The 20H of Darius Rochebin: [show of September 28, 2020]
LCI
Interview with Dore Gold pt 2
00:00:49:00>>> Well, you have to be very precise about the status of Jews and Christians under Islamic rule for centuries. Under Islam, Jews and Christians were seen as people of the book. Which means they weren't like infidels, you know, Kefir [PH], who you forcibly convert to Islam. But there were second class citizens that were forced to pay discriminatory taxes, like the ____ tax, known as jizy [PH] in Arabic, or a land tax, called jirage [PH]. In fact, in the early Middle Ages, there were still substantial Jewish land ownership in Israel and Palestine, in the 7th, 8th and 9th century. But the burden of these discriminatory taxes led to many Jews getting off the land, and the land being taken over by Arab landlords. But, at least, given the era that we lived in, at that time, Jews were protected from being killed by Arab rulers. And so, in a certain sense, as Jews were being burned in a church in York, at that time, in England, they at least were allowed to survive and physically live under Arab rule. So, one could say that in fact, there was a certain minimal degree of tolerance of Jews, but it wasn't a flourishing existence. What happened was that during the 19th Century, the Arab world imported many of the anti-Semitic motifs from Christian Europe, into the Middle East. And you have, for example, the famous 1840 Damascus Blood Libel [PH], which was based on a blood libel derived from Europe. You also had Arab interests in the protocols of the _____, which was, again, a forgery that came out of Russia. , So, to say that the Jews lived wonderfully under Arab rule, would be misrepresenting historical fact. But, at the same time, at least, Jews and Christians had a degree of safety, that perhaps they might not have had in other parts of the world at the time. INTERVIEWER: (Inaudible) that was here this morning also mentioned, in discussing the partition plan, he (Inaudible) and he said, the partition plan was unfair because 30% - or 20% of the land was owned by Jews, and actually more of it was owned by Palestinians, and it was a totally lopsided situation, where Jews were being given sovereignty over 50% ____ much less. What are we missing (Inaudible)? 00:03:27:00>>> DORE GOLD: Of course, much of the land ownership in the early part of the 20th Century, in the British Mandatory Palestine was from absentee Arab landlords living in Lebanon. And you had, also, Palestinian peasants working the land. This also created a sense, among the Palestinians, that when the Jewish agency brought the land from the rich land owners, what about the poor peasants that were working the land, and created a sense of unfairness or injustice. But there was an effort, over the last century, by Jews around the world who were putting their pennies and dimes into little charity boxes of the Jewish National Fund, to buy the land that we developed. And the issue of sovereignty, of course, came later. INTERVIEWER: They say that Israel - the hatred of America, on part of the terrorists, is because they support Israel. Might it be reversed? Might Israel really be just the larger hatred of western society in general, or might it be the opposite? DORE GOLD: Well, one of the questions that motivated me to take up nine months of my work time, and write a book called Hatred's Kingdom, was to answer the question that President Bush asked right after 9/11 - why do they hate us? And what I discovered was that the way that Wajabi Islam developed in Saudi Arabia, from where 15 of the 19 hijackers came from, was that in the 1960's and 1970's it became more and more preoccupied with what they called crusaderism, which was a reference to the west. _____, as they would call them. And, in fact, the hatred of the west emanated from these deviant off-chutes of Islam like in the Arabian peninsula, which (let me try to rephrase this) - 00:05:49:00>>> You know, one of the reasons why I took off nine months to write this book, Hatred's Kingdom, was because I wanted to answer the question that President Bush, himself, asked after 9/11, why do they hate us? And it became crystal clear to me, after a short period of time, that the hatred of the west did not emanate from the Arab-Israel conflict. Osama Bin Laden, for example, was much more preoccupied with Czechnia, Kashmir, and with other conflicts involving Muslim radicals around the world, than he was with the Arab-Israel issue. And in fact, many Arab intellectuals have pointed that out. ,What motivated the September 11th attacks, and what continues to motivate Al Qaeda, is a fundamental hatred of western civilization. And Israel is only considered a microcosm of a much bigger tapestry. In fact, if you use the Iranian language, the Iranians refer to Israel as the little Satan, and they refer to the United States as the great Satan. So that Israel is despised because it's seen as an outpost to the west. The west isn't despised because of its support of Israel. INTERVIEWER: You once talked about - that the Sharon government agonizes over trying to spare as many civilians as possible. As a government official, can you testify to the degree of indifference between Israel agonizing over trying to minimize civilian causalities, at least to their own soldiers? 00:07:23:00>>> DORE GOLD:, I can share with you - I was called into a meeting in the planning branch of the Israel Army, about the time of the Jeanine incident. We were expecting a special investigatory group to come from the security council, or from the office of Secretary General _____, and we had to prepare for that eventuality. And I recall sitting with a military man who sat next to me on the left, who had a pile of army doctrine manuals, from different armies. And these different western armies explained, what do you do when you face a terrorist threat from a built up area like a city, what type of weaponry do you use. So these manuals all called for air strikes, they called for the use of artillery in built up areas with civilians, they called for the use of flame throwers. ,Well, I can tell you, the Israeli Army in Jeanine, did not use air strikes, it didn't use artillery, and it didn't use flame throwers. In fact, to the contrary, Israel sent in its soldiers, its ground forces, in difficult house to house combat, threatening the lives of our own soldiers so they could save the lives of innocent Palestinians. In the Jeanine battle, we lost about twenty-three Israeli soldiers. These were married men, they were from the ____. There are many orphans, as a result of those losses, today. Young children who don't - will never see their fathers again. And the reason why Israel sent in those ground soldiers, is because we don't carpet bomb Palestinian refugee camps. If there are terrorists there, we use our special forces, our ground units, in order to find those who are engaged in terrorism, without causing injury to innocent Palestinians. INTERVIEWER: Another charge that was raised by the Palestinian people; look at the difference in numbers. The Israelis (,Inaudible). In light of Israeli concern, how do you achieve that statistical (Inaudible)? 00:09:37:00>>> DORE GOLD: Well, one thing is for certain, I think you have to look, not so much at numbers, I think you have to look at the strategies of both sides. The Palestinian military strategy, if you can call it that, is to target Israeli civilians. When they strap dynamite to the body of a young eighteen year old Palestinian, and tell him to walk into a hotel on March 27th, 2002, to kill as many Israelis who are having their Passover Satyr, together, that is an act which is intended to kill innocent civilians. When Israel sends an apache helicopter in the air, on the basis of intelligence, destroys a vehicle with three terrorists inside, and in that vehicle there is an innocent civilian. Israel is not directing its fire at civilians, its directing its fire at those who want to kill our civilians. There's a huge asymmetry between what both sides are doing. INTERVIEWER: The reality of the Oslo cause, you mentioned (Inaudible) today. You turn on the television and you just see Israeli checkpoints, Israeli reoccupation ____. Is it today, has it gone back to a situation where it can (Inaudible) or are these defense measures in a war? 00:11:01:00>>> DORE GOLD: Well, I think we have to understand what has happened. You know, Israel signed the Oslo accords, in good faith, in September of 1993. In implementing the Oslo Agreements, Israel withdrew its military government over the Palestinians, and put in its place the Palestinian authority; a Palestinian government, under Yasser Arafat. So, that by the time we get to September 2000, when Arafat launches his war against Israel, the Palestinians are not under military occupation. They have their own government. They don't have an independent state, but they're not under military occupation, either. And the entire Oslo Agreement was also based, not just on the concept of Palestinian grievances, but on the concept of - on the basis of Palestinian responsibility. We're giving you this territory, you have to govern it. And you have to take responsibility for security in those areas. But what happened? Those Palestinian cities, which now came under the Palestinian authority of Yasser Arafat, became vast bases for Hamas, for Islamic Jihad, to launch suicide attacks in the heart of Israeli cities; buses went up in flames, explosions in the heart of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, even _____. And hundreds of Israelis have died. ,So now that the Israeli forces have had to reenter Palestinian cities, they've done so because the Palestinian security services failed to take responsibility for the territories that we turned over to them under the Oslo Agreement. Israelis do not want to be in Palestinian cities. They don't want to be going in and finding suspects and interrogating them. What we want is a Palestinian democratic government which takes responsibility for the areas under its control, including, I should say even especially, security. If that happens, we can pull back from Palestinian cities, and there can be a Palestinian self-governing authority in the future. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] INTERVIEWER: What is motivating a young Palestinian to take his life like this? What kind of incentives could be placed? 00:13:23:00>>> DORE GOLD:,You know, most people who look at these suicide bombings from the outside think that a young person feels a sense of deprivation one day, opens up the refrigerator, nothing is there. He's seeing that people are wealthy on the other side of the fence. (Let me start again, that's not good). ,You know, most people who, for years, looked at the phenomenon of the suicide bombings in Israel, think that Palestinians, out of a sense of deprivation, or out of a sense of anger and rage, decide, spontaneously, to strap dynamite to themselves, walk into a crowded Israeli restaurant, and kill dozens of civilians. But terrorism is not just a spontaneous act. It requires a vast infrastructure to support it. It requires someone to purchase, and to acquire the weaponry, the explosive materials. It requires someone to transport those explosive materials to a forward position near an Israeli city. It requires somebody to gather intelligence, to find out that Jews go to the market place on Thursday, before the Sabbath, to make all their purchases. And therefore, that's an ideal date for time, for committing a suicide bombing. ,And finally, and I think perhaps most importantly, it requires brainwashing young people with religious doctrination, in order for them to believe that by taking their lives they will better their spiritual condition; that they will go directly to heaven and, on their day of judgment, they will proceed to a Islamic concept of paradise with 72 virgins, being able to bring their relatives to this even in the future. This religious indoctrination, I think, is one of the central elements in the motivation behind suicide bombers. There's a parallel element, of course, as well, which is the financial inducements given by states, by Iraq, of Saddam Hussein, or Saudi Arabia under King ____, and under Crown Prince Abdula [PH], who are pouring huge amounts of money, perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars into Palestinian society to pay the families of suicide bombers. So that a young man who comes from a family of twelve or thirteen children can at least hope that by him taking his life he will be regarded by his family as a hero, as a shahid [PH], as a martyr. And he will also bring about tremendous financial benefit to his family, in the form of a five, ten, or twenty thousand dollar payment. INTERVIEWER: (Inaudible) DORE GOLD: 00:15:57:00>>> Well, we used to believe that suicide bombers were probably unmarried, were probably young, that they wouldn't give their lives and leave their families without a father. But we found that most of those profiles broke down. Many people in the west used to believe that suicide bombers were poor. But what we saw, for example, in the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, is that these suicide bombers came from Saudi families who were well to do. Many of them could have gone and taken their flight training background, and flown Saudi princes in their Gulf Stream aircraft. But, in stead, for ideological reasons, because of deep, religious motivation, they decided that they preferred to destroy symbols of American civilization, and kill American civilians in the process. INTERVIEWER: Can Israeli concession with settlements, for example, buy off and placate and satisfy the ideological image of these suicide bombers? DORE GOLD: Well, you know, the big question is, what's the motivation? If the motivation was a limited parcel of territory, which the Palestinians want independence over, then one could make the argument that by simply Israel pulling back from disputed territory and giving it to the Palestinians, the whole threat of suicide bombing would end. But if you analyze the motivation of the organizations, that are sending these suicide bombers against Israel, they don't want a piece of the West Bank, they don't want a state in the Gaza Strip, they want Israel. And as a result, by Israel simply giving a settlement, or pulling back unilaterally, you wouldn't be ending the process of suicide bombing. We might be accelerating it, by showing that we could no longer withstand the threat that we're facing, and that we were pulling back, and we're on the run. INTERVIEWER: Settlements, just one thing about them, are - there seems to be a grievance, an obstacle for piece, a problem blocking the possibility of (Inaudible). Is there any accuracy to that? 00:18:03:00>>> DORE GOLD: Settlements are not really the issue. Settlements are sitting on territory, and territory is disputed. Israel has claims in the West Bank and Gaza, for secure borders, under Resolution 242. The Palestinians have claims in the West Bank and Gaza, for their Palestinian state. If you understand that these are disputed territories, the land is the issue. How much land do all the settlements sit on in the West Bank? If you actually could take a tape measure and figure out how much land the built up areas of settlements are sitting on, low and behold you would find that the settlements are sitting on 1.36% of the entire West Bank. Therefore, the settlements are an overstated issue. They may attract a lot of CNN and BBC cameras, but they are not the fundamental issue holding up an Israeli and Palestinian agreement. They are not the issue that is blocking peace. INTERVIEWER: If there were a credible Palestinian partner that could come up with a solution for a Palestinian self rule, balanced by _____, would settlements sabotage the whole process? DORE GOLD: Not at all. Because, in fact, the settlements are many times located in areas of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, that Israeli governments, for years, have thought, are vital for Israel's defense. For example, there's a settlement called Ofla [PH], north of Jerusalem. Now, the settlement itself doesn't provide Israel with security, it's not, you know, young couples with baby carriages that are going to stop and Iraqi division from coming down into northern Jerusalem. But it happens at the settlement of Ofla, is next to Bahazur [PH], the main early warning station of the Israeli Air Force, Israel's Norad [PH]. And therefore, by retaining that settlement of Ofla, we're helping hold - we're helping Israel hold on to the Bahazur early warning station. And in many cases, the settlements, which were mapped out by Israel's Ministry of Defense, in the 1970's or the late 1960's, far defending particular Israeli security interests, that Israel would hope to retain, in any future territorial settlement between Israel and the Palestinians. INTERVIEWER: Just an elaboration on that. What is the reason why Israel can't go back to June 4th, 1967? Where is geostrategic, geographical reasons? 00:20:26:00>>> DORE GOLD: Well one has to recall, in the June 1967 Six Day War, Israel came under attack from the West Bank sector. Jerusalem, our civilians, were hit by Jordanian infantry, and by Jordanian artillery. Jordan's armored forces were massed in the West Bank, and about to take over the narrower portions of Israel, near the Mediterranean. And because of that, that United Nations Security Council, back in November of 1967, recognized that Israel entered The West Bank in a war of self defense. And, as a result, Israel was entitled, entitled to defense of - [let me start again.] And, as a result, Israel was entitled to defense of borders which would not be the same as the June 4th lines. Those lines happened to be where the Jordanian and Israeli armies stopped, in 1949. There were never permanent, political borders. INTERVIEWER: Another point, what did Israel have in common with the war on terror? How does Israel - the Israeli front resemble, and help as a - help in the larger American war on terror? DORE GOLD: The war Israel is facing, from organizations like Hamas and Islamic Jihad, is not a war over some limited piece of territory, or some kind of narrow grievance, it is an anti-civilizational war. It's an attempt to destroy Israel as a free democracy in the Middle East. Hamas, it's no surprise, is alive with Al Qaeda, who has much larger goals of not just taking the piece of the United States, or having some limited grievances in Europe, it wants to destroy American civilization. If we can demonstrate that it is possible to defeat these terrorist organizations, first and foremost militarily, economically, and finally, politically, there may be a chance, in the larger struggle against terrorism, to do the same. Because, ultimately, what we have to do is eliminate the military threat. But, at the same time, demonstrate a path towards co-existence with the Arab world, and with the Islamic world. Israel is determined to do that, and hopefully our western partners, our democratic partners in the U.S. and Europe, will do the same. INTERVIEWER: I have one point, does Jerusalem say something about Israel's claim and why it's worth the fuss and (Inaudible)? 00:23:09:00>>> DORE GOLD: You know, over the years I became very close to the former prisoner of Zion [PH], Natan Sharanski [PH], who, of course, was in solitary confinement in a Soviet prison. And he shared with me his viewpoint that, first of all, what renovated or what restored the identity of Soviet Jews, who are under communism for more than 50 years, was the identification with Jerusalem. And when he was in prison, what gave him strength, was the sentence, (Inaudible) - next year in Jerusalem. ,Jerusalem has a deep, spiritual, almost mystical relationship with the Jewish people. It's our direction of prayer. It is the city that has been the capitol of the Jewish people for three thousand years, even though we were forcibly thrown out of Jerusalem by the Roman Empire, had only come back after five hundred years. If the Jewish people were to ever give up sovereignty in Jerusalem, were to ever conceive Jerusalem, it would be a fundamental blow against the identity of the Jewish people as a whole. In a certain sense, I would say, over the last number of centuries, Jews have been divided among themselves, over whether we have a responsibility first and foremost to ourselves, a particular responsibility, or a universalistic responsibility to the entire human race, to all of mankind. Jerusalem is the one case, the one area where there is two responsibilities to converge, because in protecting the rights of the Jewish people, and the rights of Israel, to sovereignty in Jerusalem, we are fulfilling our universalistic mission to protecting Jerusalem, as a city open to all faiths. The moment we let down our guard and give up Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem, we are abandoning our responsibility to all mankind, to keeping Jerusalem; a city that's open, a city of coexistence for all the great religions. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS]
FREEMEN / MONTANA MILITIA
FTG FOR CS VO BARRY SERAFIN ON THE FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIONS (FBI) STAND OFF IN THE ARREST OF SEVERAL MEMBERS OF THE MONTANA MILITIA CALLING THEMSELVES FREEMEN FOR ALLEGED FEDERAL BANKING FRAUD CHARGES AND THREATS MADE TO OFFICIALS. 14:00:04 SLATE. 14:00:20 NAT SOT INT MCU OF VIRGIL HELLYER. 14:00:59 MCU INTV W/ HELLYER. SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON RALPH CLARK AND THEIR BONDING OVER SHEEP SHEARING. SAYS HE HAD BIG DREAMS AND IS NOT A MEAN PERSON. 14:02:17 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON EMMETT CLARK. QUIET AND HARD WORKING FAMILY MAN. RALPH WAS A DREAMER. EMMETT IS VERY NICE. 14:03:19 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER DESCRIBING RALPH'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE FREEMEN PHILOSOPHY. CALLS IT BRAINWASHING. DETAILS FINANCIAL RESELLING OF PROPERTY WITHIN THE FAMILY. 14:05:42 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON RICHARD CLARK. WAS HIGH SCHOOL CHUM. TELLS OF FINANCIAL TROUBLE AND DIVORCE. ALLEGED LEGAL MISCONDUCT. STATES AFTER DIVORCE SETTLEMENT THEN RICHARD BECAME FREEMAN. 14:08:43 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON AGNES STANTON. SWEETHEART. 14:09:50 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON BILL STANTON. TELLS OF BANKRUPTCY AND FREEMEN PERSUASION. 14:10:55 MCU OF HELLYER. 14:11:21 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON ATTENDING LECTURE GIVEN BY LEROY SCHWEITZER. DESCRIBES PHYSICAL GROUNDS. 14:13:39 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON SIGNIFICANCE OF NOOSE BEING THAT HANGING IS THEIR CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. 14:14:25 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON RODNEY SKURDAL. RELIGIOUS ZEALOT AND WHITE SUPREMACIST. STATES WOMEN ARE A LOWER CLASS AND SUFFRAGE WAS WRONG. WHITES ARE SUPERIOR RACE. 14:15:59 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER ON DALE JACOBI. DISLIKED HIM. WAS PREACHER WILLING TO TEACH OTHERS HIS RELIGION. DISTRUSTED HIM. 14:17:48 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER STATING THEY ALL THINK THAT THEY WERE WRONGED BY GOVERNMENT AND NICK MURNION GARFIELD COUNTY PROSECUTOR. 14:18:19 MCU SOUNDBITE FROM HELLYER DESCRIBING FREEMEN WEAPONS. GAS MASKS. SIDE ARMS. BADGES. 14:19:57 BLANK. TC JUMP. 17:00:20 CU OF B&W PHOTO OF CLARK SETTLERS ON WAGON W/ HORSES. 17:00:52 END OF TAPE.
The United States according to Trump
France 24
Interview with Alan Dershowitz pt 2
INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 01:27:14>>>,The way in which Israel occupied particularly the West Bank is a fascinating story that I think many people just don't understand. Um Israel never attacked Jordan what happened is in 1967 Israel had intelligence information that nobody disputes that the Egyptians were gonna start the war they did start the war they did start the war they sealed off the ah the straits of Tehran. INAUDIBLE admitted it was an act of war Israel had every right to treat it as an act of war they did bomb the Israel I'm sorry. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 02:03:03>>>,Israel had the right to treat it as an act of war they bombed the Israeli airfields they bombed the Iraqi airfield and never touched the Jordanian airfield. Jordan started firing at Israeli cities 6,000 shells landed in downtown Jerusalem and in other populated areas still Israel did not retaliate only after Jordan flew it's planes and started bombing Israeli cities in the heartland of Israel did Israel retaliate by destroying the airfield in Imam. Even then it accepted a seize fire and sent emissaries to Jordan saying Israel will not set foot into Jordanian territory won't even capture the western wall the holiest sight. It won't even go and try to reclaim the Jewish quarter of Jerusalem if Jordan will simply seize fire at that point. King Hussein refused to do that probably got through a period INAUDIBLE assonated he did and he sent in the legion ah the strongest of the armies and in the course of the defensive war Israel captured the west bank at considerable loss to itself. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 03:15:26>>>,Michael Lauren who has written the definitive history of the 6th day war comments about how remarkable it was that Israel was able to win this war with hardly affecting a single um civilian. Almost no Arab civilians were killed in the entire 6 day war. The largest number of civilians killed in the 6 day war were Jews. Jews who were killed in the initial bombings of the cities and Jews who would kill in Arab countries during pogroms that were conducted during the 6 day war. And so it's quite remarkable how Israel was able to conduct a war like that far away from population centers bombing airports and destroying military bases where all the Arab countries goal was a war of extermination. A war designed to kill as many Jewish civilians as possible. Thankfully that didn't happen either. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 04:17:24>>>,There is no international law that has ever previously required a return of territory captured in a defense war. Human resolution 242 which I played a small role in drafting I was an assistant to justice INAUDIBLE Goldberg who was the united states representative to the united nations and he consulted me I was at his apartment at the Waldorf Astoria. As 242 was being drafted 242 was the first declaration of international law ever to require a country to return territories captured in a defensive war but it didn't require Israel to return a single piece of territory unless the second provision of 242 which is always omitted in discussion was complied with that as all these states in the area recognized the territorial integrity and the right to exist in every other state in the area. In other words Israel had no obligation to return an inch of territory either to Jordan or to Egypt or to Syria unless those countries recognized Israelis right to exist. Israel offered to return the territories. The response was the cartoon meeting in which all the Arab states issued their three no's. No negotiation no peace no recognition. Israel at that point satisfied 242. It's only when Israel made peace that Israel was obliged to return territory captured by Egypt it did it returned every inch of territory captured from Egypt that Egypt didn't wanted back they wanted the Gaza back. That's too bad they should have taken the Gaza back they didn't want the Gaza back. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 05:52:14>>>,Um Jordan when it made peace had renounced the west bank to the Palestinians but Jordan did get back a 300 square kilometer that was in dispute in the INAUDIBLE section of um of Israel. And Israel has offered Syria the return of the INAUDIBLE heights in exchange for full and complete peace something that the Syrians have rejected. So Israel is in full and complete compliance with 242. At Camp David it offered back territories captured during the 6 day war. Doesn't have to return all the territories. Lord Carrington justice Goldberg everybody who had anything to do with the UN resolution 242 understood that there was no obligation ever on Israel's part ever to return to the pre 67 borders what INAUDIBLE even called the Osowitz lines which made Israel vulnerable to attack. It was entitled as the result of winning a defensive war to make some territorial adjustments. And um camp David and INAUDIBLE included small territorial adjustments between 4 and 6 percent of the west bank. In which in exchange of Israel is prepared to give back about 3 percent of Israeli territory to a Palestine state. Certainly filled compliance with 242. Israel is the only country in full compliance with resolution 242. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 07:25:21>>>,There was a greater Israel movement in Israel which was completely renounced by everybody including the current prime minister Ariel Sharon. Um the greater Israel movement is dead. Um it was always a tiny tiny movement very unpopular in Israel never got anything like a majority. Every Israeli government has been prepared to give back territory. Ah the most hawkish INAUDIBLE governments gave back ah the Snide including oil reserves and forward airbases and settlements which they dismantled immediately. And the current hawkish government of Ariel Sharon has been prepared to give back ah the vast majority of territory though not to return to the pre 67 lines. Um the greater Israel movement is tiny and fading whereas the greater Palestine movement 83 percent of Palestinians according to a recent poll would not be satisfied unless all of Palestine became an Arab Palestinian state and Israel no longer existed. INTERVIEWER:INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 08:31:26>>>,67 lines were always artificial. They were not ah lines drawn in any rational way. They were the result of the way fighting ended in 1948 at a seize fire not recognized by many of the Arab states and certainly not recognized by the Palestinians. The ah Jerusalem was easily cut off from the rest of Israel ah at the Latroon area. And there were other points in which Israel could be simply off its waste. INAUDIBLE it was one of the greatest dubs in Israel history referred to the pre 67 lines as the Oswitz lines. Ah the United States was against the return of the pre 67 lines. England was against it. The Soviet Union tried to introduce a resolution in 1967 calling for Israel to return to the pre 1967 lines and that resolution was never accepted by the security counsel. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 09:35:00>>>,Israel's disadvantage would be that it would be extremely vulnerable to a pincer attack by either Arab armies masked in a Palestine state. Or also very vulnerable to terrorist attacks coming from ah the Palestinian state. Having said that I believe that if Israel could get real genuine peace by actually returning to even the 67 lines a very significant number of Israelis would support that just like a very significant number of Israelis would support the return of um much of Jerusalem ah to the Palestinians. But if think about the 67 lines that would mean the end of the Jewish quarter of Jerusalem. What conceivable argument would there be that the Jewish quarter or Jerusalem which has been a Jewish place of residence for thousands of years should suddenly and has a completely Jewish population should suddenly revert to a Palestinian state. That would make absolutely no sense. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 10:48:08>>>,Jerusalem is the easiest point to resolve. Ah that will not be a barrier to peace. Um intelligent people can think of condominium arrangements and other arrangements. Barak offered that ah others in Israel have offered that. That's not the biggest problem. The biggest barrier to peace is the fact that the vast majority of Palestinians would not be satisfied with having a Jewish state side by side with a Palestinian state. As Hamas has said even Jewish state the size of a postage stamp would not be possible under Islam law. By the way that's not true of Islamic law. Islamic law never included the claim that you couldn't have a Jewish state in Palestine until it was so interrupted by the grand INAUDIBLE of Jerusalem who's a nazi. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 11:39:11>>>,Settlements in the west bank are neither illegal nor do I think they're an obstacle for peace but I think they should end. Um Israel certainly has the right to have Jews live ah ah in places where Jews have lived historically. Take for example the INAUDIBLE which was a INAUDIBLE and in the 1947, 48 war Palestinians came and slaughtered all the residents after they surrendered with their hands up. Ah they were just short a 120 of them. Ah the grandchildren and the children of the residents of INAUDIBLE block moved back and established a settlement nothing illegal about that. What's illegal is china moving hundreds of thousands into Tibet. You don't hear any resolutions about that at the United Nations. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 12:24:09>>>,Nor is it a barrier for peace because we are not very close to peace in the Middle East before a single settlement was established. And it wasn't a barrier to peace with Egypt the settlements ended as soon as peace was a real prospect. On the other hand I don't think they make any sense. On the other think it makes a lot of sense to have forward outward settlements in areas that eventually become of a Palestinian state. So I would like to see the settlements end but I think calling the settlements a barrier to peace is an excuse. The barriers to peace are Palestinian terrorism, the unwillingness to accept a Jewish state, the claim of refugee to a right of return. The greatest barrier to peace is that for decades the Palestinians were more interested in there not being a Jewish state than in their being a Palestinian state. Once a majority of Palestinians want a Palestinian state more than they want to see the end of a Jewish state there will be a Jewish state. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 13:30:12>>>,Israel has already indicating a willingness to support a Palestinian state. Um I think a Palestinian state would be the best thing for Israel provided it was a peaceful Palestinian state. Now a state requires a monopoly of force. When Israel became a state the first thing Benguari did was it disarmed Esal and INAUDIBLE and even made Pam--- part of the Israel defense forces. Ah the Palestinians should not get a state until and unless they are prepared to disarm Hamas and disarm other terrorist groups certainly those within the fata movement the al axa brigades and and others. Ah instead Yasar Arafat compliant in brining arms on a boat from Iran to be used by territories. That's not the way a state acts. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 14:29:00>>>,If statements in fact stood in the way of a contiguous Palestinian state there would be a barrier to such statehood. I think that the settlements that would stand in the way of the Palestinian state would be terminated and, and ended. Ah contiguity by the way was never a criteria previously. Ah the appeal commission did not create a contiguous ah Jewish state. Um even the um US partition created a state which was technically contiguous but realistically was really divided ah into ah two INAUDIBLE separate easily cut off the units. Ah um I don't know how you're gonna solve the problem of contiguity between um ah the West Bank and the Gaza. That will require some creativity land bridges leasing arrangements other kinds of routes but contiguity the United States is not contiguous. I mean we have 2 states Alaska and Hawaii that are not contiguous. It's not the end all and be all of statehood contiguity. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 16:15:01>>>,The non sense that comes out of the mouths of some people saying because there are checkpoints and because there is occupation that you're entitled to blow up children and murder mothers ah wheeling carriages and kill students at the Hebrew university cafeteria and murder Jews in prayer and blow up an airplane ah coming from a Hanukah vacation in Kena. I mean even the Jews during the holocaust weren't being subjected to inconveniences but were being murdered ah never set out to kill children. Ah none of the resistance movements in Europe ever murdered children. Ah ever murdered innocent people. Never even murdered the wives of, of, of the nazi leaders. Ah this is the lowest of the low in terms of morality saying because there are checkpoints because there are inconveniences, because there are denial of work permits we are entitled to murder in cold blood children is just a complete moral non INAUDIBLE. And the tragedy is so many people have accepted it. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 17:29:05>>>,The other myth is that Palestinians are driven by desperation to terrorism. How come the Tibetans don't engage in terrorism? How come other people throughout history who have been far more oppressed have never murdered children. Terrorism is a tactic of choice it is picked by elite leaders like Yassar Arafat who send out young children as one of the worst forms of child abuse sending 11, 12, 13, 15 year old children to kill them self. Mrs. Arafat from a fancy suburb says that he, she had a son she would hope her son would become a mortar suicide bomber. That's not desperation that's simply a choice of tactics. And the reason that it's done is because it works because the international community has rewarded Palestinian terrorism by giving them special status at the UN. Much greater status then the Tibetans ever had then the Kurds ever had then the Americans ever had then the Boosts ever had. The message that's sent is that the worse your terrorism the more we'll recognize you. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 18:39:27>>>,And it's worked extremely effectively. If you just look at how Arafat played (ring) ALAN DERSHOWITZ 19:15:05>>>,The more Palestinians have engaged in terrorism the more recognition they've gotten from the international community. And some of the people who are most at fault (ring) INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 20:17:19>>>,Collective punishment the UN imposes collective punishments. It imposes sanctions for example who is hurt by a sanction everybody is hurt as a result of a sanction. Collective punishment is pervasive throughout the, the world . Ah the worst forms of collective punishment are terrorism. Another form of collective punishment is boycotting all Israeli scholars regardless of what their views might be on the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Divestment is collective punishment and yet hypocritically one sees those who practice collective punishment complaining when Israel imposes economic sanction on people who are complicit in terrorism. Ah houses are blown up only under Israeli law as construed by the Supreme Court if the person who owned the house knowingly was complicitious in terrorism. It's simply and economic function it doesn't look too good because on Arab televisions they create the impression that people are still in the house when the houses are destroyed. I'm not saying I'm supportive of house destruction but in terms of a continuum of punishment it's one of the most minor punishments imaginable. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 21:28:14>>>,I'll give you an example we had a famous case in the United states a few years ago in which a woman was raped on a pool INAUDIBLE in Fall River Massachusetts. Ah a couple of people actually raped her. A couple of other people held her down. A couple of other people blocked her way so she couldn't escape. A few other people cheered when the rapists were raping her. And a few other people simply could have called the police and refused to do so. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 21:54:28>>>,All of those people were morally morally culpable. The key is the proportionality the rapist are the most culpable the people who didn't call are the least culpable. If we had a system under which every one of them were punished but only to a slight degree consistent with their own complicity that would be a very, very fair system and that's the way I look at house destruction. House destruction is a proportional punishment to complicity with terrorism. Israel would be wiser if they didn't do that. I fact if they put people in jail for 30 days or 60 days if they were in any way complicit with terrorism that way there wouldn't be a big picture on television of a woman weeping while houses ah knocked down the day before she may have been encouraged for her son to be a suicide bomber and may have been sewing the belt. But ah it looks terrible when you're blow up people's houses. It doesn't look as bad when you put them in jail for 30 days or 60 days. But the Israeli Supreme Court has been scrupulous in demanding that any sanctions be proportionate to the complicity and terrorism. I wish other countries would be as sensitive. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 23:23:21>>>,This will sound surprising to some people but I've been teaching ah in the area of civilianizes and human rights and practicing for 40 years. There is my view no country in the history of the world that has been more sensitive to human rights and civil liberties when faced with the kind of both internal and external threats to its existence as Israel it is the number one country in the world in complying with the rule of law. It has the best Supreme Court in the world today. It is the only Supreme Court which involves itself in regulating the day to day activities in the army. It will intervene and grant an injunction against the army engaging in activities which it concludes violates the rule of law. It is the only country ever to take on the issue of the ticking bomb terrorists and to prohibit all forms of physical pressure moderate non lethal route. It is the only country to have instructed its army that under no circumstances may it hold on to prisoners beyond their term even if they want to hold them in exchange for other prisoners. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 24:39:00>>>,It has ruled that you can't transfer people from one area to another unless the person is complicitious in crime. Is has ruled that even if ambulances are used to transport terrorists if it bears a sign of an ambulance it cannot be fired upon. I chALANge anybody INAUDIBLE (no sound) ALAN DERSHOWITZ 25:13:09>>>,Israel is the best when it comes to the rule of law. And yet if you ask many students on college campuses today they will tell you it is the worst or among the worst. A student leader recently described Israel as the prime human rights violator in the world. There is no country in which the disparity between reality and acquisition and perception is greater. And that endangers not only INAUDIBLE. It endangers the rule of law, it endangers the United Nations, it endangers any kind of objective standard of evaluating people's conduct. When the best is called worst and the worst countries like Libya are on the united nations commissions on human rights counties like Syria countries like Belarus countries like north Korea countries that have no semblance of compliance with human rights are praised. The Palestinian authority tortures routinely. Has no system of trials. Kills people for complicity, murders political opponents and yet many college students around the country praise the Palestinian authority and believe that Israel is the prime human rights violator in the world. It's a topsy turvy situation. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 26:44:00>>>,If I were um space traveler from another galaxy and I was sent to the united states and world to find out who the worst violators were and I just read the united nations resolutions I'd come back to my planet and say there's only one outlaw state Israel is the worst and only human rights violator in the world and ah of course that would be wrong. The United Nations is a political organization and third world countries ah have enormous disproportion and influence particularly in the general assembly where most of these resolutions have occurred. Security counsel has also been one sidely condemning of ah Israel. The worst condemnations are vetoed by the United States but the United States even with its veto can't get the security counsel to condemn other countries. And so you get tremendous disparity. The worst are not punishment of china for example which has occupied Tibet far longer then the INAUDIBLE occupations on the West Bank is rewarded by getting the 2008 Olympics. Um whereas Israel is just completely and continuously condemned. That tells us more about the United Nations then it tells us about Israel. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 28:02:29>>>,A road map is not a solution a road map is precisely what it purports to be a way toward a solution. I approve of a road map I favor it. Um I think that ah it managed to at least temporarily stem the violence. Ah we talking point beginning and ah I like what I've seen so far um but it's only a road map. I don't think that American politicians should be standing in way of Israel and the Palestinians making peace cause they don't like the kind of peace that's being made some have done that. But um I'm I'm moderately ah encouraged by the direction of the road map. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 28:53:044>>>,At this point and time both sides are just putting their toes in the water a little bit to see what the other side is going to do. Politically it's difficult for Israel to dismantle the settlements until unless they see some progress on the part of controlling terrorism from the other side. Palestinians probably believe the same they can't take actions that might ferment the civil war by disarming the terrorist until they see concrete actions on the part of Israel. That I think is the virtue of the road map that it requires both sides to at least put their feet in the water a little bit and test the temperature and determine whether it or not it ah further steps can be taken. I'm cautiously optimistic. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 29:48:05>>>,If in fact the only way the Palestinians can disarm terrorists groups is by fermenting a civil war then the Palestinian authority is not ready for statehood. Ah then they need ah to be controlled from the outside. The worst possible solution to this problem will be the establishment of a Palestinian state which then becomes a terrorist entity which Hamas takes over or is given free reign. The the consideration for making a Palestinian state is to create a monopoly of violence a monopoly of arms a monopoly in which an attack comes if it comes from the Palestinian authorities it has a return address. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 30:32:04>>>,You know how to respond. And if there is a monopoly enforced you know how to respond. If there's not a monopoly enforced then Palestinians can have a state while at the same time maintaining deniability over terrorist's actions that come from its borders that's not an acceptable situation. INTERVIEWER:,INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 30:51:12>>>,The conflict is like all geopolitical conflicts in part about real estate. Um controlled land is very important but deep down its not about ah real estate it's not simply skewed between different claimants to the land. It really is about whether or not the Jewish people have a right to have an independent Jewish state ah in the birthplace of Judaism. And ah the answer to that is yes. The answer to that on the ground is yes the Jews by hard work and perseverance establish a state ah in an area where they have deep roots and if the Palestinians had accepted that state early on they would have their own state and as soon as the Palestinians want their own state more than they want the end of the Jewish state there will be both a Jewish state and a Palestinian state and that's the optimum resolution. INTERVIEWER: There are those who say that this is no longer about Jews and Arabs its about ah east and west and western values and eastern values moderation and moderation INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 32:05:18>>>,Every war reflects larger issues than the combatants. The Israel Palestine conflict is between two nations each seeking their own national entity ah but it's also between ah modernity secularism represented by INTERVIEWER: Go on ALAN DERSHOWITZ 32:34:22>>>,Whatever conflict you might have with modernity ah a religion has an obligation to deal with it in its own terms. You tell your own congregates not to drink coca cola not to watch television not to wear mini skirts but you don't blow up Jewish children ah in order to deter you own children from wearing mini skirts or becoming modern or ah becoming more tolerant of others ah that's just not acceptable in a pluralistic world. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 33:12:00>>>,There are many currents within the Palestinian community. There is a great intellectual ah ferment within the Palestinian community. Palestinian community has produced some brilliant scholars. Um I think in the end we will see tremendous similarities between Israel's energy and the Palestinian energy and the Palestinians can finally focus on getting their own state rather than destroying the, the Jewish state. But there are elements within the Palestinian community which are very reactionist and very fundamentalist and ah radical Islam is taking a foothold ah within the Palestinian authority. I think they had their own struggles just like Israel has its own struggles. If Israel recollected peace it would be great conflict between secular Israel and religious Israel. Um and ah countries have to resolve those disputes internally. The difference is that the Palestinians have been resolving their internal disputes by killing other people by killing Jews and by killing Israelis and there's no justification for that. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE ALAN DERSHOWITZ 34:26:06>>>,My whole life has been devoted to defending the underdog and I see my case for Israel the book I'm most proud of having written as the greatest underdog I've ever defended. Israel is the international underdog. If it ever looses a war it will be exterminated, it's civilian populations will be destroyed, another holocaust ah will occur. They're a 5 million Israeli Jews there are a billion ah Arabs and Muslims who support the um Palestinian cause. United nations supports the Palestinian cause against Israel. Um many academics are anti Israel. I've never had a greater underdog that I have defended than Israel. Israel is a multiracial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious country ah always at risk always vulnerable to attack both internal and external and I'm so proud to be defending Israel because doing so is consistent with my life's work as a civilitarian, as a human rights activist as a defender of the underdog. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 35:40:08>>>,I challenge those who defend the Palestine cause over Israel and ask them why the Palestinians why not the other groups who are fighting against Chinese oppression. When have you last spoken out at the INAUDIBLE of Tibet? When have you last spoken out on behalf of the Kurds? When have you last spoken out on behalf of the mosques or on behalf of the Armenians and turkey. When have you last spoken out on behalf of Jews who have been subjected to discrimination in Syria and in other parts of the world. A true defender of underdogs will be on the side of Israel not uncritically of course but Israel's right to exist safety and security as a Jewish state is the great moral underdog battle of the new millennium. INTERVIEWER: How do you overcome the decades of brainwashing and patriotism that's been instilled in the Palestinian people and the Palestinian children through propaganda? ALAN DERSHOWITZ 36:46:00>>>,After the second world war people thought it would be very hard to overcome propaganda imposed on Germans and central Europeans and yet it happened it happened. Whether we're seeing a return to that I don't know but certainly between 1945 and the current time we saw that hated could quickly abate and peace could be substituted. I think the great moral issue of the 21st century is whether Israel's efforts to defend itself against terrorism and external threats will become yet another excuse. And an age old attempt to demonize and de legitimate and attack Jews whether anti Zionism will become a new excuse for Antisemitism in the world. That's the great moral challenge that we face and I'm glad that I'm on the right side of that challenge. And the message that I send to young men and women in colleges who unthinkingly oppose Israel and join in those who would destroy it my message to you is you're on the wrong side of history. You're on the wrong side of morality. You are complicit with an evil. You cannot any longer blame ignorance. It's too easy to learn the facts. And if you learn the facts and you learn the truth you'll see it's more complex that there's right and wrong on both sides and that to simply always condemn and attack Israel in a thoughtless way and to support those who would murder Jewish children and Jewish people in prayer puts you in very large company but in very bad company. ALAN DERSHOWITZ 38:32:01>>>,And if once again the Jewish community would experience what it experienced previously, if Israel were to come to a tragic end the way European Jewry did history will judge those very harshly who are on the wrong side of morality just as they judged others in the past.
UN Iraq - Iraqi vice-president meets Annan, comments on Bush, Blair relationship
NAME: UN IRAQ 20061219I TAPE: EF06/1236 IN_TIME: 11:08:35:19 DURATION: 00:03:33:09 SOURCES: UNTV/Pool DATELINE: New York, 19 Dec 2006 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST UNTV 1. Wide exterior United Nations building 2. Tracking shot, Tariq al-Hashemi, Vice President of Iraq, coming out of room and towards microphone (after meeting with Kofi Annan) 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariq al-Hashemi, Vice President of Iraq: "I reconfirmed to him (referring to Kofi Annan) that Iraq will be very much interested to see the United Nations play an increasing role in the Iraqi file. Many things are so far left pending or without significant contribution from the international community that we have to focus on from now on." 4. Medium shot security personnel 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariq al-Hashemi, Vice President of Iraq: "There are many things in fact that they (United Nations) could contribute in Iraq. First of all they should be a partner in our reconciliation project. They have experience in South Africa, they have experience in Ireland. I think they are the party who should be on the front in helping Iraqis, in fact, to get things together, especially the Shia and the Sunni. This is part. The second part is in fact, this is very important: the security. Security, what we need is time, in fact, to reshuffle, retrain our armed forces and again the United Nations could play a major role." 6. Medium shot al-Hashemi and aides approaching doorway 7. Medium shot al-Hashemi greeing Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, and shaking hands 8. Wide shot al-Hashemi and Annan and aides sitting at table, zooms into al-Hashemi, and then pulls out to reveal Annan shaking hands with al-Hashemi aides Pool 9. Wide exterior Council on Foreign Relations 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariq al-Hashemi, Vice President of Iraq: "The president, your president, made some sort of brainwashing of Mr. Blair, in fact. Mr. Blair in fact is back to 'square one,' He's just back to his adamancy that 'It's difficult, in fact, Mr. Hashemi, we can't announce that we are afraid that we will pass a false message to terrorism, that we give up because of the threats.' I understand that, so OK, I said, 'Let us make some sort of amendment to the theme. Say it in this way: Timetable conditional.' Conditional withdrawal means that you rebuild the Iraqi Armed Forces on a professional basis. The time comes that this project is concluded. There should be no excuse, in fact, for you to stay in Iraq." 11. Medium shot al-Hashemi and moderator 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariq al-Hashemi, Vice President of Iraq: "And I personally, and my party, is going to struggle and to fight until we get the Shia with the Sunni, joining forces to rebuild Iraq. There is no other way. I shoulder my responsibilities. I am not going to talk on behalf of the Sunnis. I am going to talk on behalf of all Iraqis. This is the only language. The only project that could put an end of the Iraqi dilemma is to go back to the national common interest of Iraq. That's it." 13. Medium shot al-Hashemi and moderator STORYLINE US President George Bush had "brainwashed" UK Prime Minister Tony Blair over Iraq troop withdrawals, the country's vice president said on Tuesday. Speaking in New York, Tariq al-Hashemi said Blair had promised Iraqi officials he would convince Bush to set a date for troops to begin pulling out. "The president, your president, made some sort of brainwashing of Mr. Blair," Hashemi told his audience at the Council on Foreign Relations. "Mr. Blair in fact is back to square one. He's just back to his adamancy that 'It's difficult, in fact, Mr. Hashemi. We can't announce that we are afraid that we will pass a false message to terrorism, that we give up because of the threats'." Hashemi said he understood that, and suggested an "ammendment to the theme." "Say it in this way: 'timetable conditional'," Hashemi said. "Conditional withdrawal means that you rebuild the Iraqi Armed Forces on a professional basis. The time comes that this project is concluded. There should be no excuse, in fact, for you to stay in Iraq." Earlier, after meeting United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, Hashemi said Iraq needed the UN to help resolve the crisis. "I reconfirmed to him (Annan) that Iraq will be very much interested to see United Nations play an increasing role in the Iraqi file. Many things so far left pending or without significant contribution from the international community that we have to focus on from now on," he said. Al-Hashemi, Iraq's most senior politician from the Sunni Arab minority, said the UN could help by training the army and also with reconciliation. "There are many things in fact that they could contribute in Iraq. First of all they should be a partner in our reconciliation project. They have experience in South Africa, they have experience in Ireland. I think they are the party who should be on the front in helping Iraqis, in fact, to get things together, especially the Shia and the Sunni," he said. He added the UN could play a major role in security while Iraqi forces were trained. Hashemi warned that without reconciliation, his country is doomed. "And I personally, and my party, is going to struggle and to fight until we get the Shia with the Sunni, joining forces to rebuild Iraq," he said. "There is no other way. I shoulder my responsibilities. I am not going to talk on behalf of the Sunnis. I am going to talk on behalf of all Iraqis. This is the only language. The only project that could put an end of the Iraqi dilemma is to go back to the national common interest of Iraq. That's it." Both al-Hashemi's brother and sister, the former head of the Iraqi Islamic Party women's affairs unit, were gunned down last April.
Growing with Jehovah
RTS Radio télévision Suisse
Dore Gold Interview
00:00:57:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Tell us your name, and spell it please? ,00:01:05:00>>>DORE GOLD: Ambassador Dore Gold. That's D-o-r-e, G-o-l-d. ,00:01:15:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Where were you from? ,00:01:30:00>>>DORE GOLD: I was born in the State of ConnectiCUt. I lived in Israel since the mid 1970's. , ,00:01:45:00>>>INTERVIEWER: What would you say is the number one, or one of the number one misconceptions in the west, about the Arab-Israeli conflict? ,01:02:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well clearly, since September 11th, the Palestinians and their supporters in the United Nations, have been stressing that the reason, the motivation, for the Palestinian uprising, which they called Intifada, is Israel's ocCUpation, or so-called ocCUpation, of Palestinian territories, as they say. There was probably no more baseless a charge, that can be utilized, or that has been utilized in the International Community. You have to understand that those who state that what motivates the attacks on Israelis is ocCUpation, those who make that claim are, perhaps, building on the amnesia of the international community. Because, after all, what were the Oslo Agreements about, from 1993? I was an Oslo negotiator. I was involved in the ____ Agreement, and in the Wye Negotiations, in 1998. And what the Oslo Agreements were, and what we ultimately implemented, was a withdrawal of the Israeli military government over the Palestinians. And replacing that with a Palestinian government, called the Palestinian authority, under Yasser Arafat. , So, as a result of the Oslo Agreements, which Israel implemented in good faith, in the 1990's, the Palestinians were not under military ocCUpation. Did they have a Palestinian state? No. Were they under military ocCUpation? No. And they feel those who were using this argument of ocCUpation, to justify violence, are simply trying to find an exCUse for murderous terrorism against Israeli civilians. But it's a baseless argument. And it is simply used repetitive - repeatedly. It is simply used repeatedly, in places like the United Nations security Council, or the United Nations General Assembly, to justify the murder of innocent Israeli civilians. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:04:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Can you talk a little bit about what does and what does not just - what kind of grievances might justify terror? Can terror ever be justified? ,00:04:07:00>>>DORE GOLD: I think, after September 11th, it's become completely clear to most countries, in the international community, today, that there is no possible justification for the murder of innocent civilians. There is no grievance that can possibly justify taking young people and having them strap dynamite to themselves, and sending them to - into a crowded Israeli café, full of Israeli teenagers, and murdering thirty innocent Israelis. No economic deprivation, no political claim, and certainly not this baseless charge of ocCUpation, can possibly used to give a context or explanation for the kind of terrible tragedy that, that act leads to. ,00:04:45:00>>>INTERVIEWER: You talked about the ocCUpation charge, about the Palestinian people. There is also a charge that Israel is ocCUpying Palestinian land. Can you use the phrase, ‘Palestinian lands'? ,00:05:00:00>>>DORE GOLD: This is part of the language that developed in the United Nations. The United Nations, unfortunately, is many times a, a place not where international laws are established, but where international politics is pursued. And therefore, much of the normal CUlture in the UN, doesn't even reflect other fundamental UN resolutions. It's clear, from UN security Council Resolution 242, which is really the foundation of the Arab-Israeli peace process. IT was the basis of the Camp David Agreement with Egypt. IT was the basis of the peace agreement with Jordan. It was even the basis of the Oslo Agreement. It is clear, from that resolution 242, that Israel is never expected to withdraw, lock, stock and barrel, from The West Bank in Gaza Strip. That Israel had rights in those territories because it was attacked from those territories, in the 1967 Six Day War. And therefore, those territories, rather than being ocCUpied territories, which belonged to somebody else, are reality disputed territories, where Israel has claims, and an Arab party may have claims. In this case, the Palestinians. ,00:06:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The ocCUpation grievance is not really there. And nothing could justify such (Inaudible). What is, what kind of ideological motivation might be behind this attack against Israel, as well as Israeli policy?,00:06:43:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, look, Israel had the opportunity to test the intentions of the Palestinians. Most of the international community was convinced that the Palestinians simply wanted their own state, within the territory of the West Bank, in Gaza Strip. And that's what they were struggling for. And therefore, many observers looked at this conflict through the lenses of decolonization. Thinking that if Israel would just turn it over, the West Bank in Gaza Strip, or large parts of it, for a Palestinian state, the Arab-Israel conflict would end, the Middle East crisis would be terminated, and the entire Middle Eastern order would snap into place. And all of the problems in the United States, and the European union in the Middle East would end. But clearly that wasn't true. Because once Israel went to Camp David, and ____ Prime Minister Ehud Barak, basically offered Yasser Arafat, virtually all of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and even was willing to divide Jerusalem, something which most Israeli's, in fact a vast majority of Israeli's objected. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] Once Prime Minister, Ehud Barak, our former Prime Minister, went to Camp David, offered the Palestinians virtually all the West Bank, in Gaza Strip, was willing to even contemplate the division of Jerusalem, which the vast majority of Israelis objected to, and Yasser Arafat turned him down, it became clear to everybody who followed this issue that the question here is not over a limited piece of territory - the West Bank and Gaza, and a little bit of Jerusalem - Mr. Arafat and his supporters have much greater ambitions that involved Israel, itself. ,>>>INTERVIEWER: What kind of ideology might be behind the larger Islamic movement, that includes - the Islamic movement that includes maybe some (Inaudible)? What really motivated - why do they hate Israel so much? What is it about Israel in a nation of western democracy, and (Inaudible) American democracy in the Middle East, that might be motivating this hatred to resist all Israeli concessions?,00:09:05:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, I just concluded a book called Hatred's Kingdom, which viewed the impact of Wajabi Islam, on the entire Middle East. Certainly, since 1973, when Saudi Arabia began earning huge oil income from elevated oil prices, the Saudi's were able to export their very narrow version of Islam to many countries of the Middle East. To places like Pakistan, which gave birth to the Taliban regime, and certainly had an impact on many of the Moslem brotherhood organizations, including Hamas. And those organizations, first of all, do not view Christians and Jews, as legitimate, fellow, monotheists, who shared the same basic fate, as many Moslems. Classical Islam, while perhaps putting Christians and Jews in a kind of second class citizenship, requiring them to pay discriminatory taxes like the _____ and the _____, nonetheless were willing to protect Jews and Christians, as people of the book. Many of these pro lwahabi organizations even removed that status of people of the book, from Christians and Jews, and described them as _____, as polytheists, who basically didn't have a right to live. So, much of this evil wind from Arabia, has reached the shores of the Eastern Mediterranean, and has effected many ideologs in the Hamas movement, in the Islamic Jihad Movement, both of which had received financial support from Saudi Arabia. And this undoubtedly has had an impact on Palestinian politics. But there is also a fundamental problem with de fatah organization as well. ,00:11:02:55>>>INTERVIEWER: What is the fundamental problem? ,00:11:03:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, after Camp David, when we wanted to understand what was motivating Yasser Arafat, Israeli analysts, much more carefully monitored the statements within the Fatah Movement itself. For example the chief idealog of the Fatah Movement, is a man by the name of Fatah Jabash [PH]. No relationship to George Jabash. And he frequently appeared in various Palestinian towns and cities, and gave speeches in the name of Yasser Arafat. How do we know that? Because those speeches were replicated in full textual form, in ____, in ____ Al-Jadida [PH}, both of which are official newspapers of the Palestinian authority. And in those sermons that he gave in Palestinian cities, in Arafat's name, Fatah Jabash made it clear that the Palestinian, the Palestinian Fatah leadership still adhered to the stages strategy to 1974. And that is, establish a Palestinian state, and any bit of liberated Palestine that you can, and from there continue the conflict to dismantle the State of Israel. If that, indeed, was the motivation of Yasser Arafat, then that explains a great deal of why the Camp David Summit, under President Clinton, failed. And why Mr. Arafat could never bring himself to sign an agreement with Israel that talked about the termination of conflict. ,00:12:51:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The Fatah is the means for the faction of the - of Yasser Arafat's faction of the Palestinian authority, only the people don't know it. So, it can be said for the ___ Fatah, is that Yasser Arafat's mainstream faction believes, or it clearly believes in a (Inaudible). ,00:12:52:00>>>DORE GOLD:,What happened after the failed Camp David Summit, of July of 2000, was that many Israelis more carefully monitored the statements of the Fatah movement. When Israel went into the Oslo Agreement, it was understood that mainstream movements, within the PLO, like the Fatah Movement, had changed. That perhaps they were adapting a strategy very similar to Nelson Mandela in South Africa, who set aside the arms struggle, and instead showed the diplomatic process. In fact, many in Israel, in the 1990's, assumed that there was a huge struggle transpiring in the Arab world, between the old forces of Arab Nationalism, which the Fatah component of the PLO represented among the Palestinians, and the new rising forces of Islamic fundamentalism, like the Hamas, and the Islamic Jihad. It was assumed that, just as the Nationalist forces in Algeria, or Egypt, were fighting against Islamic Fundamentalists, so too Yasser Arafat, leading the Fatah Movement, and its elements in the PLO, would fight against Hamas and Islamic Jihad. But of course what really happened in the 1990's, was that the Fatah Movement colluded with Hamas and Islamic Jihad, didn't fight them, allowed them to grow, permitted suicide bombings against the State of Israel, and ultimately joined the war against Israel when Arafat initiated the second Intifada in September of 2000, against the State of Israel. So, that rather than the Fatah Movement and the PLO being this moderate force, which the world could get behind to bring an end to the Arab-Israel conflict, they were, in fact, radical allies of Hamas and Islamic Jihad. And, in a certain sense, it's not a surprise. Because anybody who knows the biographies of the leaders of the Fatah Movement, such as Yasser Arafat or his military leader, Abu Jihad, knows that many of these men were either sympathizers or activists in the famous Egyptian Moslem Brotherhood, which, of course, gave rise to many of the radical movements across the Middle East with the backing of Saudi money. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:15:15:00>>>INTERVIEWER: There was some talk today, among the Palestinian (Inaudible) warning, while Camp David failed, they were about to reach an agreement in Taba, months later. And the agreements were about to be signed, and the Palestinians approved of them, and the Israelis said (Inaudible), and then there were new elections and Sharon came to power, so it never happened. So actually, it wasn't the Palestinians, but Israel, who dropped the ball? ,00:15:52:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well there is a myth that Palestinian negotiators are interested in putting forward. That Israel and the PLO, on the verge of a final status agreement at Taba, which is, of course the Egyptian resort town, near Alat [PH] - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] There is a rumor that - there is a rumor that exists, that Palestinian negotiators love to put forward, that Israel, and the PLO, on the verge of a permanent status agreement at Taba, the resort town where negotiations were held after the failed Camp David Summit. The idea that Israel and Palestinians could - were just inches away from an agreement, is simply untrue. If you look at every category, every issue that was raised in those negotiations, borders, Jerusalem, refugees, security arrangements, what you find is that the gap between the Israeli position - the most forthcoming Israeli position, and the Palestinian position, is basically unbridgeable. And I think it's a complete misrepresentation of history. In fact, the best source about this are the notes of the European union envoy, who was at the talks, Ambassador Mortinos [PH]. And if you carefully examine his notes, which were reported in the press, you will see the gaps between the parties were unbridgeable. There was no agreement that was simply prevented by Israeli elections. ,00:7:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: If there had been agreements, would there have been a silent counter offer continually offered, instead of resorting to the ____ Intifada, that (Inaudible) for example, Palestinian. Is the failure - is there proof that the Palestinian authority might lie in the fact that, instead of offering a counter offer, they launched this ____ Intifada. This war of terror. ,00;17:50:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, what is clear is that the Palestinians -let me start again. Let's look at the sequence of events. July of 2000, is the failed Camp David Summit with President Clinton. The negotiations in Taba, which the Palestinians claim almost led to an agreement, but, in fact, the gaps were invisible, that ocCUrs in December of 2000, January 2001. But the Palestinians launched their violence against Israel in September of 2000, before those Taba negotiations even take place. If the Palestinians were serious about reaching a peaceful agreement with Israel, they would never have adopted violence. Now, there are Palestinians who argue that, that violence erupted because Prime Minister Sharon, then head of the opposition, went for a stroll on the Temple Mount, where members (Inaudible) permitted to visit and walk. But we know, from the statements of Palestinian leaders, like Imad Farugi [PH], the Communications Minister of the Palestinian Authority, that the entire Intifada of Yasser Arafat, from September 2000, was pre-planned. We know that Mawan Barguti [PH] was trying to recruit Israeli Arabs, prior to the outbreak of the Intifada, and therefore it is clear to us that Yasser Arafat elected a strategy of violence, because he had no intention of reaching a final agreement with Israel . He wanted to negotiate with Israel while Israel was bleeding. And what Ariel Sharon said was, that those rules, we will not adhere to. ,00:19:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: These facts, these damning facts, did it expose, did it really expose the Palestinians? Or, are they also a tragedy for those individual Palestinians who might have hoped for a better leadership and a better future? ,00:20:00:00>>>DORE GOLD: I was a negotiator with many Palestinians, and I have to say, I sense that there were Palestinians who really wanted to reach an agreement, who thought about the future of the Palestinian people, and believed that, ultimately, by creating a relation of peace with Israel, they could get a better future for their people as well. Unfortunately, that wasn't the dominant perspective of Yasser Arafat, and those who were loyal to him. And much time is lost, much blood has been spilled, it's been a tragedy for many Israelis who have died, people I know. As well as for the Palestinians. I think there is a lesson of all this, this entire period. It's that you have to establish firm rules, and insist that the Palestinian side, in the future, adhere to those rules, in any negotiation. The most cardinal rule, that has to become fixed in stone, is that no one use violence to advance their negotiating agenda. The moment the Pal - any Palestinian negotiator in the future who ____ the violence, the negotiations must end. Because once they do that, it becomes clear that their intention isn't peace, but perpetual conflict. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:21:00:00<<<INTERVIEWER: There is a myth that Israel is an apartide state, with unequal status, for ____ and Jews, whether in the West Bank, or in Israel proper. How would you count this charge that Israel is called the academic weapon - apartide state? ,00:21:22:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, first of all, Israel has granted citizenship to Israeli Arabs, who amount to about 20% of the Israeli population. They have full voting rights, they attend all universities. There are elements of the Arabic speaking community like the Drews [PH], who don't regard themselves as Arabs, who are also drafting into the Israeli Army. We have better volunteers than the Israeli Army, as well, but we don't force the Arabs - the Arab population - to serve in the army. We don't draft them, because we don't want to put them in a position where they have to shoot at their brothers. But in fact Israel is a country which is granted huge (let me start again.) ......Israel is a country which has sought to make sure that its Arab population has equal rights to the Israeli-Jewish population, even though Israel is a country that's been under siege for fifty years, by a coalition of Arab states. ,00:21:50:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Religious freedom, is an important value for Israel, and how is it viewed as being different now that Israel controls lands, as opposed to centuries before? ,00:22:00:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, in fact, if you look historically at what has happened to the holy sites of the great religions, (exCUse me, let me start again). [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] In fact, if you look historically, at what has happened to the holy sites of the great religions, under different people's sovereignty, what you find is that only under the sovereignty of Israel has, for example, Jerusalem been open to all faiths. The Jewish people were forcibly removed from Jerusalem when the Romans conquered Jerusalem in 70A.D., and destroyed the second temple. And for at least five hundred years Jews were forbidden to live in Jerusalem. They began coming back, ironically, with the first Moslem conquest, and later, once the crusaders were defeated by _____. But already, in 1864, under the Ottoman Empire, the Jewish people recovered their majority in Jerusalem. That was at the time of the American Civil War. It was well before the arrival of the British Empire, to the Middle East. And yet (let me start that again) - So, the Jewish people recovered their majority in Jerusalem. Already, in 1864, at the time of the American Civil War, well before the arrival of the British to the Middle East. Yet it was a struggle for the Jewish people to assure themselves full rights, and of access to the holy sites. In fact, in 1948, when the Jordanian Army invaded the nation State of Israel, and conquered Jerusalem, with the help of British officers, about 50 synagogues, in the old city of Jerusalem, many of them going back to the 13th Century, were either destroyed or desecrated. Jews were robbed of access to the Western Wall, their great holy site. The Christian population in Jerusalem suffered tremendously in the population of Christians living in Jerusalem, diminished from about 25,000 to about 11 or 12,000 by 1967. Only when Israel liberated the old city of Jerusalem, was it truly open to all faiths. Was the Armenian quarter of the old city able to prosper and thrive in the Armenian church, build a new seminary. ,00:24:57:00>>>DORE GOLD: Only when Israel was in control, did Christians begin to return to Jerusalem. Only when Israel was in control, were Jews able to pray at the Western Wall, and at their various holy sites. During the period of this Intifada that began in September of 2000, what Israelis witnessed was that holy sites, that were turned over to be protected by the Palestinian authority, were, again, abused, were again sacked. For example, Joseph's Tomb, in Nabwith [PH], the Sharam Israel [PH] Synagogue, an ancient Synagogue in Jericho. Rachel's Tomb, on the border between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, has constantly been under sniper fire by Mr. Arafat's Tanzim [PH] gunmen. And finally, the Palestinian rocks, that's the Religious Endowments Ministry, which took over for the Jordanians on the Temple Mount, has been involved in an illegal excavation, destroying artifacts going back to The Crusades, and even to the second and first temples. So, if Israelis have learned anything from the last two years, it's that only under the sovereignty of Israel, can Jerusalem truly be protected, and be a citizen that's open to all things. ,00:26:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The ancient Palestinian negotiators that you felt, genuinely, wanted peace, do you believe that there are Palestinian individuals out there who just want the house, and the garage, and the chicken in every pot, sort of just - who, themselves, do not share in either Wajabism or the Islamists, or the corruption in the phase plans of leadership? ,00:26:47:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, I think what's very hard in the west, for people to understand, is that political movements are not necessarily motivated by just - that what's very hard in the west, to understand, many times, is that political movements are not organized to address the every day needs of people. That there are many times a movement that is established on the basis of aggressive ideologies. You either have the nationalist and socialist ideologies, the constituent elements of the PLO, like the Fatah Movement, like the PFLP Socialist group, like the DFLP, also, a Pro-Marxist group. Or you have the highly ideologically charged Hamas and Islamic Jihad, who come out of these pro lobby time or - backgrounds and organizations. There are Palestinians who want normal lives. ..... You know, one time I spent weeks in Jordan, with Jordanian Military people, and they would point to some of the tremendous construction and advances inside of Jordan, and whispered to me the Palestinians were behind them. And they would talk about the fact that the Palestinians contributed to the development of Persian Golf countries like Kuwait, the United ____, and other places. ,00:28:14:00>>>DORE GOLD: The Palestinians are extraordinarily talented. They are the most educated component of the Arab World in Arab societies. And with - in the context of a political leadership that believes in freedom and democracy, it can lead to great progress for their people. But if they're trapped by their ideologies of yesterday, you know, sort of from that world of, of Fidel Castro, and Brechnev [PH], and all those who spawned the left wing organizations, as well as the ideologies of the ____ movements, those who have supported the Moslem brotherhood and come out of the extremist pro lobby wings, then the Palestinians will not progress. ....And I think what is important, at this point, is that the world community establish a model of freedom of democracy, which has worked so well in other regions of the world, for the Middle East as well, so the Palestinians will have a political context, in which their talents can be expressed. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:29:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The concept of refugees, the UN defines the Palestinian refugees in a certain way, and using a definition that is now regarded, the numbers always fluctuate - millions of Palestinians, a million and a half refugees, has this concept been misrepresented and distorted to bloat the numbers and create a _____? ,00:29:54:00>>>DORE GOLD: I think most - in - let me start again. I think in most conflicts, the UN has attempted to resolve refugee issues by finding homes for refugees, by bringing about normalized refugees. The Arab states who have been at war with Israel have been interested in keeping the refugee issue alive, refusing to grant normalcy for Palestinian refugees in Lebanon or in Syria, through a lesser extent than Jordan. Jordan has been better on this issue. And using the refugee issue as a grievance to maintain the war against the State of Israel. In order to help refugees move on and build a better life, what the international community should do is help invest in the various countries where Palestinian refugees are, so they can establish a new life in new homes. And we can move on beyond this issue. .......There are many wars that have existed since 1945, and many refugees in Afghanistan, in Iran, in Southeast Asia and elsewhere, and although there is a political interest in foCUsing on the ref - on the Palestinian refugees, there is a need to address this refugee issue, as other refugee issues have been looked at. ,00:31:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Have there been Jewish refugees? ,00:31:11:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, of course, one of the big ironies of the Arab-Israel conflict, is that while the world speaks about Palestinian refugees all the time, most in the international community completely ignore the hundreds of thousands, in fact millions of refugees that were kicked out of the Arab world, from Morocco to Iraq, who lost their property, who lost their way of life, and were accepted by the State of Israel. .........Israel was a poor country when it first was established. And yet it, it found homes and established a new life for hundred's and thousands of Jewish refugees in the Arab world. If one talks about the refugee issue, one should speak about the Palestinian refugees, but one should also speak about the Jewish refugees from Arab countries. ,00:32:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The British mandate ____, is there any way the British handled things that inappropriately shaped the conflict, today? ,00:32:30:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, in fact, you know, there were attempts by Arabs and Jews to begin to create a political context for resolving their differences. At the time of - right after the first World War, we had the Faza [PH] Whitesman [PH] Agreement, in which the man, who would go on to become the first president of Israel, Jyam [PH] Whitesman, basically stated, look, you the Arab side, you King Faza, representing the Hashamite House, want a great Arab state. You've been promised that by the British. It would cover all of Arabia, it would cover Syria, Iraq, it would cover parts of the Jordanian territory. And if you want this great Arab state, we, the Zionist Movement, will support it. If we can have our Jewish homeland in British mandatory Palestinian. And, at that time, Faza, representing the Hashamite House, which covered this whole area, agreed. And basically said, well, if you have a little Jewish state in the corner of the Middle East, that's worth supporting, so, that we have our great Arab state. ,00:33:21:00>>>DORE GOLD: But what did the British do? They gave away Syria and Lebanon to the French. They basically allowed the Saudis to kick the Hashamites out of Arabia, and be without their main patrimony in the Hijas [PHJ]. And, as a result, the conflict became much more complicated. But the conflict might have been prevented and resolved by effective diplomacy back in 1919, and 1920. ,00:34:20:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Any thoughts about British ____ of immigration to change the balance? ,00:34:50:00>>>DORE GOLD: One of the worst periods in Jewish history is, of course, in the 1930's, when the rise of Nazi power was on the horizon, and Jewish lives were threatened. And the British Empire, at the time, imposed the White Paper of 1939, which limited Jewish immigration into Palestine. At the same time, there was a huge amount of Arab immigration into Palestine, from Egypt, from Syria, from as far away as Iraq, and you created a kind of asymmetry. The Jews were kept out of British mandatory Palestine, but the Arab stream didn't because they saw this area as an area of tremendous economic success, and economic opportunity and employment. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] [TAPE BREAK] ,00:36:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: In a claim that Arab and Jews lived in coexistence, in peace and brotherhood, for centuries before Israel and the Zionists came and messed things up, was (Inaudible) at this point? ,00:00:49:00>>>TAPE 13A - DORE GOLD: Well, you have to be very precise about the status of Jews and Christians under Islamic rule for centuries. Under Islam, Jews and Christians were seen as people of the book. Which means they weren't like infidels, you know, Kefir [PH], who you forcibly convert to Islam. But there were second class citizens that were forced to pay discriminatory taxes, like the ____ tax, known as jizy [PH] in Arabic, or a land tax, called jirage [PH]. In fact, in the early Middle Ages, there were still substantial Jewish land ownership in Israel and Palestine, in the 7th, 8th and 9th century. But the burden of these discriminatory taxes led to many Jews getting off the land, and the land being taken over by Arab landlords. But, at least, given the era that we lived in, at that time, Jews were protected from being killed by Arab rulers. And so, in a certain sense, as Jews were being burned in a church in York, at that time, in England, they at least were allowed to survive and physically live under Arab rule. ..........So, one could say that in fact, there was a certain minimal degree of tolerance of Jews, but it wasn't a flourishing existence. What happened was that during the 19th Century, the Arab world imported many of the anti-Semitic motifs from Christian Europe, into the Middle East. And you have, for example, the famous 1840 DamasCUs Blood Libel [PH], which was based on a blood libel derived from Europe. You also had Arab interests in the protocols of the _____, which was, again, a forgery that came out of Russia. , So, to say that the Jews lived wonderfully under Arab rule, would be misrepresenting historical fact. But, at the same time, at least, Jews and Christians had a degree of safety, that perhaps they might not have had in other parts of the world at the time. ,00:03:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: (Inaudible) that was here this morning also mentioned, in disCUssing the partition plan, he (Inaudible) and he said, the partition plan was unfair because 30% - or 20% of the land was owned by Jews, and actually more of it was owned by Palestinians, and it was a totally lopsided situation, where Jews were being given sovereignty over 50% ____ much less. What are we missing (Inaudible)? ,00:03:27:00>>>DORE GOLD: Of course, much of the land ownership in the early part of the 20th Century, in the British Mandatory Palestine was from absentee Arab landlords living in Lebanon. And you had, also, Palestinian peasants working the land. This also created a sense, among the Palestinians, that when the Jewish agency brought the land from the rich land owners, what about the poor peasants that were working the land, and created a sense of unfairness or injustice. But there was an effort, over the last century, by Jews around the world who were putting their pennies and dimes into little charity boxes of the Jewish National Fund, to buy the land that we developed. And the issue of sovereignty, of course, came later. ,00:04:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: They say that Israel - the hatred of America, on part of the terrorists, is because they support Israel. Might it be reversed? Might Israel really be just the larger hatred of western society in general, or might it be the opposite? ,00:04:50:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, one of the questions that motivated me to take up nine months of my work time, and write a book called Hatred's Kingdom, was to answer the question that President Bush asked right after 9/11 - why do they hate us? And what I discovered was that the way that Wajabi Islam developed in Saudi Arabia, from where 15 of the 19 hijackers came from, was that in the 1960's and 1970's it became more and more preocCUpied with what they called crusaderism, which was a reference to the west. _____, as they would call them. And, in fact, the hatred of the west emanated from these deviant off-chutes of Islam like in the Arabian peninsula, which (let me try to rephrase this) - ,00:05:49:00>>>DORE GOLD: You know, one of the reasons why I took off nine months to write this book, Hatred's Kingdom, was because I wanted to answer the question that President Bush, himself, asked after 9/11, why do they hate us? And it became crystal clear to me, after a short period of time, that the hatred of the west did not emanate from the Arab-Israel conflict. Osama Bin Laden, for example, was much more preocCUpied with Czechnia, Kashmir, and with other conflicts involving Moslem radicals around the world, than he was with the Arab-Israel issue. And in fact, many Arab intellectuals have pointed that out. ,00:06:50:00>>>DORE GOLD: What motivated the September 11th attacks, and what continues to motivate Al Qaeda, is a fundamental hatred of western civilization. And Israel is only considered a microcosm of a much bigger tapestry. In fact, if you use the Iranian language, the Iranians refer to Israel as the little Satan, and they refer to the United States as the great Satan. So that Israel is despised because it's seen as an outpost to the west. The west isn't despised because of its support of Israel. ,00:07:10:00>>>INTERVIEWER: You once talked about - that the Sharon government agonizes over trying to spare as many civilians as possible. As a government official, can you testify to the degree of indifference between Israel agonizing over trying to minimize civilian causalities, at least to their own soldiers? ,00:07:23:00>>>DORE GOLD: I can share with you - I was called into a meeting in the planning branch of the Israel Army, about the time of the Jeanine incident. We were expecting a special investigatory group to come from the security council, or from the office of Secretary General _____, and we had to prepare for that eventuality. And I recall sitting with a military man who sat next to me on the left, who had a pile of army doctrine manuals, from different armies. And these different western armies explained, what do you do when you face a terrorist threat from a built up area like a city, what type of weaponry do you use. So these manuals all called for air strikes, they called for the use of artillery in built up areas with civilians, they called for the use of flame throwers. ,Well, I can tell you, the Israeli Army in Jeanine, did not use air strikes, it didn't use artillery, and it didn't use flame throwers. In fact, to the contrary, Israel sent in its soldiers, its ground forces, in diffiCUlt house to house combat, threatening the lives of our own soldiers so they could save the lives of innocent Palestinians. In the Jeanine battle, we lost about twenty-three Israeli soldiers. These were married men, they were from the ____. There are many orphans, as a result of those losses, today. Young children who don't - will never see their fathers again. And the reason why Israel sent in those ground soldiers, is because we don't carpet bomb Palestinian refugee camps. If there are terrorists there, we use our special forces, our ground units, in order to find those who are engaged in terrorism, without causing injury to innocent Palestinians. ,00:09:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Another charge that was raised by the Palestinian people; look at the difference in numbers. The Israelis (Inaudible). In light of Israeli concern, how do you achieve that ,statistical (Inaudible)? ,00:09:37:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, one thing is for certain, I think you have to look, not so much at numbers, I think you have to look at the strategies of both sides. The Palestinian military strategy, if you can call it that, is to target Israeli civilians. When they strap dynamite to the body of a young eighteen year old Palestinian, and tell him to walk into a hotel on March 27th, 2002, to kill as many Israelis who are having their Passover Satyr, together, that is an act which is intended to kill innocent civilians. When Israel sends an apache helicopter in the air, on the basis of intelligence, destroys a vehicle with three terrorists inside, and in that vehicle there is an innocent civilian. Israel is not directing its fire at civilians, its directing its fire at those who want to kill our civilians. There's a huge asymmetry between what both sides are doing. ,00:10:55:00>>>INTERVIEWER: The reality of the Oslo cause, you mentioned (Inaudible) today. You turn on the television and you just see Israeli checkpoints, Israeli reocCUpation ____. Is it today, has it gone back to a situation where it can (Inaudible) or are these defense measures in a war? ,00:11:01:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, I think we have to understand what has happened. You know, Israel signed the Oslo accords, in good faith, in September of 1993. In implementing the Oslo Agreements, Israel withdrew its military government over the Palestinians, and put in its place the Palestinian authority; a Palestinian government, under Yasser Arafat. So, that by the time we get to September 2000, when Arafat launches his war against Israel, the Palestinians are not under military ocCUpation. They have their own government. They don't have an independent state, but they're not under military ocCUpation, either. And the entire Oslo Agreement was also based, not just on the concept of Palestinian grievances, but on the concept of - on the basis of Palestinian responsibility. We're giving you this territory, you have to govern it. And you have to take responsibility for security in those areas. But what happened? Those Palestinian cities, which now came under the Palestinian authority of Yasser Arafat, became vast bases for Hamas, for Islamic Jihad, to launch suicide attacks in the heart of Israeli cities; buses went up in flames, explosions in the heart of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, even _____. And hundreds of Israelis have died. ,So now that the Israeli forces have had to reenter Palestinian cities, they've done so because the Palestinian security services failed to take responsibility for the territories that we turned over to them under the Oslo Agreement. Israelis do not want to be in Palestinian cities. They don't want to be going in and finding suspects and interrogating them. What we want is a Palestinian democratic government which takes responsibility for the areas under its control, including, I should say even especially, security. If that happens, we can ZOOM OUT from Palestinian cities, and there can be a Palestinian self-governing authority in the future. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:13:10:00>>>INTERVIEWER: What is motivating a young Palestinian to take his life like this? What kind of incentives could be placed? ,00:13:23:00>>>DORE GOLD: You know, most people who look at these suicide bombings from the outside think that a young person feels a sense of deprivation one day, opens up the refrigerator, nothing is there. He's seeing that people are wealthy on the other side of the fence. (Let me start again, that's not good). ,You know, most people who, for years, looked at the phenomenon of the suicide bombings in Israel, think that Palestinians, out of a sense of deprivation, or out of a sense of anger and rage, decide, spontaneously, to strap dynamite to themselves, walk into a crowded Israeli restaurant, and kill dozens of civilians. But terrorism is not just a spontaneous act. It requires a vast infrastructure to support it. It requires someone to purchase, and to acquire the weaponry, the explosive materials. It requires someone to transport those explosive materials to a forward position near an Israeli city. It requires somebody to gather intelligence, to find out that Jews go to the market place on Thursday, before the Sabbath, to make all their purchases. And therefore, that's an ideal date for time, for committing a suicide bombing. ,And finally, and I think perhaps most importantly, it requires brainwashing young people with religious doctrination, in order for them to believe that by taking their lives they will better their spiritual condition; that they will go directly to heaven and, on their day of judgment, they will proceed to a Islamic concept of paradise with 72 virgins, being able to bring their relatives to this even in the future. This religious indoctrination, I think, is one of the central elements in the motivation behind suicide bombers. There's a parallel element, of course, as well, which is the financial inducements given by states, by Iraq, of Saddam Hussein, or Saudi Arabia under King ____, and under Crown Prince Abdula [PH], who are pouring huge amounts of money, perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars into Palestinian society to pay the families of suicide bombers. So that a young man who comes from a family of twelve or thirteen children can at least hope that by him taking his life he will be regarded by his family as a hero, as a shahid [PH], as a martyr. And he will also bring about tremendous financial benefit to his family, in the form of a five, ten, or twenty thousand dollar payment. ,00:15:50:00>>>INTERVIEWER: (Inaudible) ,00:15:57:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, we used to believe that suicide bombers were probably unmarried, were probably young, that they wouldn't give their lives and leave their families without a father. But we found that most of those profiles broke down. Many people in the west used to believe that suicide bombers were poor. But what we saw, for example, in the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, is that these suicide bombers came from Saudi families who were well to do. Many of them could have gone and taken their flight training background, and flown Saudi princes in their Gulf Stream aircraft. But, in stead, for ideological reasons, because of deep, religious motivation, they decided that they preferred to destroy symbols of American civilization, and kill American civilians in the process. ,00:17:15:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Can Israeli concession with settlements, for example, buy off and placate and satisfy the ideological image of these suicide bombers? ,00:17:30:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well, you know, the big question is, what's the motivation? If the motivation was a limited parcel of territory, which the Palestinians want independence over, then one could make the argument that by simply Israel pulling back from disputed territory and giving it to the Palestinians, the whole threat of suicide bombing would end. But if you analyze the motivation of the organizations, that are sending these suicide bombers against Israel, they don't want a piece of the West Bank, they don't want a state in the Gaza Strip, they want Israel. And as a result, by Israel simply giving a settlement, or pulling back unilaterally, you wouldn't be ending the process of suicide bombing. We might be accelerating it, by showing that we could no longer withstand the threat that we're facing, and that we were pulling back, and we're on the run. ,00:17:55:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Settlements, just one thing about them, are - there seems to be a grievance, an obstacle for piece, a problem blocking the possibility of (Inaudible). Is there any acCUracy to that? ,00:18:03:00>>>DORE GOLD: Settlements are not really the issue. Settlements are sitting on territory, and territory is disputed. Israel has claims in the West Bank and Gaza, for seCUre borders, under Resolution 242. The Palestinians have claims in the West Bank and Gaza, for their Palestinian state. If you understand that these are disputed territories, the land is the issue. How much land do all the settlements sit on in the West Bank? If you actually could take a tape measure and figure out how much land the built up areas of settlements are sitting on, low and behold you would find that the settlements are sitting on 1.36% of the entire West Bank. Therefore, the settlements are an overstated issue. They may attract a lot of CNN and BBC cameras, but they are not the fundamental issue holding up an Israeli and Palestinian agreement. They are not the issue that is blocking peace. ,00:19:30:00>>>INTERVIEWER: If there were a credible Palestinian partner that could come up with a solution for a Palestinian self rule, balanced by _____, would settlements sabotage the whole process? ,00:19:45:00>>>DORE GOLD: Not at all. Because, in fact, the settlements are many times located in areas of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, that Israeli governments, for years, have thought, are vital for Israel's defense. For example, there's a settlement called Ofla [PH], north of Jerusalem. Now, the settlement itself doesn't provide Israel with security, it's not, you know, young couples with baby carriages that are going to stop and Iraqi division from coming down into northern Jerusalem. But it happens at the settlement of Ofla, is next to Bahazur [PH], the main early warning station of the Israeli Air Force, Israel's Norad [PH]. And therefore, by retaining that settlement of Ofla, we're helping hold - we're helping Israel hold on to the Bahazur early warning station. And in many cases, the settlements, which were mapped out by Israel's Ministry of Defense, in the 1970's or the late 1960's, far defending partiCUlar Israeli security interests, that Israel would hope to retain, in any future territorial settlement between Israel and the Palestinians. ,00:20:10:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Just an elaboration on that. What is the reason why Israel can't go back to June 4th, 1967? Where is geostrategic, geographical reasons? ,00:20:26:00>>>DORE GOLD: Well one has to recall, in the June 1967 Six Day War, Israel came under attack from the West Bank sector. Jerusalem, our civilians, were hit by Jordanian infantry, and by Jordanian artillery. Jordan's armored forces were massed in the West Bank, and about to take over the narrower portions of Israel, near the Mediterranean. And because of that, that United Nations security Council, back in November of 1967, recognized that Israel entered The West Bank in a war of self defense. And, as a result, Israel was entitled, entitled to defense of - [let me start again.] And, as a result, Israel was entitled to defense of borders which would not be the same as the June 4th lines. Those lines happened to be where the Jordanian and Israeli armies stopped, in 1949. There were never permanent, political borders. ,00:22:00:00>>>INTERVIEWER: Another point, what did Israel have in common with the war on terror? How does Israel - the Israeli front resemble, and help as a - help in the larger American war on terror? ,00:22:10:00>>>DORE GOLD: The war Israel is facing, from organizations like Hamas and Islamic Jihad, is not a war over some limited piece of territory, or some kind of narrow grievance, it is an anti-civilizational war. It's an attempt to destroy Israel as a free democracy in the Middle East. Hamas, it's no surprise, is alive with Al Qaeda, who has much larger goals of not just taking the piece of the United States, or having some limited grievances in Europe, it wants to destroy American civilization. If we can demonstrate that it is possible to defeat these terrorist organizations, first and foremost militarily, economically, and finally, politically, there may be a chance, in the larger struggle against terrorism, to do the same. Because, ultimately, what we have to do is eliminate the military threat. But, at the same time, demonstrate a path towards co-existence with the Arab world, and with the Islamic world. Israel is determined to do that, and hopefully our western partners, our democratic partners in the U.S. and Europe, will do the same. ,00:22:20:00>>>INTERVIEWER: I have one point, does Jerusalem say something about Israel's claim and why it's worth the fuss and (Inaudible)? ,00:23:09:00>>>DORE GOLD: You know, over the years I became very close to the former prisoner of Zion [PH], Natan Sharanski [PH], who, of course, was in solitary confinement in a Soviet prison. And he shared with me his viewpoint that, first of all, what renovated or what restored the identity of Soviet Jews, who are under communisms for more than 50 years, was the identification with Jerusalem. And when he was in prison, what gave him strength, was the sentence, (Inaudible) - next year in Jerusalem. ,Jerusalem has a deep, spiritual, almost mystical relationship with the Jewish people. It's our direction of prayer. It is the city that has been the capitol of the Jewish people for three thousand years, even though we were forcibly thrown out of Jerusalem by the Roman Empire, had only come back after five hundred years. If the Jewish people were to ever give up sovereignty in Jerusalem, were to ever conceive Jerusalem, it would be a fundamental blow against the identity of the Jewish people as a whole. ,In a certain sense, I would say, over the last number of centuries, Jews have been divided among themselves, over whether we have a responsibility first and foremost to ourselves, a partiCUlar responsibility, or a universalistic responsibility to the entire human race, to all of mankind. Jerusalem is the one case, the one area where there is two responsibilities to converge, because in protecting the rights of the Jewish people, and the rights of Israel, to sovereignty in Jerusalem, we are fulfilling our universalistic mission to protecting Jerusalem, as a city open to all faiths. The moment we let down our guard and give up Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem, we are abandoning our responsibility to all mankind, to keeping Jerusalem; a city that's open, a city of coexistence for all the great religions. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS]
US Mansour - Canadian sentenced to life after plotting to blow up US embassies in Asia
NAME: US MANSOUR 20080118I TAPE: EF08/0076 IN_TIME: 10:56:10:17 DURATION: 00:01:24:19 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: New York, 18 Jan 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST 1. Various of Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US court house in Manhattan 2. Sketch artist impression of Jabarah before judge 3. Sketch artist impression of Jabarah 4. Sketch artist impression of Judge Barbara S. Jones 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kenneth Paul, Mohammed Mansour Jabarah's attorney: "Well his activity was clearly 'terrorist activity' and he's admitted to all that, but he, you heard him denounce what he did, he attempted to co-operate with the government. He basically denounced everything that transpired that led him to the point where he is today, unfortunately where he's been sentenced to life imprisonment." 6. Sketch artist impression of Mohammed Mansour Jabarah before judge 7. Sketch artist impression of Jabarah 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kenneth Paul, Mohammed Mansour Jabarah's attorney: "I don't know if he would have walked, but he certainly would have been in a whole different situation as Judge Jones said that he would have been. She would have been facing a letter submitted on his behalf by the government spelling out what he'd done and we wouldn't be here today, we be here a long time from now, but, yes, he would be in a whole different situation." 7. Wide of court house STORYLINE A Kuwaiti-born Canadian who briefly became an informant against top al-Qaida leaders was sentenced to life in prison on Friday for plotting to blow up American and Israeli embassies in Singapore and the Philippines. A federal judge in Manhattan imposed the sentence after listening to one-time al-Qaida operative Mohammed Mansour Jabarah deliver a 20-minute speech, in which he blamed his past on brainwashing by evil men who exploited his youth and naivete. Jabarah was 19 when he was captured in Oman six years ago following the collapse of his bombing plot. US District Judge Barbara S. Jones said she gave Jabarah credit for his repudiation of violence, but said she could not overlook what he had done. 'Actions speak louder than words', she said. Jabarah has been in US custody since 2002, when he was turned over to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) by Canada's intelligence service and secretly pleaded guilty to 'terrorism' charges as part of a short-lived plea bargain. For a time, he was a valuable resource in the hunt for al-Qaida leaders. During the few months of his cooperation with the FBI, Jabarah gave investigators information about Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, described his personal meetings with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan, and detailed his interactions with several other high ranking al-Qaida lieutenants. After graduating from high school in Canada, where he had lived since a move from Kuwait at age 12, Jabarah slipped into Afghanistan and trained at al-Qaida camps in 2001. Prosecutors said he became a protege of Mohammad and was preparing his first major operations, bomb attacks on American and Israeli embassies in Manila and Singapore. After his capture by Oman's intelligence service, Jabarah was brought to Canada where he was interrogated and told he had two choices; Go to the US military prison in Guantanamo, or switch sides and inform on his terrorist mentors. Jabarah chose the later, and by July 2002 he had pleaded guilty in a closed court session and moved into a series of FBI safe houses in the US, where he lived in relative comfort, with a stereo and his own kitchen. His work as an informant, however, ended after just a few months, when FBI agents searching his quarters discovered jihadist writings, a knife and rope hidden in his luggage, and instructions on how to make explosives. They also found a list bearing the initials of US agents and prosecutors. Investigators believed it was a list of people Jabarah intended to murder. Jabarah was immediately transferred to the Metropolitan Correctional Centre in Manhattan, where he lived in solitary confinement for four years. The knife, he said, was for personal protection due to death threats received by his family. The extremist writings were just notes, taken on videos that he had been asked to watch as part of the investigation. An attempt to re-enlist Jabarah as an informant failed in 2006. Both sides agreed that, by then, he had soured on American law enforcement and was unwilling to cut a new deal. Jabarah's lawyer, Kenneth Paul told reporters outside the court on Friday that had his client accepted the deal, things could have been different, even though he may not have been freed. "She (the judge) would have been facing a letter submitted on his behalf by the government spelling out what he'd done and we wouldn't be here today, we be here a long time from now, but, yes, he would be in a whole different situation," he said. Sitting before the judge Friday, Jabarah said he was a changed man. He asked that he be released from prison immediately so he could go to college, become an ophthalmologist and spend the rest of his life with his family. He said he was 'brainwashed' by people he thought were liberators of an oppressed people. Jones told Jabarah she would have found his statements more compelling if he had agreed to resume his cooperation with the government. Speaking outside the court, Paul said that even though his client had admitted what he had done was wrong and offered co-operation, he was still given a prison term. "His activity was clearly 'terrorist activity' and he's admitted to all that, but he, you heard him denounce what he did, he attempted to co-operate with the government, he said. "He basically denounced everything that transpired that led him to the point where he is today, unfortunately where he's been sentenced to life imprisonment," Paul added.
Interview with Eve Harow
Interview with Eve Harow discussing the infatada against the Jews in Gaza and justifying living there among the Arabs and hopes for peace,INTERVIEWER:,Could you please tell us your full name, spell it for us, and what you do here?, HAROW:,My name is Eve Harow, E-v-e-, H-a-r-o-w. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] My name is Eve Harow, E-v-e, H-a-r-o-w. And I live in (Inaudible). , , INTERVIEWER:,And what do you do here? ,10:01:19>>>, EVE HAROW:,What do I do here? Well, in addition to my husband and I trying to raise seven children, I'm very politically active; I served on the local council, for close to eight years, until just a few months ago, and I speak, whenever I can, about the situation in perspective of somebody living here. , INTERVIEWER:,What is the perspective - what is the situation, in perspective of somebody living here? [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , EVE HAROW:,Okay, we, along with everybody in Israel, have been living through an experiment, a ten year experiment, to do things the way the left wanted to do them, which was Oslo, and to try and create a Palestinian state, and to coexist. The experiment has failed. It's failed on a grand scale. And, over seven hundred people have been killed just in the last few years. And close to two thousand have been killed in the last decade, and thousands have been wounded. And it's not just a perspective, I think anymore, of the people living out here. Although we tend to bear the brunt of what's going on, because we live among the Arabs, more than say someone in Tel Aviv. But, something has to be done, because we can't keep going on this way. ,10:02:46>>>,And so, I think what's happened is that our perspective as people who- would have had to pay the biggest price, had this experiment worked. And in the main would have been willing to pay the price, because we also want to live in peace, just as everybody else does. I think that our perspective is now being seen by the rest of Israel. And we're seeing that they don't want coexistence, and that a two-state solution isn't a viable idea. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS], , INTERVIEWER:,Tell me about the situation and the perspective - , EVE HAROW:,Look, for a long time, the people who live in Judea, and Samaria, and Gaza, the Jews who live here, have been - were seen as the obstacles to peace. If you go along with the idea that this belongs to the Arabs, anybody who knows even a little bit of history realizes that this was never an Arab country, and that if there's anywhere in the world that Jews have a right to live, it's in Judea and Samaria and Gaza. Judea, Tribe of Juda. The only reason that we weren't here before 1967, was because we were ethnically cleansed from here in 1948. And those of us who were living here, don't believe in ethnic cleansing. And we believe that if Jews can't live here, then what that does is it rewarded the people who killed us and drove us away. And that's why our houses are new, because everything that was Jewish was destroyed then. And it's time to rectify that particular travesty.,10:04:17>>>,On the other hand, we also very, very much want to live in peace. I'm a mother of seven, and we want our children to live. My niece's baby was killed a year and a half ago, in a terror incident. A boy that my son played with on his baseball team, Koby Mandell, was found brutally ripped to bits in a cave not far from here. Four of my neighbors were killed, and other people from the area. And we want it to stop. The question is, if this particular process is going to make things stop and get better, or just make things worse. If you establish a Palestinian state, here, where I live, if it's going to threaten the existence of the State of Israel, or if it's going to lead to coexistence. ,And what's interesting, now, when we see it on the Israeli political map, is that nobody, not even the furthest left, is talking about coexistence anymore. At best they're talking about a separation. And we know that the Palestinian Authority, and many of the people, unfortunately who live under the Palestinian Authority, have painted this, now, as an us or them situation. It's not something that Israelis wanted. But it's something that's coming from the other side. Their maps all show Palestine replacing Israel, not a Palestine, give or take where the borders would be, next to Israel. And, unfortunately, even though we as Israelis would like to think otherwise, because doesn't everybody want to live in peace, doesn't everybody want to compromise, we're still fighting for our right to exist at all in this part of the world. , INTERVIEWER:,Could you accept - would you accept your Palestinian neighbors, or would you - if things were peaceful,l would you be okay with you sharing the backyard with - or the next village with your Palestinian neighbors? ,10:05:56>>>, EVE HAROW:,I have no problem with Arabs. I'm not a racist. And I think that ultimately we are going to have to coexist in the Middle East. What I have a problem with, is people who don't accept my right to be here at all. And that is something that I think has to be dealt with. When we see that all the Holy places, for example, that were put under their control as part of Oslo, Joseph's Tomb the old synagogue in Jericho, were immediately destroyed. When we see what's going on in Temple Mount, for example, which almost everyone in the world acknowledges that when the temple is there and there's a Jewish connection to the place, it's not acknowledged at all, and there's a denial of any kind of Jewish tie to the land. And so we're not saying that there shouldn't be coexistence, and we all shouldn't be able to somehow work it out. But when you see a complete denial of our rights on the other side, and it makes us realize that we're speaking two different languages. And that's something that I think, that perhaps western audiences don't understand. We don't have to like or understand the mentality, shall we say, of the suicide bomber, but we have to know that it exists in their society and what we need to do about it. ,10:07:02>>>,So, there's sometimes I feel almost an arrogance in the part of the people from the west, like, we know democracy, we know freedom of speech, and we know how wonderful that life is. And doesn't everybody get it? Isn't that what everybody would want? And what we need to understand is that in this part of the world, that societies are not necessarily on the same page as we are there. And so, when we talk about compromise and largesse and willingness to share, the other side has interpreted it as a loss of will, and a lack of faith, and us starting to believe that maybe we really don't deserve to be here. And that's how they've seen it, and that is how they've run with it. ,And that's why, when we started a process that we thought was going to lead to peace, instead we're facing a war - really a war. And the guns that were given to them, that were suppose to stop the terrorists, are - have been, instead, been turned against us. So what happened? We didn't understand how the other side was interpreting what was going on. And we can't afford to do that. We just can't afford to do that. , INTERVIEWER:,Earlier on we were talking - you had mentioned that there were seven hundred people killed, over the past couple of years, and over the past decade a couple of thousand. But when you said people, you were only referring to the Israeli side. , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:, On the other side, as well, several thousand on the other side as well - several thousand on the other side as well, did they count? ,10:08:40>>>, EVE HAROW:,Of course they count. And every time an Arab - of course everybody killed, counts. And every time an Arab child is killed, I hurt, because he's got a mother, too. The question is who set up the situation? When Barak went to Camp David, he was ready to give away just about all of Judea, Samaria and Gaza, and throw in some of the Negev too, to make up the difference in percentages of the areas that he couldn't give away. And then we got a war. So, for one side to start a war, to send their children out as human bombs, and then to say, ‘Well, we're dying', is, is an absurdity. At any point in time, if the Arabs put down their guns, we'll be back at the negotiating table. If the Israelis and Jews put down their guns, we'll be in the sea. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians feel that - they feel that people like you, the settlers, they called you an obstacle for peace and that those of you who are, you know, quote, unquote, on the far right - that you accept, that, that's where you are, are - are not interested in peace. , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,-are not interested in coexistence, are not interested in two states. ,10:10:04>>>, EVE HAROW:,Well, those are all different things. Okay? To say that we're not interested in peace and coexistence, is not the same thing as saying that we're not interested in two states. I don't believe that there should be an Arab State west of the Jordan River. It's not viable, not economically, and not for many other reasons. But also there is a state, already, that exists on three-quarters of British Mandate Palestine, for the Arabs, and that's the country of Jordan. The majority of the population are Palestinians. So there already exists an Arab state, for the people who call themselves Palestinians. ,To say that we're not interested in peace and coexistence, is the most ridiculous thing. Okay? We want this war to stop, and we want people to stop dying on both sides. One of the arguments that I have, with actually the Israeli left, is when they also buy into that. Because it's very hard to understand why we're being hated. So, if we're being hated because we supposedly took something that belongs to the other side, how do you rectify that? You give them what they say is theirs; Judea, Samaria and Gaza. Then they don't hate us anymore. Which, again, doesn't make sense when they were offered that and they turned it down. ,Because it turns out that what they call the Nachba [PH], the catastrophe, is not the War of 1967, a war that Israel defended itself against three armies; Syria, Jordan and, and Egypt, and ended up winning Judea, Samaria and Gaza in the course of that war. That's not the nachba, that's not the catastrophe for the Arabs. For the Arabs, the catastrophe was 1948. That's what they call the nachba. What's 1948, the creation and the beginning of the existence of the State of Israel. And one - I have a map that shows - it's a map that I got from the Palestinian Businessman's Association. It's a map of destroyed Arab villages. Villages that they want to go home to, as they say. Kibbutz Negba which is in the Negev, sits on lands of five Arab villages that were destroyed in the course of the 1948 War. Efrat sits on land that was empty since, we don't know how long. So who exactly do they resent? ,10:12:00>>>,And this is a beast that I have with the Israeli left, who cast us as the villains, and as obstacles to peace, very often. When we have to understand that for the Arab world, I would say even as a whole, and not just the Palestinians, it isn't just Israel, it's every Jewish community, it's Tel Aviv, and it's Haifa that are just as much an obstacle, because they don't want peace. They want to eradicate the existence of Israel as a Jewish state, and turn it into another Arab country. And so we're all the problem in the Arab mind. And, again, this is where we have to understand, we have to start talking to each other and listen to what the other side is saying. We are all settlers. We all don't belong here. We are all occupiers. , INTERVIEWER:,Why did you come to Israel? ,10:12:41>>>, EVE HAROW:,Actually my father is a Palestinian. My father was born in Berlin to a Jewish family, in 1932. My grandfather saw what was gonna happen, and in 1933 brought them here to Palestine. Because, before 1948, the people who were Palestinians were the Jews. The Arabs calling themselves Palestinians is a relatively new invention. Even the Palestinian brigade went to help the Allies fight in World War II, it was made up of Jews. The Arabs called themselves, the Arab of southern Syria, not Palestinians. So my father grew up here as a Palestinian, and then in 1948 as an Israeli. My mother came, an American, and they met and I ended up being raised in the states. ,10:13:21>>>,But I always felt - we came to visit here when I was nine, because we have family here, and I always felt that this was home. And that I couldn't see, after two thousand years of the Jews not having a home, I was privileged to live in a time when we'd come home - I couldn't see living in Los Angeles, and not here. And I still feel that, even with everything that's going on and how difficult it is, it is a tremendous privilege to be able to be here, and to be able to - in writing the history of the Jewish people, I'm one of the people holding the pencil, not just reading the book. And that's something that, at times, just overwhelms me. Just by waking up here in the morning, I've done something for the Jewish people - past and future. For all the people who came before me, who hung on to inquisitions, and Crusades, and everything else. And they hung on so that I could be a Jew in the 21st Century. I owe them that, an heir to the future also. Because, if there is no State of Israel, I fear for the existence of the Jewish people. And if my being here serves as an obstacle to the Palestinian State, which I and so many Israelis see now as an existential threat to the State of Israel, there is no finer thing I can do than live here. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , INTERVIEWER:,You have children and you've chosen this life of what used to be called pioneers, and you know, even now they're called seconds. ,10:15:15>>>, EVE HAROW:,Right. Why live here and not in Tel Aviv? Why do boys serve in a combat unit and not get a job at a desk, where they know that chances are they'll make it through their army service? Because, to be a Jew, to be an Israeli, means that you have to think as a collective. You have to think of what's the best thing for the Jewish people. Even if it isn't always necessarily the best thing for you and yours. And so, we could not exist if it wasn't for the guys in the front, literally, the ones who do the dangerous mission. ,And I think Israel also needs people like myself right now, who are here. Because, if we're not here Arafat will be right here, and he'll be looking down at the people in Tel Aviv. So, if I want to go live in Tel Aviv, and tell someone else to be here, then maybe someone else doesn't want to be here. The, in that vacuum, that's evil. And if I can prevent that from happening, then I'm willing to take the risks. I'm not happy about it. I'm not happy about the danger. But I have to look at it from, from what's best for Israel and the part that I can play. I can't be a soldier, but I can do this, so that's what I'm doing. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians talk about the cycle of violence here on the - in Israel, the attacks that are - the military responses are, are not allegedly in response to terrorism. , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:,And that the Palestinians say that the ____ the terrorist attacks, ____ Israel's target assassinations, and, you know, what I mean, excursions and aggression and so on , and so forth. ,10:17:05>>>, EVE HAROW:,I think, in the world, post 9/11, there needs to be a better understanding of what's going on here. This is not just a little turf war between the Israelis and the Palestinians. This is probably nothing less than a clash of civilizations. And the reason that Israel is bearing the brunt of the terrorism, is because we are the point man for Western civilization in the Middle East. You talk about the cycle of violence, and how to break the cycle of violence. What caused nineteen suicide bombers to smash into the World Trade Center? Nothing more, nothing less than the fact that they hate the west more than anything that the west had done, except being themselves; being free society, being people who believed in openness and a liberal way of life, and not forcing anybody to do things. And that's the problem that we have in Israel. That is the threat that we hold to all the dictatorships, and the absolute monarchies, and just the bunch of thugs that control this part of the world, and control the lives of the billion people. ,10:18:08>>>,And until - and I agree wholeheartedly with what President Bush said last June, until there is a sea change in this part of the world, until the other people who live here, until the Arabs of Iran and Iraq, they have their freedoms and they have an opportunity to move on -I don't believe we'll be able to solve the Israel Palestinian problem. Because until people are happy with their lot and their leaders, they are certainly not gonna want to find a way of coexistence with me, and stop hating me. And so this - I see what's going on here as part of a much, much bigger picture, that, it's upsetting for me as an Israeli, because it means I have less control over it. ,If you break this down to just an Israeli-Palestinian issue, then we can at least pretend that we have some kind of control. But if you look at this as a map of the Middle East, and as Israel really as, just a sample of the free world here, then it's more frightening because what I say and do isn't so important. On the other hand, I can only hope that the rest of the free world will see what's happening here. ,And, there's an example given that the Jews are very often the canary in the coal mine. That whatever evil it is that's abound in the world, that starts with the Jews, will eventually, if it's not checked, make its way to the rest of the world; Nazism, Fascism, Communism, and now Islamic Fundamentalism. So when the world thought that this was just Israel's problem, so we suffered for 50, 60, 70 years from this terror, this is not something new on our own, and now we hoped that the world had seen that because it was allowed to breed, and because now we had the terrorism, and these despots have no less than nuclear and biological chemical weapons, now it's a threat for everybody, and that we need to fight this together. , INTERVIEWER:,Some people, Americans, I had a conversation with somebody that saw that the concentration camps of (Inaudible), and so forth, and that he said Israel is an apartide state. How do you respond to that? ,10:20:12>>>, EVE HAROW:,People are entitled to their own opinion. And I think what is so fascinating sometimes, I think the Jews are in some way the victims of their own success. Because who brought that whole idea of morality and fairness and equality to the world? It was the Jews. And it was the Bible, and it was what we brought that changed the world from being, you know, with paganism, and where they used to sacrifice their children to malach and to ba'al and all these kinds of idols. We changed the world. And now we're being told that we're not fair enough, and that, you know, literally we're being told to be more Catholic than the Pope, as it were. And, unfortunately whoever you spoke to who said that, that thinks Israel - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,Unfortunately, people who feel that Israel is an apartheid state, don't understand what we're going through, and it's not an apartheid state. When I vote, when I cast my ballot in ten weeks, all the Arab-Israelis will do the same. Their vote will count just as much as mine. Even though many of them are not loyal to the state of Israel, would not swear an oath of loyalty to the State of Israel. Many of them have been implicated in terror bombings, themselves, have given aid to Palestinians who were involved in terror bombing. So you could say that they're not the greatest citizens in the State of Israel, and yet they will vote for the Knesset just as I will. And so Israel is far from an apartheid state. ,And I think, especially in view of the neighborhood that we live in, and what we're up against, I think it's nothing short of phenomenal, how democratic and, and, open Israeli society is. It's possibly our greatest achievement. We're not given credit for it. , , INTERVIEWER:,What are the parameters that you could envision a peaceful solution or a peaceful coexistence to what's going on? ,10:22:03>>>, EVE HAROW:,The majority of people who call themselves Palestinians, say that they are refugees, that their grandparents came from Yaffo and Haifa in 1948. It was a war that they started, when they didn't accept the UN Partition Plan. And it was a war that they paid the price for. What's so interesting though, is that only about one hundred thousand people are actually those who left, at the time. The vast majority of the people that call themselves refugees, are children and grandchildren of the refugees. So, even an interesting legal point is, does that make them refugees? Because if children and grandchildren of refugees are also refugees, probably every Jew in the world is a refugee. Israel is certainly a country of refugees, then. Because we've been forced out and throw out of just about everywhere. ,Now they started a war that they didn't think they would lose. And the price that they paid was losing their homes. And to add insult to injury, instead of the Arab world taking them in, the Arab world that instigated them to fight against Israel, before it even began, The Arab world didn't take them in. The Arab world, their Arab brothers, put them in refugee camps, and have left them in that situation, with the collusion of the UN, now, of course, for over half a century. But, what's interesting is that the man in a Jabaliya refugee camp in Gaza, and I, share a point of view. We both feel that he's not at home. He feels that his home is in Ocko [PH], which is in Israel. The Israeli left will never let him go back to Ocko. So that's a non-starter for him. ,But what has to be done is the fulfillment of the promise of the Arab leaders, in the early 50's, made. See, in the early 50's, the Arab world threw out their Jews. That's where Sephardic Jewry comes from. Sixty percent of Israelis came in the 1950's, with the clothes on their back, because they were throw out of the Arab world. The Jews from Baghdad, some of whom their families were there for twenty-seven hundred years, since the first exile after the destruction of the first temple. It was ancient Babylon. And the Jews of Morocco, and Iraq, and Iran, and everywhere. And they came in and they were absorbed into Israeli society, and at the time, the Arab leaders said, well don't get upset at us for throwing out the Jews, we're just gonna have a population transfer. And this way we'll have room for the Arabs who fled Israel, except that they never fulfilled their side of the bargain. And they put the Arabs in refugee camps, and have left them to rot. ,And so, what needs to be done, is the Arabs in refugee camps have to finally be resettled in Arab countries. It's fifty years overdue, they've been suffering terribly, because of the intransigence of their own leaders, of people who don't care about them. And once that is done, then I think the problems are much less, and once to go back, also, to what people have spoken about before; once you have democracies and open societies in the Middle East, then people have somewhere to go. ,10:24:50>>>,Right now it's difficult for me to say to somebody, to an Arab who's living here, go live in Syria, knowing that he's going to have a miserable life, because everybody in Syria has a miserable life. But if there can be, again, an openness of the Middle East, for their own people, for their own sakes, then there's somewhere to go, there is somewhere to develop, and peace in the region really starts to be a reality for everybody. But it's not just up to Israel, here. It's up to the entire world. ,There was a study that was published a few months ago, that was done by Arabs. One of the markers of how progressive a society is, is how many books are translated into their language during the course of the year. And they found that in the last thousand years, in the last millennia, as many books have been translated into Arabic, as were translated by Spain into Spanish, in one year. It's an area of the globe - it's an area of the world that's falling off the globe, in terms of illiteracy, women not having the vote, women in Saudi Arabia can't drive. Something has to be done for these people, for their own sakes. And when they are happier and more fulfilled because they can actually not be afraid to say what they think. And I think we will find, amongst them, people who also want to live with us in peace. And things can change dramatically. One of the more -,10:26:06>>>,I think it's Bernard Lewis who is one of the foremost Islamic scholars, today. And he has said, and it's so true, that aside from Israel, the regimes in the Middle East that are most pro-west, pro-American, the people are most anti-American. Places like the Palestinian Authority, and Jordan, and Egypt, are places where, regularly, the American flag is burned, because the people hate their leaders. And in places where the regimes are seen as anti-west, the people are actually pro-west. The only place outside of Israel that had any kind of vigil, or memorial for the victims of 9/11 was Teheran. Because the Iranian people want to be free. And if we don't help them, then we, as Israelis and the West, are going to be mired in conflict for a long time. There is a lot that has to be done. , INTERVIEWER:,[OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] What's the bottom line? What is the bear minimum that you could accept, that would give you a feeling of possibility of peace? ,10:27:08>>>, EVE HAROW:,With particular -the bottom line of the bear minimum that people - that all Israelis, not just myself, of course, are willing to accept, is there has to be a complete cessation of the violence. Complete. And no looking the other way, and no saying that this bus-bombing was a sacrifice for peace. None of that. A complete cessation of violence. Because, as long as there is terror, and there are only gains for the other side, via the terror, then the lesson goes home very quickly, which is that the terror pays. So, that has to be - we have to go door to door and collect the guns. And we have to - there has to be a regime change in the Palestinian Authority. What I'm afraid of though, is that the last ten years as raised a generation of children whose textbooks talk about the, the need, the religious need or a Pan Arab need to eradicate the Jews, and to eradicate the State of Israel. , INTERVIEWER:,And the Palestinian children. ,10:27:58>>>, EVE HAROW:,Unfortunately, in the last ten years, the freedom that the Palestinian Authority got, in the last ten years, to educate their own children, has been to educate them towards hatred and away from peace. And so, if someone was still a child of six or seven, when Oslo started, he's now sixteen or seventeen. And that's his childhood, and that's his mindset. Which is that he, as a religious imperative, as an Arab imperative, as whatever, must dedicate his life to destroying the Jews, destroying the infidel, and to having Islam take over. Not just here, but in the west. And I don't know how quickly we can change that. We may have to wait until that generation no longer, or somehow, we have to un-brainwash them, because it's exactly what's happened. ,I think what's important to understand is there are no easy solutions here. You can't say, a unilateral withdrawal, and you're there and we're here and everything will be fine. We can't do it because of security reasons. Because there are missiles that can fly. And when there is a will to destroy, then we'll find a way to get in. And so what we have to do is get rid of that will to destroy, and bring back, somehow, a desire for coexistence. And there's a dearth of it now. And the first thing that has to be done is that - this band of terrorists, called the Palestinian Authority, has to be replaced one way or the other. , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinian Authority says that, how can they expect Yasser Arafat to get control over his people when he's virtually under house arrest? , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,And so forth. , EVE HAROW:,Right. So that's the big question. Can Arafat control his people? If he can't control his people then why are we talking to him in any form at all? Why is he still the head of the Palestinian Authority, if he's just a puppet? And if he can talk to them, and control them, then why isn't he telling them, listen, we messed up here. Violence isn't getting us what we want. We need to go back to the path of peace. So, either way, something doesn't fit. I don't know. , INTERVIEWER:,The world, and the (Inaudible) increasing animosity towards Israel and Europe, and in Canada - , EVE HAROW:,Right. , INTERVIEWER:,-and ____,and so forth. And Palestinians are the underdogs, the freedom fighters in Israel appear to be oppressors, and the occupiers, and the imperialists, and so on, and so forth. What is your response? ,10:30:23>>>, EVE HAROW:,I think the world has, unfortunately fallen into a mindset of appeasement. Which is that the Arab problem is just against the Jews. And therefore if, you know, the Jews are the problem. And so if we can somehow get rid of them, or somehow make them have all the difficult sacrifices, then everything will be fine. And again, blinding themselves to the reality, which is that it's really Western civilization and free societies, and Israel is an example of that. That's the bottom line problem. ,I also think that - one of the arguments that the Palestinians use, and quite successfully, is that they're the ultimate victims of the holocaust. Because we came over here from Europe, and did to them, in their version, exactly what's being done to us in Europe. And of course it's not true, and most people don't know that the Mufti here, at the time, was a big Nazi sympathizer, and that there were plans for a concentration camp, no less, drawn up to rid the world of the Jews of the Land of Israel. And that there were massacres of Jews going on all the time; pre-state, pre-occupation, pre-anything - pre, even second world war. So, that amity of Arabs towards the Jews, has been here for a long time. ,But, what's interesting is the Europeans like this version very much, because then they can feel a little less guilty over what happened on their soil, in World War II. Because they can say, you see when Israel is in power, they do to everybody else what we do to them. And so, it makes them feel a little less bad about their complicity in what happened during World War II. But, of course, it's not true, and I have yet to see on a list of terrorists, anyone named Stanley Cohen, for example. So, on the one hand there's a world that understands, what the danger is here of Islamic Fundamentalism. And strangely enough, though, they say, well in the Arab-Israeli conflict, it's the Jews who are causing all the problems. And there needs to be a slight awakening here, about what's really going on, and the battle that we're all facing together, because if we don't all join together on this, we could all go down together. , INTERVIEWER:,There are some who say that the Arab leaders in 1948 that planned to create refugee camps, as well, _____, and they had a long range goal with the refugee camps. That with the wounds that would fester in Israel's side, and eventually it would infect and it would erupt - , EVE HAROW:,[OVERLAP] Mm-hm, as it happened. , INTERVIEWER:,Can you continue that metaphor? ,10:32:45>>>, EVE HAROW:,It's possible that the Arab world, when they put their own people in refugee camps, knew that they were gonna use them for the next half a century, and that they were gonna breed hatred. And you could use these people as their frontline, in their war against Israel. And it's possible not. It's possible that they just simply didn't care, didn't want to be bothered, and dumped them in refugee camps. It doesn't matter. Because the situation exists, today, and has to be dealt with. And what the world needs to understand is that it's not Israel's responsibility. Israel will do a lot to help repatriate the refugees, join a fund, or whatever it is, to give these people a normal life on a humanitarian level. We will do more than their own people will do. Where's all the oil money? Where's the Saudi Arabian money and the Iraqi money? They have so much. How come they can't help their own people? It's just - when I compare it to how Israel welcomed the Jewish refugees in the early 1950's, from the Arab countries, it's just astonishing to me, the lack of caring on the Arab side, for their own people. , INTERVIEWER:,What do you see in a hundred years? , EVE HAROW:, What do I see in a hundred years? Being, believe it or not, an optimistic person, I hope that there will really be peace here in a hundred years. It's time, it's time for all of us to turn those swords into ploughshares. , INTERVIEWER:,Some historians take the larger view-(Inaudible) to say - historians say that the Arabs take a larger view - , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:, And their - you know, this - today the battle is just part of a larger battle. , EVE HAROW:,Yes. , INTERVIEWER:,And it took up two hundred years to get the Christians out through The Crusades, and (Inaudible). ,10:34:32>>>, EVE HAROW:,[OVERLAP] Mm-hm. There's no question that the Arabs have a lot more patience than we do. And that they see us as just an anachronism in what they call their Middle East. If they were the way they once were, it would be easier, maybe, to see their point of view. Like if, I mean who, in the Middle Ages, when Christianity in Europe was wallowing for like four hundred years and went nowhere, there were a lot of good things that came out of the Islamic world; Algebra, music, and art, and medicine. What happened? Why the stagnation? I think they have to get their own house in order. And I think what scares them is how our house is so in order. Fifty years of constantly living on the edge, and on wars. ,And Israel is - and high tech, we're at the top of the world. We've got an astronaut, an Israeli astronaut flying in space as part of the team. He's not just sitting as a passenger. He's an intregal part of the team. Nobel prizes from every which way. I think it scares them, how little - how much we've been able to accomplish with so many forces arrayed against us, and how they just keep going backwards. And that fear is what also drives the hatred. And so I think we've got to help them, for the little people's sake. Not for the leader's sake. The leaders can go home. The leaders aren't good for anybody except themselves. But, for their own people's sake, we've got to help them, because this area has tremendous potential, but only if we work together. , INTERVIEWER:,In the end do you think that _____'s solution could work? Do you think you could abide by that - live by that? , EVE HAROW:,A two-state solution, today, means creating a terror state, with an Israel, nine miles wide. Which means that Israel will be, if not destroyed, will have a terrible, terrible war with a terrible cost in lives. So today, there is no talking about a two-state solution, west of the Jordan River. It's like creating another Afghanistan, or another Iraq. Who needs that? Nobody needs that. Israel for sure not. But not the west either. ,And so, I think, first we wait and see the change. Perhaps I sound a little bit skeptical. But after ten years of broken promises, I think I have the right to be skeptical. Because, if I'm right about what's going on here, then Israel's really - it's existence is, you know, threatened. And that's not a risk that I'm willing to take. We're willing to take a lot of risks for peace and we did. And we gave them guns because they said they were gonna use their guns to protect everybody from the terrorists, and instead they turned the guns on us. And instead the police force and the Palestinian Authority has become one of the prime movers and shakers of terrorism, fatah. So, I think we have a right to be a little wary, here. The stakes are just too high to turn a blind eye. , INTERVIEWER:,If there were an election in Palestinian, today, or tomorrow, and -you know, Israel would have safe and secure boundaries, however that is defined. That in a two-state solution the majority would probably vote for it - ,10:37:44>>>, EVE HAROW:,If you have a two-state solution, but again, you have a despot or a dictator on the other side, then you assume they probably have them in the rest of the Arab world. When you have that in the PA, today, which is - he doesn't represent his people. That's what democracy means. Democracy means, the majority rules. But you don't have that in the Arab world, and not in the PA, for sure. And so, to create a state, that's the same mistakes that were made in Oslo. ,To say that Arafat is the - you know, he's a representative of his people, and either he was too weak or he, himself, was playing a game, one of his so-called moderate ministers, Faisal Hussein, who died a couple years ago in Kuwait, and he was the moderate in the Palestinian Authority, who was a minister for Jerusalem affairs. And the last interview that he gave, before he died, was to an Egyptian newspaper, and he called Oslo a Trojan Horse. Meaning, it was just a way of knowing Israel's defenses, in order to be able to eradicate Israel. And he was the moderate. ,So, we need to work on building back a little bit of trust. And they have to prove it, because we have no reason to trust them anymore. Everything that we're hearing, from the Palestinian Authority in the Arab world, shows us that they are still an implacable enemy. And we want peace desperately, but we don't the peace of the grave, and we don't want to commit suicide. And we have the right to be here, too. And we're willing to compromise. But not on our existence. , INTERVIEWER:,But my question was about the Israeli majority. , EVE HAROW:,Mm-hm. , INTERVIEWER:,Who would probably just fight the fears and the - and you articulate would still, today, given the choice, would probably go for a two-state solution as it's being presented in very different presentations. ,10:39:33>>>, EVE HAROW:,The Israeli public needs a little bit of educating here, too. Because when we started Oslo. Israelis didn't think that we were gonna give them a Palestinian state, because they deserved it, because it had been their land, and we took it away. Israelis knew better. But we were so desperate for peace that we said, fine, you know, what? Let's split the land, even though we have a right to it. But we wanted there to be peace. And if this is what they're saying is the obstacle to them giving us peace, because they want this piece of land, have their own state, fine we'll do it. In the course of the last ten years, somehow that idea got lost. And because of very poor public relations and explaining our position, now it's become conventional wisdom that they deserve a state. And that's why, despite all the terrorism, we have a Prime Minister who is talking about a Palestinian State, like it's a fait accompli and there's nothing you can do. ,And I think there is something we can do. We can educate. We can explain to people why we're not just not being nice when we say that we don't want there to be a Palestinian State. But that one already exists in Jordan, that was the intention. And to set up another one would just destabilize the region and create another terror state. And so a lot of explaining has to be done, but the facts and the history and the truth is with us. It's just that, unfortunately, people don't know. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , INTERVIEWER:,Anything that we haven't covered? ,10:41:10>>>, EVE HAROW:,I love this country. I'm not going anywhere. Because I really feel that we have the right to be here. What disturbs me is the double standard that is very often given when people talk about, we can't think about moving Arabs, because that's transfer, yet they talk about dismantling settlements, which means transferring me. And so, these are hypocrises that bother me very much. And I think that maybe people don't understand what they're saying. That if you don't want people to be moved, then I shouldn't be moved either. ,And if you don't want there to be illegal building, or so called of Jewish communities here, then you have to stop illegal building of Arab houses which is going on right outside my window. Because, to say, if that the Jews can't build, but the Arabs can, why have negotiations? They're saying that it's theirs, the whole thing is a farce. And I don't think the people understand enough, about Israeli rights. They see us with tanks [TAPE COMES TO END] -.
The Lost Children of Tranquility Bay
A2 / France 2
US Kim Reax 2
AP-APTN-2230: US Kim Reax 2 Monday, 19 December 2011 STORY:US Kim Reax 2- REPLAY Korean communities in LA and NY react to Kim Jong Il death; Clinton sbite LENGTH: 03:32 FIRST RUN: 2030 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound/English/Japanese SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 719799 DATELINE: Various, 19 Dec 2011 LENGTH: 03:32 AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only SHOTLIST Washington, DC - December 19, 2011 1. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba walk into news conference 2. Clinton and Gemba at microphones 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "Today the Foreign Minister and I discussed the evolving situation on the Korean Peninsula in light of the reports from North Korea state owned media on the death of Kim Jong Il." 4. Wide reporters to Clinton and Gemba 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "We both share a common interest in a peaceful and stable transition in North Korea, as well as in ensuring regional peace and stability. We have been in close touch with our partners in the six-party talks today." 6. Pan from officials to Clinton and Gemba 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State: "President Obama and President Lee spoke last night. I spoke with Foreign Minister Kim this morning and we are also reaching to Beijing and Moscow and of course closely coordinating with our Japanese friends." 8. Cutaway reporters 9. SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) Koichiro Gemba, Japanese Foreign Minister: "In light of the developments in North Korea, namely the death of Mr Kim Jong Il, Secretary Clinton and I had an in depth discussion on the situation in North Korea at today's meeting. We share the recognition that it is important to make sure that the latest event would not negatively affect the peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula. For this purpose we are affirm to closely monitor the situation concerned and to coordinate closely with each other by sharing information between Japan and the United States and among Japan, the United States and the Republic of Korea." 10. Mid, Clinton and Gemba shaking hands and leaving New York, New York - December 19, 2011 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mike Kulma, Asia Society Executive Director for Global Leadership: "There is virtually, I think, nothing known about the kind of policies that he (Kim Jong Un) in particular is supportive of, outside of the fact that as the successor to his father, that he would continue to carry on the policies that his father and his leadership structure has put into place." Los Angeles, California - 19 December, 2011 12. Mid of "Koreatown" street sign 13. Mid and close-ups, Korean-language newspaper on stand 14. Exterior of Radio Korea 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Choo, Assistant News Director, Radio Korea: "They've been brainwashed for 30 or 40 years, they feel like they lost their great great father. They obviously... that's what they feel right now." 16. Close up of "On Air" light 17. Mid of volume metres 18. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Choo, Assistant News Director, Radio Korea: "They worry about the situation or if the North Korean government is in danger of falling, there will be riots, like situations in Africa." 19. Wide, Radio Korea, exterior Palisades Park, New Jersey - 19 December 2011 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dae Hyun Yoon, resident: "That's kind of a good thing for them and for us too, for everyone, basically I think, because communism, what they're doing they are just a threat to the world. You know?" 21. Mother and child coming out of store 22. Mid, Korean storefronts STORYLINE: The Obama administration called for a peaceful and stable leadership transition in North Korea on Tuesday, after the death of the reclusive nation's leader Kim Jong Il. US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the situation in the Korean peninsula was evolving and that United States is looking for better relations with the North Korean people. US officials have said Kim's passing will likely delay anticipated developments on resuming nuclear disarmament talks with the North and supplying the nation with food aid. "We both share a common interest in a peaceful and stable transition in North Korea as well as ensuring regional peace and stability," Clinton told reporters at the State Department after a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba. Gemba said the US and Japan "shared the recognition that it is important to make sure that the latest events would not negatively affect the peace and stability on the Korean peninsula." Analysts say Kim's death was unlikely to plunge the country into chaos because it already was preparing for a transition. Following the death of North Korean Leader Kim Jong Il, North Korean state media proclaimed his youngest son, Kim Jong Un, a "Great Successor." Mike Kulma from the Asia Society, said that not very much is understood about Kim Jong Un and his own plans for the country. "There is virtually, I think, nothing known about the kind of policies that he (Kim Jong Un) in particular is supportive of, outside of the fact that as the successor to his father that he would continue to carry on the policies that his father and his leadership structure has put into place." The White House said it was in constant contact with allies South Korea and Japan, but it offered no substantive comment on the implications of Kim's death. US President Barack Obama spoke with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak at midnight and the two leaders agreed to stay in close touch. At Radio Korea, Assistant News Director William Choo said emotions were running high after the death was announced. "They've been brainwashed for 30 or 40 years, they feel like they lost their great great father. They obviously that's what they feel right now," Choo said. But in time that could change, Choo said, especially in light of the fact that not much is known about Kim Jong Un. "He's been around for a year now. It's too short of time of be a leader so they worry about the situation or if the North Korean government is in danger of falling, there will be riots, like situations in Africa." Koreans in the United States have expressed their feelings regarding the death, but remained vigilant for any signs of a turbulent transition at home. In Palisades Park, New Jersey and Los Angeles' Koreatown, where there are large populations of ethnic Koreans, the mood was upbeat. "That's kind of a good thing for them and for us too, for everyone, basically I think, because Communism, what they're doing they are just a threat to the world," said resident Dae Hyun Yoon. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. AP'S HIGH DEFINITION ROLLOUT TIMETABLE All Customers This message is for ALL Associated Press (AP) customers to inform you of the upcoming changes to our service and how they will affect your organization. The timeline AP will be rolling out High Definition (HD) in phases, beginning with Entertainment from 11 November 2011, followed by Sports News Television (SNTV) in January 2012. The completion date for all News services will be Q2 2012 in time for the 2012 London Olympics in July and the US presidential elections in November. What does this mean for you? The HD upgrade will affect ALL customers. Changes to Delivery If you want to upgrade to HD, you will need to make changes to your hardware equipment - either by adopting Media Port or you may need to upgrade your current Media Port server. AP Direct will also be transitioned to an encrypted HD ONLY delivery and customers will need to provide their own HD compatible Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD). This will need to be operational by 1 February 2012. Satellite Upgrades We are upgrading our satellite network. This upgrade will affect ALL AP customers. For a full overview of changes to delivery and satellite upgrades, please visit: www.aphighdefinition.com To retrieve the login, please email: edcustomerliaisonap.org or aptn-webadminap.org ++++ APTN (Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-12-19-11 1742EST
Scientology in Germany
FR3 / France 3
++US Terror
AP-APTN-2330: ++US Terror Thursday, 5 August 2010 STORY:++US Terror- NEW US Att Gen on round-up of those believed linked with Somalia militant group LENGTH: 02:30 FIRST RUN: 2330 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: Various STORY NUMBER: 653502 DATELINE: Various- 5 Aug 2010/FILE LENGTH: 02:30 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE ABC - NO ACCESS N.AMERICA/INTERNET INTERNET - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++AP TELEVISION HAS NO WAY OF INDEPENDENTLY VERIFYING THE CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS VIDEO++ SHOTLIST: ABC - NO ACCESS N.AMERICA/INTERNET Washington DC, US - 05 August 2010 1. US Attorney General Eric Holder and others walk into Department of Justice briefing room 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eric Holder, US Attorney General: "Good afternoon. Today the Department of Justice unsealed four separate indictments charging 14 individuals with terrorism violations for providing money, personnel, and services to al-Shabab, a terrorist group operating in Somalia with ties to al-Qaida. Two of these individuals have been arrested. Now these indictments and arrests in Minnesota, Alabama, and California shed further light on a deadly pipeline that has rooted funding and fighters to al-Shabab from across the United States." 3. Pull out from podium UPSOUND: Reporter's question: (English) "Mr. Attorney General, al-Shabab recently claimed credit for the bombings in Uganda and threatened attacks against the West. In light of that, and in light of the ongoing recruitment, how do you assess the threat from al-Shabab directly against this country?" (++ part of the question is inaudible++) 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eric Holder, US Attorney General: "Well, I think we have to keep that in mind. I don't think we have any direct evidence that al-Shabab is threatening the homeland. On the other hand, the fact that they have tried to successfully recruit Americans to come and join the fight there, the fact that they have expanded their range of operations outside of Somalia to Uganda gives us pause, and it is one of the things that we are monitoring." 5. Holder and others walk off, pull out to wide of room AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Minnesota, US (exact location unknown) - 30 July 2009 6. STILL image of Hawo Mohamed Hassan (alleged to have raised money for al-Shabab) sitting in a friend's living room ABC - NO ACCESS N.AMERICA/INTERNET Rochester, Minnesota, US - 05 August 2010 7. Wide of residents of a Somali neighbourhood walking down street 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, Somali resident: "It is kind of sad that you hear some Somali innocents have been labelled to, you know, terrorist, or you know, some negative judgement, you know." 9. Somali women walking across street 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, Somali resident: "I think just, those are kids that have been brainwashed. I don't think it will have an impact on the Somali community in Minneapolis, or Minnesota, or anywhere in the world." 11. Somali women walking down sidewalk INTERNET - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++AP TELEVISION HAS NO WAY OF INDEPENDENTLY VERIFYING THE CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS VIDEO++ FILE 12. Close up of purportedly Abu Mansour al-Amriki (one of al-Shabab's most high-profile members who was charged in Alabama and is also known as Omar Hammami) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Kampala, Uganda - July 11, 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 13. Various of blast area showing injured, bystanders 14. Injured man being carried from the scene 15. Close up of injured man lying on ground 16. Various of injured being carried into ambulance FILE: Kampala, Uganda - July 12, 2010 ++DAY SHOTS++ 17. Wide of security at 'Ethiopian Village' restaurant blast site 18. Close up of blood stained staircase 19. Close up of sign reading (English): "Welcome to Ethiopian Village" 20. Wide of blast site, tables and chairs scattered around STORYLINE: The US government announced on Thursday that it has charged 14 people as participants in "a deadly pipeline" to Somalia that routed money and fighters from the United States to the militant group al-Shabab. The indictments reflect "a disturbing trend" of recruitment efforts targeting U.S. residents to become "terrorists," Attorney General Eric Holder told a news conference in Washington DC. "These indictments and arrests in Minnesota, Alabama, and California shed further light on a deadly pipeline that has rooted funding and fighters to al-Shabab from across the United States," added Holder. In one case, two women pleaded for money "to support violent jihad in Somalia," according to an indictment. The attorney general credited Muslim community leaders in the United States for regularly denouncing extremism and for providing critical assistance to law enforcement to help disrupt militant plots and combat radicalisation. At least seven of the 14 people charged are U.S. citizens and 10, all from Minnesota, allegedly left the United States to join al-Shabab. Of the 14 only two women are actually in US and have appeared in court. Seven of the 10 had been charged previously in the probe. Al-Shabab is a Somali insurgent faction embracing a radical form of Islam similar to the one practiced by Afghanistan's Taliban. Its fighters, numbering several thousand strong, are battling Somalia's weakened government and have been branded a "terrorist" group, by America, with ties to al-Qaida by the U.S. and other Western countries. Militant organisations such as al-Shabab continue to radicalise and recruit U.S. citizens and others to train and fight with them, said the FBI's executive assistant director for the national security branch. Attorney General Holder said while there was no direct evidence of al-Shabab threatening the US, authorities have been kept on alert to the militant organisation as they have successful recruited Americans to join their fight. "The fact that they have expanded their range of operations outside of Somalia to Uganda gives us pause, and it is one of the things that we are monitoring," added Holden. One of two indictments issued in Minnesota alleges that two Somali women who were among those charged, and others, went door-to-door in Minneapolis; Rochester, Minnesota, and elsewhere in the U.S. and Canada to raise funds for al-Shabab's operations in Somalia. The indictment says the women raised the money under false pretences, claiming it would be received by the poor and needy, and used false names for recipients to conceal that the money was going to al-Shabab. One of the Minnesota indictments alleges that the two women, Amina Farah Ali and Hawo Mohamed Hassan, raised money by making direct appeals to people in teleconferences "in which they and other speakers encouraged financial contributions to support violent jihad in Somalia." The indictment said Ali and others sent the funds to al-Shabab through various "hawalas", money transfer businesses that are a common source of financial transactions in the Islamic world. Ali is accused of sending 8,608 US Dollars to al-Shabab on 12 occasions between September 17, 2008 through July 5, 2009. The fundraising operation in Minnesota reached into Ohio, where a Columbus resident helped collect donations for al-Shabab, according to one of the indictments unsealed in Minneapolis. During appearances by Ali and Hassan before a federal judge in St. Paul, Minnesota, prosecutors didn't seek detention for either woman. A judge set several conditions, including barring travel outside Minnesota. Ali's attorney said she denied the allegations. She said she worked in home health care and had lived in Rochester for 11 years. Hassan said she was self-employed, running a day care. After the FBI searched Ali's home in 2009, she allegedly contacted an al-Shabab leader in southern Somalia and said: "I was questioned by the enemy here. ... they took all my stuff and are investigating it ... do not accept calls from anyone." Roughly 20 men from the U.S. all but one of Somali descent left Minnesota from December 2007 through October 2009 to join al-Shabab, officials have said. Omar Hammami, who is now known as Abu Mansour al-Amriki, was charged in Birmingham, Alabama. Hammami grew up in the middle-class town of Daphne, Alabama, and attended the University of South Alabama in Mobile, where he was president of the Muslim Student Association nine years ago. On the streets of Rochester, Minnesota, which has a significant Somalia community, locals said they were saddened to hear of the arrests with one man saying they had been "brainwashed" by al-Shabab. Al-Shabab last month claimed twin bombings in Uganda that killed 76 during the World Cup final, the group's first international attack. Uganda and Burundi both have peacekeeping forces in Mogadishu, the Somali capital, and al-Shabab has vowed to continue attacks against the two countries. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 08-05-10 2049EDT
Grannies against gurus
A2 / France 2
WRAP
AP-APTN-0830: US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0444EST
+US Shooting 6
AP-APTN-0830: +US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:+US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0436EST
WRAP
AP-APTN-0830: US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0444EST
REPLA
AP-APTN-0830: US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0444EST
REPLA
AP-APTN-0830: US Shooting 6 Sunday, 9 January 2011 STORY:US Shooting 6- WRAP +4:3 Vigils for shot politician, victims, Obama reax, suspect still LENGTH: 04:18 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 671182 DATELINE: Various - 8 Jan 2011 LENGTH: 04:18 CLIENTS NOTE: IGNORE EDIT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE WHICH HAS CORRECTED VIDEO AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY/STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE HANDOUT MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of residents holding candlelight vigil across from the office of US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, singing "Amazing Grace" 2. Giffords' sign outside her office 3. Wide of police officers outside office 4. Wide of vigil across the street from office 5. Various of candles 6. Mid shot of candles, flowers and notes at makeshift memorial (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Phoenix, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wide of exterior of Phoenix statehouse 8. Mid of people gathered outside of statehouse for vigil 9. Mid of children holding candles 10. Tight shot of table lit with candles and a photo of one of the victims of the shooting, US federal judge John Roll 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Man at vigil, name unknown, Vox Pop: "I think there will be a lot of caution but I think the spirit of democracy and the public demand that our politicians be accessible will mend that and we'll go back to having our politicians appearing very openly and very publicly." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Mid shot of crime scene at night 13. Wide shot crime scene at night, with sign reading name of shopping centre 'La Toscana Village' (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and location unknown 14. STILL: undated photo of US representative Gabrielle Giffords, Arizona Democrat (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington DC - 6 January 2011 15. Congresswoman Gabriel Giffords reading the first amendment from the US constitution on the House floor UPSOUND (English) "The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." (FIRST RUN 2230 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 08 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington DC - 08 January 2011 16. US President Barack Obama walking to podium to make a statement 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, President of the United Sates: "It's not surprising that today Gabby (Giffords) was doing what she always does - listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours. That is the essence of what our democracy is all about. That is why this is more than a tragedy for those involved. It is a tragedy for Arizona and a tragedy for our entire country." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ HANDOUT PHOTO FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona, Date Unknown 18. STILL: School photo of shooting suspect Jared Loughner (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "He has kind of a troubled past, I can tell you that, and we're not convinced that he acted alone." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 20. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Secondly, my hope-is for you to be literate! If you're literate in English grammar, then you comprehend English grammar. The majority of people, who reside in District-B, are illiterate-hilarious. I don't control your English grammar structure, but you control your English grammar structure." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "All I can tell you is that there is reason to believe that this individual may have a mental issue. And I think that people who are unbalanced are especially susceptible to vitriol." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Internet - date unknown 22. Video showing a message from shooting suspect's Jared Loughner's YouTube page reading (English) "Thirdly, I know who is listening: Government officials, and the People. Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++4:3++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 23. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarence Dupnik, Pima County Sheriff: "Let me just say one thing, because people tend to poo poo this business about all the vitriol that we hear inflaming the American public by people who make a living off of doing that. That may be free speech, but it's not without consequences." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) AP PHOTOS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Tucson, Arizona - March, 2010 ++4:3++ 24. STILL Jared L. Loughner at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 25. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English): Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "Well, I had passed by the table, the Congresswoman was standing there talking to several people, I went to the side of the table, on the side of a concrete post and I looked up and I saw a man shoot her in the head and then he began just spraying gunfire everywhere. At that point I ducked behind the concrete post and as he came around it, the whole thing unfolded maybe 12 or 15 seconds as he came around it, I laid on the ground and acted as if I were shot." (FIRST RUN 0230 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 26. Audio of eyewitness to the crime overlaid with video of crime scene SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Steven Rayle, Eyewitness to shooting: "It seemed like at least 15-20 he was, there was, the crowd was actually quite small, it was probably 20 to 25 people there very loosely gathered, half of them were shot." (FIRST RUN 0430 NEWS UPDATE - 09 JANUARY 2011) ++16:9++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Tucson, Arizona - 08 January 2011 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 27. Mid shot of crime scene at night 28. Mid shot of store front 29. Tight shot of sign on store front reading (English) "Due to today's sad events we will be closed the rest of the day. We will be open on Sunday from noon (1900 GMT) to 6pm (0100 GMT)." STORYLINE Vigils were held in Arizona late on Saturday, hours after a gunman targeted Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords as she met constituents outside a busy supermarket, wounding her and killing six others. The assassination attempt left the three-term congresswoman in critical condition after a bullet passed through her head. Among the dead were Arizona's chief federal judge, John Roll, a nine-year-old girl and one of Giffords' aides. US President Barack Obama called the attack "a tragedy for our entire country". More than 100 people attended a candlelight vigil outside the headquarters of Giffords in Tuscon, where authorities investigated a suspicious package that turned out to be non-explosive. A bomb squad worked for a couple of hours, using X-ray equipment, to try to figure out what the package was before a loud noise was heard. The noise was caused by authorities' efforts to destroy the package and render it safe. Also on Saturday, mourners in Phoenix attended a candlelight vigil outside the State House. Saturday's shooting targeted Giffords during a public gathering and the attempted assassination of a political figure left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed the suspect over the edge. The 40-year-old politician is a moderate Democrat who narrowly won re-election in November against a conservative tea party-aligned candidate who sought to throw her from office over her support of the historic health care reform law. Anger over her position became violent at times, with her Tucson office vandalised after the House of Representatives passed the overhaul last March and someone showing up at a recent gathering with a weapon. Gifford, affectionately known as "Gabby", had tweeted shortly before the shooting, describing her "Congress on Your Corner" event: "My 1st Congress on Your Corner starts now. Please stop by to let me know what is on your mind or tweet me later." "It's not surprising that today Gabby was doing what she always does, listening to the hopes and concerns of her neighbours," Obama said as he commented on the shooting, adding: "That is the essence of what our democracy is about." Saturday's suspected shooter was in custody and was identified by people familiar with the investigation as 22-year-old Jared Loughner. US officials who provided his name to the AP spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release it publicly. The reason for the assassination attempt was not immediately known, but Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik described the suspect as mentally unstable and possibly acting with an accomplice. The sheriff blamed the vitriolic political rhetoric that has consumed the country, much of it occurring in Arizona. A former classmate described Loughner as a marijuana smoking loner and the army said he tried to enlist in December 2008 but was rejected for reasons not disclosed. Federal law enforcement officials were poring over versions of a MySpace page that belonged to him and over a YouTube video published weeks ago under an account "Classitup10" and linked to him. The MySpace page, which was removed within minutes of the gunman being identified by officials, included a mysterious "Goodbye friends" message published hours before the shooting and exhorted his friends to "Please don't be mad at me". In one of several Youtube videos, which featured text against a dark background, Loughner described inventing a new US currency and complained about the illiteracy rate among people living in Giffords' congressional district in Arizona. "I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accurate information of a new currency, aren't aware of mind control and brainwash methods. If I have my civil rights, then this message wouldn't have happen (sic)." The shooting cast a pall over Washington as politicians of all stripes denounced the attack as horrific. Capitol police asked members of Congress to be more vigilant about security in the wake of the shooting and Obama dispatched the chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to Arizona. The shooting comes amid a highly charged political environment that has seen several dangerous threats against lawmakers but nothing that reached the point of actual violence. Law enforcement officials said members of Congress reported 42 cases of threats or violence in the first three months of 2010, nearly three times the 15 cases reported during the same period a year earlier. Nearly all dealt with the health care bill and Giffords was among the targets. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-09-11 0444EST
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff
White House- GW Bush with President Karzai Photo Op / Stix and Cuts
Presiden George W. Bush Photo Op with President Hamid Karzai at Camp David STIX & CUTS RS20/X83/Slugged: 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 & 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 1115 WH KARZAI STIX X83 *** STIX - no timecodes *** BUSH: Good morning. Thank you. Be seated. Welcome. Appreciate a man I've come to admire, President Karzai, for joining us. Laura and I had the honor of hosting the president for dinner last night. He and I spent a lot of this morning just sitting down alone, talking about our common interests, common concerns. President Karzai's an optimistic man. He's watched his country emerge from days of darkness to days of hope. KARZAI: Absolutely. BUSH: I appreciate your stewardship. I appreciate your commitment to empowering your people. I appreciate your strong stance for freedom and justice. And I'm proud to call you an ally in this war against those who would wreak havoc in order to deny people a chance to live in peace. We're working closely together to help the people of Afghanistan prosper. We work together to give the people of Afghanistan a chance to raise their children in a hopeful world. And we're working together to defeat those who would try to stop the advance of a free Afghan society. Spent a fair amount of time talking about our security strategy. You might remember it was last winter that people were speculating about the Taliban spring offensive, about how the Taliban had regrouped and were going to go on the attack inside Afghanistan. There was a spring offensive all right. It was conducted by U.S., NATO and, equally importantly, Afghan troops. And we went on the offense because we understand that it is in our mutual interest to deny extremists the opportunity to derail this young democracy. There's still a fight going on, but I'm proud to report to the American people that the Afghan army is in the fight. The government's in the fight, and the army's in the fight. Afghan national security forces are increasing its strength. There's about 110,000 Afghans now defending their nation, and more Afghans are stepping up to serve. And it's in the interests of the United States to help you develop that -- national army and local police, that will send a clear message to the people of Afghanistan that the governments can help provide an opportunity for people to raise their children in a peaceful world. There's a lot of forces there in Afghanistan supporting this government. And our 23,500 troops are proud to stand side by side with 26,000 troops from other nations. And we applaud those countries who have committed their troops to help Afghanistan succeed. We've committed more than $23 billion since 2001 to help rebuild the country. I think our citizens will be interested to know, for example, that 7,000 community health care workers have been trained, that provide about 340,000 Afghan men, women and children a month with good health care. I remember talking a lot about how the Taliban prevented young girls from going to school in Afghanistan. American citizens recall with horror to think about a government that would deny a young child the opportunity to have the basics necessary to succeed in life. Today there are nearly 5 million students going to school in Afghanistan, a third of whom are girls. Still work to be done. Don't get me wrong. But progress is being made, Mr. President, and we're proud of you, proud of the work you're doing. We talked about the need to stem the narcotics trade. I'm sure the president will comment on this. He understands that it's very important for farmers to be incented to grow crop other than poppy and that he knows full well the United States is watching, measuring and trying to help eradicate poppy cultivation. We spend more than a fair amount of time on it. We spend a lot of time on it. And it's important that we get this right. Mr. President, I appreciate your commitment to not only dealing with the poppy growers and the poppy crop, but also dealing with corruption. It's very important that our societies emerge in such a way that the people have confidence in the capacity of government to conduct the affairs -- conduct their affairs in a way that's above board and honest and transparent. And finally, I do want to congratulate you on the joint jirga that's coming up. This is a meeting between President Karzai, President Musharraf and representative elements from parts of their respective countries, all coming together to talk about reconciliation and how we can work together -- how you can work together -- to achieve a -- to achieve common solutions to problems. And the main problem is to fight extremism; to recognize that history has called us into action, and by fighting extremists and radicals, we help people realize dreams. And helping realize -- people realize dreams helps promote peace. That's what we want. You come from a part of the world, Mr. President, where there's a long history of violence and a long history of people seeking freedom. It's in the interest of the United States to be on the -- tip the scales of freedom your way. We can only do so with strong leadership, and I appreciate the leadership you're providing. So welcome to Camp David. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Smilah rahman rahim (ph). Thank you very much, Mr. President, for receiving me in Camp David. You and the first lady are generous and kind hosts. And thank you very much for that. Mr. President, I'm here today to, once again, thank you and the American people for all that you have done for Afghanistan: for our liberation first and then for our stability and prosperity. We have gone a long way. I've been here many times before in America, thanking the American people for what they have given to Afghanistan. I've spoken of roads. I've spoken of schools. I've spoken of clinics. I've spoken of health services. I've spoken of education. I've spoken of agriculture. I've spoken of lots of achievements. I've also had requests for help that you have delivered to us. But today I'm going to speak about only one achievement that means so much for the Afghan people and surely to you and the rest of the world. That is that Afghanistan today, with the help that you have provided and our other allies have provided, can save, is saving the life of at least 50,000 infants after they are born and the life of 85,000 children under 5. Mr. President, when you and I begin to think of the mothers who can have their babies safe today, then we know the value and the importance of this achievement. And thank you very, very much for this tremendous help. Afghanistan will have not have not had 85,000 children living today had you not been there to help us, with the rest of the world. BUSH: Thank you, sir. ON TALIBAN: KARZAI: That's a massive achievement. And I'm happy about it. I'm sure you are too. And so are women and mothers around the world. Mr. President, as we have gone a long way, progress has been made. We will still continue to fight terrorism. Our enemy is still there, defeated but still hiding in the mountains. And our duty is to complete the job, to get them out of their hideouts in the mountains and to bring justice to the people of Afghanistan, to the people of America, and to the people around the world who are threatened by these terrorists. One of the significant steps that we have taken together with Pakistan to have an effective fight against terrorism, an effective fight against extremism and radicalism, was discussed during the dinner that you kindly hosted for me and President Musharraf. And the result of that is going to be seen in two days from today, the 9th of August, where, in Kabul, we will have the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan jirga. I hope very much that this jirga will bring to us what we need, which I think it will. And thank you very much for this opportunity you caused us to have, the meeting, and to have a result of that. Mr. President, we have a long journey ahead of us. But what we have travelled so far has given us greater hope for a better future, for a better life. The Afghans are still suffering, but there are millions of Afghans who are enjoying a better and more secure life, who can send their children to school and who can work in their fields. And thank you very much for that. Yes, we do have the problem of poppies and narcotics in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is committed to fighting it, because this evil is first hurting us, and then youth in the rest of the world. So this is for Afghanistan to work against and for the rest of us to work against. ON FIGHTING NARCOTICS/POPPIES: We are committed. It will take time. We are realistic about that. But the fight is there and I hope your assistance will continue to be delivered to Afghanistan to fight narcotics. We have raised our army, indeed. We are working on our police. Our police needs a lot of improvement. And I'm glad that you have committed to helping us with the raising of a better police in Afghanistan. The fight against corruption is going on. We have developed a mechanism, worked through a commission headed by the chief justice of Afghanistan, that will be ready in two months from now and will announced to the Afghan people on hows and measures and the time frame that we will need to have an effective fight against corruption in Afghanistan. The rest, life is going on well with a lot of folk. We have a better administration, more capabilities. We can do lots of things on our own. And I'm sure your continued assistance will make life better for us. And thank you very much, Mr. President. Nice of you to receive me here. (CROSSTALK) BUSH: Thanks for coming. A couple of questions. ***Q&A*** TAKE OUT AQ IN PAKISTAN: QUESTION: Mr. President, if you had actionable intelligence about the whereabouts of top Al Qaida leaders in Pakistan, would you wait for Musharraf's permission to send in U.S. forces, even if it meant missing an opportunity to take him out? Or have you and Musharraf worked out some deal about this already? And, President Karzai, what will be your top concern when you meet with Musharraf later this week? BUSH: I'm confident that with actionable intelligence we will be able to bring top Al Qaida to justice. We're in constant communications with the Pakistan government. It's in their interest that foreign fighters be brought to justice. After all, these are the same ones who are plotting to kill President Musharraf. We share a concern. And I'm confident, with real, actionable intelligence, we will get the job done. KARZAI: When President Musharraf visits Afghanistan on the 9th of August to inaugurate the joint Pakistan-Afghanistan convention, or jirga, together with me, we will be discussing further improvements in relations between the two countries. The two countries are neighbors. They've been having extensive relationships with each other. And we'll be discussing improvement of those relations, on all aspects of them. We'll also be discussing the possible outcome of the joint jirga between the two countries and how effectively, then, we can carry on the fight against terrorism in both countries and in the region, as a result of that jirga. So, It's going to be, I'm sure, a good meeting, ma'am. Afghan press? TALIBAN IN AFGHAN: QUESTION: I will ask in Pashtun and then I will translate my question. My question is for Mr. Karzai. (SPEAKING IN PASHTUN) I will repeat in English, too, that four years ago in a press conference Mr. President Karzai said Taliban do not pose any threat to Afghan people. So who do you think supported Taliban to threaten the security by doing kidnappings and attacking the government officials and why? KARZAI: Four years ago I did say that, and I continue to say that. The Taliban do pose dangers to our innocent people, to children going to school, to our clergy, to our teachers, to our engineers, to international aid workers. They're not posing any threat to the government of Afghanistan. They're not posing any threat to the institutions of Afghanistan or to the buildup of institutions of Afghanistan. It's a force that's defeated. It's a force that is frustrated. It's a force that is acting in cowardice by killing children going to school. Who's supporting them is a question that we have been working on for a long time and since then. And I hope that the jirga between us and Pakistan will give us solutions to some of the questions that we have. BUSH: Yes. One thing is for certain: We know the vision -- their vision of how to govern. They've been in power. I mean, they've had the opportunity to show the world how they think and what they do. I mean, it's instructive for people to speak to, you know, a mother of a young girl about what life was like under the Taliban. These are brutal, cold-blooded killers. KARZAI: Yes. BUSH: That's what they are. And the fundamental question facing those of us who believe in freedom is whether or not we confront them and whether or not it's worth it, the effort, to spread an alternative to their hateful vision. And we've come to the conclusion it is. And that's why President Karzai stands right here at Camp David discussing common concerns, common opportunities, about how to defeat a vision of darkness. That's what they are. They just don't believe in freedom. They don't believe it's possible to live in a society where people are allowed to express themselves in free fashion. And it's -- this is really, they're part of an ongoing challenge that the free world faces. And the real question is whether or not those of us who have the blessings of liberty will continue to pursue policies -- foreign policy, security policy -- aimed at not only protecting our homeland, but aimed at laying a condition for peace to prevail. CIVILIAN CASUALTIES CAUSED BY US MILITARY: QUESTION: President Karzai said yesterday that he believed Iran was playing a helpful role in Afghanistan. Was he able to convince you, in your meetings, that that was the case, or do you still have concerns about Iran's role? And I have a question for President Karzai as well. I'm just wondering if the president was able to give you the assurances that you sought about the effort to reduce civilian casualties in Afghanistan. BUSH: Let me comment on the civilian casualties, if I might. First, I fully understand the angst, the agony and the sorrow that Afghan citizens feel when an innocent life is lost. I know that must cause grief in villages and heartbreak in homes. Secondly, I can assure the Afghan people, like I assured the president, that we do everything that we can to protect the innocent, that our military operations are mindful that innocent life might be exposed to danger. And we adjust accordingly. Thirdly, it is the Taliban who surround themselves with innocent life as human shields. The Taliban are the cold-blooded killers. The Taliban are the murderers. The Taliban have no regard for human life. And, therefore, we spent some time talking about -- the president rightly expressed his concerns about civilian casualty. And I assured him we share those concerns. IRAN'S ROLE IN AFGHAN: Secondly, it's up to Iran to prove to the world that they're a stabilizing force as opposed to destabilizing force. After all, this is a government that has proclaimed its desire to build a nuclear weapon. This is a government that's in defiance of international accord, a government that seems to be willing to thumb its nose at the international community, and at the same time a government that denies its people a rightful place in the world and denies its people the ability to realize their full potential. So I believe that it's in the interests of all of us that we have an Iran that tries to stabilize, not destabilize; an Iran that gives up its weapons ambitions. And therefore we're working to that end. The president knows best about what's taking place in his country. And, of course, I'm willing to listen. But from my perspective, the burden of proof is on the Iranian government to show us that they're a positive force. And I must tell you that this current leadership there is a -- is a big disappointment to the people of Iran. I mean, the people of Iran could be doing a lot better than they are today. But because of the actions of this government, this country is isolated. And we will continue to work to isolate it. Because they're not a force for good, as far as we can see. They are a destabilizing influence, wherever they are now. The president will talk to you about Afghanistan. But I would be very cautious about whether or not the Iranian influence there in Afghanistan is a positive force. And, therefore, it's going to be up to them to prove to us and prove to the government that they are. ON CIVILIAN CASUALTIES: KARZAI: I had a good discussion with President Bush on civilian casualties. I'm very happy to tell you that President Bush felt very much with Afghan people, that he calls the Afghan people allies in the war against terror, and friends, and that he is as much concerned as I am, as the Afghan people are. I was very happy with that conversation. QUESTION: Mr. Karzai, avino (ph). Can I ask my question in Dari first? KARZAI: Please, yes. QUESTION: (SPEAKING IN DARI) You have recently become a father, and also you have recently pardoned a teenage who suicide himself, and you said he was brainwashed. KARZAI: Brainwashed, yes. QUESTION: Yes. What do you think about the future of Afghanistan in view of this problem? KARZAI: Well, ma'am, the man -- the boy, I should say -- that I pardoned was a 14-year-old boy from Pakistan's South Waziristan agency. He was sent by his father to a madrassa to get education because he could not anymore afford to have him in school, because his mother had a heart ailment and they had to spend money on her treatment. Having sent the boy to a madrassa, he disappeared from there. After a few months his father heard that he was arrested in Afghanistan, and then he came to Afghanistan. And having seen that this was a teenage -- rather legally underage innocent boy, used by terrorists to kill himself and to kill other innocent people, I felt that it was the right decision to pardon him, to give him a new opportunity for education and a new life, and to send a message to his mother that, "Your child is going to be back with you." I'm very glad I did that. But this gives us a lesson about those who are the enemies of all of us, the enemies of people, who use young children, who brainwashes them and who forces them to kill themselves. The message should be clear to the rest of the world about the evil that we are fighting, the heartless people that we are fighting, who don't even have any feeling for young children, for babies, for teenagers. Most of that we know today that the terrorists are buying and selling suicide bombers. We have received calls in our government offices by handlers of suicide bombers that they want to sell them to us. So it's become a trade -- a mean trade. Merchants of death are around there. So it's our job to get rid of them. BUSH: Thank you very much. KARZAI: Thank you very much. Thank you. BUSH: Good job. 1145 WH KARZAI CUTS X83 *** CUTS *** 11:48:05 Robert Gates and Condoleezza Rice exit car, walk to presser 11:50:07 TS Rice talking to afghan representative 11:50:41 WS bush & karzai walking down towards presser 11:51:21 TS bush & karzai walking 11:51:41 MS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:53:16 WS side shot Bush & Karzai at presser, bush speaking 11:54:53 WS side shot presser 11:55:35 MS side shot presser 11:55:56 MS Rice & afghan representative 11:56:26 MS Defense Secretary Robert Gates 11:56:48 MS press 11:56:57 TS Karzai side shot pull to MS karzai & bush 11:57:49 MS karzai & bush side shot 12:00:31 MS side shot karzai talking to bush 12:00:45 WS side shot karzai & bush at presser 12:02:10 MS press asking question 12:02:44 WS side shot karzai & bush on left & press on right 12:03:27 MS cochran & ed henry 12:04:39 TS rice 12:05:12 TS side shot bush pull to MS bush & karzai 12:07:25 MS bush & karzai from audience 12:08:07 WS side shot bush & karzai 12:09:36 TS press 12:09:44 MS bush & karzai handshake 12:09:49 MS bush & karzai walkoff