JAPAN BLUE FIN BAN TZ
Big-eye scads being hunted
Big-eye scad (Selar crumenopthalmus) schooling over a reef, being hunted by blue-fin trevally (Caranx melampygus), dogtooth tuna (Gymnosarda unicolor) and grey reef sharks (Charcharhinus amblyrhynchos). Filmed at Ulong Channel, Palau.
pt2 - tuna - tracking (01/07/1999)
Part two of tracking the giant blue fin tuna.
GERMANY: BLUE FIN TUNA - QUOTAS FOR JAPAN (2)
TAPE_NUMBER: EF99/0954 IN_TIME: 17:08:20 // 19:33:11 - 20:26:50 LENGTH: 02:29 SOURCES: GREENPEACE/WWF/DFA RESTRICTIONS: DFA = No Access Germany/ Internet/ GREENPEACE = No re-use without clearance FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: English/Nat An international tribunal has issued a temporary injunction against Japan, requiring it to abide by catch quotas for the threatened southern bluefin tuna. The measure was sought by Australia and New Zealand, which claimed increased fishing by Japan threatens \"serious or irreversible damage to the southern bluefish tuna population\". The three nations are signatories of a 1993 treaty limiting catches of the highly prized bluefin tuna. The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, meeting in Hamburg, Germany, on Friday sided with Australia and New Zealand in the dispute. It ruled that Japan must consider any fish it catches under an experimental programme it started in 1995 as part of its quota. In addition, Japan may only continue an experimental fishing programme if the other two countries agree, the court said. Since large-scale fishing began in the 1950s, the southern bluefin tuna species has declined to five percent of its original numbers. Japan proposed an increase in the total allowable catch in 1995, but no agreement was reached. Last year, it began an \"experimental fishing programme\", under which it hauled in 14-hundred (metric) tons, or 25 percent above its quota. It resumed the programme in June. Australian government officials said they were pleased with the provisional measures. SOUNDBITE: (English) \"We welcome the decision of the tribunal which largely gives measures as sought by Australia and New Zealand and we also appreciate the expedition with which the tribunal has dealt with the matter.\" SUPER CAPTION: William Campbell, Australian Government Representative Japan had no immediate comment. Australia and New Zealand alleged the programme was for commercial, rather than scientific purposes. On the Japanese market there is a huge demand for high quality raw tuna which may now have to be curbed. SHOTLIST: xfa Hamburg, Germany - August 27 1999 and file DFA - Hamburg - August 27 1. Exterior of International tribunal 2. People entering 3. Japanese panel 4. Japanese notes 5. Pull out to show NZ panel 6. Judges filing in and sitting down 7. Japanese delegate going up to speak 8. Japanese delegate speaking 9. Australian delegate writing WWF - 30 Nov 1996 10. Various of tuna underwater 11. Tuna landed 12. Tuna trashing in water 13. Fishermen landing tuna 14. Tuna on hoist 15. Fish market in Japan 16. Man inspecting tuna 17. Tuna on trolley DFA - Hamburg - August 27 1999 18. SOUNDBITE (English) William Campbell, Australian Government Representative GREENPEACE - Sea South of Australia, 17 Feb 1998 19. Various of shoal of Southern Blue Fin Tuna underwater 20. Wide shot of fishing vessel lowering net into water 21. Various of net in water?
ECO SOLUTIONS/BLUE FIN
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
tuna - tracking - pt1 (01/07/1999)
A two part series on the tracking of the blue fin tuna off the coast of North Carolina. Tracking devices are placed on these huge fish, which weigh several hundred pounds.
BP OIL SPILL BRIEFING
12:00:00:15 WX-SAFINA/BLUEFIN TUNA 12:35:46 Blue fin tuna, a fish that's been in the news a lot because it is severely depleted by over-fishing, a giant fish - the entire west Atlantic population that ...
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
Squid - Invasion
HUNDREDS OF SQUID ARE WASHING UP ON BEACHES IN LA JOLLA COVE, CALIFORNIA. SOME EXPERTS SAY IT IS HAPPENING AS A RESULT OF EL NINO WEATHER PATTERNS.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL / EXXON VALDEZ
ENVIRONMENTAL CLIP REEL. 12:56:18 FTG OF DOLPHINS SWIMMING, GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DEMONSTRATING AGAINST THE KILLING OF WHALES IN ICELAND, A WHALE SWIMMING AND A MOTHER AND BABY DOLPHIN SWIMMING IN THE PERSIAN GULF. FTG OF DOLPHINS EMERGING FROM THE WATER. FTG OF A HERD OF DOLPHINS PEEKING THEIR FINS UP OUT OF THE WATER. FTG OF THE OIL TANKER THE EXXON VALDEZ STATIONED IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA. AERIAL FTG OF THE SOUND REVEALING PICTURESQUE SCENES OF FOREST LINED ALONG THE SHORE OF BLUE-GREEN OCEAN WATER. UNDERWATER FTG OF ALASKAN SALMON SWIMMING. FTG OF A FLOCK OF WATER FOWL IN FLIGHT AND OTTERS SWIMMING AND BATHING. 13:11:10 FTG OF DOLPHINS GETTING CAUGHT IN TUNA FISHING NETS. VS OF TUNA BOATS. FTG OF DEAD DOLPHINS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN. FTG OF DRIFT NETS DRAPED UNDER WATER AND ENTANGLING FISH. 13:15:34 FTG OF ACTRESS MERYL STREEP PERFORMING IN A "MOTHERS AND OTHERS FOR PESTICIDE LIMITS" COMMERCIAL. FTG OF A DEER CARCASS LYING INSIDE A DUMPSTER. AERIAL FTG OF THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL, A BIRD COVERED WITH OIL STRUGGLING IN THE WATER AND A PERSON HOLDING UP A DEAD BIRD COVERED IN OIL. VS OF CLEAN UP CREWS WORKING ON THE VALDEZ OIL SPILL. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS RELOCATING AN OTTER, WIPING OFF ROCKS COVERED IN OIL AND HOSING DOWN A SHORELINE. AERIAL FTG OF PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND. FTG OF OCEAN WATER THICKLY LADEN WITH OIL SPLASHING UP ALONG A SHORE. FTG OF CREW MEMBERS CLEANING ANIMALS. AERIAL FTG OF SEA LIONS LYING ON ICEBERGS. 13:28:34 VS OF DROUGHT STRICKEN CORN FIELDS IN DECATUR, ILLINOIS. FTG OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN THE USSR. FTG OF SCIENTISTS TESTING RADIATION LEVELS IN DEER. 13:32:19 BLANK TO END. CI: PERSONALITIES: STREEP, MERYL. ANIMALS: DOLPHINS. ANIMALS: FISH. ANIMALS: WHALE. CONSERVATION: ANIMAL. DEMONSTRATIONS: GREENPEACE. DISASTERS: CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. DISASTERS: MARINE. DISASTERS: OIL SLICK, ALASKA. ECOLOGY: POLLUTION, WATER. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. SCENICS: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA.
Earth 2100 Interview Jeremy Jackson HD
FOR ABC NEWS - 20/20 147 Columbus Avenue New York NY 10023 DATE 7/11/08 PROGRAM 20/20 Earth 2100 Jeremy Jackson-Tp 109-111 BGT NO. 1082724 TAPE 109. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] INTERVIEWER [14;02;06;15] So in terms of when you look around the world today, what are the signs you see that, that we're heading where we are, uh, you know, heading towards some really serious shocks, heading towards collapse in terms of the oceans? JEREMY JACKSON [14;02;20;03] Well, they're, if you go to the Chesapeake Bay, about fifty miles from the nation's capital, the, the water is, uh, incredibly dirty. It's, it's, it's full of all these, these, these algae, a lot of which are toxic. It, it loses all its oxygen in the bottom waters almost every summer. [14;02;41;10] Um, the fish die, the crabs die. There's no oysters left. Um, oysters used to be incredibly abundant. They were hazards to navigation. The reefs, they, they were incredible - rich resource. Um, the, we spend a fortune - hundreds of millions of dollars every year - to make the bay better and it just keeps getting worse. [14;03;04;12] Um, it's sort of obvious why, in terms of not changing our behavior. But, um, you can multiply that by all the large estuaries and coastal seas of the world. Um, I can't think of a single one which is, uh, in anything vaguely like a healthy condition. [14;03;23;02] Fishkills, all these things have happened. You go off the mouth of the Mississippi River and there's something called the dead zone, which is, um, like the size of two New Jerseys. And it's caused by all the run-off of fertilizer from the Mississippi drainage because we use so much fertilizer, which is artificially made. [14;03;46;08] Um, every summer the dead zone grows like a kind of monster in the ocean. It's not really dead. It's full of jellyfish and bacteria. But the fish die, the shrimp die. Everything we value dies. Um, again, it's because all the oxygen is used up by this hyper-productivity. [14;04;06;23] Um, ninety per cent of the big fish that we like to eat are gone from most of the open ocean. Uh, cod was so abundant once there were World Wars over cod. It was, uh, the second or third most valuable natural commodity in the world for two centuries. [14;04;29;18] Uh, it fed the entire slave population of the Caribbean and, and, and much of Western Europe. Um, we stopped fishing cod thirty years ago and it hasn't come back. Um, the, uh, blue fin tuna is on the verge of extinction. A single fish that's not been frozen in the Tokyo fish market is worth a hundred and fifty thousand to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. [14;04;56;24] Um, we will, at those kinds of prices we will fish blue fin tuna until we've got the last blue fin tuna. Um, climate change is, uh, is inexorable. It's, uh, moving very fast. The, the water of the ocean is, uh, warming at a rate which is higher than the most dire predictions of the, um, of the, the whole global climate report. [14;05;28;15] The, the, um, in 2005, for example, there was a pool of hot water in the Eastern Caribbean that, um, was unprecedented and, and in many places -- I saw photographs yesterday at a, at a meeting. Um, eighty, ninety, ninety per cent of the, ninety-five per cent of all the corals bleach, they throw out, uh, the symbiotic algae that live in their tissues. [14;05;58;12] Those algae manufacture the sugar, which is the primary diet of the corals. It's a pathologic response. It's, uh, not really interest...in the interest of the corals to do it, but they, they're sort of tricked into it by the, the freakiness of what happens. [14;06;16;13] And when that happens a quarter or a third of them die, um, depending upon the severity of the bleaching, all of them can die. So it just goes on and on and on. And then, and these are all things we measure and we see. [14;06;30;19] Um, I work at, uh, at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. And it's a place where, where people are out on the ocean all the time. They're measuring the acidity of the ocean all the time. We know that in the last ten or fifteen years the, the ocean has decreased by a tenth of a P.H unit. [14;06;51;03] Now, what does that mean? That, that, that means, uh, the, the normal ocean has a, a P.H of eight, eight point one. Um, it's already dropped a couple of units. Seven point four is disaster. [14;07;05;13] Seven point four is when clams and snails and corals that build their houses out of calcium carbonate -- the shell of a snail or a clam or the skeleton of a coral - they can't make the skeleton. Um, so it's a little hard to have coral reefs if you don't have any skeleton. [14;07;24;13] Um, so we just, uh, it's, it's, it's, it's amazing and everywhere you look. If, if, if ocean environments were thought of as species, in terms of the Endangered Species Act, then coastal oceans and estuaries would be critically endangered. [14;07;46;27] Coral reefs would be critically endangered. The continental shelves of the global ocean would be endangered and the high seas would be threatened. I mean, that's all of the environments of the surface ocean and, and probably the deep sea as, as well. But I don't know anything about the deep sea. [14;08;09;11] I, and, um, in fact, you know, ignorance is bliss. So, because there's much less understanding of the changes that happen in the, the deep ocean. They're not really on the radar screen. So it's, it's very grim. And, and I suppose the, the most important point is this isn't hypothetical. This is what we measure. [14;08;31;20] If we project out to the future, uh, which is always much more risky, um, there are certain things that are, that are pretty obvious. Um, the dead - I, um, I got involved in thinking about these issues about ten years ago. [14;08;49;08] When I began it was recognized that there were perhaps a hundred of these dead zones around the world. Now there are more than three hundred. Uh, when I first started to look at these issues, um, toxic algal blooms happened occasionally. Now they're happening almost all the time. [14;09;14;26] Um, and so it's, it's just really speeding up. And this issue of the acidity of the ocean is just something that any thinking person has to be terrified of because, um, a lot of the, a lot of the primary production of the ocean, a lot of the basic cycles that make the air we breathe the way it is, um, are, are based on, uh, organisms that have little shells. [14;09;45;19] And, and there have been experiments done, um, that show when the ocean becomes somewhat acidic they can't make their little shells anymore. We, we don't have a clue what that means. You know, we don't know whether there are organisms that will take their place, that will do just as well, that will continue to be productive. [14;10;05;27] Um, but it's scary to contemplate the fact that the most important primary producers in the surface ocean in cold waters of the, of the global ocean are creatures that can't make their shells when the ocean becomes more acidic. [14;10;24;00] And we know the ocean is becoming more acidic. So it, it, it's, it's quite striking. INTERVIEWER So when you look ahead, you know, to, um, 2015, say, what - are you talking about shells of, of, uh, fish, what are we talking about, in terms of which specific species are gonna not be there? JEREMY JACKSON [14;10;45;00] You know, if you look, if you look ahead at, to 2015 you wouldn't see much of a difference, because it's only seven years. And, and change creeps up slowly. And, and until some threshold or tipping point is reached and then all hell breaks loose and, and, and you just, you - what happened, you know? [14;11;05;15] But my guess is that 2015 won't look very different and the nay sayers will say, You see, it's, it's, uh, the oceans have become a little bit more acidic but not that much has happened. Uh, um, there's a few more dead zones but we still have fish to eat. [14;11;22;04] Um, most people don't realize that the vast majority of the fish they eat does not come from the United States. It's basically stuff that we, we get from the West Coast of Africa or off the coast of Antarctica. You know, we're, we're, we're not only fishing down the, the, the food web to lower and lower and less and less desirable forms, but we're also fishing out geographically further and further away from the rich countries. [14;11;55;00] And, um, and that's why fish are still rather cheap in a place like a Costco. So fifteen, by 2015 it'll just be a little worse. It'll be like gas prices creeping up. By 2025, um, unless we, we virtually ban high seas fishing, um, goodbye tuna fish. You know, I mean, it, those kinds of things. And then people will say, Well, why didn't you tell me? [14;12;22;11] But the, but the, because these, it'll be like cod. Cod is a, a very important model because, uh, we fished it for four hundred years. And, and people said, Well, you know, you've warned us about this before but we still have it. And then all of a sudden we didn't have it. [14;12;42;02] Thirty-five thousand people lost their jobs in one day. They never got them back. Um, in California, um, tuna is a big deal. And, uh, not to mention that we're sort of finding out that dolphin-safe tuna aren't dolphin-safe because the tuna don't like being caught in those nets and so they don't reproduce. [14;13;04;15] And so the dolphins are going down the drain and the tunas are becoming rarer. Um, the most important fisheries in California are invertebrates, are things like squid and shellfish. Uh, they're no longer fish because most of the, most of the fish have been fished to the point where they're not, uh, a viable industry. [14;13;25;06] Tuna are still going fairly strong. There are no salmon left, uh, to fish in the northwest. Salmon, I think, are the cod of the Pacific. Um, who can imagine a world, um, you know, without lox and bagels? And then we'll farm it and we'll say, That's fine. [14;13;46;10] But we feed that farm salmon, um, this trash fish that we, we catch. Um, it's full of stuff that if you knew what was in it you probably wouldn't want to eat it. Um, and, uh, it's like farming lions and tigers. So imagine raising corn to feed cattle to feed to lions to eat the lions. It's not, um, it's not real efficient. [14;14;10;11] But salmon are lions and tigers. They're, they're top predators. They use up a lot of energy to, to make their flesh. And, and so, uh, what's dangerous is that, um, is that the next ten years won't be that bad. It'll be just like gas prices. The, and that could lull us into thinking, Well, we can adapt. [14;14;39;09] Um, but the tipping points - you know, the straw that broke the camel's back, um, syndrome is, is, um, is really scary. And we've had tipping points like cod and salmon. We've had tipping points like the, the creation of dead zones in places that once had very rich fisheries. [14;15;00;26] Um, we think we see tipping points coming with coral bleaching. Um... INTERVIEWER Explain that. Explain tipping points in terms of coral bleaching and coral reefs. What - JEREMY JACKSON [OVERLAP] Well, the -- INTERVIEWER [14;15;11;29] [OVERLAP] What happens? What, what do you see? JEREMY JACKSON [14;15;13;27] [OVERLAP] Well, you can't have a coral reef without coral. Coral's, uh, it's like New York City. You know, the corals are the buildings. And, and, and, you know, you, every time I go to New York there's one new building going up and there's one new building coming down - per, on every block. [14;15;30;23] And, and reefs are the same way. So there are corals growing and building buildings. And then there are all these things like sea urchins and whatever that are grinding them down and, and, and eating them and storms that, that break them up. [14;15;45;06] And, and so there's a dynamic balance. And if the rate of destruction exceeds the rate of construction, then you don't have a New York City anymore and you don't have a coral reef anymore. [14;15;58;05] And that's what's starting to happen in reefs all over the world because the corals are dying at increasing rates from more frequent hurricanes and stronger hurricanes but mostly from this phenomenon of coral bleaching where the water gets too warm. [14;16;16;26] This happy relationship between the coral and the, the algal cells that live inside it breaks down. The, the algae don't make the food for the corals. The coral says, You know, you're not paying your rent. The coral kicks 'em out. They, they turn white, which is why it's called bleaching. [14;16;33;13] And, um, they start to starve. And, um, [CLEARS THROAT] in, in good scenarios they get 'em back. And there are lots of different kinds. And one of the hopeful things is that some of these algae are more resistant to high temperature than others. [14;16;49;28] And so there's, um, there's a very real possibility that we may see some adaptation of this relationship. Um, but a lot of them die. Um, uh, in, in 1998 in the very strong El Nino, um, eighty per cent of all the corals in the Indian Ocean bleached. [14;17;11;10] Uh, the, the, there's an analogy that, that, that actually my wife gave me, which is that imagine you go camping on the 4th of July somewhere in, let's say on the Appalachian Trail. And you wake up in the morning and look around and eighty per cent of all the trees have dropped their leaves overnight. [14;17;29;26] And you come back to, to D.C. and, and, and you turn on the tube and you discover that eighty per cent of all the trees in all of North America dropped their leaves. And then about a month later, you know, on page seventeen of The New York Times, buried somewhere down below, it says, Oh, and by the way, a quarter of all those corals died. [14;17;53;14] So imagine how you'd feel if twenty per cent of all the trees in North America died because of something that happened on the 4th of July. Well, that's what happened in the Indian Ocean, to the corals of the Indian Ocean. And we sure as hell didn't read about it on the, the front page of the paper. [14;18;11;03] Um, coral reefs can't sustain many of those events. If, if, if, if twenty per cent of all the buildings in New York got knocked down in one bad year and this sort of thing happened every five years there wouldn't be any New York in twenty years. And, and so this is what we're all terrified. [14;18;29;26] Um, and then, um, you know, they also, corals grow more slowly when the environmental conditions aren't so good. That's as if, you know, the unions had four days off and three days to build the buildings. And so the buildings go up more slowly. [14;18;44;06] And, and so, uh, but the, you know, the guys who are tearing them down are tearing them down at the same rate. And so just because the construction is slower, the balance between construction and destruction is, is, is altered. [14;18;59;28] So coral reefs are, it's a, it's a very grim story. We, we, uh, we have over fishing, which we can do something about. [14;19;05;22] I, I gave a talk yesterday about, at the Coral Reef Meetings, about, about, uh, the, this, this shifting base line problem that we forget how luxuriant coral reefs were, um, the value of local protection and the, and the global threats. And, um, we're all so terrified of the global threats we tend to forget that, um, that over fishing is also a problem. [14;19;34;03] If we waved our magic wand and, and made global change go away, there wouldn't be any coral reefs in twenty or thirty years just because if we remove all the fish then, then the seaweeds grow over the corals and kill them and they get sick of disease and they disappear for different reasons. [14;19;49;17] So there is the excess nutrients from all that fertilizer and, and human waste. Um, there's a huge human waste problem in the Florida Keys. There's this, this, uh, this problem of fishing. There's this problem of climate change. [14;20;06;23] Uh, it looks grim for coral reefs, uh, and, and, um, they have disappeared from many places. INTERVIEWER And why should we care about coral reefs? JEREMY JACKSON [14;20;17;05] Well, if you lived in the state of Florida, if you were the Governor of Florida you'd care because the Florida, the coral reefs in the Florida Keys are worth billions of dollars a year. [14;20;24;26] Um, if you lived in Thailand and you had the tsunami and your coral reefs were all dead and your, and your mangroves were dead, uh, then all the people along that area of the coast were toast, whereas the people who lived behind big mangroves [HAND SLAP] and coral reefs, they, they absorbed the shock of the, of the wave and, and, and the damage was much less. Um, and they - INTERVIEWER [OVERLAP] Do they have coral reefs? What, what kind of [UNCLEAR] What, what are we talking about in terms of the damage that, that has -- JEREMY JACKSON [14;20;55;17] [OVERLAP] Well, we're, you know, it depends on whether you only care about yourself or whether you have some sort of sense that there is a, a wholeness to the world and, and that it makes you feel good to know that there are these beautiful places. [14;21;10;21] I mean, I study coral reefs because I, um, was moved as a child by the beauty that I saw and the fascination of it. I, I fully recognize that a lot of people who have never experienced maybe don't share that point of view. Um, economically, they're pretty big. [14;21;28;21] They're not as big as fisheries but they're pretty big. Certainly to the people of Florida they're a huge issue, to the people of Hawaii they're a big issue. Um, to the people of the island states of the world they're everything they have. [14;21;43;13] The fisheries of coral reefs in the developing world are the major source of protein for the people of some of the most populist nations in the world. The Philippines, Indonesia - um, when those people eat protein it's most fish. [14;22;02;09] It's not cattle or pork or, or, or sheep. So, so in, in, in those parts of the world coral reefs are a critical factor in the livelihood of hundreds of millions of people. Um, you know, we're sort of disconnected from that. And, and we don't even know where our fish comes from so what do we care? [14;22;24;27] But, but, um, and, and, you know, um, uh, we have, we're obsessed by terrorism but what we ought to be obsessed by is, is, is the kind of collapse of our societies because of the collapse of nations. And one of the major driving forces in the collapse of nations is the collapse of their natural resources. [14;22;53;28] And there are, you know, a couple of dozen nations around the world that are essentially dysfunctional, that have lost their infrastructure and in which war lords reign, like in Somalia. [14;23;10;12] And a huge component of that is the breakdown of resources and, and the poverty, poverty trap that the people, the people are in. [14;23;19;02] And, and, and so coral reefs, for example, are, are a big factor in, in the general well being of people and the, the functioning of society in these, in these southeast Asian nations that, that, um, are not particularly well developed. [14;23;40;22] So, and, and, and the same kind of argument goes for virtually every issue of the environment. It's, I mean, I personally deeply care about bio-diversity and it means something to me. But from a strictly human welfare point of view, the breakdown of our natural resources is not something that we can easily fix. [14;24;05;02] It's, it's, it's, you know, it's like the nursery rhyme of Humpty Dumpty, who, who had his great fall and, and all the king's horses and king's men couldn't put him back together again. We're really good at breaking ecosystems. We don't have a clue, really, of how to put back together a coral reef. [14;24;26;01] Uh, we don't even know how to put back together a, a, a salt marsh and yet we still allow new developments to destroy one and say they'll restore another one down the way. So, um, so the implications of all this are, are really big. INTERVIEWER [14;24;43;22] This is a, you know, just an ignorant question, but you talked about coral reefs and fish in the same breath. And I'm still looking, if you can just explain what the relationship between coral reefs are to fish and why, you know, if you could, if you destroy a coral reef it could mean that you destroy your, your protein source. [CLEARS THROAT] JEREMY JACKSON [14;25;03;01] Well, because, um, fish have very complicated, uh, they, they, the relationship between, between coral reef as a habitat and the fish and lobster that we like to eat is that the coral reef provides the home for the fish and the lobster. [14;25;24;10] And, uh, the life cycles of organisms in the ocean are, are much more complicated than most animals that live on the land, although insects approximate it in, in some cases. The, the, the typical fish, um, or say, lobster, um, releases eggs and sperm just into the open ocean. [14;25;46;04] They, they fertilize by chance, uh, although there are very elaborate mechanisms to, to have them sort of get together. To increase the chance of that the fertilized egg grows up into, uh, what we call a larva. [14;26;01;08] It floats around in the ocean for varying lengths of time, feeding or not feeding. It's, there are lots of details that don't really matter. And then they have to settle down into a, a habitat, which is the right place to live. [14;26;13;28] It's sort of like looking for a new apartment in a, in a different city. And, and, and, you know, we choose our apartment based on how much money we can afford to pay for the rent and what kind of neighborhood we'd like to live in. [14;26;26;11] Well, it's the same for these organisms, except it's much more severe because they won't, they won't survive at all unless they find, um, [CLEARS THROAT] a place with the right cues for the larva to know I should settle here, because they don't exactly have brains and they're not thinking about the address. [14;26;42;23] And so, so there are these, these cues that determine whether or not they'll settle. Coral won't settle unless there's a particular kind of, of what we call calcareous algae growing all over, that they're, they're sort of programmed to say, Ah, this is a good place. I'm going to settle down here. [14;27;02;14] Lobsters do that, fish do that. Lots of reef fish float around for six months or a, a year in the water. If, when they, they come down and they settle as tiny little things, they -- um, a, a, a, uh, a quarter of an inch long, a half an inch long - they're, uh, they're sort of sitting ducks for bigger fish, right? And big fish eat little fish. [14;27;26;15] And so, uh, they start their life out very neurotic and, and, and hiding in little places to escape from predators. Um, the corals provide those little places to hide. [14;27;37;04] Um, [CLEARS THROAT] as they grow bigger they change their behavior. They change their diet, they move on to different things. So if we lose coral, uh, reefs we lose the habitat for a vast array of the organisms that mean something to us. [14;27;53;19] If we lose mangroves -- it turns out that a lot of the fish we like to eat start out as babies in mangroves, then move to the, the sea grass meadows that are sort of offshore from them and then eventually end up on the coral reefs. [14;28;09;22] And so, um, you know, it's not just the coral reef. It's also these other associated environments that are critical to different life stages. Shrimp are utterly dependent on sea grass beds in tropical shrimp, in, in these kinds of areas. [14;28;26;12] When the sea grasses of Florida Bay died the shrimp were, were gone, you know, for - It was very bad years for shrimp. So, so, um, the, the habitat for organisms is, is, is a critical factor in their development and, uh, there have now been some very elegant studies that have shown that in places where the corals died because of bleaching or disease or, uh, overgrowth by algae because of over fishing - it doesn't matter why they died - in places where they have died on a massive scale and have been overgrown by algae the abundance of fish drops precipitously. [14;29;12;00] In places, not because of fishing, but because the fish don't like it and they leave. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] [CUT TAPE] END TAPE 109.
APTN 1830 PRIME NEWS NORTH AMERICA
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Thursday, 18 March 2010 North America Prime News MidEast Attack 3 04:19 See Script REPLAY Thai man killed by rocket fired from Gaza, militant video; Israeli reax ++US Suspect 00:58 See Script NEW US woman denies involvement in plot to kill Swedish artist ++US Healthcare 03:00 See Script NEW Obama further delays Asia visit ahead of crucial healthcare vote Guatemala Extradition 02:50 AP Clients Only REPLAY Court agrrees to extradite former Gauatemalan president to US Cuba Dissidents 02:15 AP Clients Only REPLAY Wives march to mark anniversary of arrest of dissident men Russia US 2 03:23 AP Clients Only REPLAY Clinton and Lavrov give news conference Iraq Vote Count 01:13 AP Clients Only REPLAY Iraqi central electoral commission press conference Qatar Tuna 2 02:55 AP Clients Only REPLAY Proposed ban on blue fin tuna trade defeated; vote, reax B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 03-18-10 1456EDT -----------End of rundown----------- AP-APTN-1830: MidEast Attack 3 Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:MidEast Attack 3- REPLAY Thai man killed by rocket fired from Gaza, militant video; Israeli reax LENGTH: 04:19 FIRST RUN: 1630 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Arabic/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 640476 DATELINE: Various, 18 March 2010 LENGTH: 04:19 ++CLIENTS PLEASE IGNORE EDIT JUST SENT AND REPLACE WITH THIS ONE++ CHANNEL 2- NO ACCESS ISRAEL AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++MILITANT VIDEO/UNKNOWN SOURCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY++ ++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: AP TELEVISION CANNOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE CONTENT OF THE MILITANT VIDEO WHICH PURPORTS TO SHOW THE LAUNCHING OF A ROCKET ON THURSDAY 18 MARCH++ SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 1430 ME EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 18 MARCH 2010) MILITANT VIDEO/UNKNOWN SOURCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: AP TELEVISION CANNOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE CONTENT OF THE MILITANT VIDEO WHICH PURPORTS TO SHOW THE LAUNCHING OF A ROCKET ON THURSDAY 18 MARCH++ Gaza Strip - exact location unknown 1. Video purporting to show rocket being launched AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gaza city, Gaza Strip - 18 March 2010 2. Wide of Abu Thaer spokesman of Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades 3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abu Thaer, spokesman of Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades: "Martyr Ayman Judah groups (unit of Al-Aqsa Brigades) fired on Ashkelon (South Israel) an Al Aqsa 3 (type of Palestinian made rocket) missile, and this comes as part of our response to the Judaization of our sacred places and note that the launch of the missile was at 11:30." 4. End shot of Thaer (FIRST RUN 1230 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 18 MARCH 2010) CHANNEL 2 - NO ACCESS ISRAEL Netiv Haasara, southern Israel - 18 March 2010 5. Wide of hit area, zoom in on body on the ground next to ambulance 6. Wide of hit area, ambulance 7. Wide of medics and police surrounding body on the ground 8. Blood on the ground, zoom in to body covered by sheet (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Netiv Haasara, southern Israel - 18 March 2010 9. Ambulance leaving scene 10. Soldiers at scene 11. Wide of damaged greenhouse where rocket struck 12. Israeli police at scene 13. Wide of kibbutz workers 14. Kibbutz worker crying ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Netiv Haasara, southern Israel, 18 March 2010 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Danny Ayalon, Israeli Deputy Defence Minister: "I'm here to say that Israel will not, will not allow terrorism, Palestinian terrorism to continue their attacks and to kill Israelis and we will have to keep deterrence and response. Also the second point I want to make is at the same time where Israel is stretching their hand for peace, for the last 12 months, and the Palestinians are keeping their intransigence and they are not coming to the table, with all kinds of excuses and pre-conditions. On top of that they are inciting, this is what we saw in Jerusalem yesterday, when they are through lies and incitement try to inflame the areas and we see the continuation here with the Qassam (rocket) and the dead man here today." (FIRST RUN 1230 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gaza City, Gaza Strip - 18 March 2010 16. Set up shot of Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum 17. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Fawzi Barhoum, Hamas spokesman: "The one who carries the consequences of this dramatic escalation against our people and our land and our holy places is the Zionist enemy who keeps doing a merciless war against the Islamic sacred places and the Palestinian people, and ignoring the Palestinian people's feelings and also ignoring the regional and international interventions to stop the vicious Zionist attack." 18. End shot of Barhoum (FIRST RUN 1430 ME EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Erez crossing, Israeli side - 18 March 2010 19. Various of convoy carrying European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton leaving Gaza 20. Catherine Ashton, European Union foreign policy chief walking 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Catherine Ashton, European Union foreign policy chief: "I'm extremely shocked by the rocket attack and very saddened by the tragic loss of life it has brought. I said when I came to Israel that part of the reason for my trip in this region was to express my concern that we move as quickly as we can to proximity talks and from proximity talks to concluding talks, and I urge everyone to continue to work in that direction and to make sure that these incidents cannot deter us from finding a lasting peace in this region." 22. Ashton getting into car STORYLINE Palestinian militants fired a rocket at Israel from the Gaza Strip on Thursday, killing a Thai farm worker, Israeli medics said, in the first death from such an attack since the Gaza offensive last year. An Israeli emergency service official said the man was about 30 years old and was working in an agricultural community just north of Gaza. Tens of thousands of foreign labourers work in construction, agriculture and other menial jobs in Israel. In many cases, these foreign workers have replaced Palestinian labourers from Gaza, who are no longer allowed to enter Israel. A small Islamist faction calling itself Ansar al-Sunna was the first to claim responsibility for the attack. Similar groups, which are inspired by al-Qaida's ideology and see Gaza's Hamas rulers as too moderate, have been responsible for most of the attacks since the Gaza war ended in January 2009. A second group, the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, also later claimed responsibility and handed out a video purporting to show the moment the rocket was launched. Thursday's dual claims of responsibility, which could not be independently verified, came from Hamas' rivals. Israel's Deputy Defence Minister meanwhile condemned the rocket attack. Danny Ayalon said such actions were worsening any chance for peace between Israel and the Palestinians. "I'm here to say that Israel will not, will not allow terrorism, Palestinian terrorism to continue their attacks and to kill Israelis and we will have to keep deterrence and response," Aylon told reporters. In Gaza, Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum accused Israel of provoking the attack. "The one who carries the consequences of this dramatic escalation against our people and our land and our holy places is the Zionist enemy," he said. He added that Israel kept "doing a merciless war against the Islamic sacred places and the Palestinian people, and ignoring the Palestinian people's feelings." Thursday's attack came on the same day as a visit to Gaza by Europe's top diplomat, EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, who had just crossed into the territory when the rocket was fired. She condemned the attack, as did United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. "All such acts of terror and violence against civilians are totally unacceptable and contrary to international law," he said in a statement. In a statement e-mailed to reporters in Gaza, the Ansar al-Sunna faction said the attack was a response to Israel's "Judaization" of Islamic holy places in Jerusalem and elsewhere in the West Bank. In a filmed statement, a man claiming to be the spokesman of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, Abu Thaer made a similar remark saying "this comes as part of our response to the Judaization of our sacred places." Israel's military said it was the third rocket fired from Gaza in a 12-hour stretch. There was no immediate Israeli retaliation. Israel claims that thousands of crude rockets launched from Gaza at Israel over a seven-year period sparked its military's three-week offensive in the Gaza Strip last year in late 2008 and early 2009. The brief war devastated the Palestinian territory, killing 1,400 Palestinians, including hundreds of civilians. Thirteen Israelis were killed. Rocket attacks and border ambushes have dropped dramatically since the war, but have not come to a complete halt. Hamas itself has largely refrained from carrying out attacks since that conflict and had urged rival groups to maintain the calm. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1437EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++US Suspect Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:++US Suspect- NEW US woman denies involvement in plot to kill Swedish artist LENGTH: 00:58 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/AP PHOTOS/SITE INTELLIGENCE GROUP STORY NUMBER: 640507 DATELINE: Philadelphia - 10/18 Mar 2010 LENGTH: 00:58 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY - MANDATORY COURTESY JANET HAMLIN AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE SITE INTELLIGENCE GROUP- AP CLIENTS ONLY -MANDATORY COURTESY SITE INTELLIGENCE GROUP SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY - MANDATORY COURTESY JANET HAMLIN Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - 18 March 2010 1. STILL court sketch of courtroom 2. STILL court sketch of suspect Colleen LaRose, also known as 'Jihad Jane' AP PHOTOS/TOM GREEN COUNTY JAIL HANDOUT - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE FILE: San Angelo, Texas - 26 June 1997 3. STILL Police mug shot of LaRose AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY - MANDATORY COURTESY JANET HAMLIN Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - 18 March 2010 4. STILL court sketch of LaRose SITE INTELLIGENCE GROUP- AP CLIENTS ONLY - MANDATORY COURTESY SITE INTELLIGENCE GROUP FILE: Location and Date Unknown 5. STILL photo of LaRose 6. STILL photo of LaRose AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Pennsburg, Pennsylvania - 10 March 2010 7. Wide of street where LaRose lived with her ex-boyfriend 8. Wide of house where LaRose lived 9. Close-up of entrance to house 10. Tilt down of house where LaRose lived STORYLINE: A Pennsylvania woman accused of trolling the Internet as "Jihad Jane" denied in court on Thursday that she sought to kill a Swedish artist targeted by radical Muslims or agreed to marry a terrorism suspect to help him get travel documents. Colleen LaRose, 46, of Pennsburg, appeared in federal court wearing a green jumpsuit and corn rows in her blond hair, smiling warmly at her public defenders when she entered the courtroom for her arraignment. The judge set a May 3 trial date on charges in the four-count indictment, unsealed last week. LaRose was accused of conspiring with fighters overseas and pledging to commit murder in the name of a Muslim holy war, or jihad. She was arrested on October 15 when returning to Philadelphia from Europe and remained in federal custody while authorities pursued the investigation. The indictment was filed on March 4 and made public five days later after authorities rounded up seven terror suspects in Ireland. Those suspects are linked to LaRose, according to a US official not authorised to discuss the case, who spoke to The Associated Press previously on condition of anonymity. Thursday's hearing lasted less than five minutes, just long enough for LaRose to say "not guilty" when asked her plea to the charges: conspiring to aid terrorists, conspiring to kill someone overseas, lying to the FBI and stealing her ex-boyfriend's passport. Authorities were on her trail as early as July 2009, when the FBI interviewed her about more than a year's worth of online posts and messages, including a 2008 YouTube video in which she said she was "desperate to do something" to ease the suffering of Muslims. She denied to agents that she had used the screen name "Jihad Jane" or had sent any of the messages recovered, which included fundraising appeals for the jihadist cause, according to the indictment. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1508EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++US Healthcare Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:++US Healthcare- NEW Obama further delays Asia visit ahead of crucial healthcare vote LENGTH: 03:00 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 640506 DATELINE: Washington DC - 18 Mar 2010/File LENGTH: 03:00 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY US BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING - AP CLIENTS ONLY POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: AP Television - AP Clients Only Washington, DC - 18 March 2010 1. Wide of White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs walking to podium 2. Various cutaways of news conference 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House Press Secretary: "Since the House rules rightly provide for a 72 hour public review period, it is clear that a final vote on health insurance reform cannot take place before Sunday afternoon. As a result, the President telephoned the leader of Indonesia and will call the leader of Australia later this afternoon and tell them that he must postpone his planned visits for a later date so that he can remain in Washington for this critical vote. The President now expects to visit Indonesia in June." 4. Cutaway of reporters 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House Press Secretary: "The President greatly regrets the delay; our international alliances are critical to America's security and economic progress but passage of health insurance reform is of paramount importance and the President is determined to see this battle through." 6. Cutaway of reporters US Bureau of Engraving and Printing - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington, DC - date unknown 7. Various of US dollars being printed on printing press Handout - US Department of Health and Human Services - AP Clients Only FILE - Washington, DC - date unknown 8. Nurse taking patient's temperature AP Television - AP Clients Only Washington, DC - 18 March 2010 9. Wide of US President Barack Obama walking out of White House 10. Cutaway of press 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Barack Obama, US President: "This morning, a new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office concludes that the reform we seek would bring 1.3 (t) trillion dollars in deficit reduction over the next two decades. That makes this legislation the most significant effort to reduce deficits since the Balanced Budget Act in the 1990s. And this is, this is but one virtue of a reform that will bring new accountability to the insurance industry and greater economic security to all Americans. So I urge every member of Congress to consider this as they prepare for their important vote this weekend." POOL - AP Clients Only Washington, DC - 18 March 2010 12. Wide of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi walking to podium at news conference 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nancy Pelosi, US House Speaker: "For the health and well being of the American people, for the fiscal soundness of America's budget, for seniors, for our young people, for women, for small businesses and for competitiveness, we will make history and we will make progress by passing this legislation." 14. Wide of Republican leaders walking down halls of Capitol building 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Boehner, House Republican Leader: "Republicans in the House and Senate have worked closely together over the last year and we're going to continue to work closely together to do everything that we can do to make sure that this bill never, ever, ever passes." AP Television - AP Clients Only Washington, DC - 18 March 2010 16. Mid of man carrying sign reading: (English) "Kill Health Care Bill," pull out to wide of the Capitol building STORYLINE: US President Barack Obama is postponing a trip to Asia until June so he can stay in Washington for a possible Sunday vote on his health care overhaul plan. White House spokesman Robert Gibbs made the announcement during Thursday's White House briefing. Gibbs said Obama called the leaders of Indonesia and Australia to express his regret that he will not be able to visit their nations next week as planned. "The President greatly regrets the delay. Our international alliances are critical to America's security and economic progress but passage of health insurance reform is of paramount importance and the President is determined to see this battle through," Gibbs said. Obama had already pushed the trip back once, delaying his originally scheduled March 18 departure until Sunday so he could help Democrats on Capitol Hill rally last-minute votes for the plan. House Democrats say they are on track to vote on Sunday on a 940 (b) billion dollar health care bill that will expand coverage to (m) millions. Offering a boost of sorts to Democrats still lobbying for more votes, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated on Thursday that Obama's legislation would cut the federal deficit by 138 (b) billion dollars over 10 years. The CBO also said the plan would provide coverage to 32 (m) million people now uninsured by 2016, bring the total number of insured to about 95 percent of eligible Americans. It estimated the bill would cost 940 (b) billion dollars over the next 10 years - more than paid for by Medicare cuts and some new taxes. In the White House Rose Garden on Thursday morning, Obama urged lawmakers to consider those figures as they prepare to vote on the bill. "This is but one virtue of a reform that will bring new accountability to the insurance industry and greater economic security to all Americans. So I urge every member of Congress to consider this as they prepare for their important vote this weekend," the president said. Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, Democrats continued their scramble for last-minute votes. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said a Sunday vote was planned for the bill, calling the legislation historic. Still, Pelosi predicted an all-out assault by Republicans and the insurance industry as Democrats get closer to passage of the bill. Republicans, themselves, said they'd do everything in their power to defeat the measure. "We're going to continue to work closely together to do everything that we can do to make sure that this bill never, ever, ever passes," said House Republican leader John Boehner. The White House said President Obama will continue his one-on-one hard sell of the legislation to wavering members of Congress up until the final hours. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1541EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Guatemala Extradition Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:Guatemala Extradition- REPLAY Court agrees to extradite former Guatemalan president to US LENGTH: 02:50 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Spanish/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640472 DATELINE: Guatemala City - 18 Mar 2010 LENGTH: 02:50 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of security convoy taking former President Alfonso Portillo to tribunal 2. Tight of former President Alfonso Portillo getting out of vehicle and heading to court 3. Tilt up from Portillo's hands to his face 4. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Morelia Rios, Judge: "The United States of America has filed an extradition request for the Guatemalan citizen Alfonso Portillo for money-laundering." 5. Tight shot of Guatemalan flag in courtroom 6. Wide shot of court room 7. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Eunice Mendizabal, Public Ministry Prosecutor: "They accuse Mr. Alfonso Portillo Cabrera of acts committed from 1999 to 2009, it is necessary to establish that those acts that he's accused of were on US territory to launder money and from there to other countries." 8. Wide shot of journalists 9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Alfonso Portillo, former Guatemalan President: "Supposing that the crime of laundering exists and matches the formal charges, the last activity that has to be seen with these petitions is a withdrawal of 10,000 dollars that occurred on September 27, 2006 in Switzerland." 10. Tight shot of extradition file for Portillo 11. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Morelia Rios, Judge: "The court has received a phone call in which the callers said they had our family members and if we don't halt the proceedings they will be killed." 12. Various of court officials phoning family members to check they are safe 13. Wide shot of audience ++SOUND AS INCOMING++ 14. Mid shot of Portillo/ UPSOUND: (Spanish) court secretary, no name available: "The court announces the extradition request by the US will proceed against Alfonso Portillo Carbrera for the offence of conspiracy to launder money." STORYLINE: A Guatemalan court has approved former President Alfonso Portillo's extradition to the US to face money laundering charges. Portillo does not face imminent extradition, however. Under Guatemalan law, he must first be tried at home in a separate corruption case before facing charges abroad. During the proceedings, Prosecutor Eunice Mendizabal outlined the charges. "They accuse Mr. Alfonso Portillo Cabrera of acts committed from 1999 to 2009, it is necessary to establish a that those acts that he's accused of used US territory to launder money and from there to other countries," she said. Portillo denied any wrongdoing, saying one of the alleged transfers came after his term ended in 2004. "Supposing that the crime of laundering exists and matches the formal charges, the last activity that has to be seen with these petitions is a withdrawal of 10,000 dollars that occurred on September 27, 2006 in Switzerland," he said. Proceedings were interrupted after the judge, Morelia Rios, announced a threatening phone call had been made to the court. "The court has received a phone call in which the callers said they had our family members and if we don't halt the proceedings they will be killed," said Rios. Court officials hurriedly called their family members. After assuring that they were all safe, the judge resumed the hearing. A court secretary announced the extradition request would go forward. Portillo denies the charges and vows to appeal Wednesday's ruling. He is charged in a New York federal court with embezzling 1.5 (m) million dollars in foreign donations intended to buy school library books in Guatemala. He allegedly endorsed cheques drawn from a New York bank and deposited them in a Miami account. Portillo was president from 2000 to 2004. He was arrested January 26 on the US extradition request. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1605EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Cuba Dissidents Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:Cuba Dissidents- REPLAY Wives march to mark anniversary of arrest of dissident men LENGTH: 02:15 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640491 DATELINE: Havana, 18 March 2010 LENGTH: 02:15 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Pull out Ladies in White holding flowers and surrounded by pro-government crowd as they march down street 2. Mid shot of Ladies' flowers surrounded by crowd 3. Zoom into Reina Tamayo, mother of dead hunger striker, shouting (Spanish): "Zapata Lives!" 4. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Laura Pollan, Lady in White: "They either kill us in the street, or take us to prison, or give them their freedom. We will not stop marching, no matter what happens." 5. Wide shot crowd chanting surrounding Ladies in White 6. Pull out from Fidel and Che posters to crowd shouting (Spanish): "He who doesn't jump is a Yankee! He who doesn't jump is a Yankee!" 7. Zoom into Ladies in White entering home as crowd pushes and shouts at them 8. Travelling shot woman being arrested and forced into government vehicle. 9. Close up of Ladies in White at window shouting at crowd (Spanish): "Long live Human Rights! Freedom for political prisoners!" 10. Mid shot of pushing and shoving as Ladies in White make their way into house 11. Pull out crowd outside home singing Cuban national anthem STORYLINE: For the third day in a row, a peaceful opposition march by the Damas de Blanca - or "Ladies in White" - degenerated into a shouting match in Cuba on Thursday, raising tensions on the anniversary of a major crackdown on dissent. Dozens of the protesters marched through Havana's crowded streets, surrounded by a mass uniformed Cuban security agents, undercover agents and counter-protesters. The Ladies in White waved pink gladiolas as they marched and chanted. The women are the mothers and wives of dissidents, marching in the streets of the capital to demand the release of their loved ones. The security operatives surrounding the women protected them from a crowd of hundreds of screaming pro-government supporters who shoved the women as they left a local church and walked home. The Ladies in White are the relatives of some 75 dissidents arrested in a sweeping government operation on or around March 18, 2003. Some 53 of the dissidents remain in jail, many of whom have sentences lasting decades. As a group of about 30 Ladies in White left a church in Old Havana, a crowd of hundreds of pro-government supporters crowded around them, shouting "Long Live Fidel!" and calling to the women "Get out, worms!" Such "acts of repudiation" have become something of a ritual in Cuba. The government claims they arise spontaneously as a result of Cubans disgusted with the dissidents. Others believe that the government organises them and that many of those taking part are members of state security. One woman was detained and carried to an undercover security vehicle where she was forced into the back seat. It remains unclear who the woman was or why she was detained. The women walked about two miles (three miles) to the home of one of the group's organisers. Pro-government demonstrators gathered outside the door and continued shouting and chanting. Meanwhile, the Ladies in White crowded into a window facing the mob and shouted back "Long live Human Rights!" and "Freedom for political prisoners!" It culminated with the pro-government group singing Cuba's national anthem. Cuba's human rights situation has been a cause of renewed international tension since the 23 February death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo after a long hunger strike in jail. Another man, Guillermo Farinas, has refused to eat or drink since shortly after Zapata Tamayo's death, though he is currently allowing himself to be fed intravenously at a local hospital. The European Parliament voted overwhelmingly to condemn Cuba for Zapata Tamayo's death last week, and a group of artists and intellectuals including Pedro Almodovar have begun to circulate a petition against the Cuban government for its actions. On Tuesday, the human rights group Amnesty lent its voice to the criticism, calling for the release of all political prisoners. Cuba has lashed out at the criticism, saying it will not accept pressure or give in to blackmail. It considers the dissidents common criminals who are paid by the United States to destabilise the government, and says every country should have the right to jail traitors. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1438EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Russia US 2 Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:Russia US 2- REPLAY Clinton and Lavrov give news conference, comment on nuclear treaty LENGTH: 03:23 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640439 DATELINE: Moscow, 18 March 2010 LENGTH: 03:23 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Exterior Russian Foreign Ministry Guest House 2. Wide of Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton entering to hold talks 3. Mid of Lavrov and Clinton shaking hands and posing for pictures 4. Mid of reporters 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State "We met for the first time over a year ago in Geneva. And in that last year I think that bilateral relationship between the United States and Russia has moved in a very positive direction". 6. Wide of talks 7. Wide of Lavrov and Clinton taking seats at press conference 8. Wide of reporters 9. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Sergey Lavrov, Russian Foreign Minister: "Russia and our US partner have a common strategic goal - not to allow a violation of regime of non-proliferation, to remove the concerns which exist around Iran's nuclear activity and to provide a total cooperation between Iran and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)". 10. Wide of news conference 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State: "Iran is entitled to civil nuclear power. It is a nuclear weapons programme that it is not entitled too. And if it reassures the world or its behaviour is changed because of international sanctions then they can pursue peaceful, civil nuclear power. In the absence of those reassurances we think it would be premature to go forward with any project at this time because we want to send an unequivocal message to the Iranians". 12. Mid of press 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State: "We are making substantial progress on the new START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) treaty. That's the word from my negotiators in Geneva and the results from the latest negotiating rounds lead us to believe we will be reaching a final agreement soon". 14. Mid of press, reverse shot 15. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Sergey Lavrov, Russian Foreign Minister: "This project will be finished. Now the appropriate steps on providing all the technological requirements come into the closing stage, and this nuclear power station (in the Iranian port city of Bushehr) will be launched, it will be working and giving electric energy. This is an object which is under the total guarantee of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and which plays a very important role, and that was admitted not just once by our partners in the US as well as our other partners, including our European partners. Bushehr plays a special role in providing the presence of IAEA in Iran and in providing a discharge of obligations by Iran under a non-proliferation treaty". 16. Wide of press 17. Wide of Lavrov and Clinton leaving press conference STORYLINE: US Secretary of State Hilary Rodham Clinton said on Thursday that Washington and Moscow were making "substantial progress" in negotiating a replacement pact to an expired treaty on limiting their strategic nuclear arsenals. Clinton spoke in Moscow during a two-day visit for talks on a range of international issues, after a one-on-one meeting with her Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov. The long-awaited replacement to the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty - which expired on 5 December - is a pillar of the so-called reset in relations between the former Cold War foes. President Barack Obama and his Russian counterpart, Dmitry Medvedev, called for a quick signing at their Moscow summit in July, but negotiations stalled over such issues as counting methods, verification procedures and US Plans for a missile defence system in Europe. Teams of negotiators from both countries have been hammering out a new pact over the last months in Switzerland. "We are making substantial progress on the new START treaty. The word from our negotiators in Geneva and the results from the latest negotiating rounds lead us to believe we will be reaching a final agreement soon," Clinton said. Some observers say Russia and the US want a deal reached before nonproliferation conferences in the United States in April and May. Clinton has urged Russia to delay launching Iran's nuclear plant until Tehran proves that it's not pursuing atomic weapons. Clinton made the statement on Thursday when asked about Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's statement that Iran's first nuclear reactor was set to be launched this summer. Clinton said Iran was entitled to civil atomic energy, but added it would be premature to go forward with any nuclear project when Tehran had yet to prove the peaceful nature of its programme. The US and other nations are concerned that Iran has been trying to secretly develop nuclear weapons. Lavrov said that Russia still intended to launch the plant in the Iranian port city of Bushehr. Both spoke after their talks in Moscow. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1457EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Iraq Vote Count Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:Iraq Vote Count- REPLAY Iraqi central electoral commission press conference LENGTH: 01:13 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Arabic/Natsound SOURCE: AGENCY POOL STORY NUMBER: 640493 DATELINE: Baghdad, 18 March 2010 LENGTH: 01:13 AGENCY POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Wide of news conference by Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) 2. Cutaway of cameramen 3. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Judge Qasim al-Abudi, IHEC official: "Today we have announced 89 percent of the results of election. I hope we were able to solve the problems we had with the CD (containing electoral results) and we provided all parties with a CD. The results include 70 percent of the special voting. Vote counting is underway in some provinces." 4. Wide of reporters 5. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Judge Qasim al-Abudi, IHEC official: "We hope to finish the counting of votes regarding the special vote tomorrow in order to announce the final results during the next few days. Actually, the IHEC's board of commissioners is at meeting to issue decisions regarding complaints (filed by political blocs)." 6. Wide of banner reading Independent High Electoral Commission STORYLINE The Iraqi prime minister's coalition has kept an edge of almost 40,000 votes ahead of his secular rival in the latest release of preliminary results from the 7 March parliamentary elections. The latest tally shows Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki locked in a very tight race with his secular Shiite challenger, former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi. The partial results, released on Thursday by Iraq's election commission, were based on 89 percent of ballots counted. Al-Maliki is winning in seven of Iraq's 18 provinces, while Allawi leads in five. The results also include 70 percent of ballots tallied from the early voting by policemen, soldiers and hospital patients and staff. The vote counting has been protracted, with results released piecemeal and marred by fraud accusations. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1541EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Qatar Tuna 2 Thursday, 18 March 2010 STORY:Qatar Tuna 2- REPLAY Proposed ban on blue fin tuna trade defeated; vote, reax LENGTH: 02:55 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/GREENPEACE STORY NUMBER: 640474 DATELINE: Doha, 18 March 2010/ File LENGTH: 02:55 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY GREENPEACE - AP CLIENTS ONLY (FIRST RUN 1330 NEWS UPDATE - 18 MARCH 2010) GREENPEACE - AP Clients Only FILE: At sea, Cyprus - 19 June 2006 1. Various aerials of bluefin tuna fishing 2. Various underwater shots of bluefin tuna swimming inside tuna cage (FIRST RUN 1530 NEWS UPDATE - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only Doha, Qatar - 18 March 2010 3. Chairman announcing start of vote on banning export of bluefin tuna at CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) 4. Mid of delegates voting 5. Wide of delegates voting UPSOUND: chairman announcing 'voting stops now' 6. Computer screen reading that voting finished 7. Chairman announcing results of vote 8. Various of delegates applauding ++AUDIO AS INCOMING++ 9. Wide set up of head of Monaco delegation Patrick Van Klaveren 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Patrick Van Klaveren, head of Monaco delegation: "No no, ah yes, I am disappointed for some second on the moment, yes, sure, but not disappointed because there will be a follow-up. Ok, I am sorry, I have to go to a press conference." 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jane Lyder, head of US delegation: "There was an intense amount of lobbying that went on here at this meeting, an intense amount of pressure that was put on many of the parties to this delegation. We understand that, we understand that that happens, and so while we're disappointed by the vote, we're not surprised by the vote." 12. Head of Japanese delegation Masanori Miyahara talking to media 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Masanori Miyahara, head of Japanese delegation: "I'm happy to have this result, but at the same time the meeting has not finished yet. So we will just continue our work until the end of the plenary of this conference, and after that, of course we have commitment to work in ICCAT to ensure the recovery of Atlantic bluefin tuna. That is a big task, it is a more important task for us." 14. Mid of Miyahara talking to reporters (FIRST RUN 1330 NEWS UPDATE - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only FILE: Sapporo, Japan - 7 June 2009 15. Bluefin tuna being filleted at Sapporo Central Wholesale Market (FIRST RUN 1330 NEWS UPDATE - 18 MARCH 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only FILE: Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan - 16 May 2009 16. Tuna being filleted at counter in department store STORYLINE: A US-backed proposal to ban the export of Atlantic bluefin tuna prized in sushi was rejected on Thursday by a UN wildlife meeting, with scores of developing nations joining Japan in opposing a measure they feared would devastate fishing economies. It was a stunning setback for conservationists who had hoped the 175-nation Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, would give the iconic fish a lifeline. They joined the proposal's sponsor Monaco in arguing that extreme measures were necessary because the stocks have fallen by 75 percent due to widespread overfishing. However, following the decision, Monaco's Patrick Van Klaveren said that his disappointment in the failure of the ban was momentary, because he had confidence in follow-up measures. As the debate opened, Monaco painted a dire picture for a once-abundant species that roams across vast stretched of the Atlantic Ocean and can grow to as big as 1,500 pounds (682 kilograms). It has been depleted by the growing demand for raw tuna for traditional dishes such as sushi and sashimi. The bluefin variety - called "hon-maguro" in Japan - is particularly prized with a 200-kilogram (440-pound) Pacific bluefin tuna fetching a record 20.2 million yen (220 thousand US dollars) last year. Van Klaveren told delegates that it was no longer a case of "exploitation by traditional fishing people to meet regional needs," but industrial scale fishing having a severe impact on the species and its capacity to recover. "We are facing a real ecosystem collapse," he said. But it became clear that the proposal had little support. Only the United States, Norway and Kenya supported the proposal outright. The European Union asked that implementation be delayed until May 2011 to give authorities time to respond to concerns about overfishing. Fishing nations from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean complained any ban would damage their fishing communities and that fears of the stock's collapse were overstated. Libya, in a rambling defence of its position, went so far as accusing Monaco of lying and trying to mislead the delegates before calling for the snap vote. Japan, which imports 80 percent of Atlantic bluefin and has led the opposition to the ban, acknowledged stocks were in trouble but echoed a growing consensus at the meeting that CITES should have no role in regulating tuna and other marine species. It expressed willingness to accept lower quotas for bluefin tuna but wanted those to come from the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, or ICCAT, which currently regulates the trade. Masanori Miyahara, chief counsellor of the Fisheries Agency of Japan, said that Japan is "very serious" about measures to conserve the Atlantic bluefin tuna and aims to "ensure the recovery of the stock". However, he said that Japan believes regulation should come from ICCAT, not CITES, a position which he said was shared by most Asian nations. Afterward, Miyahara welcomed the decision but admitted the pressure would be on his country and others who depend on the Atlantic bluefin to abide by ICCAT. It ruled in November to reduce its quota from 22,000 tons to 13,500 tons for this year. The body has also vowed to rebuild the stock by 2022, which could include closing some fisheries if necessary. But the European Union's Gael de Rotalier said the vote set a worrying precedent and showed there was widespread mistrust about giving CITES any role in marine issues. That could bode ill for several other proposals still pending, including several regulating the trade in sharks and one dealing with red and pink corals. If that would occur, a meeting that was expected to boost the protection of marine species wood be seen by many environmentalists as a failure. The tuna defeat came hours after delegates rejected a US proposal to ban the international sale of polar bear skins and parts, suggesting that economic interests at this meeting were trumping conservation. Jane Lyder, head of the US delegation which backed the tuna vote blamed the outcome on "an intense amount of lobbying". The Americans argued that the sale of polar bears skins is compounding the loss of the animals' sea ice habitat due to climate change. There are projections that the bear's numbers, which are estimated at 20,000 to 25,000, could decline by two-thirds due by 2050 due to habitat loss in the Arctic. But Canada, Greenland and several indigenous communities argued the trade had little impact on the white bears' population and would adversely affect their economies. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-18-10 1438EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------