4/10/67 A0040339 WAT3 : WASHINGTON - DEMOCRATIC SENATOR HART OF MICHIGAN URGES ABOLITION OF DEATH PENALTY FOR FEDERAL CRIMES (F)
4/10/67 A0040339 WAT3 : WASHINGTON - DEMOCRATIC SENATOR HART OF MICHIGAN URGES ABOLITION OF DEATH PENALTY FOR FEDERAL CRIMES (F) WA 13415 "DEATH PENALTY" SHOWS: (1) SEVERAL SCENES HART AND FORMER OHIO GOVERNER MICHAEL DISALLE AT DESK, NEWSMEN, 15 SECS; (2) SOUND UP, CU HART, SOF, 1:12 (52FT - 1:26, SHOT 5/10/67) MJ247PED HART, PHILIP - SOF DISALLE, MICHAEL - SOF IN CUTS CAPITOL PUNISHMENT XX / 350 FT / 16 - NEG /
"The bottom of the laws": Debates in the National Assembly, the death penalty
Grand Est
McVeigh - Vigil
SOME PEOPLE IN INDIANA ARE HOLDING VIGIL FOR TIMOTHY MCVEIGH. THEY OPPOSE THE DEATH PENALTY.
US SCOTUS Lethal (Lon NR)
Protestors from the Washington Coalition for the Abolition of the Death Penalty say Monday's Supreme Court ruling uholding use of a controversial drug in lethal injections doesn't go far enough. (June 29)
CLEAN : SHORT PROFILE: Robert Badinter, French politician, lawyer and writer
French politician, lawyer and writer Robert Badinter, best known for his role in the abolition of the death penalty in France, when he was Minister of Justice, under François Mitterrand, in 1981 (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL / US DEATH PENALTY / NEWS CONFERENCE (1994)
CLEAN : Parisians remember Robert Badinter, French minister who ended death penalty
"A great humanist" with "empathy for both victims and criminals", an "infinitely remarkable and respectable" person, "someone who represented the best of the French conscience": in Paris, in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés district, passers-by remember with emotion the former Socialist Minister of Justice, Robert Badinter, who oversaw the abolishing of the death penalty following news of his passing at the age of 95 (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)
US DC Pope Congress 3 (Lon NR)
Pope Calls for Abolition of Death Penalty
FRANCE ANTI DEATH PENALTY CAMPAIGN
14:50:40 NATS EXT FTG OF BUILDING. INT FTG OF MEETING W/ OFFICIALS TAKING PLACE. CU SIGN IN FRANCE. MCU OF BIANCA JAGGER TALKING ABOUT THE ABOLITION OF THE DEATH PENALTY AND WHY IT IS WRONG. VS INT FTG OF MEETING IN WHICH JAGGER IS PRESENT. VS OFFICIALS AT MEETING. MORE SOT JAGGER, THIS TIME IN UNTRANSLATED FRENCH. VS MORE FTG OF JAGGER TALKING ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT IN AMERICA. VS OFFICIALS LISTENING ON.
Memorial moot competition: interview with S Boucetta
Nord
France Campaign - Bianca Jagger on the death penalty abolition campaign
TAPE: EF01/0332 IN_TIME: 23:16:20 DURATION: 2:43 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Paris - April 9, 2001 SHOTLIST: 1. Wide shot of the office of the president of the National Assembly 2. Wide interior shot of press conference led by French National Assembly President Raymond Forni and including Nicole Fontaine, President of the European Parliament 3. Side shot of podium showing all participants including Bianca Jagger and Lord Russel Johnston, President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe 4. Tight shot of Bianca Jagger 5. Closeup of sign that reads "Together Against the Death Penalty" 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bianca Jagger, Anti-Death Penalty Activist: "Today at the beginning of this new century, more than half of the countries in the world have abolished the death penalty. To belong or to be a member of the Council of Europe, you have to have abolished the death penalty. It is incomprehensible to all of us to think that we still have the death penalty in America especially when we know that the death penalty is fraught with arbitrariness, that the majority of the people on death row are poor, that they are a member of a minority and the U.S. is executing the mentally ill and juveniles under 18 years of age." 7. Wide shot of podium with Fontaine and Forni in the middle 8. Audience watching proceedings with one reading the anti-death penalty pamphlet 9. Cutaway photographer 10. SOUNDBITE: (French) Bianca Jagger, Anti-Death Penalty Activist: "There will be a congress - the 21st of June in Strasbourg in order to demand the end of the death penalty in the world. This is important for the countries that still have the death penalty like the United States, China and Japan, and others to understand that in our society today, this is not acceptable that we kill, and that we kill in certain circumstances innocent people and it is not acceptable either that we can have in countries like the U.S., which is a country that calls itself the country that defends the human rights throughout the entire world - that it is a force in this domain - and yet it has this system that is so wrong." 11. Cutaway of pamphlet that reads "Together Against the Death Penalty" 12. Man with the pamphlet on his lap 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bianca Jagger, Anti-Death Penalty Activist: "If the United States is going to execute him (James Kopp) and if France has abolished the death penalty, I think that it is up the French to think what is morally right, to decide what should be done." 14. Jagger seated at podium STORYLINE: Bianca Jagger, representatives from the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and other high level activists gathered in Paris on Monday to announce a forthcoming congress against the death penalty. The first world congress for the abolition of the death penalty will be held in Strasbourg from June 21 to 23. Jagger told APTN that she couldn't understand how the United States could practice the death penalty while calling itself "the country that defends human rights throughout the world". She said capital punishment "is fraught with arbitrariness" and that most people on death row are poor and members of minority groups. Jagger was asked about the possible extradition to the U.S. of James Kopp, an American fugitive in France who was charged with the killing of a Buffalo-area abortion provider. She said France had the right to refuse to extradite the anti-abortionist, if the U.S. indented to execute him.
CLEAN : Macron announces "national tribute" for Badinter
A "national tribute will be paid" to Robert Badinter, announces Emmanuel Macron, following the death, at the age of 95, of the former Minister of Justice and father of the abolition of the death penalty (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)
Adv - Week - Ahead
HERE'S A LOOK AT WHAT'S HAPPENING IN WASHINGTON FOR THE WEEK AHEAD.
19 20 Edition Picardie: [issue of February 13, 2022]
Nord
CLEAN : Badinter: Jack Lang hails "an admirable lawyer, persuasive, combative and brilliant"
Jack Lang, Director of the Institut du Monde Arabe and former French Minister of Culture, pays tribute to Robert Badinter, the father of the abolition of the death penalty in France in 1981, who died on the night of Feb 8 at the age of 95 (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)
Green - Governor
REPUBLICAN RICK PERRY AND DEMOCRAT TONY SANCHEZ AREN'T THE ONLY CANDIDATES FOR TEXAS GOVERNOR... A LOOK AT THE GREEN PARTY CANDIDATE
US Death Penalty - New Jersey becomes first state in 42 years to ban death penalty
NAME: US DEATH PEN 20071217Ixx TAPE: EF07/1504 IN_TIME: 10:10:10:19 DURATION: 00:03:08:22 SOURCES: ABC/AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Various, 17 Dec 2007/File RESTRICTIONS: see script SHOTLIST: ABC (WPVI) - No Access NAmerica/Internet Trenton, New Jersey - 17 December 2007 1. New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine signing bill to eliminate the state's death penalty 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jon Corzine, Governor of New Jersey: "Prison without parole best captures our state's highest values and reflects our best efforts to search for true justice rather than state-endorsed killing." 3. Corzine holding bill and shaking hands with supporters ++MUTE++ AP Television Trenton, New Jersey - 13 December 2007 4. Prison guard tower, pan to wall 5. Guard tower and barbed wire on top of prison wall 6. Wide of state assembly in session debating the death penalty bill 7. Lawmaker speaking about bill 8. Lawmakers sitting in desks during debate ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet FILE: New Jersey, date unknown ++MUTE SHOTS++ 9. Death row chamber 10. Prison cell on death row 11. Pan up STILL photo of a murdered parents of Sharon Hazard-Johnson ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet FILE: Pleasantville, New Jersey, date unknown 12. Zoom in to murder scene and police cordon ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet FILE: Date and location unknown 13. Death row inmate, Brian Wakefield, convicted of murder ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet Trenton, New Jersey - date unknown 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sharon Hazard-Johnson, opposed to death penalty repeal: "The death penalty is the ultimate penalty for the ultimate crime. We all get one life. That's all we get, and for somebody to take somebody else's life away, they get the dead end penalty for the dead end crime." ++MUTE SHOT++ 15. New Jersey state legislative committee meeting on the death penalty repeal bill, pan to witness 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rich Kanka, Murder victim's father, opposed to death penalty repeal: "She (his daughter, Megan Kanka) was abducted. She was raped. She was strangled. She was suffocated. She was raped post-mortem. Her body was dumped in a park. Now if that does not constitute gross and heinous, I don't understand what you people are thinking about." AP Television Trenton, New Jersey - 13 December 2007 17. Former New Jersey death row inmate Robert O. Marshall 18. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert O. Marshall, New Jersey inmate: "Killing the one person, the person he killed is still dead, so it doesn't accomplish anything there either. I don't believe it psychologically affects people on the street because most murders are, they're not premeditated. They're in many cases emotional or spur of the moment." ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet File - New Jersey, date and location unknown 19. Pan of death row area in a prison ++MUTE++ ABC (WPVI) - No Access N.America/Internet Trenton, New Jersey - 17 December 2007 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sister Helen Prejan, anti-death penalty activist: "The Colosseum in Rome is going to be lit tonight and tomorrow night, and the word will travel around the globe that there is a state in the United States of America that was the first to show that life is stronger than death, that love is great than hatred." AP Television Trenton, New Jersey - 13 December 2007 21. Prison guard tower STORYLINE: The state of New Jersey has become the first in four decades in the United States to abolish the death penalty. The bill, approved last week by the state's Assembly and Senate, replaces the death sentence with life in prison without parole. The move comes as the top US court, the Supreme Court, considers the constitutionality of execution by lethal injection. The Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine signed the law on Monday, the abolition spares the lives of eight men who are currently being held on death row in the state. Corzine commuted their sentences to life in prison without parole. "Prison without parole best captures our state's highest values and reflects our best efforts to search for true justice rather than state-endorsed killing," said Corzine after the signing. The death row inmates include the sex offender who murdered seven-year-old Megan Kanka in 1994. Megan's father, Rich Kanka, had pleaded with lawmakers not to pass the bill, given the nature of the crimes against his daughter. "She was raped. She was strangled. She was suffocated. She was raped post-mortem," said an emotional Kanka at a hearing with lawmakers before the vote. Sharon Hazard-Johnson, whose parents were killed in Pleasantville in 2001, said justice had not been served. "For somebody to take somebody else's life away, they should get the dead end penalty for the dead end crime," said Hazard-Johnson. A judge spared Robert O. Marshall the death penalty in 2004 after he had spent 18 years on the state's death row. While speaking to the Associated Press from the New Jersey State Prison, Marshall, an insurance salesman convicted of hiring a contract killer to kill his wife in 1984, said the death penalty isn't likely to deter crimes and it won't to bring solace to the families of the victims either. "Killing the one person, the person he killed is still dead, so it doesn't accomplish anything there either. I don't believe it psychologically affects people on the street because most murders are, they're not premeditated. They're in many cases emotional or spur of the moment," he said. Activists on both sides of the issue had passionately lobbied the State Assembly, including a famous anti-death penalty advocate, and author of 'Dead Man Walking', Sister Helen Prejean. "The word will travel around the globe that there is a state in the United State of America that was the first to show that life is stronger than death, that love is great than hatred," said Prejean after the bill signing. The Italian capital plans to shine a golden light on the Colosseum in support of the new law. Once the arena for deadly gladiator combat and executions, the Colosseum is now a symbol of the fight against the death penalty. The bill passed the Legislature largely along party lines, with controlling Democrats supporting the abolition and minority Republicans opposed. Republicans had sought to retain the death penalty for those who murder law enforcement officials, rape and murder children, and those convicted under terrorism law, but Democrats rejected that. The last states to eliminate the death penalty were Iowa and West Virginia in 1965, according to the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. The United States has executed 1,099 people since the U.S. Supreme Court re-authorised the death penalty in 1976. Last year, 53 people were executed, the lowest since 1996. Other states have considered abolishing the death penalty recently, but none has advanced as far as New Jersey.
EXTRACT FROM CUNTRASTU/ SOUND Bruno QUESTEL on POLITICAL PRISONERS
Méditerranée
CAB SJT PASS VACCINAL/ THE GOVERNMENT ACCELERATES AGAINST THE WAVE
A2 / France 2
CLEAN : SHORT PROFILE: Robert Badinter, French politician, lawyer and writer
French politician, lawyer, writer, Robert Badinter has marked France in particular for his role in the abolition of the death penalty, when he was Minister of Justice, under François Mitterrand, in 1981 (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)
UK Amnesty - Amnesty report says China leads the world in executions
NAME: UK AMNESTY 20080415Ix TAPE: EF08/0399 IN_TIME: 10:50:44:10 DURATION: 00:02:17:01 SOURCES: AP Television/Pool/Iraqi Government Video DATELINE: Various - 14 Apr 2008/ File RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST POOL FILE: London, 6 April 2008 1. Chinese officials lighting Olympic flame in London 2. Demonstrator trying to grab Olympic flame from torch bearer AP Television London, 14 April 2008 3. Set-up of Piers Bannister, Amnesty researcher 4. Close of press release in hands 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Piers Bannister, Amnesty researcher: "We need to see the death penalty abolished in China. As a first step, we need to see an open, honest discussion with full information about the death penalty in that country. That can't happen just in the Olympic year. That needs to happen year in, year out, until China achieves the abolition of the death penalty." POOL FILE: London, 6 April 2008 6. Demonstrator being wrestled to ground by policeman on bike AP Television London, 14 April 2008 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Piers Bannister, Amnesty researcher: "Chinese authorities have made several positive statements about the death penalty, including that they would like eventual abolition. I hope, as China takes its place on the global stage, that it will seriously look at its human rights record, and that one of the things it will do is abolish the death penalty." AP Television FILE: Berlin, 22 January 2008 8. Demonstrators protesting against capital punishment in Iran 9. Various of protesters acting out mock stoning and hanging AP Television FILE: California, USA - Recent ++MUTE++ 10. Doors opening to death chamber 11. Strap down table in death chamber 12. Wide of death chamber AP Television London, 14 April 2008 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Piers Bannister, Amnesty researcher: "Large parts of the world are execution-free. We need to see that those borders of execution-free Europe and the Americas are pushed back into the Middle East and Asia until we see a world free of executions." Iraqi Government Video FILE: Iraq - 19 December 2007 14. Various of handcuffed men in black hoods 15. Close of men at gallows with nooses around necks STORYLINE Amnesty International condemned China as the "world's top executioner" on Tuesday in its annual survey of countries that carry out capital punishment. The human rights organisation said China had executed at least 470 people in 2007 but added that the true figure was without doubt much higher. Amnesty said the total number of executions worldwide was at least 1,200, suggesting that China accounts for more than a third of the global count. Noting that Beijing classifies the death penalty as a state secret, Amnesty commented that "as the world and Olympic guests are left guessing, only the Chinese authorities know exactly how many people have been killed with state authorisation." The organisation said that with the Olympic Games taking place in Beijing this year, it was pushing for change on the part of the Chinese authorities. "I hope, as China takes its place on the global stage, that it will seriously look at its human rights record, and that one of the things it will do is abolish the death penalty," commented Amnesty researcher Piers Bannister. The Amnesty report said 88 percent of all known executions take place in just five countries - China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the United States. It said Iran carried out at least 377 executions, while the figure for the United States was 42. Amnesty called on all governments that allow the death penalty to lift what it called the "veil of secrecy" over the practice. "We need to see that the borders of execution-free Europe and the Americas are pushed back into the Middle East and Asia until we see a world free of executions," Bannister said.
You’re not turning your own guillotine?
Radio France: filmed programmes
Entertainment Daily Bianca Jagger - Bianca Jagger was in Paris to announce a forthcoming congress against the death penalty.
TAPE: EF01/0333 IN_TIME: 13:46:53 DURATION: 2:43 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: No re-use/re-sale without clearance DATELINE: Monday 9th April, Paris, France SHOTLIST: Paris, France April 9, 2001 1. Wide shot of the office of the president of the National Assembly 2. Wide interior shot of press conference underway led by French National Assembly President Raymond Forni and including Nicole Fontaine, President of the European Parliament 3. Side shot of podium showing all participants including Bianca Jagger and Lord Russel Johnston (bald gentleman) who is President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe 4. Tight shot of Bianca Jagger 5. Closeup of sign that reads "Together Against the Death Penalty" 6. SOUNDBITE: (ENGLISH) Bianca Jagger, Anti-Death Penalty Activist "Today at the beginning of this new century, more than half of the countries in the world have abolished the death penalty. To belong or to be a member of the Council of Europe, you have to have abolished the death penalty. It is incomprehensible to all of us to think that we still have the death penalty in America, especially when we know that the death penalty is fraught with arbitrariness, that the majority of the people on death row are poor that they are a member of a minority and the US is executing the mentally ill and juveniles under 18 years of age." 7. Wide shot of podium with Fontaine and Forni in the middle 8. Audience watching proceedings with one reading the anti-death penalty pamphlet 9. Cutaway photographer 10. SOUNDBITE: (FRENCH) Bianca Jagger, Anti-Death Penalty Activist "There will be a congress - the 21st of June in Strasbourg in order to demand the end of the death penalty in the world. This is important for the countries that still have the death penalty like the United States, China and Japan, and others to understand that in our society today, this is not acceptable that we kill, and that we kill in certain circumstances innocent people and it is not acceptable either that we can have in countries like the US, which is a country that calls itself the country that defends the human rights throughout the entire world - that it is a force in this domain - and yet it has this system that is so wrong." 11. Cutaway of pamphlet that reads "Together Against the Death Penalty" 12. Man with the pamphlet on his lap 13. SOUNDBITE: (ENGLISH) (Regarding whether James Kopp should be executed) "If the United States is going to execute him and if France has abolished the death penalty, I think that it is up the French to think what is morally right, to decide what should be done." 14. Jagger seated at podium BIANCA JAGGER ADDS VOICE TO ANTI DEATH PENALTY LOBBY ===================================================== BIANCA JAGGER has joined calls for the death penalty to be dropped around the world. The actress and former wife of Rolling Stone Mick Jagger arrived in Paris on monday to join representatives from the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and other high level activists in Paris at the Presidency of the National Assembly, to announced a forthcoming congress against the death penalty. The first world congress for the abolition of the death penalty will be held in Strasbourg from June 21 to 23. Ahead of the press conference, Bianca Jagger told APTN that it was incomprehensible to her how the United States, which calls itself a defender of human rights could still enforce the death penalty. She said capital punishment "is fraught with arbitrariness" and that most people on death row are poor and members of minority groups. Jagger was also asked about the possible extradition to the U.S. of James Kopp, an American fugitive in France who was charged with the killing of a Buffalo-area abortion doctor. Kopp vanished after officials said they wanted to question him about the 1998 murder of Dr. Barnett Slepian (SLEHP'-ee-uhn) in suburban Buffalo, New York. One of the charges against the anti-abortion activist carries a potential death penalty. Kopp has become one of the F-B-I's most wanted fugitives. Jagger says France had the moral right to refuse to extradite the anti-abortionist, if the U.S. intended to execute him.
CLEAN : Death penalty progress but some worrying
Amnesty International said progress was made towards abolition of death penalty but also expressed concern about the resumption of executions in some countries 2012 in its annual report on death penalty. CLEAN : Death penalty progress but some worrying on April 09, 2013 in London, England (Footage by AFPTV via Getty Images)