11:53.1 three days ago that's still true. it's getting worse over here not better. let's not have more deaths. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. 10:12:09.5 speaker. imagine my beloved st. louis cardinals playing the much despised chicago cubs. the cardinals are are up by five finishing the top of the ninth. is this a cause for celebration? is this a cause for victory? no. unbelievable as it may seem, 10:12:26.2 the cubbies score five runs in the bottom of the ninth to throw the games into extra innings. there the score remains until 1:00 a.m. five innings later. however at the top of the 15th the cardinals fail to field a batter. the entire team has left the stadium. 10:12:41.4 it seems that they are more worried about next day's 1:00 p.m. game at home than finishing the game at hand. who wins? we know it's the team that stays on the field. arbitrary deadlines and a date certain accept defeat before the conclusion of the contest. it is our national security 10:12:58.5 interest that continue to take the field and support a moderate arab state. leaving prior assures a loss for us and victory for our opponents which will lead to another extremist islamic state. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. 10:13:14.0 the gentleman from texas. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, the president can veto our plan for a safe, orderly phased redeployment from iraq, but he cannot veto reality. 10:13:29.7 our troops are coming home. it's just a question of how much blood and money will be spent before they do. if the president had listened to the generals, we would never have invaded iraq in the first place. each day of this unnecessary tragedy demonstrates the wisdom 10:13:47.6 of general schwarzkopf that we would become like a dinosaur in a tar pit. had he listened to the generals, the president would have deployed enough troops to get the job done. instead he rejected the advice of general shinseki and allowed 10:14:03.5 the violence to spiral and unguarded weapons heaps became i.e.d.'s. if the president had listened to the generals, he would now be redeploying our troops instead of sending more inadequately protected for longer repeat tours of duty. 10:14:18.5 had he listened to the generals, our veterans would be getting the quality care that they have earned and deserved. but in this administration, generals who disagree with the president earn a new title -- retired. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. 10:14:35.4 mr. kirk: i ask unanimous consent to address the house. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kirk: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the conyers-kirk local law enforcement hate crimes prevention act. we know that a hate crime can ignite group on group violence 10:14:49.7 that can completely overwhelm a small suburban police department. in 2005, the f.b.i. recorded 7,000 hate crimes in our country, 168 in the state of illinois, and two in my congressional district, one in 10:15:06.5 wheeling and one in pallentine. for us we remember a tragic night in 1999 when ben min smith, a member of a white supremacist group, gunned down the northwestern university basketball coach in front of two kids. 10:15:20.9 why? because he was black. . smith continued his hunting spree shooting orthodox jews coming home from synagogue. these were hate crimes, crimes 10:15:37.4 designed to tear a community apart, crimes designed to commit and isolate a sigma tiesed members because of the color of their skin or the religion they practice. 10:15:51.1 i urge my colleagues to back the hate crimes bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without 10:16:04.3 objection. >> yesterday, the supplemental bill provides our soldiers everything the president asked for and more. it's a bill supported by the american people, this congress and military experts who believe it's time to change the course of the war in iraq. 10:16:18.7 the president's response, a veto. the president's action last night shows not only his stubbornness and his inability to work with others, it also demonstrates that he refuses to change the status quo. the president refuses to give 10:16:34.1 our troops, this congress or the american people any timelines as to when this war will end or under what conditions he will finally bring our troops home. mr. speaker, the president says that things are getting better in iraq, but that's simply not true. 10:16:48.8 last month was one of the deadliest months for american troops in iraq. 104 soldiers were killed. it's time for a new course. it's time for the president to sit down and work with this congress so we can finally produce the change that will end this war. 10:17:05.8 i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from minnesota. >> i request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> last night the president did what he said he was going to do 10:17:22.2 for weeks now. he vetoed the democrat supplemental that was loaded with pork, provided the enemy with an ill-conceived exit strategy. as the president said last night, mr. speaker, congress passed the bill that substitutes the judgment of politicians for 10:17:39.0 the judgment of our military commanders. i couldn't agree with him more. and that's why i oppose this supplemental. and that's exactly why he vetoed it. we must not, as a nation, be invested in defeat. again, i repeat. we must not as a nation be 10:17:55.8 invested in defeat. unilateral surrender may be the democrats' plan but it may not lead to a safer america. now that the veto has taken place, it's simply unacceptable for the democrat leaders to delay any further the funding 10:18:09.4 that our american troops deserve. let's pass a clean iraq supplemental, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa. >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the 10:18:25.7 house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> even after losing 3,100 american lives and spending billions of taxpayers' dollars after declaring mission accomplished four years ago, the bush administration continues to demand an open-ended commitment 10:18:43.0 of american troops in iraq. last night president bush refused to change a course when he vetoed a bill that was supported by congress, retired military generals and the american people. this put an end to the end 10:18:57.9 consistent with our national security needs. even secretary gates reiterated last month that congressional debate was helpful. he delivered the message to the iraqi government that the clock is ticking on u.s. operations there. 10:19:11.8 president bush's veto yesterday lets the iraqi government off the hook and shows the president plans to keep our troops there indefinitely. mr. speaker, the days of rubber stamping the president's war proposals are long over. the president is going to have to learn to work with the 10:19:27.4 democratic leadership on this congress so that we can find a way out of iraq soon and so we can provide our troops with the resources they need. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. poe: request permission to address the house for one 10:19:44.7 minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: now that the media side shows is over for the iraqi surrender group and the president vetoed the day of surrender bill yesterday and properly so, congress needs to get on with the business of funding our troops. failure to fund our troops not 10:20:00.5 only will affect our troops there but it will affect the iraqi security forces, the national guard and, of course, our reserves. that first bill may have funded some of the troops but it had the pork and beans pro-vision. the peanut farmers and the 10:20:18.1 spinach farmers. eliminate that and have a clean bill to support our troops. no more complaining. send them the money they need. this reminds me the same problem that stonewall jackson had with the army when they were 10:20:34.9 complaining about the war. he said, send more troops, no more questions. and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new hampshire. >> permission to address the house for one minute. yesterday, president bush called 10:20:50.8 the timetable a prescription for chaos and confusion. that timetable was a responsible road map out of iraq. the president has caused chaos 10:21:02.5 and confusion for four long years, replacing one general after another when the general disagrees with the policy. what has the president given us? he's given us the largest deficit in history. he's cut back from domestic programs to pay for this war. 10:21:19.5 he's weakened the military. 88% of the national guard is prepared to go to war. he's neglected our own people, and he's destroyed iraq's economy, their social fabric. people are leaving iraq, fleeing from the chaos the president has 10:21:34.6 caused for four long years. we had a responsible road map. the president should have signed it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. price: i ask unanimous 10:21:49.7 consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. price: yesterday the majority party sent a plan for fail aure to the president and the president did the write thing, he sent it back. it's now time for congress to pass a funding bill that supports their mission. 10:22:08.2 the majority party has done nothing, nothing but delay the delivery of tools and resources to our troops in the field while outlining a very specific and dangerous blueprint for defeat. let's stop wasting time. let's stop trying to rewrite the constitution and the role of the 10:22:24.6 commander in chief. we have a choice. the majority can continue to play these partisan games or we can get down to work. we have that choice. the brave men and women in our armed forces do not. let's honor their sacrifice with leadership rather than political partisanship. 10:22:40.3 the american people are watching, and so are our allies and our enemies around the world. we have a choice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. sires: request perm -- question permission to address 10:22:59.2 the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sires: president bush said that our mission in iraq was accomplished. can you imagine that? four years later it is clear that this was one of the many miscalculations on the bush 10:23:15.0 administration part. over the past four years we've lost more than 3,000 additional troops. tens of thousands more have been injured. and hundreds of billions of u.s. taxpayers' dollars have been spent. now a dangerous civil war has been waged with no end in sight. the american military did its 10:23:31.7 job. military experts agree there is no military solution to the war in iraq. that is why this congress approved an mother-in-law supplemental bill last week -- approved an emergency supplemental bill last week. american troops are not going to 10:23:48.0 be there indefinitely. mr. speaker, president bush was wrong four years ago. he's wrong now. it's time for the president to work with this congress to come up with a plan to end this war. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:24:02.9 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> one of our greatest responsibilities is our dependence on middle east oil. and we need to advance home 10:24:24.3 grown renewable energy resources. this week i will introduce the energy through independence through biodiesel act, creating this will help the scales 10:24:38.2 necessary to america america the leader in re-- necessary to make america the leader in renewable resources. it will demand the clean air act to require that all diesel fuels sold contains a 2% industry 10:24:53.7 average. 55 billion gallons of diesel was consumed in 2005. and a 2% standard will create a 1.1 billion gallon market. this will spur the necessary investments and facilities and technological advancements needed in this alternative fuel 10:25:09.3 industry. i urge my colleagues to commit to diversifying our supply and less our dependence on foreign industry and support this act. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota. 10:25:24.8 >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, four years ago today, president bush landed for a photo opportunity in front of a banner that said mission accomplished and declared an end to major combat in iraq. 10:25:41.2 four years later this president refuses to discuss the reality of a military mission that's entered its fifth year. yesterday the president has vetoed the second bill. he called it a prescription for chaos and confusion. i ask, how is that different from what we have now? 10:25:56.3 he refuses to even hold the iraqis accountable for making 10:26:03.3 economic or diplomatic reforms that he promised and they promised to make. what exactly is the president waiting for? now that the president's rejected our legislation, he has the responsibility to tell the american people how many more years does he expect us to stay. 10:26:17.0 do you think it will be five, maybe 10? and what exactly do the ground conditions look like in order to have us beginning to withdraw? wishful thinking, political talking points and rigid ideology do not make good foreign policy. this president was wrong when he declared an end of combat 10:26:33.7 operations. and he's been consistently wrong about every single thing in iraq. it's time that this president works with the new congress, elected by the majority of the american people so that we can bring about a change to this war and truly secure america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:26:49.4 gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from oklahoma. ms. fallin: question permission to address the house for one minute. mr. speaker, this is a difficult time for our nation. we are all war weary. we're all heart broken over any loss of life, and we're all 10:27:04.3 concerned about the cost of the war. all americans, republicans, democrats and, yes, the president, want this war over as soon as possible. it's time to stop the political games and put the needs of our men and our women defending our nation first. 10:27:19.3 the people of america want a solution to bring the troops home, but not at the expense of jeopardizing the safety and the future of our nation. as a nation we must make a strong commitment and a decoration to the world that the united states will defend itself and will not tolerate terrorism. 10:27:37.1 nor will we coddle terrorists or surrender or appease them. the commander in chief vetoed a bill which sought to micromanage the war, tie the hands of our generals. 10:27:50.3 congress must uphold the president's veto, set aside the cut and run attitude, the loser attitude for good. where is the pride for the defense of our nation, the liberty and the freedoms that thousands of men and women have given their lives for in earlier years? thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:28:08.0 time of the gentlewoman has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. i would remind our guests in the gallery that any expression of favor or disfavor with what is said on the floor is a violation of the rules. 10:28:24.9 the gentleman from new jersey. mr. payne: thank you, mr. speaker. over this past week, five more american soldiers were killed in iraq bringing the number killed in april to over 100 u.s. soldiers. it was the deadliest month for american soldiers this year. 10:28:41.3 sadly, the total number of americans killed now stand at 3,351, along with thousands of innocent iraqi men, women and children. the reality is on the ground that our brave soldiers continue to face day in and day out, stand in stark contrast to 10:28:59.9 president bush's pronouncement four years ago that major combat operations were over. if was over four years ago, what have our troops been fighting the last four years? it's indeed our mission was 10:29:15.3 accomplished four years ago as the banner behind the president on that aircraft carrier proclaimed. what are our troops still doing in iraq? if our president wants to bring this to a just conclusion, he should work with congress 10:29:29.8 instead of just vetoing our funding bill as he did. it's now up to the president to decide if he will support accountability for iraqis' benchmarks for success, a new direction in iraq or we cannot stay this course. 10:29:44.7 i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from florida. >> i request that i address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, under current law, military pay rates must be reasonably 10:30:02.3 comparable to those in the private sector with similar skills, education and experience. unfortunately, due to budgetary constraints over the years, the military pay increase has not always met this criteria, and a pay gap was created. 10:30:17.1 . this gap is not only unfair to our brave men and women in uniform, it also has raised retention and readiness concerns. for this reason i have introduced h.r. 2027, the military pay improvement act 10:30:33.4 which would give them a minimum of 3.5%. our nation's brave men and women in uniform have fought gallantly to ensure the continued safety, security, and prosperity of this great nation. 10:30:49.0 i believe it is unacceptable that we task these men and women with extraordinary responsibilities, especially during war times, and cannot compensate them accordingly. 10:31:01.2 the debt we owe them for their sacrifices can never be repaid. however my bill will take a small step in the right direction to show our appreciation for their valor. thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all my colleagues to co-sponsor the bill. appreciate it. 10:31:14.6 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the seener, house of representatives. madam, pursuant to clause 5-a -4-a of rule 10 of the rules of 10:31:30.8 the house of representatives, i designate the following members to be available for service on investigative subcommittees of the committee on standards of official conduct during the 110th congress. the honorable rod bishop, the monyash marshall blackburn, the 10:31:46.3 honorable andrew crenshaw, the honorable lincoln diaz-balart, the honorable phil english, the honorable tom latham, the honorable frank lucas, the honorable sue myrick, the honorable mike simpson, and the honorable greg walden. 10:32:04.3 sincerely, john a. bane letter -- boehner, republican leader. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 349 and ask for its 10:32:18.7 immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 47, house resolution 349, resolved that at any time after the adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 10:32:34.5 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill h.r. 1867, to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2008, 2009, and 2010, for the national science foundation and 10:32:51.2 for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be 10:33:06.8 confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. it shall be in order under -- 10:33:23.7 in order to consider as an original bill for purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on science and technology now printed in the bill. all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are 10:33:37.6 waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in the portion of the 10:33:52.9 congressional record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule 18, and except pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate. each amendment so printed may be offered only by the member who caused it to be printed or his designee and shall be 10:34:08.1 considered as read. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the 10:34:24.1 committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. 10:34:40.6 section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1867, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to 10:34:54.1 such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for one hour. mrs. matsui: for the purpose of debate only, i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from washington, mr. hastings, winding which i yield 10:35:10.2 myself such time as i may consume. -- pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. matsui: during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on h.res. 349 and insert extraneous 10:35:30.8 material into the record. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, this rule permits the house to consider the national science foundation authorization act of 2007. this important legislation would be considered under an open rule with a preprinting 10:35:47.4 requirement. allowing any member to submit changes or improvements to the bill. chairman gordon, chairman baird, ranking member hall, ranking member ehlers, and the science and technology committee have put together an 10:36:01.9 excellent product and look forward to an open and constructive debate. i am proud that today's debate will shine a light on the national science foundation. the national science foundation is truly one of the federal government's greatest 10:36:14.9 accomplishments. it features a rich tradition that has supported talented young investigators, made america the world leader in basic science and renovation, and laid the ground-work for the nation's economic strength. this also represents another 10:36:31.5 important step in the implementation of the innovation agenda. by boosting scientific research and development, moving the nation toward a clean energy economy, promoting broadband deployment, and supporting small business entrepreneurs, 10:36:48.4 the innovation agenda will keep our promise to maintain and strengthen america's competitiveness and leadership in the global economy. at present the national science foundation supports research and education activities at 10:37:04.4 over 2,000 universities, colleges, k through 12 schools, and research institutions throughout the country. it is unique among our federal research enterprises in that n.s.f. supports scientists and engineers across all disciplines. 10:37:19.7 in a given year n.s.f. will support about 200,000 scientists, engineers, teachers, and students. that is why n.s.f. funding has led to groundbreaking research in such varied fields as genetics, computer science, 10:37:37.3 information technology, nanotechnology, and climate change. by way of example in my district n.s.f. funds the u.c. davis center for biofoe tonic science and technology. the center features dynamic and 10:37:54.1 innovative research that harnesses light to facile at this time revolutionary advances in biomedical science. the potential applications for medical research and treatment are are groundbreaking and will offer hope to thousands of our 10:38:08.9 constituents. that is the kind of research n.s.f. supports. i'd also like to point out that n.s.f. resources are distributed on a competitive peer review basis. so an objective process allows for only the most worthy 10:38:23.6 proposal to receive funding. this is the best kind of investment the federal government can make because a return on this investment is tremendous. by stimulating innovative research, we create educational opportunities for promising 10:38:39.2 students and drive cutting-edge research throughout the country. there is no better way to fuel the economy and create quality jobs. that is why the national science foundation has broad and bipartisan support in 10:38:53.1 congress. this re-authorization provides $21 billion at n.s.f. for fiscal years 2008 through 2010. in doing so, it keeps us on the path to double national science foundation funding by 2017. 10:39:10.6 this was a key recommendation of the highly respected national accounting report on u.s. competitiveness, rising above the gathering storm. and this boost is urgently needed. 10:39:24.4 since today n.s.f. can only fund about a quarter of the grant proposals that are submitted. the bill also creates a pilot program targeted at new investigators so we can bring more talented young people into scientific research fields. and it directs n.s.f. to 10:39:41.9 facilitate public-private partnerships, a proven method to leveraging federal investment and bolstering american competitiveness. finally, this re-authorization bill is on the agency's legacy of promoting math and science 10:39:56.5 education by including the provisions of h.r. 362, the 10,000 teacher, 10 million minds math and science scholarship act, which the house passed last week. with that i thank the science committee once again for this excellent legislation. 10:40:11.8 i look forward to a robust debate on this bill. and i hope we can work with the senate to get it on the president's desk in short order. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:28.1 mr. speaker, i thank the gentlelady from california for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. hastings: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:43.8 mr. speaker, the national science foundation plays an important role in making sure that our nation is a global leader in the fields of science and engineering. this federal agency provides critical support for researchers, educators, and students in science, technology, engineering, and 10:41:00.9 mathematics. specifically federal support allows the american scientists to pursue high risk, high return fields that increase our nation's competitiveness and scientific knowledge, and ensures we are able to attract the brightest minds to our colleges and universities. 10:41:15.4 one area in which the national science foundation is supporting u.s. leadership is in the sciences -- in the sciences is in the laser interferamoter observatory 10:41:29.5 program. the ligo program which operates and observatory in central washington in my district is trying to detect for the first time the existence of gravitational waves which have been sought by physicists around the world since they were theorized by albert einstein. 10:41:45.5 their discovery would lead to a greater understanding of the makeup of the universe and help solidify our nation's lead in the fields of physics and astrophysics. the president's fiscal year 2008 budget provides for the expansion of lyingo and nearly bubbles funding for the 10:42:02.8 observatory to allow for more advanced research. i'm leezed -- pleased that the national science foundation authorization act supports this proposed expansion. the program is not only an important investment in our nation's science capability, but it also has been an 10:42:18.9 instrument of learning for local communities. the ligo's observatory was recently awarded one of the first ever science education advocate awards by the washington state leadership and assistance science education reform. 10:42:33.5 a partnership of public schools and science institutions. ligo is an excellent example of the national science foundation's dedication to funding world class research while also helping to grow students' interest in the science. mr. speaker, if america is to 10:42:49.7 continue to lead the world in science and the pursuit of knowledge, funding for the national science foundation is essential. the underlying legislation authorizes the national science foundation for three years at strong levels needed to maintain and strengthen 10:43:05.8 research through the foundation. but, mr. speaker, i am once again disappointed that the democrat majority has once again missed an opportunity to provide consideration for the national science foundation act under an open rule that would allow all members of the house 10:43:21.5 to come to the floor and offer amendments during consideration of the bill. the national science foundation was last authorized in 2002 and at that time the republican majority allowed the bill to be considered under a truly open rule. i'm disappointed the democrat 10:43:38.1 majority has pledged a new era of openness, but so far has not lived up to their commitment. instead it frankly has tried to change the definition of what an open rule is. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:43:54.9 gentleman from washington reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i inquire of the gentleman from washington if he has any remaining speakers. mr. hastings: i have no requests for time. if the gentlelady is prepared to yield back, i'll yield back. mrs. matsui: i have some closing remarks. 10:44:10.1 would you like to -- mr. hastings: i've made remarks. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i'm very much looking forward to the upcoming debate on the national science foundation re-authorizing this rule 10:44:26.9 allows. in discussing the various programs initiatives at n.s.f. we'll demonstrate how the federal government can effectively drive scientific discovery and innovation. the importance of the national science foundation and its mission must not be underestimated. 10:44:41.5 while america has been blessed with abundant natural resources, it is innovative spirit of our citizens that has driven this nation's leadership and global economy. throughout our history, we have been willing to experiment, to take risk, to constantly redefine what is possible. 10:44:59.1 that tradition has given us a competitive advantage over other countries that has created prosperity for the nation. improving the quality of life for all our constituents. as members know well, our leadership in the global economy is at risk today. we face rising threats from 10:45:14.7 countries like india and china, we have also failed to make the necessary invetsments in education, science, and research and development to maintain the foundation of knowledge that has served us so well in the past. . this re-authorization chase 10:45:30.8 great strides to remedy that neglect. most importantly to double n.s.f. funding over the next 10 years. we demonstrate that ensuring the nation's competitiveness as a high priority. the importance we place on 10:45:47.3 competitiveness will be demonstrated against and again. with that i look forward to today's debate and continuing to move forward on measures like this that will boleser innovation and compet i have -- 10:46:00.4 bolster innovation and competitiveness. i urge a yes vote and move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. all time has now expired. without objection, the previous 10:46:13.7 question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the ayes have it, the resolution is agreed to and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. 10:46:55.1 10:47:08.5 the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek recognition? 10:47:13.9 ms. sutton: i ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 350. resolved, that at anytime after the adoption of this resolution, the speaker may, pursuant to 10:47:29.3 clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union, to authorize appropriations for the national institute of standards and technology for fiscal years 10:47:44.8 2008, 2009 and 2010, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be confined 10:48:01.8 to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered under amendment under the five-minute rule. 10:48:16.5 it shall be considered as original bill for purpose of the amendment under the five-minute rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee of science and technology now printed in the bill. the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. 10:48:32.5 all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are waived except those arising out of clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be 10:48:48.6 in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall 10:49:03.7 be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent and shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject for division of the question in the house or in 10:49:19.0 the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 under rule 21. after conclusion of the consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as 10:49:34.3 may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to 10:49:51.4 final passage without intervening motions except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1868, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of 10:50:06.0 the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized for one hour. ms. sutton: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purpose of debate only, 10:50:21.2 i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. sessions. all time yielded during consideration of the bill is for debate only. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i also ask unanimous consent that all members may be given 10:50:40.0 five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks on house resolution 350. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. sutton: h.r. 350 provides consideration for h.r. 186867 -- 10:50:57.5 1867 under a structured rule. 10:51:00.3 it provides one hour of general debate to be controlled by the chairman and the ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. the rule makes in order five amendments printed in the rules committee report, each with 10 minutes of debate. the rule also provides one 10:51:17.0 motion to recommit with or without instructions. mr. speaker, i speak today in support of house resolution 350 and h.r. 1868, the technology, manufacturing and stimulation 10:51:33.8 fact. the united states commerce department's national institute of standards and technology strives to promote u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness through the 10:51:49.0 advancement of measurement, standards, science and technology. through numerous individual laboratories, the nist makes important scientific contributions to numerous scientific fields. 10:52:05.3 this bill will enhance the important mission putting the nisto a path to double its budget by the year 2017. with additional funding. the nist will continue to make important contributions to public safety, industrial 10:52:21.7 competitiveness and economic growth. this bill also alindicates funding for the manufacturing extension partnership, also known as m.e.p. these m.e.p. programs will leverage federal, state, local and private investments to 10:52:37.3 stimulate new manufacturing processes and technologies. these new processes and technologies are a key component for ensuring manufacturers have the tools to compete effectively and efficiently against overseas 10:52:54.3 manufacturers. the m.e.p. program has proven remarkably effective in my home state of ohio where small and mid-sized manufacturers face limited budgets, in-house expertise and access to the 10:53:09.5 newest technologies. m.e.p. assistance provided training, expertise and services tailored to the critical needs of ohio's small and mid-sized manufacturers have made a big difference. through this assistance, manufacturers in ohio have 10:53:25.0 increased productivity, achieved higher profits and remained competitive by providing the latest and most efficient technologies, processes and business practices. in 2006, as a direct result of m.e.p. assistance, my state 10:53:41.5 enjoyed over $150 million of new investment and over $500 million in increased or retained sales. companies in ohio participating in the m.e.p. reported cost savings of over $100 million. through the continued funding of 10:53:58.2 this vital program, we can bring these vast benefits to even more small manufacturers across the country. finally and very importantly, this bill allocates funding for the new technology innovation program, which funds high-risk, 10:54:16.2 high-reward, pre-competitive technology development by small and medium-sized companies. the goal of this program is to accelerate the development of technologies that will have a broad economic impact on our technology market. 10:54:32.2 harvard professor daniel bell once said, quote, technology, like art, is a soaring exercise of human imagination, end quote. it is through the national institute of standards and technology, the manufacturing extension partnership, and the technology innovation program 10:54:48.7 that technology is given the wind that it needs to soar. even more importantly, through this bill, small and mid-sized manufacturers will be given the support they need to compete with larger competitors in overseas businesses. 10:55:03.4 this bill will not only provide assistance to american companies, like the 1,773 companies in ohio that were helped by the manufacturing extension partnership, but it will also create a stronger and more vibrant american technology industry. 10:55:19.3 this is a good bill, and it deserves our support. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: good morning, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of promoting technological innovation, 10:55:38.2 bolesering the strength of our manufacturing industry, and contributing to the overall global competitiveness of american business. however, i simply cannot support the closed rule process brought forward today by the democrat majority that prevents all but one republican amendment from 10:55:53.9 being considered by the house. 10:55:58.9 -- this rule represents a substantial break by recent precedent because a comprehension of this report that was brought to the rules committee, the republican 10:56:11.0 majority provided the house with a completely open rule for its consideration. i know this, mr. speaker, because i had the privilege of managing that rule for our majority. and the democrat minority's position was then aptly handled by the chairman of the rules committee, my good friend, 10:56:29.6 chairwoman louise slaughter. unfortunately, chairwoman slaughter has forgotten the merits of providing the house with an open rules process, because today the committee that she chairs has provided the house with a closed process. through a restrictive rule, not 10:56:45.5 an open rule, even using the more len yant definition of an open rule currently being employed by the democrat leadership, it is a modified 10:56:59.7 open rule. i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record to have a copy of this rule which provided for consideration of h.r. 2733, to remind the majority that nist re-authorization is -- it's 10:57:17.5 possible to do this under an open process. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sessions: despite my objection to the rule, i do support the underlying legislation which makes a number of positive changes to an institution with a long history of helping to keep america globally competitive. 10:57:35.9 since its inception in 1901, the national institute of standards and technology has worked diligently to achieve its mission of promoting u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement, science, standards 10:57:52.6 and technology in ways that enhances economic security and improve the quality of life. by focusing on its core mission of stimulating innovation, fostering industrial competition and competitiveness and improving quality of life, the 10:58:09.7 nist has become a valuable component in the ongoing struggle that the united states faces to remain globally competitive. this legislation authorizes appropriations for nist for the 10:58:24.7 next three years. most notably, doubling the federal government's investment in fiscal science research as proposed by president bush's american competitiveness initiative. and this increased investment will yield real world benefits 10:58:41.3 across the number of diverse sectors, including development standards for bulletproof vests for military and law enforcement, chemical and biological protection equipment for first responders and measurement standards vital to 10:58:57.7 leading edge industries, like nanotechnology and next generation solar cells that will help america increase its energy independence. this legislation strengthens oversight by requiring the nist director to submit annual 10:59:15.6 problematic planning documents to congress ensuring that the nist budget is -- their budget is spent on activities that meet the needs of american industry, and that the increased funds, which the nist is being 10:59:29.8 entrusted with, are spent wisely. this legislation also takes steps to ensure the continued viability of the workhouses of the american economy. small and medium-sized manufacturers. 10:59:45.0 by re-authorizing the manufacturing extension partnership program, congress will help countless domestic manufacturers to improve their manufacturing process, reduce waste, and to train workers to use new equipment. mr. speaker, i do appreciate the
United States House of Representatives 1000-1100
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House meets for legislative business. Ten One Minutes per side Last votes expected between 9:00 & 10:00 p.m. Veto Override on the Conference Report on H.R. 1591- U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Health and Iraq Accountability Act. H.R. 1429 - Improving Head Start Act of 2007 (Rep. Kildee - Education and Labor) (Subject to a Rule) H.R. 1867 - National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2007 (Rep. Baird - Science and Technology) (Subject to a Rule) Postponed Suspension Vote (1 bill): 1) H.Res.243 - Calling on the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to immediately and unconditionally release Father Nguyen Van Ly, Nguyen Van Dai, Le Thi Cong Nhan, and other political prisoners and prisoners of conscience, and for other purposes (Rep. Smith (NJ) - Foreign Affairs) 10:02:47.9 the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the chaplain. chaplain coughlin: lord god, who speaks wisdom to the 10:02:59.3 brokenhearted and heals the wounds of nations, when any of us comes to an impasse and becomes paralyzed with fear or confusion, by prophetic call you bid us to turn to you with renewed faith. 10:03:15.6 lord, speak your word and help leaders of government and judges in courts to look beyond self-interest as if this were the path for another's good. and while in dialogue seeking 10:03:31.2 the full circumference of facts , let a new light arise in their midst which draws all to a deeper common ground. which will grant us surface of security and truth and pave a 10:03:48.1 course to justice and peace. which always reflects your image and will last now and forever. amen. the speaker: the chair has 10:04:02.1 examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge to the flag will be 10:04:19.3 led by the gentleman from ohio, mr. kucinich. mr. kucinich: thank you, madam speaker. please join me in pledging to the flag which embodies our nation's highest ideals. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty 10:04:34.2 and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will 10:04:50.6 receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the messenger: madam speaker. the speaker: mr. secretary. the secretary: i'm directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker: the chair will 10:05:25.6 entertain up to 10 one minutes on each side. the gentleman from illinois. mr. emanuel: to address the house for one minute. 10:05:41.2 the list of republicans under investigation or resigning in this administration in disgrace keeps growing. this morning "the washington post" reported julia mcdonald, the deputy assistant secretary of the interior department, resigned just as she was being investigated for changing 10:05:58.9 scientific reports. i wish this was an isolated 10:06:06.4 case in the bush administration . this morning "the new york times" reported the department of commerce inspector general faces three separate investigations into the conduct of his office. scott block, the special counsel at the justice department, is being investigated for the management of his office. 10:06:20.8 lucita doan being investigated for the politicization of the offices. sue ellen woolridge at justice stepped down. davis sabian, o.m.b. had to 10:06:38.2 step down. all have had their conduct scrutinized. it is time for a fact and justifies why this congress is doing its job of oversight and accountability and bringing 10:06:49.9 people's professional conduct in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. mchenry: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mchenry: thank you, madam speaker. i rise to join with millions across our nation who applaud the supreme court's recent decision to ban -- to uphold 10:07:07.8 the ban on partial-birth abortion. partial-birth abortion is unrivaled in its gruesome brutality. there is no question it's caused the vicious destruction of viable living, breathing babies whose only crime is inconvenience. 10:07:22.1 the court's decision is a victory in the quest to restore the dignity of human life. no longer will the most vulnerable and innocent among us be subject to such cruelty as partial-birth abortion. it's also a victory for the constitution, mr. speaker. which liberal activist judges have demeaned for far too long. 10:07:40.8 it's encouraging to see the court's decision move towards our founders' vision, a vision rooted in the commitment to not only protect but also respect human life. while this is a step forward, it is only one victory in a 10:07:55.7 longer struggle to assure that the abolition of abortion altogether is achieved. let us not ever forget our responsibility to hold the basic sanctity granted to us by our maker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:08:10.1 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. mr. kucinich: request permission to address the house, revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kucinich: the president's veto will stand but now what will we stand for? we say we want the war to end. 10:08:29.6 but will we give the president the money to continue the war? we say we want our troops home. but will we continue to support the occupation? we know that u.s. contractors have been stealing from u.s. 10:08:45.8 taxpayers and iraqi government, but will we leave our troops in iraq to protect them? we know oil has had a lot to do with this war, but will we let this president get away with attempting to privatize iraq's 10:09:02.3 oil well shall shall -- wealth in the name of reconciliation? we can still change course. we can deny the administration funds to continue the war. we can bring our troops home, we can stabilize iraq with international security force, once we end the occupation. 10:09:18.3 that's exactly what h.r. 1234 is about. and it's time that we started to look for alternatives which reflect this nation's highest aspirations. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from 10:09:31.6 pennsylvania. mr. pitts: to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pitts: mr. speaker, anyone who was alive at the time will always remember the collapse of the berlin wall. with the soviet block crumbling, the western world rejoiced as freedoms spread to 10:09:48.2 populations once thought hopelesslyly -- hopelessly in the grip of communist -- communism. unfortunately recent actions seem to be giving new life to old communist ghost. police squads crushing the 10:10:04.6 kremlin's decenters. advocates of freedom and transparency silenced. cultural figures detained. the recent backsliding in russia should be cause for alarm for all freedom-loving people. 10:10:18.9 as the kremlin's power expands, freedom for the russian people sha rinks. this was wrong during the -- shrinks. this was wrong during the cold war and wrong now. it is time the free nations of the world take a stand against this trend. start demanding more from mr. putin and russia's leaders. i yield back. 10:10:36.5 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. cohen: request one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cohen: i want to talk, mr. speaker, today about a gentleman who was an army specialist, evan caradine jr. 10:10:53.9 he would have been 36 years old today if he lived. he was from my hometown of memphis, tennessee, where we have lost nine veterans. he joined the army to provide a 10:11:04.6 wetter life -- better life for his family. he graduated from high school and worked his way up to being manager of a restaurant. he had a wife and four children. three years ago to this day army specialist died. 10:11:22.7 he was in a convoy in baghdad that was hit by an i.e.d. three years ago. three days before his death he called his wife and he said, there was a change. she said there was a change in 10:11:36.5 his voice. he said it's getting worse over here. it's not getting better. since then nearly 3,000 more soldiers have died. army specialist carradine jr. said something three years and 10:11:53.1 three days ago that's still true. it's getting worse over here not better. let's not have more deaths. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. 10:12:09.5 speaker. imagine my beloved st. louis cardinals playing the much despised chicago cubs. the cardinals are are up by five finishing the top of the ninth. is this a cause for celebration? is this a cause for victory? no. unbelievable as it may seem, 10:12:26.2 the cubbies score five runs in the bottom of the ninth to throw the games into extra innings. there the score remains until 1:00 a.m. five innings later. however at the top of the 15th the cardinals fail to field a batter. the entire team has left the stadium. 10:12:41.4 it seems that they are more worried about next day's 1:00 p.m. game at home than finishing the game at hand. who wins? we know it's the team that stays on the field. arbitrary deadlines and a date certain accept defeat before the conclusion of the contest. it is our national security 10:12:58.5 interest that continue to take the field and support a moderate arab state. leaving prior assures a loss for us and victory for our opponents which will lead to another extremist islamic state. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. 10:13:14.0 the gentleman from texas. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, the president can veto our plan for a safe, orderly phased redeployment from iraq, but he cannot veto reality. 10:13:29.7 our troops are coming home. it's just a question of how much blood and money will be spent before they do. if the president had listened to the generals, we would never have invaded iraq in the first place. each day of this unnecessary tragedy demonstrates the wisdom 10:13:47.6 of general schwarzkopf that we would become like a dinosaur in a tar pit. had he listened to the generals, the president would have deployed enough troops to get the job done. instead he rejected the advice of general shinseki and allowed 10:14:03.5 the violence to spiral and unguarded weapons heaps became i.e.d.'s. if the president had listened to the generals, he would now be redeploying our troops instead of sending more inadequately protected for longer repeat tours of duty. 10:14:18.5 had he listened to the generals, our veterans would be getting the quality care that they have earned and deserved. but in this administration, generals who disagree with the president earn a new title -- retired. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. 10:14:35.4 mr. kirk: i ask unanimous consent to address the house. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kirk: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the conyers-kirk local law enforcement hate crimes prevention act. we know that a hate crime can ignite group on group violence 10:14:49.7 that can completely overwhelm a small suburban police department. in 2005, the f.b.i. recorded 7,000 hate crimes in our country, 168 in the state of illinois, and two in my congressional district, one in 10:15:06.5 wheeling and one in pallentine. for us we remember a tragic night in 1999 when ben min smith, a member of a white supremacist group, gunned down the northwestern university basketball coach in front of two kids. 10:15:20.9 why? because he was black. . smith continued his hunting spree shooting orthodox jews coming home from synagogue. these were hate crimes, crimes 10:15:37.4 designed to tear a community apart, crimes designed to commit and isolate a sigma tiesed members because of the color of their skin or the religion they practice. 10:15:51.1 i urge my colleagues to back the hate crimes bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without 10:16:04.3 objection. >> yesterday, the supplemental bill provides our soldiers everything the president asked for and more. it's a bill supported by the american people, this congress and military experts who believe it's time to change the course of the war in iraq. 10:16:18.7 the president's response, a veto. the president's action last night shows not only his stubbornness and his inability to work with others, it also demonstrates that he refuses to change the status quo. the president refuses to give 10:16:34.1 our troops, this congress or the american people any timelines as to when this war will end or under what conditions he will finally bring our troops home. mr. speaker, the president says that things are getting better in iraq, but that's simply not true. 10:16:48.8 last month was one of the deadliest months for american troops in iraq. 104 soldiers were killed. it's time for a new course. it's time for the president to sit down and work with this congress so we can finally produce the change that will end this war. 10:17:05.8 i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from minnesota. >> i request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> last night the president did what he said he was going to do 10:17:22.2 for weeks now. he vetoed the democrat supplemental that was loaded with pork, provided the enemy with an ill-conceived exit strategy. as the president said last night, mr. speaker, congress passed the bill that substitutes the judgment of politicians for 10:17:39.0 the judgment of our military commanders. i couldn't agree with him more. and that's why i oppose this supplemental. and that's exactly why he vetoed it. we must not, as a nation, be invested in defeat. again, i repeat. we must not as a nation be 10:17:55.8 invested in defeat. unilateral surrender may be the democrats' plan but it may not lead to a safer america. now that the veto has taken place, it's simply unacceptable for the democrat leaders to delay any further the funding 10:18:09.4 that our american troops deserve. let's pass a clean iraq supplemental, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa. >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the 10:18:25.7 house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> even after losing 3,100 american lives and spending billions of taxpayers' dollars after declaring mission accomplished four years ago, the bush administration continues to demand an open-ended commitment 10:18:43.0 of american troops in iraq. last night president bush refused to change a course when he vetoed a bill that was supported by congress, retired military generals and the american people. this put an end to the end 10:18:57.9 consistent with our national security needs. even secretary gates reiterated last month that congressional debate was helpful. he delivered the message to the iraqi government that the clock is ticking on u.s. operations there. 10:19:11.8 president bush's veto yesterday lets the iraqi government off the hook and shows the president plans to keep our troops there indefinitely. mr. speaker, the days of rubber stamping the president's war proposals are long over. the president is going to have to learn to work with the 10:19:27.4 democratic leadership on this congress so that we can find a way out of iraq soon and so we can provide our troops with the resources they need. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. poe: request permission to address the house for one 10:19:44.7 minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: now that the media side shows is over for the iraqi surrender group and the president vetoed the day of surrender bill yesterday and properly so, congress needs to get on with the business of funding our troops. failure to fund our troops not 10:20:00.5 only will affect our troops there but it will affect the iraqi security forces, the national guard and, of course, our reserves. that first bill may have funded some of the troops but it had the pork and beans pro-vision. the peanut farmers and the 10:20:18.1 spinach farmers. eliminate that and have a clean bill to support our troops. no more complaining. send them the money they need. this reminds me the same problem that stonewall jackson had with the army when they were 10:20:34.9 complaining about the war. he said, send more troops, no more questions. and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new hampshire. >> permission to address the house for one minute. yesterday, president bush called 10:20:50.8 the timetable a prescription for chaos and confusion. that timetable was a responsible road map out of iraq. the president has caused chaos 10:21:02.5 and confusion for four long years, replacing one general after another when the general disagrees with the policy. what has the president given us? he's given us the largest deficit in history. he's cut back from domestic programs to pay for this war. 10:21:19.5 he's weakened the military. 88% of the national guard is prepared to go to war. he's neglected our own people, and he's destroyed iraq's economy, their social fabric. people are leaving iraq, fleeing from the chaos the president has 10:21:34.6 caused for four long years. we had a responsible road map. the president should have signed it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. price: i ask unanimous 10:21:49.7 consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. price: yesterday the majority party sent a plan for fail aure to the president and the president did the write thing, he sent it back. it's now time for congress to pass a funding bill that supports their mission. 10:22:08.2 the majority party has done nothing, nothing but delay the delivery of tools and resources to our troops in the field while outlining a very specific and dangerous blueprint for defeat. let's stop wasting time. let's stop trying to rewrite the constitution and the role of the 10:22:24.6 commander in chief. we have a choice. the majority can continue to play these partisan games or we can get down to work. we have that choice. the brave men and women in our armed forces do not. let's honor their sacrifice with leadership rather than political partisanship. 10:22:40.3 the american people are watching, and so are our allies and our enemies around the world. we have a choice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. sires: request perm -- question permission to address 10:22:59.2 the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sires: president bush said that our mission in iraq was accomplished. can you imagine that? four years later it is clear that this was one of the many miscalculations on the bush 10:23:15.0 administration part. over the past four years we've lost more than 3,000 additional troops. tens of thousands more have been injured. and hundreds of billions of u.s. taxpayers' dollars have been spent. now a dangerous civil war has been waged with no end in sight. the american military did its 10:23:31.7 job. military experts agree there is no military solution to the war in iraq. that is why this congress approved an mother-in-law supplemental bill last week -- approved an emergency supplemental bill last week. american troops are not going to 10:23:48.0 be there indefinitely. mr. speaker, president bush was wrong four years ago. he's wrong now. it's time for the president to work with this congress to come up with a plan to end this war. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:24:02.9 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> one of our greatest responsibilities is our dependence on middle east oil. and we need to advance home 10:24:24.3 grown renewable energy resources. this week i will introduce the energy through independence through biodiesel act, creating this will help the scales 10:24:38.2 necessary to america america the leader in re-- necessary to make america the leader in renewable resources. it will demand the clean air act to require that all diesel fuels sold contains a 2% industry 10:24:53.7 average. 55 billion gallons of diesel was consumed in 2005. and a 2% standard will create a 1.1 billion gallon market. this will spur the necessary investments and facilities and technological advancements needed in this alternative fuel 10:25:09.3 industry. i urge my colleagues to commit to diversifying our supply and less our dependence on foreign industry and support this act. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota. 10:25:24.8 >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, four years ago today, president bush landed for a photo opportunity in front of a banner that said mission accomplished and declared an end to major combat in iraq. 10:25:41.2 four years later this president refuses to discuss the reality of a military mission that's entered its fifth year. yesterday the president has vetoed the second bill. he called it a prescription for chaos and confusion. i ask, how is that different from what we have now? 10:25:56.3 he refuses to even hold the iraqis accountable for making 10:26:03.3 economic or diplomatic reforms that he promised and they promised to make. what exactly is the president waiting for? now that the president's rejected our legislation, he has the responsibility to tell the american people how many more years does he expect us to stay. 10:26:17.0 do you think it will be five, maybe 10? and what exactly do the ground conditions look like in order to have us beginning to withdraw? wishful thinking, political talking points and rigid ideology do not make good foreign policy. this president was wrong when he declared an end of combat 10:26:33.7 operations. and he's been consistently wrong about every single thing in iraq. it's time that this president works with the new congress, elected by the majority of the american people so that we can bring about a change to this war and truly secure america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:26:49.4 gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from oklahoma. ms. fallin: question permission to address the house for one minute. mr. speaker, this is a difficult time for our nation. we are all war weary. we're all heart broken over any loss of life, and we're all 10:27:04.3 concerned about the cost of the war. all americans, republicans, democrats and, yes, the president, want this war over as soon as possible. it's time to stop the political games and put the needs of our men and our women defending our nation first. 10:27:19.3 the people of america want a solution to bring the troops home, but not at the expense of jeopardizing the safety and the future of our nation. as a nation we must make a strong commitment and a decoration to the world that the united states will defend itself and will not tolerate terrorism. 10:27:37.1 nor will we coddle terrorists or surrender or appease them. the commander in chief vetoed a bill which sought to micromanage the war, tie the hands of our generals. 10:27:50.3 congress must uphold the president's veto, set aside the cut and run attitude, the loser attitude for good. where is the pride for the defense of our nation, the liberty and the freedoms that thousands of men and women have given their lives for in earlier years? thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:28:08.0 time of the gentlewoman has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. i would remind our guests in the gallery that any expression of favor or disfavor with what is said on the floor is a violation of the rules. 10:28:24.9 the gentleman from new jersey. mr. payne: thank you, mr. speaker. over this past week, five more american soldiers were killed in iraq bringing the number killed in april to over 100 u.s. soldiers. it was the deadliest month for american soldiers this year. 10:28:41.3 sadly, the total number of americans killed now stand at 3,351, along with thousands of innocent iraqi men, women and children. the reality is on the ground that our brave soldiers continue to face day in and day out, stand in stark contrast to 10:28:59.9 president bush's pronouncement four years ago that major combat operations were over. if was over four years ago, what have our troops been fighting the last four years? it's indeed our mission was 10:29:15.3 accomplished four years ago as the banner behind the president on that aircraft carrier proclaimed. what are our troops still doing in iraq? if our president wants to bring this to a just conclusion, he should work with congress 10:29:29.8 instead of just vetoing our funding bill as he did. it's now up to the president to decide if he will support accountability for iraqis' benchmarks for success, a new direction in iraq or we cannot stay this course. 10:29:44.7 i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from florida. >> i request that i address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, under current law, military pay rates must be reasonably 10:30:02.3 comparable to those in the private sector with similar skills, education and experience. unfortunately, due to budgetary constraints over the years, the military pay increase has not always met this criteria, and a pay gap was created. 10:30:17.1 . this gap is not only unfair to our brave men and women in uniform, it also has raised retention and readiness concerns. for this reason i have introduced h.r. 2027, the military pay improvement act 10:30:33.4 which would give them a minimum of 3.5%. our nation's brave men and women in uniform have fought gallantly to ensure the continued safety, security, and prosperity of this great nation. 10:30:49.0 i believe it is unacceptable that we task these men and women with extraordinary responsibilities, especially during war times, and cannot compensate them accordingly. 10:31:01.2 the debt we owe them for their sacrifices can never be repaid. however my bill will take a small step in the right direction to show our appreciation for their valor. thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all my colleagues to co-sponsor the bill. appreciate it. 10:31:14.6 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the seener, house of representatives. madam, pursuant to clause 5-a -4-a of rule 10 of the rules of 10:31:30.8 the house of representatives, i designate the following members to be available for service on investigative subcommittees of the committee on standards of official conduct during the 110th congress. the honorable rod bishop, the monyash marshall blackburn, the 10:31:46.3 honorable andrew crenshaw, the honorable lincoln diaz-balart, the honorable phil english, the honorable tom latham, the honorable frank lucas, the honorable sue myrick, the honorable mike simpson, and the honorable greg walden. 10:32:04.3 sincerely, john a. bane letter -- boehner, republican leader. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 349 and ask for its 10:32:18.7 immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 47, house resolution 349, resolved that at any time after the adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 10:32:34.5 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill h.r. 1867, to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2008, 2009, and 2010, for the national science foundation and 10:32:51.2 for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be 10:33:06.8 confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. it shall be in order under -- 10:33:23.7 in order to consider as an original bill for purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on science and technology now printed in the bill. all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are 10:33:37.6 waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in the portion of the 10:33:52.9 congressional record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule 18, and except pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate. each amendment so printed may be offered only by the member who caused it to be printed or his designee and shall be 10:34:08.1 considered as read. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the 10:34:24.1 committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. 10:34:40.6 section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1867, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to 10:34:54.1 such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for one hour. mrs. matsui: for the purpose of debate only, i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from washington, mr. hastings, winding which i yield 10:35:10.2 myself such time as i may consume. -- pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. matsui: during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on h.res. 349 and insert extraneous 10:35:30.8 material into the record. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, this rule permits the house to consider the national science foundation authorization act of 2007. this important legislation would be considered under an open rule with a preprinting 10:35:47.4 requirement. allowing any member to submit changes or improvements to the bill. chairman gordon, chairman baird, ranking member hall, ranking member ehlers, and the science and technology committee have put together an 10:36:01.9 excellent product and look forward to an open and constructive debate. i am proud that today's debate will shine a light on the national science foundation. the national science foundation is truly one of the federal government's greatest 10:36:14.9 accomplishments. it features a rich tradition that has supported talented young investigators, made america the world leader in basic science and renovation, and laid the ground-work for the nation's economic strength. this also represents another 10:36:31.5 important step in the implementation of the innovation agenda. by boosting scientific research and development, moving the nation toward a clean energy economy, promoting broadband deployment, and supporting small business entrepreneurs, 10:36:48.4 the innovation agenda will keep our promise to maintain and strengthen america's competitiveness and leadership in the global economy. at present the national science foundation supports research and education activities at 10:37:04.4 over 2,000 universities, colleges, k through 12 schools, and research institutions throughout the country. it is unique among our federal research enterprises in that n.s.f. supports scientists and engineers across all disciplines. 10:37:19.7 in a given year n.s.f. will support about 200,000 scientists, engineers, teachers, and students. that is why n.s.f. funding has led to groundbreaking research in such varied fields as genetics, computer science, 10:37:37.3 information technology, nanotechnology, and climate change. by way of example in my district n.s.f. funds the u.c. davis center for biofoe tonic science and technology. the center features dynamic and 10:37:54.1 innovative research that harnesses light to facile at this time revolutionary advances in biomedical science. the potential applications for medical research and treatment are are groundbreaking and will offer hope to thousands of our 10:38:08.9 constituents. that is the kind of research n.s.f. supports. i'd also like to point out that n.s.f. resources are distributed on a competitive peer review basis. so an objective process allows for only the most worthy 10:38:23.6 proposal to receive funding. this is the best kind of investment the federal government can make because a return on this investment is tremendous. by stimulating innovative research, we create educational opportunities for promising 10:38:39.2 students and drive cutting-edge research throughout the country. there is no better way to fuel the economy and create quality jobs. that is why the national science foundation has broad and bipartisan support in 10:38:53.1 congress. this re-authorization provides $21 billion at n.s.f. for fiscal years 2008 through 2010. in doing so, it keeps us on the path to double national science foundation funding by 2017. 10:39:10.6 this was a key recommendation of the highly respected national accounting report on u.s. competitiveness, rising above the gathering storm. and this boost is urgently needed. 10:39:24.4 since today n.s.f. can only fund about a quarter of the grant proposals that are submitted. the bill also creates a pilot program targeted at new investigators so we can bring more talented young people into scientific research fields. and it directs n.s.f. to 10:39:41.9 facilitate public-private partnerships, a proven method to leveraging federal investment and bolstering american competitiveness. finally, this re-authorization bill is on the agency's legacy of promoting math and science 10:39:56.5 education by including the provisions of h.r. 362, the 10,000 teacher, 10 million minds math and science scholarship act, which the house passed last week. with that i thank the science committee once again for this excellent legislation. 10:40:11.8 i look forward to a robust debate on this bill. and i hope we can work with the senate to get it on the president's desk in short order. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:28.1 mr. speaker, i thank the gentlelady from california for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. hastings: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:43.8 mr. speaker, the national science foundation plays an important role in making sure that our nation is a global leader in the fields of science and engineering. this federal agency provides critical support for researchers, educators, and students in science, technology, engineering, and 10:41:00.9 mathematics. specifically federal support allows the american scientists to pursue high risk, high return fields that increase our nation's competitiveness and scientific knowledge, and ensures we are able to attract the brightest minds to our colleges and universities. 10:41:15.4 one area in which the national science foundation is supporting u.s. leadership is in the sciences -- in the sciences is in the laser interferamoter observatory 10:41:29.5 program. the ligo program which operates and observatory in central washington in my district is trying to detect for the first time the existence of gravitational waves which have been sought by physicists around the world since they were theorized by albert einstein. 10:41:45.5 their discovery would lead to a greater understanding of the makeup of the universe and help solidify our nation's lead in the fields of physics and astrophysics. the president's fiscal year 2008 budget provides for the expansion of lyingo and nearly bubbles funding for the 10:42:02.8 observatory to allow for more advanced research. i'm leezed -- pleased that the national science foundation authorization act supports this proposed expansion. the program is not only an important investment in our nation's science capability, but it also has been an 10:42:18.9 instrument of learning for local communities. the ligo's observatory was recently awarded one of the first ever science education advocate awards by the washington state leadership and assistance science education reform. 10:42:33.5 a partnership of public schools and science institutions. ligo is an excellent example of the national science foundation's dedication to funding world class research while also helping to grow students' interest in the science. mr. speaker, if america is to 10:42:49.7 continue to lead the world in science and the pursuit of knowledge, funding for the national science foundation is essential. the underlying legislation authorizes the national science foundation for three years at strong levels needed to maintain and strengthen 10:43:05.8 research through the foundation. but, mr. speaker, i am once again disappointed that the democrat majority has once again missed an opportunity to provide consideration for the national science foundation act under an open rule that would allow all members of the house 10:43:21.5 to come to the floor and offer amendments during consideration of the bill. the national science foundation was last authorized in 2002 and at that time the republican majority allowed the bill to be considered under a truly open rule. i'm disappointed the democrat 10:43:38.1 majority has pledged a new era of openness, but so far has not lived up to their commitment. instead it frankly has tried to change the definition of what an open rule is. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:43:54.9 gentleman from washington reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i inquire of the gentleman from washington if he has any remaining speakers. mr. hastings: i have no requests for time. if the gentlelady is prepared to yield back, i'll yield back. mrs. matsui: i have some closing remarks. 10:44:10.1 would you like to -- mr. hastings: i've made remarks. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i'm very much looking forward to the upcoming debate on the national science foundation re-authorizing this rule 10:44:26.9 allows. in discussing the various programs initiatives at n.s.f. we'll demonstrate how the federal government can effectively drive scientific discovery and innovation. the importance of the national science foundation and its mission must not be underestimated. 10:44:41.5 while america has been blessed with abundant natural resources, it is innovative spirit of our citizens that has driven this nation's leadership and global economy. throughout our history, we have been willing to experiment, to take risk, to constantly redefine what is possible. 10:44:59.1 that tradition has given us a competitive advantage over other countries that has created prosperity for the nation. improving the quality of life for all our constituents. as members know well, our leadership in the global economy is at risk today. we face rising threats from 10:45:14.7 countries like india and china, we have also failed to make the necessary invetsments in education, science, and research and development to maintain the foundation of knowledge that has served us so well in the past. . this re-authorization chase 10:45:30.8 great strides to remedy that neglect. most importantly to double n.s.f. funding over the next 10 years. we demonstrate that ensuring the nation's competitiveness as a high priority. the importance we place on 10:45:47.3 competitiveness will be demonstrated against and again. with that i look forward to today's debate and continuing to move forward on measures like this that will boleser innovation and compet i have -- 10:46:00.4 bolster innovation and competitiveness. i urge a yes vote and move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. all time has now expired. without objection, the previous 10:46:13.7 question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the ayes have it, the resolution is agreed to and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. 10:46:55.1 10:47:08.5 the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek recognition? 10:47:13.9 ms. sutton: i ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 350. resolved, that at anytime after the adoption of this resolution, the speaker may, pursuant to 10:47:29.3 clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union, to authorize appropriations for the national institute of standards and technology for fiscal years 10:47:44.8 2008, 2009 and 2010, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be confined 10:48:01.8 to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered under amendment under the five-minute rule. 10:48:16.5 it shall be considered as original bill for purpose of the amendment under the five-minute rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee of science and technology now printed in the bill. the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. 10:48:32.5 all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are waived except those arising out of clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be 10:48:48.6 in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall 10:49:03.7 be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent and shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject for division of the question in the house or in 10:49:19.0 the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 under rule 21. after conclusion of the consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as 10:49:34.3 may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to 10:49:51.4 final passage without intervening motions except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1868, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of 10:50:06.0 the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized for one hour. ms. sutton: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purpose of debate only, 10:50:21.2 i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. sessions. all time yielded during consideration of the bill is for debate only. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i also ask unanimous consent that all members may be given 10:50:40.0 five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks on house resolution 350. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. sutton: h.r. 350 provides consideration for h.r. 186867 -- 10:50:57.5 1867 under a structured rule. 10:51:00.3 it provides one hour of general debate to be controlled by the chairman and the ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. the rule makes in order five amendments printed in the rules committee report, each with 10 minutes of debate. the rule also provides one 10:51:17.0 motion to recommit with or without instructions. mr. speaker, i speak today in support of house resolution 350 and h.r. 1868, the technology, manufacturing and stimulation 10:51:33.8 fact. the united states commerce department's national institute of standards and technology strives to promote u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness through the 10:51:49.0 advancement of measurement, standards, science and technology. through numerous individual laboratories, the nist makes important scientific contributions to numerous scientific fields. 10:52:05.3 this bill will enhance the important mission putting the nisto a path to double its budget by the year 2017. with additional funding. the nist will continue to make important contributions to public safety, industrial 10:52:21.7 competitiveness and economic growth. this bill also alindicates funding for the manufacturing extension partnership, also known as m.e.p. these m.e.p. programs will leverage federal, state, local and private investments to 10:52:37.3 stimulate new manufacturing processes and technologies. these new processes and technologies are a key component for ensuring manufacturers have the tools to compete effectively and efficiently against overseas 10:52:54.3 manufacturers. the m.e.p. program has proven remarkably effective in my home state of ohio where small and mid-sized manufacturers face limited budgets, in-house expertise and access to the 10:53:09.5 newest technologies. m.e.p. assistance provided training, expertise and services tailored to the critical needs of ohio's small and mid-sized manufacturers have made a big difference. through this assistance, manufacturers in ohio have 10:53:25.0 increased productivity, achieved higher profits and remained competitive by providing the latest and most efficient technologies, processes and business practices. in 2006, as a direct result of m.e.p. assistance, my state 10:53:41.5 enjoyed over $150 million of new investment and over $500 million in increased or retained sales. companies in ohio participating in the m.e.p. reported cost savings of over $100 million. through the continued funding of 10:53:58.2 this vital program, we can bring these vast benefits to even more small manufacturers across the country. finally and very importantly, this bill allocates funding for the new technology innovation program, which funds high-risk, 10:54:16.2 high-reward, pre-competitive technology development by small and medium-sized companies. the goal of this program is to accelerate the development of technologies that will have a broad economic impact on our technology market. 10:54:32.2 harvard professor daniel bell once said, quote, technology, like art, is a soaring exercise of human imagination, end quote. it is through the national institute of standards and technology, the manufacturing extension partnership, and the technology innovation program 10:54:48.7 that technology is given the wind that it needs to soar. even more importantly, through this bill, small and mid-sized manufacturers will be given the support they need to compete with larger competitors in overseas businesses. 10:55:03.4 this bill will not only provide assistance to american companies, like the 1,773 companies in ohio that were helped by the manufacturing extension partnership, but it will also create a stronger and more vibrant american technology industry. 10:55:19.3 this is a good bill, and it deserves our support. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: good morning, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of promoting technological innovation, 10:55:38.2 bolesering the strength of our manufacturing industry, and contributing to the overall global competitiveness of american business. however, i simply cannot support the closed rule process brought forward today by the democrat majority that prevents all but one republican amendment from 10:55:53.9 being considered by the house. 10:55:58.9 -- this rule represents a substantial break by recent precedent because a comprehension of this report that was brought to the rules committee, the republican 10:56:11.0 majority provided the house with a completely open rule for its consideration. i know this, mr. speaker, because i had the privilege of managing that rule for our majority. and the democrat minority's position was then aptly handled by the chairman of the rules committee, my good friend, 10:56:29.6 chairwoman louise slaughter. unfortunately, chairwoman slaughter has forgotten the merits of providing the house with an open rules process, because today the committee that she chairs has provided the house with a closed process. through a restrictive rule, not 10:56:45.5 an open rule, even using the more len yant definition of an open rule currently being employed by the democrat leadership, it is a modified 10:56:59.7 open rule. i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record to have a copy of this rule which provided for consideration of h.r. 2733, to remind the majority that nist re-authorization is -- it's 10:57:17.5 possible to do this under an open process. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sessions: despite my objection to the rule, i do support the underlying legislation which makes a number of positive changes to an institution with a long history of helping to keep america globally competitive. 10:57:35.9 since its inception in 1901, the national institute of standards and technology has worked diligently to achieve its mission of promoting u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement, science, standards 10:57:52.6 and technology in ways that enhances economic security and improve the quality of life. by focusing on its core mission of stimulating innovation, fostering industrial competition and competitiveness and improving quality of life, the 10:58:09.7 nist has become a valuable component in the ongoing struggle that the united states faces to remain globally competitive. this legislation authorizes appropriations for nist for the 10:58:24.7 next three years. most notably, doubling the federal government's investment in fiscal science research as proposed by president bush's american competitiveness initiative. and this increased investment will yield real world benefits 10:58:41.3 across the number of diverse sectors, including development standards for bulletproof vests for military and law enforcement, chemical and biological protection equipment for first responders and measurement standards vital to 10:58:57.7 leading edge industries, like nanotechnology and next generation solar cells that will help america increase its energy independence. this legislation strengthens oversight by requiring the nist director to submit annual 10:59:15.6 problematic planning documents to congress ensuring that the nist budget is -- their budget is spent on activities that meet the needs of american industry, and that the increased funds, which the nist is being 10:59:29.8 entrusted with, are spent wisely. this legislation also takes steps to ensure the continued viability of the workhouses of the american economy. small and medium-sized manufacturers. 10:59:45.0 by re-authorizing the manufacturing extension partnership program, congress will help countless domestic manufacturers to improve their manufacturing process, reduce waste, and to train workers to use new equipment. mr. speaker, i do appreciate the
United States House of Representatives 1000-1100
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House meets for legislative business. Ten One Minutes per side Last votes expected between 9:00 & 10:00 p.m. Veto Override on the Conference Report on H.R. 1591- U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Health and Iraq Accountability Act. H.R. 1429 - Improving Head Start Act of 2007 (Rep. Kildee - Education and Labor) (Subject to a Rule) H.R. 1867 - National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2007 (Rep. Baird - Science and Technology) (Subject to a Rule) Postponed Suspension Vote (1 bill): 1) H.Res.243 - Calling on the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to immediately and unconditionally release Father Nguyen Van Ly, Nguyen Van Dai, Le Thi Cong Nhan, and other political prisoners and prisoners of conscience, and for other purposes (Rep. Smith (NJ) - Foreign Affairs) 10:02:47.9 the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the chaplain. chaplain coughlin: lord god, who speaks wisdom to the 10:02:59.3 brokenhearted and heals the wounds of nations, when any of us comes to an impasse and becomes paralyzed with fear or confusion, by prophetic call you bid us to turn to you with renewed faith. 10:03:15.6 lord, speak your word and help leaders of government and judges in courts to look beyond self-interest as if this were the path for another's good. and while in dialogue seeking 10:03:31.2 the full circumference of facts , let a new light arise in their midst which draws all to a deeper common ground. which will grant us surface of security and truth and pave a 10:03:48.1 course to justice and peace. which always reflects your image and will last now and forever. amen. the speaker: the chair has 10:04:02.1 examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge to the flag will be 10:04:19.3 led by the gentleman from ohio, mr. kucinich. mr. kucinich: thank you, madam speaker. please join me in pledging to the flag which embodies our nation's highest ideals. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty 10:04:34.2 and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will 10:04:50.6 receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the messenger: madam speaker. the speaker: mr. secretary. the secretary: i'm directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker: the chair will 10:05:25.6 entertain up to 10 one minutes on each side. the gentleman from illinois. mr. emanuel: to address the house for one minute. 10:05:41.2 the list of republicans under investigation or resigning in this administration in disgrace keeps growing. this morning "the washington post" reported julia mcdonald, the deputy assistant secretary of the interior department, resigned just as she was being investigated for changing 10:05:58.9 scientific reports. i wish this was an isolated 10:06:06.4 case in the bush administration . this morning "the new york times" reported the department of commerce inspector general faces three separate investigations into the conduct of his office. scott block, the special counsel at the justice department, is being investigated for the management of his office. 10:06:20.8 lucita doan being investigated for the politicization of the offices. sue ellen woolridge at justice stepped down. davis sabian, o.m.b. had to 10:06:38.2 step down. all have had their conduct scrutinized. it is time for a fact and justifies why this congress is doing its job of oversight and accountability and bringing 10:06:49.9 people's professional conduct in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. mchenry: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mchenry: thank you, madam speaker. i rise to join with millions across our nation who applaud the supreme court's recent decision to ban -- to uphold 10:07:07.8 the ban on partial-birth abortion. partial-birth abortion is unrivaled in its gruesome brutality. there is no question it's caused the vicious destruction of viable living, breathing babies whose only crime is inconvenience. 10:07:22.1 the court's decision is a victory in the quest to restore the dignity of human life. no longer will the most vulnerable and innocent among us be subject to such cruelty as partial-birth abortion. it's also a victory for the constitution, mr. speaker. which liberal activist judges have demeaned for far too long. 10:07:40.8 it's encouraging to see the court's decision move towards our founders' vision, a vision rooted in the commitment to not only protect but also respect human life. while this is a step forward, it is only one victory in a 10:07:55.7 longer struggle to assure that the abolition of abortion altogether is achieved. let us not ever forget our responsibility to hold the basic sanctity granted to us by our maker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:08:10.1 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. mr. kucinich: request permission to address the house, revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kucinich: the president's veto will stand but now what will we stand for? we say we want the war to end. 10:08:29.6 but will we give the president the money to continue the war? we say we want our troops home. but will we continue to support the occupation? we know that u.s. contractors have been stealing from u.s. 10:08:45.8 taxpayers and iraqi government, but will we leave our troops in iraq to protect them? we know oil has had a lot to do with this war, but will we let this president get away with attempting to privatize iraq's 10:09:02.3 oil well shall shall -- wealth in the name of reconciliation? we can still change course. we can deny the administration funds to continue the war. we can bring our troops home, we can stabilize iraq with international security force, once we end the occupation. 10:09:18.3 that's exactly what h.r. 1234 is about. and it's time that we started to look for alternatives which reflect this nation's highest aspirations. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from 10:09:31.6 pennsylvania. mr. pitts: to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pitts: mr. speaker, anyone who was alive at the time will always remember the collapse of the berlin wall. with the soviet block crumbling, the western world rejoiced as freedoms spread to 10:09:48.2 populations once thought hopelesslyly -- hopelessly in the grip of communist -- communism. unfortunately recent actions seem to be giving new life to old communist ghost. police squads crushing the 10:10:04.6 kremlin's decenters. advocates of freedom and transparency silenced. cultural figures detained. the recent backsliding in russia should be cause for alarm for all freedom-loving people. 10:10:18.9 as the kremlin's power expands, freedom for the russian people sha rinks. this was wrong during the -- shrinks. this was wrong during the cold war and wrong now. it is time the free nations of the world take a stand against this trend. start demanding more from mr. putin and russia's leaders. i yield back. 10:10:36.5 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. cohen: request one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cohen: i want to talk, mr. speaker, today about a gentleman who was an army specialist, evan caradine jr. 10:10:53.9 he would have been 36 years old today if he lived. he was from my hometown of memphis, tennessee, where we have lost nine veterans. he joined the army to provide a 10:11:04.6 wetter life -- better life for his family. he graduated from high school and worked his way up to being manager of a restaurant. he had a wife and four children. three years ago to this day army specialist died. 10:11:22.7 he was in a convoy in baghdad that was hit by an i.e.d. three years ago. three days before his death he called his wife and he said, there was a change. she said there was a change in 10:11:36.5 his voice. he said it's getting worse over here. it's not getting better. since then nearly 3,000 more soldiers have died. army specialist carradine jr. said something three years and 10:11:53.1 three days ago that's still true. it's getting worse over here not better. let's not have more deaths. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. 10:12:09.5 speaker. imagine my beloved st. louis cardinals playing the much despised chicago cubs. the cardinals are are up by five finishing the top of the ninth. is this a cause for celebration? is this a cause for victory? no. unbelievable as it may seem, 10:12:26.2 the cubbies score five runs in the bottom of the ninth to throw the games into extra innings. there the score remains until 1:00 a.m. five innings later. however at the top of the 15th the cardinals fail to field a batter. the entire team has left the stadium. 10:12:41.4 it seems that they are more worried about next day's 1:00 p.m. game at home than finishing the game at hand. who wins? we know it's the team that stays on the field. arbitrary deadlines and a date certain accept defeat before the conclusion of the contest. it is our national security 10:12:58.5 interest that continue to take the field and support a moderate arab state. leaving prior assures a loss for us and victory for our opponents which will lead to another extremist islamic state. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. 10:13:14.0 the gentleman from texas. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. doggett: mr. speaker, the president can veto our plan for a safe, orderly phased redeployment from iraq, but he cannot veto reality. 10:13:29.7 our troops are coming home. it's just a question of how much blood and money will be spent before they do. if the president had listened to the generals, we would never have invaded iraq in the first place. each day of this unnecessary tragedy demonstrates the wisdom 10:13:47.6 of general schwarzkopf that we would become like a dinosaur in a tar pit. had he listened to the generals, the president would have deployed enough troops to get the job done. instead he rejected the advice of general shinseki and allowed 10:14:03.5 the violence to spiral and unguarded weapons heaps became i.e.d.'s. if the president had listened to the generals, he would now be redeploying our troops instead of sending more inadequately protected for longer repeat tours of duty. 10:14:18.5 had he listened to the generals, our veterans would be getting the quality care that they have earned and deserved. but in this administration, generals who disagree with the president earn a new title -- retired. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. 10:14:35.4 mr. kirk: i ask unanimous consent to address the house. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kirk: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the conyers-kirk local law enforcement hate crimes prevention act. we know that a hate crime can ignite group on group violence 10:14:49.7 that can completely overwhelm a small suburban police department. in 2005, the f.b.i. recorded 7,000 hate crimes in our country, 168 in the state of illinois, and two in my congressional district, one in 10:15:06.5 wheeling and one in pallentine. for us we remember a tragic night in 1999 when ben min smith, a member of a white supremacist group, gunned down the northwestern university basketball coach in front of two kids. 10:15:20.9 why? because he was black. . smith continued his hunting spree shooting orthodox jews coming home from synagogue. these were hate crimes, crimes 10:15:37.4 designed to tear a community apart, crimes designed to commit and isolate a sigma tiesed members because of the color of their skin or the religion they practice. 10:15:51.1 i urge my colleagues to back the hate crimes bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without 10:16:04.3 objection. >> yesterday, the supplemental bill provides our soldiers everything the president asked for and more. it's a bill supported by the american people, this congress and military experts who believe it's time to change the course of the war in iraq. 10:16:18.7 the president's response, a veto. the president's action last night shows not only his stubbornness and his inability to work with others, it also demonstrates that he refuses to change the status quo. the president refuses to give 10:16:34.1 our troops, this congress or the american people any timelines as to when this war will end or under what conditions he will finally bring our troops home. mr. speaker, the president says that things are getting better in iraq, but that's simply not true. 10:16:48.8 last month was one of the deadliest months for american troops in iraq. 104 soldiers were killed. it's time for a new course. it's time for the president to sit down and work with this congress so we can finally produce the change that will end this war. 10:17:05.8 i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from minnesota. >> i request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> last night the president did what he said he was going to do 10:17:22.2 for weeks now. he vetoed the democrat supplemental that was loaded with pork, provided the enemy with an ill-conceived exit strategy. as the president said last night, mr. speaker, congress passed the bill that substitutes the judgment of politicians for 10:17:39.0 the judgment of our military commanders. i couldn't agree with him more. and that's why i oppose this supplemental. and that's exactly why he vetoed it. we must not, as a nation, be invested in defeat. again, i repeat. we must not as a nation be 10:17:55.8 invested in defeat. unilateral surrender may be the democrats' plan but it may not lead to a safer america. now that the veto has taken place, it's simply unacceptable for the democrat leaders to delay any further the funding 10:18:09.4 that our american troops deserve. let's pass a clean iraq supplemental, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa. >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the 10:18:25.7 house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> even after losing 3,100 american lives and spending billions of taxpayers' dollars after declaring mission accomplished four years ago, the bush administration continues to demand an open-ended commitment 10:18:43.0 of american troops in iraq. last night president bush refused to change a course when he vetoed a bill that was supported by congress, retired military generals and the american people. this put an end to the end 10:18:57.9 consistent with our national security needs. even secretary gates reiterated last month that congressional debate was helpful. he delivered the message to the iraqi government that the clock is ticking on u.s. operations there. 10:19:11.8 president bush's veto yesterday lets the iraqi government off the hook and shows the president plans to keep our troops there indefinitely. mr. speaker, the days of rubber stamping the president's war proposals are long over. the president is going to have to learn to work with the 10:19:27.4 democratic leadership on this congress so that we can find a way out of iraq soon and so we can provide our troops with the resources they need. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. poe: request permission to address the house for one 10:19:44.7 minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: now that the media side shows is over for the iraqi surrender group and the president vetoed the day of surrender bill yesterday and properly so, congress needs to get on with the business of funding our troops. failure to fund our troops not 10:20:00.5 only will affect our troops there but it will affect the iraqi security forces, the national guard and, of course, our reserves. that first bill may have funded some of the troops but it had the pork and beans pro-vision. the peanut farmers and the 10:20:18.1 spinach farmers. eliminate that and have a clean bill to support our troops. no more complaining. send them the money they need. this reminds me the same problem that stonewall jackson had with the army when they were 10:20:34.9 complaining about the war. he said, send more troops, no more questions. and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new hampshire. >> permission to address the house for one minute. yesterday, president bush called 10:20:50.8 the timetable a prescription for chaos and confusion. that timetable was a responsible road map out of iraq. the president has caused chaos 10:21:02.5 and confusion for four long years, replacing one general after another when the general disagrees with the policy. what has the president given us? he's given us the largest deficit in history. he's cut back from domestic programs to pay for this war. 10:21:19.5 he's weakened the military. 88% of the national guard is prepared to go to war. he's neglected our own people, and he's destroyed iraq's economy, their social fabric. people are leaving iraq, fleeing from the chaos the president has 10:21:34.6 caused for four long years. we had a responsible road map. the president should have signed it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. price: i ask unanimous 10:21:49.7 consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. price: yesterday the majority party sent a plan for fail aure to the president and the president did the write thing, he sent it back. it's now time for congress to pass a funding bill that supports their mission. 10:22:08.2 the majority party has done nothing, nothing but delay the delivery of tools and resources to our troops in the field while outlining a very specific and dangerous blueprint for defeat. let's stop wasting time. let's stop trying to rewrite the constitution and the role of the 10:22:24.6 commander in chief. we have a choice. the majority can continue to play these partisan games or we can get down to work. we have that choice. the brave men and women in our armed forces do not. let's honor their sacrifice with leadership rather than political partisanship. 10:22:40.3 the american people are watching, and so are our allies and our enemies around the world. we have a choice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. sires: request perm -- question permission to address 10:22:59.2 the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sires: president bush said that our mission in iraq was accomplished. can you imagine that? four years later it is clear that this was one of the many miscalculations on the bush 10:23:15.0 administration part. over the past four years we've lost more than 3,000 additional troops. tens of thousands more have been injured. and hundreds of billions of u.s. taxpayers' dollars have been spent. now a dangerous civil war has been waged with no end in sight. the american military did its 10:23:31.7 job. military experts agree there is no military solution to the war in iraq. that is why this congress approved an mother-in-law supplemental bill last week -- approved an emergency supplemental bill last week. american troops are not going to 10:23:48.0 be there indefinitely. mr. speaker, president bush was wrong four years ago. he's wrong now. it's time for the president to work with this congress to come up with a plan to end this war. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:24:02.9 gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> one of our greatest responsibilities is our dependence on middle east oil. and we need to advance home 10:24:24.3 grown renewable energy resources. this week i will introduce the energy through independence through biodiesel act, creating this will help the scales 10:24:38.2 necessary to america america the leader in re-- necessary to make america the leader in renewable resources. it will demand the clean air act to require that all diesel fuels sold contains a 2% industry 10:24:53.7 average. 55 billion gallons of diesel was consumed in 2005. and a 2% standard will create a 1.1 billion gallon market. this will spur the necessary investments and facilities and technological advancements needed in this alternative fuel 10:25:09.3 industry. i urge my colleagues to commit to diversifying our supply and less our dependence on foreign industry and support this act. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota. 10:25:24.8 >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, four years ago today, president bush landed for a photo opportunity in front of a banner that said mission accomplished and declared an end to major combat in iraq. 10:25:41.2 four years later this president refuses to discuss the reality of a military mission that's entered its fifth year. yesterday the president has vetoed the second bill. he called it a prescription for chaos and confusion. i ask, how is that different from what we have now? 10:25:56.3 he refuses to even hold the iraqis accountable for making 10:26:03.3 economic or diplomatic reforms that he promised and they promised to make. what exactly is the president waiting for? now that the president's rejected our legislation, he has the responsibility to tell the american people how many more years does he expect us to stay. 10:26:17.0 do you think it will be five, maybe 10? and what exactly do the ground conditions look like in order to have us beginning to withdraw? wishful thinking, political talking points and rigid ideology do not make good foreign policy. this president was wrong when he declared an end of combat 10:26:33.7 operations. and he's been consistently wrong about every single thing in iraq. it's time that this president works with the new congress, elected by the majority of the american people so that we can bring about a change to this war and truly secure america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:26:49.4 gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from oklahoma. ms. fallin: question permission to address the house for one minute. mr. speaker, this is a difficult time for our nation. we are all war weary. we're all heart broken over any loss of life, and we're all 10:27:04.3 concerned about the cost of the war. all americans, republicans, democrats and, yes, the president, want this war over as soon as possible. it's time to stop the political games and put the needs of our men and our women defending our nation first. 10:27:19.3 the people of america want a solution to bring the troops home, but not at the expense of jeopardizing the safety and the future of our nation. as a nation we must make a strong commitment and a decoration to the world that the united states will defend itself and will not tolerate terrorism. 10:27:37.1 nor will we coddle terrorists or surrender or appease them. the commander in chief vetoed a bill which sought to micromanage the war, tie the hands of our generals. 10:27:50.3 congress must uphold the president's veto, set aside the cut and run attitude, the loser attitude for good. where is the pride for the defense of our nation, the liberty and the freedoms that thousands of men and women have given their lives for in earlier years? thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:28:08.0 time of the gentlewoman has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. >> i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. i would remind our guests in the gallery that any expression of favor or disfavor with what is said on the floor is a violation of the rules. 10:28:24.9 the gentleman from new jersey. mr. payne: thank you, mr. speaker. over this past week, five more american soldiers were killed in iraq bringing the number killed in april to over 100 u.s. soldiers. it was the deadliest month for american soldiers this year. 10:28:41.3 sadly, the total number of americans killed now stand at 3,351, along with thousands of innocent iraqi men, women and children. the reality is on the ground that our brave soldiers continue to face day in and day out, stand in stark contrast to 10:28:59.9 president bush's pronouncement four years ago that major combat operations were over. if was over four years ago, what have our troops been fighting the last four years? it's indeed our mission was 10:29:15.3 accomplished four years ago as the banner behind the president on that aircraft carrier proclaimed. what are our troops still doing in iraq? if our president wants to bring this to a just conclusion, he should work with congress 10:29:29.8 instead of just vetoing our funding bill as he did. it's now up to the president to decide if he will support accountability for iraqis' benchmarks for success, a new direction in iraq or we cannot stay this course. 10:29:44.7 i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from florida. >> i request that i address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, under current law, military pay rates must be reasonably 10:30:02.3 comparable to those in the private sector with similar skills, education and experience. unfortunately, due to budgetary constraints over the years, the military pay increase has not always met this criteria, and a pay gap was created. 10:30:17.1 . this gap is not only unfair to our brave men and women in uniform, it also has raised retention and readiness concerns. for this reason i have introduced h.r. 2027, the military pay improvement act 10:30:33.4 which would give them a minimum of 3.5%. our nation's brave men and women in uniform have fought gallantly to ensure the continued safety, security, and prosperity of this great nation. 10:30:49.0 i believe it is unacceptable that we task these men and women with extraordinary responsibilities, especially during war times, and cannot compensate them accordingly. 10:31:01.2 the debt we owe them for their sacrifices can never be repaid. however my bill will take a small step in the right direction to show our appreciation for their valor. thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all my colleagues to co-sponsor the bill. appreciate it. 10:31:14.6 the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the seener, house of representatives. madam, pursuant to clause 5-a -4-a of rule 10 of the rules of 10:31:30.8 the house of representatives, i designate the following members to be available for service on investigative subcommittees of the committee on standards of official conduct during the 110th congress. the honorable rod bishop, the monyash marshall blackburn, the 10:31:46.3 honorable andrew crenshaw, the honorable lincoln diaz-balart, the honorable phil english, the honorable tom latham, the honorable frank lucas, the honorable sue myrick, the honorable mike simpson, and the honorable greg walden. 10:32:04.3 sincerely, john a. bane letter -- boehner, republican leader. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 349 and ask for its 10:32:18.7 immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 47, house resolution 349, resolved that at any time after the adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 10:32:34.5 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill h.r. 1867, to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2008, 2009, and 2010, for the national science foundation and 10:32:51.2 for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be 10:33:06.8 confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. it shall be in order under -- 10:33:23.7 in order to consider as an original bill for purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on science and technology now printed in the bill. all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are 10:33:37.6 waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in the portion of the 10:33:52.9 congressional record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule 18, and except pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate. each amendment so printed may be offered only by the member who caused it to be printed or his designee and shall be 10:34:08.1 considered as read. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the 10:34:24.1 committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. 10:34:40.6 section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1867, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to 10:34:54.1 such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for one hour. mrs. matsui: for the purpose of debate only, i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from washington, mr. hastings, winding which i yield 10:35:10.2 myself such time as i may consume. -- pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. matsui: during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on h.res. 349 and insert extraneous 10:35:30.8 material into the record. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, this rule permits the house to consider the national science foundation authorization act of 2007. this important legislation would be considered under an open rule with a preprinting 10:35:47.4 requirement. allowing any member to submit changes or improvements to the bill. chairman gordon, chairman baird, ranking member hall, ranking member ehlers, and the science and technology committee have put together an 10:36:01.9 excellent product and look forward to an open and constructive debate. i am proud that today's debate will shine a light on the national science foundation. the national science foundation is truly one of the federal government's greatest 10:36:14.9 accomplishments. it features a rich tradition that has supported talented young investigators, made america the world leader in basic science and renovation, and laid the ground-work for the nation's economic strength. this also represents another 10:36:31.5 important step in the implementation of the innovation agenda. by boosting scientific research and development, moving the nation toward a clean energy economy, promoting broadband deployment, and supporting small business entrepreneurs, 10:36:48.4 the innovation agenda will keep our promise to maintain and strengthen america's competitiveness and leadership in the global economy. at present the national science foundation supports research and education activities at 10:37:04.4 over 2,000 universities, colleges, k through 12 schools, and research institutions throughout the country. it is unique among our federal research enterprises in that n.s.f. supports scientists and engineers across all disciplines. 10:37:19.7 in a given year n.s.f. will support about 200,000 scientists, engineers, teachers, and students. that is why n.s.f. funding has led to groundbreaking research in such varied fields as genetics, computer science, 10:37:37.3 information technology, nanotechnology, and climate change. by way of example in my district n.s.f. funds the u.c. davis center for biofoe tonic science and technology. the center features dynamic and 10:37:54.1 innovative research that harnesses light to facile at this time revolutionary advances in biomedical science. the potential applications for medical research and treatment are are groundbreaking and will offer hope to thousands of our 10:38:08.9 constituents. that is the kind of research n.s.f. supports. i'd also like to point out that n.s.f. resources are distributed on a competitive peer review basis. so an objective process allows for only the most worthy 10:38:23.6 proposal to receive funding. this is the best kind of investment the federal government can make because a return on this investment is tremendous. by stimulating innovative research, we create educational opportunities for promising 10:38:39.2 students and drive cutting-edge research throughout the country. there is no better way to fuel the economy and create quality jobs. that is why the national science foundation has broad and bipartisan support in 10:38:53.1 congress. this re-authorization provides $21 billion at n.s.f. for fiscal years 2008 through 2010. in doing so, it keeps us on the path to double national science foundation funding by 2017. 10:39:10.6 this was a key recommendation of the highly respected national accounting report on u.s. competitiveness, rising above the gathering storm. and this boost is urgently needed. 10:39:24.4 since today n.s.f. can only fund about a quarter of the grant proposals that are submitted. the bill also creates a pilot program targeted at new investigators so we can bring more talented young people into scientific research fields. and it directs n.s.f. to 10:39:41.9 facilitate public-private partnerships, a proven method to leveraging federal investment and bolstering american competitiveness. finally, this re-authorization bill is on the agency's legacy of promoting math and science 10:39:56.5 education by including the provisions of h.r. 362, the 10,000 teacher, 10 million minds math and science scholarship act, which the house passed last week. with that i thank the science committee once again for this excellent legislation. 10:40:11.8 i look forward to a robust debate on this bill. and i hope we can work with the senate to get it on the president's desk in short order. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:28.1 mr. speaker, i thank the gentlelady from california for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. hastings: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. 10:40:43.8 mr. speaker, the national science foundation plays an important role in making sure that our nation is a global leader in the fields of science and engineering. this federal agency provides critical support for researchers, educators, and students in science, technology, engineering, and 10:41:00.9 mathematics. specifically federal support allows the american scientists to pursue high risk, high return fields that increase our nation's competitiveness and scientific knowledge, and ensures we are able to attract the brightest minds to our colleges and universities. 10:41:15.4 one area in which the national science foundation is supporting u.s. leadership is in the sciences -- in the sciences is in the laser interferamoter observatory 10:41:29.5 program. the ligo program which operates and observatory in central washington in my district is trying to detect for the first time the existence of gravitational waves which have been sought by physicists around the world since they were theorized by albert einstein. 10:41:45.5 their discovery would lead to a greater understanding of the makeup of the universe and help solidify our nation's lead in the fields of physics and astrophysics. the president's fiscal year 2008 budget provides for the expansion of lyingo and nearly bubbles funding for the 10:42:02.8 observatory to allow for more advanced research. i'm leezed -- pleased that the national science foundation authorization act supports this proposed expansion. the program is not only an important investment in our nation's science capability, but it also has been an 10:42:18.9 instrument of learning for local communities. the ligo's observatory was recently awarded one of the first ever science education advocate awards by the washington state leadership and assistance science education reform. 10:42:33.5 a partnership of public schools and science institutions. ligo is an excellent example of the national science foundation's dedication to funding world class research while also helping to grow students' interest in the science. mr. speaker, if america is to 10:42:49.7 continue to lead the world in science and the pursuit of knowledge, funding for the national science foundation is essential. the underlying legislation authorizes the national science foundation for three years at strong levels needed to maintain and strengthen 10:43:05.8 research through the foundation. but, mr. speaker, i am once again disappointed that the democrat majority has once again missed an opportunity to provide consideration for the national science foundation act under an open rule that would allow all members of the house 10:43:21.5 to come to the floor and offer amendments during consideration of the bill. the national science foundation was last authorized in 2002 and at that time the republican majority allowed the bill to be considered under a truly open rule. i'm disappointed the democrat 10:43:38.1 majority has pledged a new era of openness, but so far has not lived up to their commitment. instead it frankly has tried to change the definition of what an open rule is. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 10:43:54.9 gentleman from washington reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i inquire of the gentleman from washington if he has any remaining speakers. mr. hastings: i have no requests for time. if the gentlelady is prepared to yield back, i'll yield back. mrs. matsui: i have some closing remarks. 10:44:10.1 would you like to -- mr. hastings: i've made remarks. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california. mrs. matsui: mr. speaker, i'm very much looking forward to the upcoming debate on the national science foundation re-authorizing this rule 10:44:26.9 allows. in discussing the various programs initiatives at n.s.f. we'll demonstrate how the federal government can effectively drive scientific discovery and innovation. the importance of the national science foundation and its mission must not be underestimated. 10:44:41.5 while america has been blessed with abundant natural resources, it is innovative spirit of our citizens that has driven this nation's leadership and global economy. throughout our history, we have been willing to experiment, to take risk, to constantly redefine what is possible. 10:44:59.1 that tradition has given us a competitive advantage over other countries that has created prosperity for the nation. improving the quality of life for all our constituents. as members know well, our leadership in the global economy is at risk today. we face rising threats from 10:45:14.7 countries like india and china, we have also failed to make the necessary invetsments in education, science, and research and development to maintain the foundation of knowledge that has served us so well in the past. . this re-authorization chase 10:45:30.8 great strides to remedy that neglect. most importantly to double n.s.f. funding over the next 10 years. we demonstrate that ensuring the nation's competitiveness as a high priority. the importance we place on 10:45:47.3 competitiveness will be demonstrated against and again. with that i look forward to today's debate and continuing to move forward on measures like this that will boleser innovation and compet i have -- 10:46:00.4 bolster innovation and competitiveness. i urge a yes vote and move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. all time has now expired. without objection, the previous 10:46:13.7 question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the ayes have it, the resolution is agreed to and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. 10:46:55.1 10:47:08.5 the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek recognition? 10:47:13.9 ms. sutton: i ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 350. resolved, that at anytime after the adoption of this resolution, the speaker may, pursuant to 10:47:29.3 clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union, to authorize appropriations for the national institute of standards and technology for fiscal years 10:47:44.8 2008, 2009 and 2010, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. general debate shall be confined 10:48:01.8 to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. after general debate, the bill shall be considered under amendment under the five-minute rule. 10:48:16.5 it shall be considered as original bill for purpose of the amendment under the five-minute rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee of science and technology now printed in the bill. the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. 10:48:32.5 all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are waived except those arising out of clause 9 or 10 of rule 21. notwithstanding clause 11 of rule 18, no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be 10:48:48.6 in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall 10:49:03.7 be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent and shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject for division of the question in the house or in 10:49:19.0 the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived except those arising under clause 9 or 10 under rule 21. after conclusion of the consideration of the bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as 10:49:34.3 may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to 10:49:51.4 final passage without intervening motions except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, during consideration in the house of h.r. 1868, pursuant to this resolution, notwithstanding the operation of 10:50:06.0 the previous question, the chair may postpone further consideration of the bill to such time as may be designated by the speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized for one hour. ms. sutton: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purpose of debate only, 10:50:21.2 i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. sessions. all time yielded during consideration of the bill is for debate only. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i also ask unanimous consent that all members may be given 10:50:40.0 five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks on house resolution 350. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. sutton: h.r. 350 provides consideration for h.r. 186867 -- 10:50:57.5 1867 under a structured rule. 10:51:00.3 it provides one hour of general debate to be controlled by the chairman and the ranking minority member of the committee on science and technology. the rule makes in order five amendments printed in the rules committee report, each with 10 minutes of debate. the rule also provides one 10:51:17.0 motion to recommit with or without instructions. mr. speaker, i speak today in support of house resolution 350 and h.r. 1868, the technology, manufacturing and stimulation 10:51:33.8 fact. the united states commerce department's national institute of standards and technology strives to promote u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness through the 10:51:49.0 advancement of measurement, standards, science and technology. through numerous individual laboratories, the nist makes important scientific contributions to numerous scientific fields. 10:52:05.3 this bill will enhance the important mission putting the nisto a path to double its budget by the year 2017. with additional funding. the nist will continue to make important contributions to public safety, industrial 10:52:21.7 competitiveness and economic growth. this bill also alindicates funding for the manufacturing extension partnership, also known as m.e.p. these m.e.p. programs will leverage federal, state, local and private investments to 10:52:37.3 stimulate new manufacturing processes and technologies. these new processes and technologies are a key component for ensuring manufacturers have the tools to compete effectively and efficiently against overseas 10:52:54.3 manufacturers. the m.e.p. program has proven remarkably effective in my home state of ohio where small and mid-sized manufacturers face limited budgets, in-house expertise and access to the 10:53:09.5 newest technologies. m.e.p. assistance provided training, expertise and services tailored to the critical needs of ohio's small and mid-sized manufacturers have made a big difference. through this assistance, manufacturers in ohio have 10:53:25.0 increased productivity, achieved higher profits and remained competitive by providing the latest and most efficient technologies, processes and business practices. in 2006, as a direct result of m.e.p. assistance, my state 10:53:41.5 enjoyed over $150 million of new investment and over $500 million in increased or retained sales. companies in ohio participating in the m.e.p. reported cost savings of over $100 million. through the continued funding of 10:53:58.2 this vital program, we can bring these vast benefits to even more small manufacturers across the country. finally and very importantly, this bill allocates funding for the new technology innovation program, which funds high-risk, 10:54:16.2 high-reward, pre-competitive technology development by small and medium-sized companies. the goal of this program is to accelerate the development of technologies that will have a broad economic impact on our technology market. 10:54:32.2 harvard professor daniel bell once said, quote, technology, like art, is a soaring exercise of human imagination, end quote. it is through the national institute of standards and technology, the manufacturing extension partnership, and the technology innovation program 10:54:48.7 that technology is given the wind that it needs to soar. even more importantly, through this bill, small and mid-sized manufacturers will be given the support they need to compete with larger competitors in overseas businesses. 10:55:03.4 this bill will not only provide assistance to american companies, like the 1,773 companies in ohio that were helped by the manufacturing extension partnership, but it will also create a stronger and more vibrant american technology industry. 10:55:19.3 this is a good bill, and it deserves our support. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: good morning, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of promoting technological innovation, 10:55:38.2 bolesering the strength of our manufacturing industry, and contributing to the overall global competitiveness of american business. however, i simply cannot support the closed rule process brought forward today by the democrat majority that prevents all but one republican amendment from 10:55:53.9 being considered by the house. 10:55:58.9 -- this rule represents a substantial break by recent precedent because a comprehension of this report that was brought to the rules committee, the republican 10:56:11.0 majority provided the house with a completely open rule for its consideration. i know this, mr. speaker, because i had the privilege of managing that rule for our majority. and the democrat minority's position was then aptly handled by the chairman of the rules committee, my good friend, 10:56:29.6 chairwoman louise slaughter. unfortunately, chairwoman slaughter has forgotten the merits of providing the house with an open rules process, because today the committee that she chairs has provided the house with a closed process. through a restrictive rule, not 10:56:45.5 an open rule, even using the more len yant definition of an open rule currently being employed by the democrat leadership, it is a modified 10:56:59.7 open rule. i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record to have a copy of this rule which provided for consideration of h.r. 2733, to remind the majority that nist re-authorization is -- it's 10:57:17.5 possible to do this under an open process. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sessions: despite my objection to the rule, i do support the underlying legislation which makes a number of positive changes to an institution with a long history of helping to keep america globally competitive. 10:57:35.9 since its inception in 1901, the national institute of standards and technology has worked diligently to achieve its mission of promoting u.s. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement, science, standards 10:57:52.6 and technology in ways that enhances economic security and improve the quality of life. by focusing on its core mission of stimulating innovation, fostering industrial competition and competitiveness and improving quality of life, the 10:58:09.7 nist has become a valuable component in the ongoing struggle that the united states faces to remain globally competitive. this legislation authorizes appropriations for nist for the 10:58:24.7 next three years. most notably, doubling the federal government's investment in fiscal science research as proposed by president bush's american competitiveness initiative. and this increased investment will yield real world benefits 10:58:41.3 across the number of diverse sectors, including development standards for bulletproof vests for military and law enforcement, chemical and biological protection equipment for first responders and measurement standards vital to 10:58:57.7 leading edge industries, like nanotechnology and next generation solar cells that will help america increase its energy independence. this legislation strengthens oversight by requiring the nist director to submit annual 10:59:15.6 problematic planning documents to congress ensuring that the nist budget is -- their budget is spent on activities that meet the needs of american industry, and that the increased funds, which the nist is being 10:59:29.8 entrusted with, are spent wisely. this legislation also takes steps to ensure the continued viability of the workhouses of the american economy. small and medium-sized manufacturers. 10:59:45.0 by re-authorizing the manufacturing extension partnership program, congress will help countless domestic manufacturers to improve their manufacturing process, reduce waste, and to train workers to use new equipment. mr. speaker, i do appreciate the