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Interview with Eve Harow
Interview with Eve Harow discussing the infatada against the Jews in Gaza and justifying living there among the Arabs and hopes for peace,INTERVIEWER:,Could you please tell us your full name, spell it for us, and what you do here?, HAROW:,My name is Eve Harow, E-v-e-, H-a-r-o-w. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] My name is Eve Harow, E-v-e, H-a-r-o-w. And I live in (Inaudible). , , INTERVIEWER:,And what do you do here? ,10:01:19>>>, EVE HAROW:,What do I do here? Well, in addition to my husband and I trying to raise seven children, I'm very politically active; I served on the local council, for close to eight years, until just a few months ago, and I speak, whenever I can, about the situation in perspective of somebody living here. , INTERVIEWER:,What is the perspective - what is the situation, in perspective of somebody living here? [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , EVE HAROW:,Okay, we, along with everybody in Israel, have been living through an experiment, a ten year experiment, to do things the way the left wanted to do them, which was Oslo, and to try and create a Palestinian state, and to coexist. The experiment has failed. It's failed on a grand scale. And, over seven hundred people have been killed just in the last few years. And close to two thousand have been killed in the last decade, and thousands have been wounded. And it's not just a perspective, I think anymore, of the people living out here. Although we tend to bear the brunt of what's going on, because we live among the Arabs, more than say someone in Tel Aviv. But, something has to be done, because we can't keep going on this way. ,10:02:46>>>,And so, I think what's happened is that our perspective as people who- would have had to pay the biggest price, had this experiment worked. And in the main would have been willing to pay the price, because we also want to live in peace, just as everybody else does. I think that our perspective is now being seen by the rest of Israel. And we're seeing that they don't want coexistence, and that a two-state solution isn't a viable idea. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS], , INTERVIEWER:,Tell me about the situation and the perspective - , EVE HAROW:,Look, for a long time, the people who live in Judea, and Samaria, and Gaza, the Jews who live here, have been - were seen as the obstacles to peace. If you go along with the idea that this belongs to the Arabs, anybody who knows even a little bit of history realizes that this was never an Arab country, and that if there's anywhere in the world that Jews have a right to live, it's in Judea and Samaria and Gaza. Judea, Tribe of Juda. The only reason that we weren't here before 1967, was because we were ethnically cleansed from here in 1948. And those of us who were living here, don't believe in ethnic cleansing. And we believe that if Jews can't live here, then what that does is it rewarded the people who killed us and drove us away. And that's why our houses are new, because everything that was Jewish was destroyed then. And it's time to rectify that particular travesty.,10:04:17>>>,On the other hand, we also very, very much want to live in peace. I'm a mother of seven, and we want our children to live. My niece's baby was killed a year and a half ago, in a terror incident. A boy that my son played with on his baseball team, Koby Mandell, was found brutally ripped to bits in a cave not far from here. Four of my neighbors were killed, and other people from the area. And we want it to stop. The question is, if this particular process is going to make things stop and get better, or just make things worse. If you establish a Palestinian state, here, where I live, if it's going to threaten the existence of the State of Israel, or if it's going to lead to coexistence. ,And what's interesting, now, when we see it on the Israeli political map, is that nobody, not even the furthest left, is talking about coexistence anymore. At best they're talking about a separation. And we know that the Palestinian Authority, and many of the people, unfortunately who live under the Palestinian Authority, have painted this, now, as an us or them situation. It's not something that Israelis wanted. But it's something that's coming from the other side. Their maps all show Palestine replacing Israel, not a Palestine, give or take where the borders would be, next to Israel. And, unfortunately, even though we as Israelis would like to think otherwise, because doesn't everybody want to live in peace, doesn't everybody want to compromise, we're still fighting for our right to exist at all in this part of the world. , INTERVIEWER:,Could you accept - would you accept your Palestinian neighbors, or would you - if things were peaceful,l would you be okay with you sharing the backyard with - or the next village with your Palestinian neighbors? ,10:05:56>>>, EVE HAROW:,I have no problem with Arabs. I'm not a racist. And I think that ultimately we are going to have to coexist in the Middle East. What I have a problem with, is people who don't accept my right to be here at all. And that is something that I think has to be dealt with. When we see that all the Holy places, for example, that were put under their control as part of Oslo, Joseph's Tomb the old synagogue in Jericho, were immediately destroyed. When we see what's going on in Temple Mount, for example, which almost everyone in the world acknowledges that when the temple is there and there's a Jewish connection to the place, it's not acknowledged at all, and there's a denial of any kind of Jewish tie to the land. And so we're not saying that there shouldn't be coexistence, and we all shouldn't be able to somehow work it out. But when you see a complete denial of our rights on the other side, and it makes us realize that we're speaking two different languages. And that's something that I think, that perhaps western audiences don't understand. We don't have to like or understand the mentality, shall we say, of the suicide bomber, but we have to know that it exists in their society and what we need to do about it. ,10:07:02>>>,So, there's sometimes I feel almost an arrogance in the part of the people from the west, like, we know democracy, we know freedom of speech, and we know how wonderful that life is. And doesn't everybody get it? Isn't that what everybody would want? And what we need to understand is that in this part of the world, that societies are not necessarily on the same page as we are there. And so, when we talk about compromise and largesse and willingness to share, the other side has interpreted it as a loss of will, and a lack of faith, and us starting to believe that maybe we really don't deserve to be here. And that's how they've seen it, and that is how they've run with it. ,And that's why, when we started a process that we thought was going to lead to peace, instead we're facing a war - really a war. And the guns that were given to them, that were suppose to stop the terrorists, are - have been, instead, been turned against us. So what happened? We didn't understand how the other side was interpreting what was going on. And we can't afford to do that. We just can't afford to do that. , INTERVIEWER:,Earlier on we were talking - you had mentioned that there were seven hundred people killed, over the past couple of years, and over the past decade a couple of thousand. But when you said people, you were only referring to the Israeli side. , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:, On the other side, as well, several thousand on the other side as well - several thousand on the other side as well, did they count? ,10:08:40>>>, EVE HAROW:,Of course they count. And every time an Arab - of course everybody killed, counts. And every time an Arab child is killed, I hurt, because he's got a mother, too. The question is who set up the situation? When Barak went to Camp David, he was ready to give away just about all of Judea, Samaria and Gaza, and throw in some of the Negev too, to make up the difference in percentages of the areas that he couldn't give away. And then we got a war. So, for one side to start a war, to send their children out as human bombs, and then to say, ‘Well, we're dying', is, is an absurdity. At any point in time, if the Arabs put down their guns, we'll be back at the negotiating table. If the Israelis and Jews put down their guns, we'll be in the sea. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians feel that - they feel that people like you, the settlers, they called you an obstacle for peace and that those of you who are, you know, quote, unquote, on the far right - that you accept, that, that's where you are, are - are not interested in peace. , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,-are not interested in coexistence, are not interested in two states. ,10:10:04>>>, EVE HAROW:,Well, those are all different things. Okay? To say that we're not interested in peace and coexistence, is not the same thing as saying that we're not interested in two states. I don't believe that there should be an Arab State west of the Jordan River. It's not viable, not economically, and not for many other reasons. But also there is a state, already, that exists on three-quarters of British Mandate Palestine, for the Arabs, and that's the country of Jordan. The majority of the population are Palestinians. So there already exists an Arab state, for the people who call themselves Palestinians. ,To say that we're not interested in peace and coexistence, is the most ridiculous thing. Okay? We want this war to stop, and we want people to stop dying on both sides. One of the arguments that I have, with actually the Israeli left, is when they also buy into that. Because it's very hard to understand why we're being hated. So, if we're being hated because we supposedly took something that belongs to the other side, how do you rectify that? You give them what they say is theirs; Judea, Samaria and Gaza. Then they don't hate us anymore. Which, again, doesn't make sense when they were offered that and they turned it down. ,Because it turns out that what they call the Nachba [PH], the catastrophe, is not the War of 1967, a war that Israel defended itself against three armies; Syria, Jordan and, and Egypt, and ended up winning Judea, Samaria and Gaza in the course of that war. That's not the nachba, that's not the catastrophe for the Arabs. For the Arabs, the catastrophe was 1948. That's what they call the nachba. What's 1948, the creation and the beginning of the existence of the State of Israel. And one - I have a map that shows - it's a map that I got from the Palestinian Businessman's Association. It's a map of destroyed Arab villages. Villages that they want to go home to, as they say. Kibbutz Negba which is in the Negev, sits on lands of five Arab villages that were destroyed in the course of the 1948 War. Efrat sits on land that was empty since, we don't know how long. So who exactly do they resent? ,10:12:00>>>,And this is a beast that I have with the Israeli left, who cast us as the villains, and as obstacles to peace, very often. When we have to understand that for the Arab world, I would say even as a whole, and not just the Palestinians, it isn't just Israel, it's every Jewish community, it's Tel Aviv, and it's Haifa that are just as much an obstacle, because they don't want peace. They want to eradicate the existence of Israel as a Jewish state, and turn it into another Arab country. And so we're all the problem in the Arab mind. And, again, this is where we have to understand, we have to start talking to each other and listen to what the other side is saying. We are all settlers. We all don't belong here. We are all occupiers. , INTERVIEWER:,Why did you come to Israel? ,10:12:41>>>, EVE HAROW:,Actually my father is a Palestinian. My father was born in Berlin to a Jewish family, in 1932. My grandfather saw what was gonna happen, and in 1933 brought them here to Palestine. Because, before 1948, the people who were Palestinians were the Jews. The Arabs calling themselves Palestinians is a relatively new invention. Even the Palestinian brigade went to help the Allies fight in World War II, it was made up of Jews. The Arabs called themselves, the Arab of southern Syria, not Palestinians. So my father grew up here as a Palestinian, and then in 1948 as an Israeli. My mother came, an American, and they met and I ended up being raised in the states. ,10:13:21>>>,But I always felt - we came to visit here when I was nine, because we have family here, and I always felt that this was home. And that I couldn't see, after two thousand years of the Jews not having a home, I was privileged to live in a time when we'd come home - I couldn't see living in Los Angeles, and not here. And I still feel that, even with everything that's going on and how difficult it is, it is a tremendous privilege to be able to be here, and to be able to - in writing the history of the Jewish people, I'm one of the people holding the pencil, not just reading the book. And that's something that, at times, just overwhelms me. Just by waking up here in the morning, I've done something for the Jewish people - past and future. For all the people who came before me, who hung on to inquisitions, and Crusades, and everything else. And they hung on so that I could be a Jew in the 21st Century. I owe them that, an heir to the future also. Because, if there is no State of Israel, I fear for the existence of the Jewish people. And if my being here serves as an obstacle to the Palestinian State, which I and so many Israelis see now as an existential threat to the State of Israel, there is no finer thing I can do than live here. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , INTERVIEWER:,You have children and you've chosen this life of what used to be called pioneers, and you know, even now they're called seconds. ,10:15:15>>>, EVE HAROW:,Right. Why live here and not in Tel Aviv? Why do boys serve in a combat unit and not get a job at a desk, where they know that chances are they'll make it through their army service? Because, to be a Jew, to be an Israeli, means that you have to think as a collective. You have to think of what's the best thing for the Jewish people. Even if it isn't always necessarily the best thing for you and yours. And so, we could not exist if it wasn't for the guys in the front, literally, the ones who do the dangerous mission. ,And I think Israel also needs people like myself right now, who are here. Because, if we're not here Arafat will be right here, and he'll be looking down at the people in Tel Aviv. So, if I want to go live in Tel Aviv, and tell someone else to be here, then maybe someone else doesn't want to be here. The, in that vacuum, that's evil. And if I can prevent that from happening, then I'm willing to take the risks. I'm not happy about it. I'm not happy about the danger. But I have to look at it from, from what's best for Israel and the part that I can play. I can't be a soldier, but I can do this, so that's what I'm doing. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians talk about the cycle of violence here on the - in Israel, the attacks that are - the military responses are, are not allegedly in response to terrorism. , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:,And that the Palestinians say that the ____ the terrorist attacks, ____ Israel's target assassinations, and, you know, what I mean, excursions and aggression and so on , and so forth. ,10:17:05>>>, EVE HAROW:,I think, in the world, post 9/11, there needs to be a better understanding of what's going on here. This is not just a little turf war between the Israelis and the Palestinians. This is probably nothing less than a clash of civilizations. And the reason that Israel is bearing the brunt of the terrorism, is because we are the point man for Western civilization in the Middle East. You talk about the cycle of violence, and how to break the cycle of violence. What caused nineteen suicide bombers to smash into the World Trade Center? Nothing more, nothing less than the fact that they hate the west more than anything that the west had done, except being themselves; being free society, being people who believed in openness and a liberal way of life, and not forcing anybody to do things. And that's the problem that we have in Israel. That is the threat that we hold to all the dictatorships, and the absolute monarchies, and just the bunch of thugs that control this part of the world, and control the lives of the billion people. ,10:18:08>>>,And until - and I agree wholeheartedly with what President Bush said last June, until there is a sea change in this part of the world, until the other people who live here, until the Arabs of Iran and Iraq, they have their freedoms and they have an opportunity to move on -I don't believe we'll be able to solve the Israel Palestinian problem. Because until people are happy with their lot and their leaders, they are certainly not gonna want to find a way of coexistence with me, and stop hating me. And so this - I see what's going on here as part of a much, much bigger picture, that, it's upsetting for me as an Israeli, because it means I have less control over it. ,If you break this down to just an Israeli-Palestinian issue, then we can at least pretend that we have some kind of control. But if you look at this as a map of the Middle East, and as Israel really as, just a sample of the free world here, then it's more frightening because what I say and do isn't so important. On the other hand, I can only hope that the rest of the free world will see what's happening here. ,And, there's an example given that the Jews are very often the canary in the coal mine. That whatever evil it is that's abound in the world, that starts with the Jews, will eventually, if it's not checked, make its way to the rest of the world; Nazism, Fascism, Communism, and now Islamic Fundamentalism. So when the world thought that this was just Israel's problem, so we suffered for 50, 60, 70 years from this terror, this is not something new on our own, and now we hoped that the world had seen that because it was allowed to breed, and because now we had the terrorism, and these despots have no less than nuclear and biological chemical weapons, now it's a threat for everybody, and that we need to fight this together. , INTERVIEWER:,Some people, Americans, I had a conversation with somebody that saw that the concentration camps of (Inaudible), and so forth, and that he said Israel is an apartide state. How do you respond to that? ,10:20:12>>>, EVE HAROW:,People are entitled to their own opinion. And I think what is so fascinating sometimes, I think the Jews are in some way the victims of their own success. Because who brought that whole idea of morality and fairness and equality to the world? It was the Jews. And it was the Bible, and it was what we brought that changed the world from being, you know, with paganism, and where they used to sacrifice their children to malach and to ba'al and all these kinds of idols. We changed the world. And now we're being told that we're not fair enough, and that, you know, literally we're being told to be more Catholic than the Pope, as it were. And, unfortunately whoever you spoke to who said that, that thinks Israel - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,Unfortunately, people who feel that Israel is an apartheid state, don't understand what we're going through, and it's not an apartheid state. When I vote, when I cast my ballot in ten weeks, all the Arab-Israelis will do the same. Their vote will count just as much as mine. Even though many of them are not loyal to the state of Israel, would not swear an oath of loyalty to the State of Israel. Many of them have been implicated in terror bombings, themselves, have given aid to Palestinians who were involved in terror bombing. So you could say that they're not the greatest citizens in the State of Israel, and yet they will vote for the Knesset just as I will. And so Israel is far from an apartheid state. ,And I think, especially in view of the neighborhood that we live in, and what we're up against, I think it's nothing short of phenomenal, how democratic and, and, open Israeli society is. It's possibly our greatest achievement. We're not given credit for it. , , INTERVIEWER:,What are the parameters that you could envision a peaceful solution or a peaceful coexistence to what's going on? ,10:22:03>>>, EVE HAROW:,The majority of people who call themselves Palestinians, say that they are refugees, that their grandparents came from Yaffo and Haifa in 1948. It was a war that they started, when they didn't accept the UN Partition Plan. And it was a war that they paid the price for. What's so interesting though, is that only about one hundred thousand people are actually those who left, at the time. The vast majority of the people that call themselves refugees, are children and grandchildren of the refugees. So, even an interesting legal point is, does that make them refugees? Because if children and grandchildren of refugees are also refugees, probably every Jew in the world is a refugee. Israel is certainly a country of refugees, then. Because we've been forced out and throw out of just about everywhere. ,Now they started a war that they didn't think they would lose. And the price that they paid was losing their homes. And to add insult to injury, instead of the Arab world taking them in, the Arab world that instigated them to fight against Israel, before it even began, The Arab world didn't take them in. The Arab world, their Arab brothers, put them in refugee camps, and have left them in that situation, with the collusion of the UN, now, of course, for over half a century. But, what's interesting is that the man in a Jabaliya refugee camp in Gaza, and I, share a point of view. We both feel that he's not at home. He feels that his home is in Ocko [PH], which is in Israel. The Israeli left will never let him go back to Ocko. So that's a non-starter for him. ,But what has to be done is the fulfillment of the promise of the Arab leaders, in the early 50's, made. See, in the early 50's, the Arab world threw out their Jews. That's where Sephardic Jewry comes from. Sixty percent of Israelis came in the 1950's, with the clothes on their back, because they were throw out of the Arab world. The Jews from Baghdad, some of whom their families were there for twenty-seven hundred years, since the first exile after the destruction of the first temple. It was ancient Babylon. And the Jews of Morocco, and Iraq, and Iran, and everywhere. And they came in and they were absorbed into Israeli society, and at the time, the Arab leaders said, well don't get upset at us for throwing out the Jews, we're just gonna have a population transfer. And this way we'll have room for the Arabs who fled Israel, except that they never fulfilled their side of the bargain. And they put the Arabs in refugee camps, and have left them to rot. ,And so, what needs to be done, is the Arabs in refugee camps have to finally be resettled in Arab countries. It's fifty years overdue, they've been suffering terribly, because of the intransigence of their own leaders, of people who don't care about them. And once that is done, then I think the problems are much less, and once to go back, also, to what people have spoken about before; once you have democracies and open societies in the Middle East, then people have somewhere to go. ,10:24:50>>>,Right now it's difficult for me to say to somebody, to an Arab who's living here, go live in Syria, knowing that he's going to have a miserable life, because everybody in Syria has a miserable life. But if there can be, again, an openness of the Middle East, for their own people, for their own sakes, then there's somewhere to go, there is somewhere to develop, and peace in the region really starts to be a reality for everybody. But it's not just up to Israel, here. It's up to the entire world. ,There was a study that was published a few months ago, that was done by Arabs. One of the markers of how progressive a society is, is how many books are translated into their language during the course of the year. And they found that in the last thousand years, in the last millennia, as many books have been translated into Arabic, as were translated by Spain into Spanish, in one year. It's an area of the globe - it's an area of the world that's falling off the globe, in terms of illiteracy, women not having the vote, women in Saudi Arabia can't drive. Something has to be done for these people, for their own sakes. And when they are happier and more fulfilled because they can actually not be afraid to say what they think. And I think we will find, amongst them, people who also want to live with us in peace. And things can change dramatically. One of the more -,10:26:06>>>,I think it's Bernard Lewis who is one of the foremost Islamic scholars, today. And he has said, and it's so true, that aside from Israel, the regimes in the Middle East that are most pro-west, pro-American, the people are most anti-American. Places like the Palestinian Authority, and Jordan, and Egypt, are places where, regularly, the American flag is burned, because the people hate their leaders. And in places where the regimes are seen as anti-west, the people are actually pro-west. The only place outside of Israel that had any kind of vigil, or memorial for the victims of 9/11 was Teheran. Because the Iranian people want to be free. And if we don't help them, then we, as Israelis and the West, are going to be mired in conflict for a long time. There is a lot that has to be done. , INTERVIEWER:,[OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] What's the bottom line? What is the bear minimum that you could accept, that would give you a feeling of possibility of peace? ,10:27:08>>>, EVE HAROW:,With particular -the bottom line of the bear minimum that people - that all Israelis, not just myself, of course, are willing to accept, is there has to be a complete cessation of the violence. Complete. And no looking the other way, and no saying that this bus-bombing was a sacrifice for peace. None of that. A complete cessation of violence. Because, as long as there is terror, and there are only gains for the other side, via the terror, then the lesson goes home very quickly, which is that the terror pays. So, that has to be - we have to go door to door and collect the guns. And we have to - there has to be a regime change in the Palestinian Authority. What I'm afraid of though, is that the last ten years as raised a generation of children whose textbooks talk about the, the need, the religious need or a Pan Arab need to eradicate the Jews, and to eradicate the State of Israel. , INTERVIEWER:,And the Palestinian children. ,10:27:58>>>, EVE HAROW:,Unfortunately, in the last ten years, the freedom that the Palestinian Authority got, in the last ten years, to educate their own children, has been to educate them towards hatred and away from peace. And so, if someone was still a child of six or seven, when Oslo started, he's now sixteen or seventeen. And that's his childhood, and that's his mindset. Which is that he, as a religious imperative, as an Arab imperative, as whatever, must dedicate his life to destroying the Jews, destroying the infidel, and to having Islam take over. Not just here, but in the west. And I don't know how quickly we can change that. We may have to wait until that generation no longer, or somehow, we have to un-brainwash them, because it's exactly what's happened. ,I think what's important to understand is there are no easy solutions here. You can't say, a unilateral withdrawal, and you're there and we're here and everything will be fine. We can't do it because of security reasons. Because there are missiles that can fly. And when there is a will to destroy, then we'll find a way to get in. And so what we have to do is get rid of that will to destroy, and bring back, somehow, a desire for coexistence. And there's a dearth of it now. And the first thing that has to be done is that - this band of terrorists, called the Palestinian Authority, has to be replaced one way or the other. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinian Authority says that, how can they expect Yasser Arafat to get control over his people when he's virtually under house arrest? , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,And so forth. , EVE HAROW:,Right. So that's the big question. Can Arafat control his people? If he can't control his people then why are we talking to him in any form at all? Why is he still the head of the Palestinian Authority, if he's just a puppet? And if he can talk to them, and control them, then why isn't he telling them, listen, we messed up here. Violence isn't getting us what we want. We need to go back to the path of peace. So, either way, something doesn't fit. I don't know. , INTERVIEWER:,The world, and the (Inaudible) increasing animosity towards Israel and Europe, and in Canada - , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:,-and ____,and so forth. And Palestinians are the underdogs, the freedom fighters in Israel appear to be oppressors, and the occupiers, and the imperialists, and so on, and so forth. What is your response? ,10:30:23>>>, EVE HAROW:,I think the world has, unfortunately fallen into a mindset of appeasement. Which is that the Arab problem is just against the Jews. And therefore if, you know, the Jews are the problem. And so if we can somehow get rid of them, or somehow make them have all the difficult sacrifices, then everything will be fine. And again, blinding themselves to the reality, which is that it's really Western civilization and free societies, and Israel is an example of that. That's the bottom line problem. ,I also think that - one of the arguments that the Palestinians use, and quite successfully, is that they're the ultimate victims of the holocaust. Because we came over here from Europe, and did to them, in their version, exactly what's being done to us in Europe. And of course it's not true, and most people don't know that the Mufti here, at the time, was a big Nazi sympathizer, and that there were plans for a concentration camp, no less, drawn up to rid the world of the Jews of the Land of Israel. And that there were massacres of Jews going on all the time; pre-state, pre-occupation, pre-anything - pre, even second world war. So, that amity of Arabs towards the Jews, has been here for a long time. ,But, what's interesting is the Europeans like this version very much, because then they can feel a little less guilty over what happened on their soil, in World War II. Because they can say, you see when Israel is in power, they do to everybody else what we do to them. And so, it makes them feel a little less bad about their complicity in what happened during World War II. But, of course, it's not true, and I have yet to see on a list of terrorists, anyone named Stanley Cohen, for example. So, on the one hand there's a world that understands, what the danger is here of Islamic Fundamentalism. And strangely enough, though, they say, well in the Arab-Israeli conflict, it's the Jews who are causing all the problems. And there needs to be a slight awakening here, about what's really going on, and the battle that we're all facing together, because if we don't all join together on this, we could all go down together. , INTERVIEWER:,There are some who say that the Arab leaders in 1948 that planned to create refugee camps, as well, _____, and they had a long range goal with the refugee camps. That with the wounds that would fester in Israel's side, and eventually it would infect and it would erupt - , EVE HAROW:,[OVERLAP] Mm-hm, as it happened. , INTERVIEWER:,Can you continue that metaphor? ,10:32:45>>>, EVE HAROW:,It's possible that the Arab world, when they put their own people in refugee camps, knew that they were gonna use them for the next half a century, and that they were gonna breed hatred. And you could use these people as their frontline, in their war against Israel. And it's possible not. It's possible that they just simply didn't care, didn't want to be bothered, and dumped them in refugee camps. It doesn't matter. Because the situation exists, today, and has to be dealt with. And what the world needs to understand is that it's not Israel's responsibility. Israel will do a lot to help repatriate the refugees, join a fund, or whatever it is, to give these people a normal life on a humanitarian level. We will do more than their own people will do. Where's all the oil money? Where's the Saudi Arabian money and the Iraqi money? They have so much. How come they can't help their own people? It's just - when I compare it to how Israel welcomed the Jewish refugees in the early 1950's, from the Arab countries, it's just astonishing to me, the lack of caring on the Arab side, for their own people. , INTERVIEWER:,What do you see in a hundred years? , EVE HAROW:, What do I see in a hundred years? Being, believe it or not, an optimistic person, I hope that there will really be peace here in a hundred years. It's time, it's time for all of us to turn those swords into ploughshares. , INTERVIEWER:,Some historians take the larger view-(Inaudible) to say - historians say that the Arabs take a larger view - , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:, And their - you know, this - today the battle is just part of a larger battle. , EVE HAROW:,Yes. , INTERVIEWER:,And it took up two hundred years to get the Christians out through The Crusades, and (Inaudible). ,10:34:32>>>, EVE HAROW:,[OVERLAP] Mm-hm. There's no question that the Arabs have a lot more patience than we do. And that they see us as just an anachronism in what they call their Middle East. If they were the way they once were, it would be easier, maybe, to see their point of view. Like if, I mean who, in the Middle Ages, when Christianity in Europe was wallowing for like four hundred years and went nowhere, there were a lot of good things that came out of the Islamic world; Algebra, music, and art, and medicine. What happened? Why the stagnation? I think they have to get their own house in order. And I think what scares them is how our house is so in order. Fifty years of constantly living on the edge, and on wars. ,And Israel is - and high tech, we're at the top of the world. We've got an astronaut, an Israeli astronaut flying in space as part of the team. He's not just sitting as a passenger. He's an intregal part of the team. Nobel prizes from every which way. I think it scares them, how little - how much we've been able to accomplish with so many forces arrayed against us, and how they just keep going backwards. And that fear is what also drives the hatred. And so I think we've got to help them, for the little people's sake. Not for the leader's sake. The leaders can go home. The leaders aren't good for anybody except themselves. But, for their own people's sake, we've got to help them, because this area has tremendous potential, but only if we work together. , INTERVIEWER:,In the end do you think that _____'s solution could work? Do you think you could abide by that - live by that? , EVE HAROW:,A two-state solution, today, means creating a terror state, with an Israel, nine miles wide. Which means that Israel will be, if not destroyed, will have a terrible, terrible war with a terrible cost in lives. So today, there is no talking about a two-state solution, west of the Jordan River. It's like creating another Afghanistan, or another Iraq. Who needs that? Nobody needs that. Israel for sure not. But not the west either. ,And so, I think, first we wait and see the change. Perhaps I sound a little bit skeptical. But after ten years of broken promises, I think I have the right to be skeptical. Because, if I'm right about what's going on here, then Israel's really - it's existence is, you know, threatened. And that's not a risk that I'm willing to take. We're willing to take a lot of risks for peace and we did. And we gave them guns because they said they were gonna use their guns to protect everybody from the terrorists, and instead they turned the guns on us. And instead the police force and the Palestinian Authority has become one of the prime movers and shakers of terrorism, fatah. So, I think we have a right to be a little wary, here. The stakes are just too high to turn a blind eye. , INTERVIEWER:,If there were an election in Palestinian, today, or tomorrow, and -you know, Israel would have safe and secure boundaries, however that is defined. That in a two-state solution the majority would probably vote for it - ,10:37:44>>>, EVE HAROW:,If you have a two-state solution, but again, you have a despot or a dictator on the other side, then you assume they probably have them in the rest of the Arab world. When you have that in the PA, today, which is - he doesn't represent his people. That's what democracy means. Democracy means, the majority rules. But you don't have that in the Arab world, and not in the PA, for sure. And so, to create a state, that's the same mistakes that were made in Oslo. ,To say that Arafat is the - you know, he's a representative of his people, and either he was too weak or he, himself, was playing a game, one of his so-called moderate ministers, Faisal Hussein, who died a couple years ago in Kuwait, and he was the moderate in the Palestinian Authority, who was a minister for Jerusalem affairs. And the last interview that he gave, before he died, was to an Egyptian newspaper, and he called Oslo a Trojan Horse. Meaning, it was just a way of knowing Israel's defenses, in order to be able to eradicate Israel. And he was the moderate. ,So, we need to work on building back a little bit of trust. And they have to prove it, because we have no reason to trust them anymore. Everything that we're hearing, from the Palestinian Authority in the Arab world, shows us that they are still an implacable enemy. And we want peace desperately, but we don't the peace of the grave, and we don't want to commit suicide. And we have the right to be here, too. And we're willing to compromise. But not on our existence. , INTERVIEWER:,But my question was about the Israeli majority. , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,Who would probably just fight the fears and the - and you articulate would still, today, given the choice, would probably go for a two-state solution as it's being presented in very different presentations. ,10:39:33>>>, EVE HAROW:,The Israeli public needs a little bit of educating here, too. Because when we started Oslo. Israelis didn't think that we were gonna give them a Palestinian state, because they deserved it, because it had been their land, and we took it away. Israelis knew better. But we were so desperate for peace that we said, fine, you know, what? Let's split the land, even though we have a right to it. But we wanted there to be peace. And if this is what they're saying is the obstacle to them giving us peace, because they want this piece of land, have their own state, fine we'll do it. In the course of the last ten years, somehow that idea got lost. And because of very poor public relations and explaining our position, now it's become conventional wisdom that they deserve a state. And that's why, despite all the terrorism, we have a Prime Minister who is talking about a Palestinian State, like it's a fait accompli and there's nothing you can do. ,And I think there is something we can do. We can educate. We can explain to people why we're not just not being nice when we say that we don't want there to be a Palestinian State. But that one already exists in Jordan, that was the intention. And to set up another one would just destabilize the region and create another terror state. And so a lot of explaining has to be done, but the facts and the history and the truth is with us. It's just that, unfortunately, people don't know. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , INTERVIEWER:,Anything that we haven't covered? ,10:41:10>>>, EVE HAROW:,I love this country. I'm not going anywhere. Because I really feel that we have the right to be here. What disturbs me is the double standard that is very often given when people talk about, we can't think about moving Arabs, because that's transfer, yet they talk about dismantling settlements, which means transferring me. And so, these are hypocrises that bother me very much. And I think that maybe people don't understand what they're saying. That if you don't want people to be moved, then I shouldn't be moved either. ,And if you don't want there to be illegal building, or so called of Jewish communities here, then you have to stop illegal building of Arab houses which is going on right outside my window. Because, to say, if that the Jews can't build, but the Arabs can, why have negotiations? They're saying that it's theirs, the whole thing is a farce. And I don't think the people understand enough, about Israeli rights. They see us with tanks [TAPE COMES TO END] -.
US Kim Reax 2
AP-APTN-2230: US Kim Reax 2 Monday, 19 December 2011 STORY:US Kim Reax 2- REPLAY Korean communities in LA and NY react to Kim Jong Il death; Clinton sbite LENGTH: 03:32 FIRST RUN: 2030 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound/English/Japanese SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 719799 DATELINE: Various, 19 Dec 2011 LENGTH: 03:32 AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only SHOTLIST Washington, DC - December 19, 2011 1. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba walk into news conference 2. Clinton and Gemba at microphones 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "Today the Foreign Minister and I discussed the evolving situation on the Korean Peninsula in light of the reports from North Korea state owned media on the death of Kim Jong Il." 4. Wide reporters to Clinton and Gemba 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "We both share a common interest in a peaceful and stable transition in North Korea, as well as in ensuring regional peace and stability. We have been in close touch with our partners in the six-party talks today." 6. Pan from officials to Clinton and Gemba 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "President Obama and President Lee spoke last night. I spoke with Foreign Minister Kim this morning and we are also reaching to Beijing and Moscow and of course closely coordinating with our Japanese friends." 8. Cutaway reporters 9. SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) Koichiro Gemba, Japanese Foreign Minister: "In light of the developments in North Korea, namely the death of Mr Kim Jong Il, Secretary Clinton and I had an in depth discussion on the situation in North Korea at today's meeting. We share the recognition that it is important to make sure that the latest event would not negatively affect the peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula. For this purpose we are affirm to closely monitor the situation concerned and to coordinate closely with each other by sharing information between Japan and the United States and among Japan, the United States and the Republic of Korea." 10. Mid, Clinton and Gemba shaking hands and leaving New York, New York - December 19, 2011 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mike Kulma, Asia Society Executive Director for Global Leadership: "There is virtually, I think, nothing known about the kind of policies that he (Kim Jong Un) in particular is supportive of, outside of the fact that as the successor to his father, that he would continue to carry on the policies that his father and his leadership structure has put into place." Los Angeles, California - 19 December, 2011 12. Mid of "Koreatown" street sign 13. Mid and close-ups, Korean-language newspaper on stand 14. Exterior of Radio Korea 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Choo, Assistant News Director, Radio Korea: "They've been brainwashed for 30 or 40 years, they feel like they lost their great great father. They obviously... that's what they feel right now." 16. Close up of "On Air" light 17. Mid of volume metres 18. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Choo, Assistant News Director, Radio Korea: "They worry about the situation or if the North Korean government is in danger of falling, there will be riots, like situations in Africa." 19. Wide, Radio Korea, exterior Palisades Park, New Jersey - 19 December 2011 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dae Hyun Yoon, resident: "That's kind of a good thing for them and for us too, for everyone, basically I think, because communism, what they're doing they are just a threat to the world. You know?" 21. Mother and child coming out of store 22. Mid, Korean storefronts STORYLINE: The Obama administration called for a peaceful and stable leadership transition in North Korea on Tuesday, after the death of the reclusive nation's leader Kim Jong Il. US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the situation in the Korean peninsula was evolving and that United States is looking for better relations with the North Korean people. US officials have said Kim's passing will likely delay anticipated developments on resuming nuclear disarmament talks with the North and supplying the nation with food aid. "We both share a common interest in a peaceful and stable transition in North Korea as well as ensuring regional peace and stability," Clinton told reporters at the State Department after a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba. Gemba said the US and Japan "shared the recognition that it is important to make sure that the latest events would not negatively affect the peace and stability on the Korean peninsula." Analysts say Kim's death was unlikely to plunge the country into chaos because it already was preparing for a transition. Following the death of North Korean Leader Kim Jong Il, North Korean state media proclaimed his youngest son, Kim Jong Un, a "Great Successor." Mike Kulma from the Asia Society, said that not very much is understood about Kim Jong Un and his own plans for the country. "There is virtually, I think, nothing known about the kind of policies that he (Kim Jong Un) in particular is supportive of, outside of the fact that as the successor to his father that he would continue to carry on the policies that his father and his leadership structure has put into place." The White House said it was in constant contact with allies South Korea and Japan, but it offered no substantive comment on the implications of Kim's death. US President Barack Obama spoke with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak at midnight and the two leaders agreed to stay in close touch. At Radio Korea, Assistant News Director William Choo said emotions were running high after the death was announced. "They've been brainwashed for 30 or 40 years, they feel like they lost their great great father. They obviously that's what they feel right now," Choo said. But in time that could change, Choo said, especially in light of the fact that not much is known about Kim Jong Un. "He's been around for a year now. It's too short of time of be a leader so they worry about the situation or if the North Korean government is in danger of falling, there will be riots, like situations in Africa." Koreans in the United States have expressed their feelings regarding the death, but remained vigilant for any signs of a turbulent transition at home. In Palisades Park, New Jersey and Los Angeles' Koreatown, where there are large populations of ethnic Koreans, the mood was upbeat. "That's kind of a good thing for them and for us too, for everyone, basically I think, because Communism, what they're doing they are just a threat to the world," said resident Dae Hyun Yoon. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. AP'S HIGH DEFINITION ROLLOUT TIMETABLE All Customers This message is for ALL Associated Press (AP) customers to inform you of the upcoming changes to our service and how they will affect your organization. The timeline AP will be rolling out High Definition (HD) in phases, beginning with Entertainment from 11 November 2011, followed by Sports News Television (SNTV) in January 2012. The completion date for all News services will be Q2 2012 in time for the 2012 London Olympics in July and the US presidential elections in November. What does this mean for you? The HD upgrade will affect ALL customers. Changes to Delivery If you want to upgrade to HD, you will need to make changes to your hardware equipment - either by adopting Media Port or you may need to upgrade your current Media Port server. AP Direct will also be transitioned to an encrypted HD ONLY delivery and customers will need to provide their own HD compatible Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD). This will need to be operational by 1 February 2012. Satellite Upgrades We are upgrading our satellite network. This upgrade will affect ALL AP customers. For a full overview of changes to delivery and satellite upgrades, please visit: www.aphighdefinition.com To retrieve the login, please email: edcustomerliaisonap.org or aptn-webadminap.org ++++ APTN (Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-12-19-11 1742EST
CONTROVERSY OVER “MAGIC THE GATHERING” (3/17/1997)
School controversy over the use of the game, “Magic the Gathering.”
Snake and human skull
Snake and human skull at red light.
Iraq Baghdad Blast Wrap - WRAP 5 killed in Green Zone attack, immediate blast pix
NAME: BAG BLAST WP 141004N TAPE: EF04/1018 IN_TIME: 10:00:09:00 DURATION: 00:04:34:13 SOURCES: VARIOUS DATELINE: Various, 14 Oct 2004 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: APTN Baghdad, Iraq 1. Smoke rising after explosions in Green Zone Amateur video from mobile phone Baghdad, Iraq 2. Various of destruction in cafe after the blast APTN Baghdad, Iraq 3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Eyewitness to Green zone explosion: "I entered the restaurant and I saw them sitting on the table. Suddenly the workers of the restaurant came to us and told that two people were acting suspiciously so we called the US soldiers to check them. One of the workers asked them about their nationality, he was told that they were Jordanian and not Iraqis. After ten seconds of the arrival of the American troops the first explosion happened and followed by the second explosion in ten or fifteen seconds, I fell down, and I checked myself, and I was okay. I saw the injured people being helped by the restaurant workers and then I saw the destruction around me." CBS Baghdad, Iraq 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Larry Kaplow, Cox Newspapers Correspondent (relaying report he heard from witnesses at the cafe blast): "They got their tea. One of the men sat down and, they said, kept their hand on the table and their other hand in the bag, one of the bags. And the other man spent most of his time, according to this witness standing next to him and talking to him very fervently about something that they said they didn't overhear. But they said afterward they thought it was encouraging him, brainwashing up, coaxing him into blowing himself up. After they were there, they said maybe even 20, 25 minutes, the man in the yellow shirt put one of the bags over his shoulder, walked out of the restaurant and a restaurant employee said the man was seen getting into a taxi. A few minutes after that, they heard the blast at the bazaar a few hundred metres from there and people were just sort of taking that in when, according to them, the man who was sitting there blew up his bag." APTN Baghdad, Iraq 5. Smoke rising after explosions in Green Zone CBS Baghdad, Iraq 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Larry Kaplow, Cox Newspapers Correspondent: "But I've heard that one of the stories coming from the bazaar, is that the person, the bomber emerged from the taxi and soon after that the bomb went off, so that would match - you know witness accounts are always a little bit suspect because of all the adrenalin and excitement they are going through. But that would match with the story we were hearing at the restaurant." APTN Baghdad, Iraq 7. Smoke rising after explosions in Green Zone APTN Washington DC, US 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Bouchner, US State Department Spokesman "We also condemn these terrorist attacks, there is an effort that we are making to try and help the Iraqi people rebuild their country and it's another example of where there are terrorist who want to attack the Iraqis, who want to attack us, like anybody who is trying to establish opportunity and freedom for the Iraqi people,we know that is the situation there, there are people who know that they are serving in dangerous circumstances, but its obviously very sad and unfortunate when something happens to them, or frankly when something happens to the Iraqis, who we are working with in the Green Zone and elsewhere in the country." APTN Baghdad, Iraq 9. Smoke rising STORYLINE Insurgents penetrated Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone and set off bombs at a market and a popular cafe on Thursday, killing five people, including four Americans, the US military said. A US military statement said the two bombs appeared to have been "hand carried" into the zone. And Iraqi national security adviser Qassem Dawoud said "initial information" indicated the attacks were a "suicide operation." If so, it would be the first time insurgents have successfully infiltrated and set off bombs in the Green Zone compound. The attack raised fears over security in the country and underscored militants' ability to strike in the capital even as US-Iraqi forces step up military operations to suppress them in other parts of the country. Iraq's most feared militant group, Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's Tawhid and Jihad, purportedly claimed responsibility for the bombings, according to a statement posted on a Web site known for its Islamic content. APTN obtained footage of the attack's immediate aftermath that had been filmed from a mobile phone. The man who filmed the scene, who wishes to remain anonymous, described the events leading up to the blast. He said two men in the restaurant had been acting suspiciously before the attack. A US journalist who visited the scene shortly afterwards said witnesses told him two men had gone into the cafe. One of the men left in a taxi, and a blast was heard shortly afterwards, from the market, according to the journalist, Larry Kaplow of Cox newspapers. The man who had stayed in the cafe then blew himself up, he said. Other witnesses to the attack on the market said a man had got out of a taxi before detonating his device. In Washington DC, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said security arrangements were put under immediate review but it was "much too early to start speculating" on whether they would be overhauled. He called the bombings "awful events" and condemned the attacks. Boucher said they were the work of terrorists but he did not have solid information on their identity.
CERMAK FAMILY SEXUAL ABUSE CASE
State v. Cermak 365 N.W.2d 243 (1985) STATE of Minnesota, Respondent, v. Alice CERMAK, Appellant. No. C5-83-543. Supreme Court of Minnesota. April 5, 1985. *244 C. Paul Jones, Public Defender, Michael F. Cromett, Asst. Public Defender, Minneapolis, for appellant. *245 Hubert H. Humphrey III, Atty. Gen., St. Paul, R. Kathleen Morris, Scott County Atty., Shakopee, for respondent. Considered and decided by the court en banc without oral argument. WAHL, Justice. Defendant was charged in Scott County with 18 counts of criminal sexual conduct. Ten of the charges were based on an incident that occurred in June of 1981 at a trailer rented by defendant's son, James, in Belle Plaine, and eight were based on similar incidents that occurred there in July of 1981. The state contended that in each incident defendant, along with her husband Stanley, her son James and his wife Beverly, and her son John and his wife Jillayne,[1] participated in the playing of a "game" in which each of the children present was sexually penetrated by one or more of the adults. The state alleged that five children were victimized in the June incident and four of these five in the July incident. Defendant was charged with one count of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree, Minn.Stat. § 609.342(a) (1982), and one count of criminal sexual conduct in the second degree, Minn.Stat. § 609.343(a) (1982), for each victim per incident, making a total of 18 counts. Subsection (a) of the two statutes is the subsection dealing with penetration (section 609.342) or contact (section 609.343) with a child under age 13 by a person more than 36 months older. Defendant was born in 1930 and was 51 years old; the children involved were three girls, ages 9, 8, and 6, and two boys, ages 5 and 3. Venue was changed to Alexandria in Douglas County. Defendant was found guilty of all eight charges involving the two older girls and was sentenced for the four more serious charges to four consecutive prison terms of 45 months, or a total of 180 months. She was found guilty only of the five lesser charges involving the other children, and for those was sentenced to five stayed terms of 21 months. On this appeal she contends that she is alternatively entitled to (1) an outright reversal of all convictions, (2) a new trial, or (3) a reduction in sentence. We affirm. 1. Defendant's first contention is that the evidence was insufficient to support her convictions and that therefore they must be reversed outright. The two older girls, who were 11 and 9½ by the time of trial, testified against defendant, as did Beverly Cermak and Jillayne Cermak, both admitted participants in the crimes. The testimony of these witnesses established that the "game," to which we earlier alluded, was played frequently and consisted of one or more of the adults getting several of the children together and ordering the children to participate in various sex acts with the adults and with the other children. As part of the "game," the adults would photograph the children in sexually suggestive poses. Sometimes, they would photograph actual sex acts between adults and children. Some of these photographs were admitted in defendant's trial. Each of the four witnesses connected defendant to the playing of the "game." The younger of the two girls was unable to recall when the "game" was last played but testified that defendant did play the "game" on that occasion. Specifically, she recalled that defendant had digitally penetrated her rectum as well as that of the older girl. The older of the two girls testified that the "game" was last played in July of 1981 on the day that James and Beverly Cermak moved from their trailer. She testified that defendant participated in the game by digitally penetrating her and one or more of the other children present. *246 Beverly Cermak testified that the "game" was played at the trailer both in June and on July 16, which was moving day. She testified that defendant participated on both occasions and testified further that whenever the game was played each child was penetrated by one or more of the adult participants. She did not completely recall who did what in the June incident but recalled that defendant committed fellatio on one of the boys. She recalled that in the July incident defendant digitally penetrated the rectum of one or more of the girls. Jillayne Cermak testified that defendant participated in the "game" on both occasions charged in the complaint and that on each occasion each of the children present was sexually penetrated in some way by one or more of the adults present. She had a more specific recollection of who did what at the July incident, stating, among other things, that defendant digitally penetrated the two older girls, both vaginally and rectally, and that defendant also made the girls digitally penetrate her vagina. As a participant in the playing of the "game," defendant properly could be found guilty of aiding and abetting each act of penetration of or contact with each of the children. Minn.Stat. § 609.05 (1982). This being so, we conclude that the evidence was sufficient to support the convictions. In so concluding, we reject the contention that the testimony of the two girls and the two admitted accomplices was, as a matter of law, unworthy of belief. 2. Defendant next contends that she was denied a fair trial by the prosecutor's excessive reliance on evidence showing the guilt of other family members and by the erroneous admission of what she characterizes as "prejudicial and irrelevant information." (a) Among the evidence which defendant contends pointed only to the guilt of other family members were pictures seized from James Cermak and John Cermak, defendant's sons. Over defense objection, the trial court admitted a representative selection of these pictures. The pictures show the children naked and in varying sexual poses; one of the pictures shows an adult's penis being inserted into the rectum of one of the children. Both Beverly Cermak and Jillayne Cermak were able to positively identify several of the children in the pictures, and the two girls identified themselves in two of the pictures. All four witnesses testified that taking the pictures was part of the "game" and both Beverly and Jillayne testified that defendant sometimes took the pictures herself. Defendant argues that the pictures were not relevant within the meaning of Minn.R. Evid. 401, which defines "relevant evidence" as "evidence having any tendency to make the existence of any fact that is of consequence to the determination of the action more probable or less probable than it would be without the evidence." She argues further that even if the pictures were relevant, they should have been excluded pursuant to Minn.R.Evid. 403, which provides that relevant evidence "may be excluded if its probative value is substantially outweighed by the danger of unfair prejudice, confusion of the issues, or misleading the jury, or by considerations of undue delay, waste of time, or needless presentation of cumulative evidence." We conclude that the pictures were relevant under the test of Rule 401 and were not otherwise excludable pursuant to Rule 403. It is true that the pictures were seized from James Cermak and John Cermak, not from defendant, that defendant does not appear in the pictures, and that the state could not establish the specific dates when the pictures were taken or that defendant was present when the pictures were taken. The state's evidence, however, indicated that defendant and the other adults, including James and John, conspired with each other to sexually abuse the children and that the conspiracy was ongoing. Under the circumstances, the pictures in question were clearly admissible against defendant even if she was not present when they were taken and even though she is not depicted in them and was not in possession of them when they were seized. State v. Walker, 306 Minn. 105, *247 235 N.W.2d 810 (1975). The significant facts are that defendant was a member of the conspiracy, that the conspiracy involved sexually abusing children by playing the "game," that the pictures were representative of pictures taken during the playing of the "game," and that defendant fully participated in the "game," including taking pictures on occasion. Some of the jurors may have been understandably reluctant to believe that parents and grandparents would abuse children in the ways described by the witnesses in their testimony. The pictures gave silent but compelling witness to the facts depicted and credence to the other testimony, thereby significantly strengthening the state's case against defendant. Balancing the relevance of the pictures against their potential for "unfair prejudice,"[2] the trial court properly exercised its discretion and admitted the pictures. State v. Molin, 288 N.W.2d 232 (Minn.1979) (brother of rape victim interrupted the rape and held defendant, with defendant's pants still down, while victim called police; we held on appeal that trial court properly refused to exclude, as unfairly prejudicial, the photograph police took of defendant, with his pants still down, when the police arrived on the scene); State v. Shotley, 305 Minn. 384, 233 N.W.2d 755 (1975) (prosecution of defendant for sodomy upon or with a child; we held that trial court properly refused to exclude evidence that police, in search of the defendant's apartment, found display of pictures depicting aberrant behavior like that of which defendant was accused). (b) Defendant similarly argues that the trial court erred in admitting a tube of "Anal-eze" which was found by police in James Cermak's car. The state's witnesses specifically testified that the adult participants in the "game," including defendant, often used "Anal-eze" as a sexual lubricant. Under the circumstances, the same reasoning that supports the admission of the photographs supports the admission of this evidence. (c) Defendant also contends that the prosecutor improperly elicited testimony by a police officer summarizing key elements of the investigation that led to the charging of defendant, including evidence that James, John, and Stanley Cermak had been investigated, charged, convicted (two after trial, one by plea), and sentenced on similar charges. Defendant contends that admission of this evidence, when the three men did not testify, constitutes reversible error. We agree that generally evidence of a plea of guilty, conviction or acquittal of an accomplice of the accused is not admissible to prove the guilt or lack of guilt of the accused. State v. Helenbolt, 334 N.W.2d 400 (Minn.1983); State v. Howard, 324 N.W.2d 216 (Minn.1982), cert. denied, 459 U.S. 1172, 103 S. Ct. 818, 74 L. Ed. 2d 1016 (1983). We also agree that a police officer testifying in a criminal case may not, under the guise of explaining how his investigation focused on defendant, relate hearsay statements of others. State v. Hardy, 354 N.W.2d 21 (Minn.1984). In this case, however, the evidence was clearly introduced in anticipation of defendant's argument that the charges against her were questionable because they were not filed for over 1 year after the arrest of James Cermak, the first of the defendants arrested. The officer's testimony established that the children did not reveal everything immediately, that James and John were charged and prosecuted first, then Beverly and Jillayne, then Stanley and defendant. Since defendant made an issue of the adequacy of the investigation and even contended that the children were "brainwashed" into falsely accusing her, it was permissible for the prosecutor to provide the jury with the additional detail. Significantly, there were no objections *248 to most of the evidence, and the prosecutor in closing argument cautioned the jury not to convict defendant because the other defendants had been convicted. (d) Defendant also contends that the trial court erred in admitting, over objection, testimony by Beverly Cermak that on her first date with James Cermak, James' father Stanley Cermak had anal and vaginal intercourse with her while James watched. The questions which elicited this evidence were part of a series of questions eliciting the sequence of events leading to Beverly's introduction to the aberrant sexual practices of the Cermak family. Defendant made a major effort to impeach Beverly's credibility, pointing out that she made a very favorable plea agreement in exchange for her testimony. Beverly's answers to the prosecutor's questions were extremely degrading to her and helped bolster her credibility as a witness on the theory that she would not reveal such things about herself unless they were true. (e) Defendant in her brief lists numerous instances of leading questions used by the prosecutor in direct examination of state's witnesses. We are satisfied that the prosecutor's use of leading questions did not have a significant effect on the trial. Defendant objected to only four of these questions, and the trial court sustained two of the objections. If defendant had objected to the others and the trial court had sustained the objections, the prosecutor presumably would have been able to elicit the same information by the use of nonleading questions. 3. Defendant's final contention is that her sentence should be reduced. She advances two different theories in support of her contention. (a) First, she argues that the facts did not justify an upward departure from the Sentencing Guidelines and that, in any event, the sentence she received was "unjustifiably disparate" from the sentences imposed on Beverly and Jillayne Cermak. The presumptive sentence for the offense of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree (a severity level VIII offense) by a person with defendant's criminal history score (zero) is an executed term of 43 (41-45) months in prison. The 45-month term imposed by the trial court for each of the four convictions of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree is within the range of deviation permitted without the court having to give any justification. The court's use of consecutive sentencing was permissive with respect to two of the convictions (those involving different victims) and constituted a departure with respect to two of them (those involving the same victims but on different dates). Minnesota Sentencing Guidelines and Commentary II.F.06. (1984); State v. (James) Cermak, 350 N.W.2d 328 (Minn.1984); State v. Wellman, 341 N.W.2d 561 (Minn.1983). We hold that the two departures with respect to consecutive service were justified, for reasons stated in State v. (James) Cermak, 350 N.W.2d 328 (Minn.1984), and State v. (John) Cermak, 344 N.W.2d 833 (Minn.1984). We also hold that the sentence that defendant received was not "unjustifiably disparate" from the sentences that Beverly and Jillayne Cermak received as part of their plea bargain. State v. Vazquez, 330 N.W.2d 110 (Minn.1983). (b) Defendant's alternative argument is that she should have been prosecuted under the intrafamilial sexual abuse statute and therefore should have received only the maximum sentence she would have received if she had been convicted of one offense under that statute (two times the maximum presumptive sentence duration of 45 months). This argument is answered by our decision in State v. Love, 350 N.W.2d 359 (Minn.1984), where we held that the legislature's passage of the intrafamilial sexual abuse statute was not intended to limit the prosecutor's discretion to prosecute under the criminal sexual conduct statute. Affirmed. NOTES [1] James Cermak was convicted of multiple offenses after a jury trial and was sentenced to 480 months in prison [see State v. (James) Cermak, 350 N.W.2d 328 (Minn.1984)]; John Cermak pleaded guilty to multiple offenses and was sentenced to 480 months in prison [see State v. (John) Cermak, 344 N.W.2d 833 (Minn.1984)]; Beverly Cermak and Jillayne Cermak both pleaded guilty to multiple offenses pursuant to plea agreements and were sentenced to stayed 43-month prison terms; Stanley Cermak was convicted of multiple offenses after a jury trial and was sentenced to 225 months in prison [see State v. (Stanley) Cermak, 365 N.W.2d 238 (Minn., filed herewith)].
PA-2082 3 4 inch; PA-0158 Beta SP
Despotism
Priest on the field
Two men, priests in black clothing walking on field on autumn day.
Female shaman bewitching in desert tent. Magical meditation
Mysterious, redhead woman throwing a spell during meditation. Burning dust surrounding her hands
USA: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE WRAP
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/0422 IN_TIME: 20:40:55 - 21:42:33 LENGTH: 02:32 SOURCES: Shots 1-4, 7-8 = NYSE, the rest = APTN RESTRICTIONS: All No Access Internet FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: English/Nat Stocks plummeted in heavy trading on Friday - with the Dow industrials down a record 616 points and the Nasdaq composite index also taking a record fall of 356 points - as inflation jitters extended Wall Street's selling spree. The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 201 points on Thursday, at one point tumbled an additional 722 points before coming back somewhat in the final minutes. A government report of an unexpectedly strong rise in consumer prices in March only added to Wall Street's unease. Wall Street's best-known indicator closed down 616.23, or 5.6 percent, at 10,307.32, according to preliminary figures. That surpassed the previous record one-day drop of 554.26 points of Oct. 27, 1997, but was far from a record decline in percentage terms. The slide on Friday left the blue-chip index down 12 percent from its Jan. 14 record of 11,722.98. The Nasdaq composite index didn't fare any better, tumbling 356.74, or by 9.7 percent, to 3,320.04 at the close, according to early calculations, dropping deeper into bear- market territory. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Today is a historic day in the sense that you don't get many crash-type days. We haven't had one of severe magnitude since 1987, of this size. It's a historic day in the sense that you look for certain characteristics of a big drop in the market - illiquidity, stocks just dropping because there's no buyers, it doesn't occur very often." SUPER CAPTION: Barry Hyman, Market Analyst, Ehrenkrantz King Nussbaum Inc. The Nasdaq already had plunged or 17 percent in the first four days of this week, and with the latest decline, the technology-focused average was off 34 percent from its March 10 record of 5,048.62. A bear market is considered a sustained drop of more than 20 percent. Trading volume exceeded two billion shares on the Nasdaq Stock Market and surpassed 1 billion shares on the New York Stock Exchange. Analysts say the most fundamental reason for the drop in high-tech stocks is a growing sense that investors pushed those issues too far last year, when the Nasdaq rose an unprecedented 86 percent. The frenzy for technology stocks gave many young, unproven companies market values they did not yet deserve. But many market watchers were still optimistic that this is only a minor setback, and that technology stocks will continue to drive up world markets. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I think - I don't want to say brainwashing - but I think technology is driving the economy at this point in time, and people are confident that technology is just going to keep advancing, so - I think it's a good thing. I really do. I think we're the market leaders in the world for technology, and I'm betting that we'll be number one going forward." SUPER CAPTION: Ed Wachowicz (Voxpop) A government report on Friday morning of an unexpectedly strong rise in consumer prices in March added to Wall Street's unease. The figures rekindled worries that the Federal Reserve not only would raise interest rates again, but might be more aggressive in trying to cool down the economy. The Fed has raised rates five times since June, each time by a quarter-point in borrowing charges. This has prompted pessimists to warn against investors who are searching for bargains against buying into the market after Thursday's drop. SOUNDBITE: (English) "We heard the repetitive story of, you know, the market goes down, you have to buy. And I think it's irresponsible and it's dangerous. I mean, the investors have been kind of programmed with this mentality, yet we're sitting on an economic situation and a stock market certainly that's the most overvalued by any comparison." SUPER CAPTION: Mike Norman, Publisher "Economic Contrarian Update" newsletter Markets overseas also were broadly lower: Japan's Nikkei stock average fell about 0.5 percent before trading began on Wall Street. In Europe, where trading ended as Wall Street shares were tumbling, key indexes fell 2.8 percent in Britain, 3.2 percent in France and 3.1 percent in Germany. SHOTLIST: New York, April 14, 2000 NYSE 1. Wide shot, interior NYSE, zoom in to man ringing closing bell 2. Close up electronic board at NYSE 3. Wide shot New York city street, pan up to show big Nasdaq electronic board on street NASDAQ 4. Close up electronic board showing closing level of Nasdaq composite index APTN 5. Interior trading floor Ehrenkrantz King Nussbaum Inc. 6. SOUNDBITE: (English): Barry Hyman, Market Analyst, Ehrenkrantz King Nussbaum Inc. NYSE 7. Close up NYSE electronic board 8. Medium shot traders on floor of NYSE APTN 9. Wide shot exterior Nasdaq market site, pan down to pedestrians on street 10. Close up people looking through window into Nasdaq market site APTN 11. SOUNDBITE: (English): Ed Wachowicz (Voxpop) 12. Wide shot people looking through window into Nasdaq market site 13. SOUNDBITE: (English): Mike Norman, Publisher "Economic Contrarian Update" newsletter 14. Close up Nasdaq electronic board, zoom out to show wide shot of board XFA?
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
Female shaman bewitching in desert tent. Magical meditation
Mysterious, redhead woman throwing a spell during meditation. Burning dust surrounding her hands
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
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White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
Wooden cross on fire
Close up and low angle shot of a wooden cross on fire outside in low light. (SAFA666E - ABUA096T)
Snake and human skull
Snake and human skull at red light.
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
Priest walking in nature
Two men, priests in black clothing walking on field on autumn day.
WRAP
AP-APTN-0830: US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0444EST
+US Shooting 6
AP-APTN-0830: +US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:+US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0436EST
Monks in forest
Two men, priests in black clothing walking in forest on autumn day.
Typing Propaganda War on an old manual typewriter.
War propaganda, lies and misinformation. Typing Propaganda War on an old manual typewriter.