WHITECHAPEL MARKET/CANARY WHARF TUBE
00:10:00:00 Ext gvs WHITECHAPEL tube station; commuters out of station exit; "Islamic extremism" poster; ext of tube station; street scenes - people along w/ GHERKIN / SWISS RE building in foreground ...
Isle Of Dogs and Canary Wharf, during the Covid-19 lockdown, London filmed by helicopter
Hosiho
Canary Wharf train station
Canary Wharf, ext. train station London3_-27
Entertainment: Turin Brakes - Indie band lead celebration of legal busking on London's Underground
TAPE: EF03/0459 IN_TIME: 14:23:35 DURATION: 2:12 SOURCES: VNR/ EMI RESTRICTIONS: music/performance rights must be cleared DATELINE: London 16/05/10 SHOTLIST VNR (EMI) 1. Various London Underground Station 2. London Underbround sign 3. Ws of the elevator people going up 4. Turin Brakes playing at tube station 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mike Brown, London Underground Spokesman: "We at The Tube have listened to our cutomers whop've told us they like quality busking on The Tube. So working with Carling, twelve stations throughout The Tube were having a sixteen week trial to get soem real quality busking on the tube system." 6. Turin Brakes performing 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dave McCarthy, Carling representative: "Well Carling Live thus far is a supporter of music at all levels and we're getting involved in this project because we think it's a great way to bring some fun and enjoyment to people as they commute on the Underground." 8. Performance different busker - Robbie AKA Hanger Lane TURIN BRAKES RETURN TO BUSKING Indie band Turin Brakes went back to their roots today busking at London's Canary Wharf tube station. The South London boys, who begun their music career playing for coins tossed into their hat by London's commuters, played an acoustic set of hit single 'Painkiller' and their new single 'Average Man' to help launch a scheme to promote legal busking on London's Underground. A range of artists including students, professional musicians and experienced buskers, battled through auditions to win the new performance licences which allow them to perform several three-hour slots a week. The bylaw banning buskers was changed after 80 per cent of passengers questioned by LU said they liked live music as they waited. Performers will eventually rotate around 25 pitches at 12 stations, including Oxford Circus, Charing Cross and Tottenham Court Road. The initial 16 week trial is sponsored by drinks firm Carling, but the buskers will have to rely on the generosity of the public for payment. Turin Brakes' new single, 'Average Man,' is the follow-up to their top five single, 'Painkiller,' and will be released through Source/ Virgin on May 26th. CLEARANCE DETAILS TITLE: Painkiller ARITST: Turin Brakes WRITER: Knights/Paridjanian PUBLISHER: TBC LABEL: EMI TITLE: Average Man ARITST: Turin Brakes WRITER: Knights/Paridjanian PUBLISHER: TBC LABEL: EMI
London Canary Wharf Tube Station Escalator (UHD)
Real time shot made in Ultra High Definition
UK Markets 2 - FTSE continues to rally ADDS reax to latest developments
NAME: UK MARKETS2 20081014I TAPE: EF08/1044 IN_TIME: 10:04:36:22 DURATION: 00:03:29:17 SOURCES: AP/Various DATELINE: London - 14 Oct 2008 RESTRICTIONS: See Script SHOTLIST SKY Recent 1. Aerials of financial district London Stock Exchange 14 October 2008 2. Screens showing London Stock Exchange opening for trading AP Television 14 October 2008 3. Wide of newspapers 4. Newspaper headline reading "Greed that fuelled a crash" 5. The Guardian newspaper headline reading "Day the markets breathed again" 6. The Telegraph newspaper headline reading "Brown takes over the banks" 7. The Times newspaper headline reading "Markets soar as world acts to rescue banks" 8. Tilt down from skyscrapers in Canary Wharf district, to Underground station, commuters emerging 9. Electronic strip showing share prices 10. Various of trading floor at BGC Voice and Electronic Brokerage firm 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Howard Wheeldon, Senior strategist BGC Partners: "I think the confidence levels that the capital markets' problems are being sorted, that governments have come together, they're doing a similar job to sort out the problem will work, and it's going down well in markets. I am not surprised by it, I welcome it, and I take my hat off to them in terms of the job they have announced. Now, of course, the real work begins." 12. Various of brokers in BGC office 13. SOUNDBITE (English) Howard Wheeldon, Senior strategist BGC Partners: "Recession will have to be fought still, interest rates will probably have to come down further, jobs will be lost in the process. I don't think what we've seen today in capital markets will make that much difference to plans for job cuts in the short term." 14. People walking in Canary Wharf area 15. SOUNDBITE (English) Vox Pop, no name given, Canary Wharf worker: "I think it's definitely going to bring some relief between inter-bank lending, which is going to be great. I also think that this might be a turning point for the banking industry. So let's hope it's working out." 16. SOUNDBITE (English) Vox Pop, no name given, Canary Wharf worker: "As we've seen through the markets yesterday they did rally a bit, the US wasn't open, but I think you'll see it continue today so hopefully we've seen the bottom. Hopefully." 17. Tilt down of skyscraper SKY'S JEFF RANDALL LIVE - NO ACCESS UK/CNNi/RTE - MUST CREDIT 14 October 2008 18. SOUNDBITE (English) Hector Sants, Chief Executive of Financial Services Authority (FSA): "We wouldn't expect a return to some of the easy money era that existed just prior to this particular crisis. We also of course have yet to see how the events that have already taken place play through the real economy." 19. Set-up shot of retail mogul Sir Philip Green 20. SOUNDBITE (English) Sir Philip Green, Retail mogul: "At the shop floor level, business is actually not bad, it is not off the cliff. Fundamentally if you talk to most people, yes, there's some fall out. Is it disaster? No." SKY - No Access UK/CNNi/RTE Recent 21. Aerial of financial district STORYLINE: The FTSE 100 index rose by more than 4 percent in Tuesday trading, a day after the UK government announced a bailout of three of the country's largest banks. Other markets across the world also soared for a second day after Wall Street rallied from its worst week ever on optimism that government rescue efforts will heal the crippled global financial system. Britain's government injected an unprecedented 37 (b) billion pounds (63 (b) billion US dollars) into some of the country's leading banks to avoid a full-scale collapse of the sector and restore confidence. In return for the rescue, the Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC, Lloyds TSB Group PLC and HBOS PLC will cede major stakes to the government and halt cash bonuses for bank board members this year. The banks also will be required to lend more money to small- and medium-sized businesses and homeowners in a bid to rescue the country's housing market. The deal will leave taxpayers owning as much as 60 percent of RBS and 43.5 percent of the merged Lloyds HBOS bank - the two are in the process of combining. While concerns still linger, investors were encouraged that governments appeared to be taking steps to tackle one of the core problems, helping to revive bank-to-bank lending, which has almost ground to halt because of fears about repayment due to enormous losses from souring mortgage-linked debt. Howard Wheeldon, a senior strategist at BGC Partners in London, said on Tuesday that the steps in Europe and the US have gone down well with the markets, but said that recession and high interest rates would still have to be addressed in order to avoid job cuts in the short term. Other London bank workers were also cautiously optimistic, saying Tuesday's development was hopefully a turning point for the markets. Tuesday's advance on the markets came after the Dow Jones industrial average gained more than 11 percent, its biggest one-day gain since 1933, in a huge overnight rally as traders reacted with relief to efforts by the US and Europe to inject capital into banks and get lending flowing again. Late on Monday in the US, government officials and industry executives said the Bush administration will use 250 (b) billion US dollars of the 700 (b)billion US dollar bailout program recently passed by Congress to buy into American banks. The government initially will buy stock of nine large banks, but the program is expected to be expanded to many others. US President George W. Bush planned to announce the details later on Tuesday. That followed signals that European governments were putting up nearly 2 (t) trillion US dollars to safeguard their own banks. Meanwhile, British retail sales fell for a fourth month in a row in September, according to figures released by the British Retail Consortium (BRC). It said that like-for-like sales values were 1.5 percent lower in September 2008 compared to a year ago, being the sharpest fall since April. The BRC blamed the credit crunch and a weak housing market for the steep fall. Despite the figures, British billionaire retail mogul Philip Green, who owns fashion chain Top Shop and department stores group Bhs, said business at floor shop level was not bad, and far from disastrous.
Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf
4K Footage Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf, London, United Kingdom, business and transportation of British culture concept
London Skyline Shard The City Panorama Canary Wharf in background United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
UK Markets 3 - WRAP London stock index FTSE falls over 4 percent ADDS analyst
NAME: UK MARKETS 3 20081006I TAPE: EF08/1012 IN_TIME: 11:24:19:07 DURATION: 00:02:42:00 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION/ LSE DATELINE: London - 6 Oct 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: LSE 1. Various of London Stock Exchange morning opening AP Television 2. Wide of traders in office 3. Mid of trader sitting at desk with four computer screens 4. Close shot of trader talking on the phone, holding his head 5. Various of screens showing stock values and arrows pointing downwards 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) James Hughes, Market Analyst at CMC Markets: "The FTSE 100 has opened down pretty heavily lower today, it's opened around four percent lower. And it's all mainly on the back of the Fed (Federal Reserve Bank) bailout plan from Friday. We've seeing heavy losses across the board, and it seems that we aren't necessarily thinking that this is going to solve the problems that we think it will. We could still continue to see the financial global crisis really continue to hurt markets." 7. Wide of traders office AP Television 8. Low shot of skyscraper in Canary Wharf, pan to second skyscraper 9. Mid-shot of buildings 10. Wide of people walking, many on their way to work 11. Closer shot of people walking, man reading newspaper 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Thorsten Lake, City worker, vox pop: "Oh, absolutely I think there should be Europe-wide action. But our government have made a decision that they're going to only guarantee fifty thousand pounds worth of savings, which I think is outrageous. You know, we should do it right across the board." 13. Various of people coming out of Canary Wharf Underground station 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) no name given, City worker, Vox pop: "I think in a crisis of this magnitude you have to do it. There are no winners." (Reporter: "So Britain should do it as well?") "Yes." 15. Wide of buildings at Canary Wharf STORYLINE: London's Stock Exchange opened for business on Monday morning with Britain's benchmark stock index, the FTSE 100, falling 4.62 percent in the first 15 minutes of trading, following a slide in Asian markets. The worst declines were in the banking industry - HBOS PLC's share price dropped 12.7 percent to 175 pence (3.08 US dollars), while the Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC fell 10.8 percent to 166 pence (2.92 US dollars). Other European stocks also plunged, indicating that a widely anticipated US rescue plan, as well as moves in Europe, to bail out the financial sector seemed to fail to lift investors' sentiments. The United States House of Representatives' on Friday approved a 700 (b) billion US dollar bailout plan that will allow the US government to buy distressed mortgages and securities backed by mortgages from banks and other financial institutions. It was aimed at easing fears of a global financial crisis, but provided little relief to investors. James Hughes, a market at CMC Markets in London, said the US bill was far from a miracle remedy for the financial market, and predicted the global financial crisis would continue. Investors were also confronted with deepening financial woes in Europe that threaten to derail global growth. On Monday, the European Central Bank (ECB), the Bank of England and the Swiss National Bank offered more than 60 (b) billion US dollars to markets to try to keep the financial sector flush with cash, and more European governments moved to bolster protection of bank accounts. Germany had announced on Sunday that it would guarantee all private bank accounts, joining Ireland, Denmark, Sweden and Greece in taking drastic independent action to ward off financial crisis. In Copenhagen, the Economy Ministry said commercial lenders had agreed to contribute up to 35 (b) billion kroner, or about 6.4 (b) billion US dollars, over two years to a fund that will help insure account holders from losses. In neighbouring Sweden, the government said it would raise the limit for deposit insurance to 500-thousand kronor (71-thousand US dollars) from 250-thousand kronor (35,500 US dollars). Back in London, financial workers on Monday expressed their views about Germany's savings guarantee. City worker Thorsten Lake called for Europe-wide action on the matter and criticised the decision by the British government only to guarantee savings up to 50-thousand pounds (88,700 US dollars). A fellow city worker thought the moves made by Germany were wise and had to be done in a crisis of this "magnitude." In another development on Germany Monday, Berlin approved a bailout package totalling 50 (b) billion euros (69 (b) billion US dollars) for Hypo Real Estate, Germany's second-biggest commercial property lender.
Time lapse of Crowd Commuter business office people walking in rush hour after working at Canary Wharf Station in London, United Kingdom
4K Footage of Crowd Commuter business office people walking in rush hour after working at Canary Wharf Station in London, United Kingdom, business and transportation of British culture concept
London Skyline Shard The City Panorama Canary Wharf in background United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
London Skyline Shard The City Panorama Canary Wharf in background United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
UK Tallest Building - London OKs plans to build Europe's tallest building
TAPE: EF02/0208 IN_TIME: 23:48:23 DURATION: 1:21 SOURCES: LNN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: London - 12 March 2002 SHOTLIST: 1. Pan of London skyline 2. Graphic of what Shard of Glass building will look like 3. Pan of London skyline 4. Shot of London Bridge train station - area where skyscraper is to be built 5. Various set up shots of Stephanie Elsey, Leader of Southwark Council 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Stephanie Elsey, Leader of Southwark Council: "To be honest, it gives us a view, it gives us something to look at. When you look at most modern, international cities, particularly major cities, financially and economically, they have spectacular tall buildings in them. And I think it is important that London has those as well, or otherwise, I think, we'll fall behind the rest of the world." 7. Graphic of showing relative heights of Shard of Glass, Canary Wharf and Natwest tower, London's tallest buildings 8. Pan of London 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nick Antrim, English Heritage: "Our first concern has to be the historic environment and achieving the right balance between development and the historic environment and in this case the balance is not right." 10. Pan of London STORYLINE: A London council gave the go ahead to build Europe's tallest building on Monday night, despite new concerns about the vulnerability of skyscrapers in the wake of the the September 11 attacks on New York's World Trade Centre. Supporters of the tower, dubbed the "Shard of Glass", say it will make the designer building capital of Europe and that it will be a positive change to the London horizon. At over 306-metres (1,004-feet) the tower is set to be by far Europe's tallest building. But critics say this is precisely the problem. Cultural watchdog English Heritage says it will completely overshadow the historic Tower of London and harm the views of St Paul's Cathedral. The Mayor of London still has to give the Shard of Glass his blessing but if he does English Heritage will call for a public enquiry. The tower could take five years to build and will cost up to 350 (M) million pounds (495 (M) million) creating up to 10-thousand jobs.
Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf
4K Footage Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf, London, United Kingdom, business and transportation of British culture concept
Europe Markets 2 - Merkel on rescue plan, Barosso says 'light at end of tunnel
NAME: EUR MARKETS 2 20081014I TAPE: EF08/1045 IN_TIME: 10:11:25:04 DURATION: 00:03:02:01 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION/ EBS DATELINE: Various - 14 Oct 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST AP Television Berlin, Germany 1. German Chancellor Angela Merkel walking onto stage 2. Wide of stage 3. Cutaway audience at metal industry congress 4. SOUNDBITE (German) Angela Merkel, German chancellor "We will insist very quickly, and we are in agreement with other EU members which belong to the G8, to act together with the big emerging countries. That is why we will insist at the upcoming EU-Canada summit, the French president will bring it up, to have such meeting in this year already." EBS Brussels, Belgium 5. Wide of EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso at podium 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jose Manuel Barroso, EU Commission President: "This is, as I said earlier, an unprecedented crisis and this is precisely the reason why I have called for unprecedented efforts of coordination. This is of course something that requires unprecedented European Union action and we have created nothing less than a community package for financial recovery and future sustainability. But let me be clear: this is and remains work in progress. We see light at the end of the tunnel but we are not yet there." 7. Wide of press conference AP Television London, Britain 8. Tilt down of skyscraper in Canary Wharf district 9. Tilt down from skyscrapers, to Underground station, commuters emerging 10. People walking out of Canary Wharf station 11. Electronic strip showing share prices 12. Various of trading floor at BGC Voice and Electronic Brokerage firm AP Television Frankfurt, Germany 13. Wide of German Stock Exchange 14. Mid of traders 15. Various of electronic board showing index rising AP Television Moscow, Russia 16. Exterior of Moscow Interbank Currency Exchange (MICEX) building 17. Various of trading floor inside MICEX STORYLINE Stock markets in Europe and Asia rose strongly for a second straight day on Tuesday after Wall Street rallied from its worst week ever on mounting evidence that government attempts to shore up the world's battered financial system are beginning to thaw frozen credit markets. On Tuesday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel called for further international coordination, involving countries like China, India and Japan, and called for a further top level meeting to be held by the end of this year. Addressing a congress of German metal industry representatives, she said that immediate rescue measures must be followed by new international rules that would, for example, improve the work of rating agencies. EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso also said Europe can bounce back from the financial crisis if it takes the right decisions now to prevent a repeat. He said the "unprecedented coordination" between European governments and central banks in deciding banking guarantees and interest rate cuts has helped in creating a package for financial recovery. In London, the FTSE 100 index of leading shares was up 255.08 points, or 6.0 percent, at 4,511.98, despite news that inflation in Britain is running at a 16-year high. Germany's DAX was up 257.46, or 5.1 percent, at 5,319.91 even though a group of leading German economic think tanks said Tuesday that Europe's largest economy is on the brink of a recession. The CAC-40 in France was 199.21 points, or 5.6 percent, stronger at 3,730.71. Russia's stock markets joined the surge on Tuesday, prompting regulators to suspend trading on one of the two major exchanges. The MICEX, where most of Russia's trading takes place, climbed 11.2 percent before trading was halted for an hour. The RTS climbed 6.4 percent. Britain's government injected an unprecedented 37 (b) billion pounds (63 (b) billion US dollars) into some of the country's leading banks to avoid a full-scale collapse of the sector and restore confidence. In return for the rescue, the Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC, Lloyds TSB Group PLC and HBOS PLC will cede major stakes to the government and halt cash bonuses for bank board members this year. The banks also will be required to lend more money to small- and medium-sized businesses and homeowners in a bid to rescue the country's housing market. The deal will leave taxpayers owning as much as 60 percent of RBS and 43.5 percent of the merged Lloyds HBOS bank - the two are in the process of combining. While concerns still linger, investors were encouraged that governments appeared to be taking steps to tackle one of the core problems, helping to revive bank-to-bank lending, which has almost ground to halt because of fears about repayment due to enormous losses from souring mortgage-linked debt. The resurgence in the markets followed the announcement Monday by European government of 1.7 (t) trillion Euro set of national packages to save ailing banks, and the confirmation that the US will follow suit and buy stakes in nine US financial institutions. The action by Germany, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Austria and Britain came after weeks in which the governments often acted independently - a piecemeal approach that failed to stop steep and frightening slides on financial markets. Late Monday in the US, government officials and industry executives said the Bush administration would use 250 (b) billion US dollars of the 700 (b) billion US dollar bailout program recently passed by Congress to buy into American banks. The government initially will buy stock of nine large banks, but the program is expected to be expanded to many others. US President George W. Bush planned to announce the details before Wall Street opens. The long-term key is whether the flurry of activity can actually break the logjam in credit markets and the early indications are that there has been some easing in rates and spreads. The interbank lending rate for three-month euro loans, known as the Euro Interbank Offered Rate, or Euribor, fell 0.08 percentage points to 5.24 percent from 5.32 percent the day before. Rates had fallen on Monday as well, but by a more modest 0.06 percentage points.
London South Central Skyline London Eye Bt Tower St Pauls Panorama United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
People In Front Of London Canary Wharf Tube Station (UHD)
Real time shot made in Ultra High Definition
UK Olympic Missiles
AP-APTN-0730: UK Olympic Missiles Friday, 4 May 2012 STORY:UK Olympic Missiles- Mixed response as military shows off missiles to protect Olympics LENGTH: 02:53 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/AMATEUR VIDEO VIA BRIAN WHELAN STORY NUMBER: 739482 DATELINE: London - 3 May 2012 LENGTH: 02:53 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY AMATEUR VIDEO VIA BRIAN WHELAN - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++TWO WEEKS NEWS ACCESS ONLY++ SHOTLIST AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Blackheath, south east London 1. Close up of Rapier air defence missile battery 2. Wide of Rapier missiles on Blackheath common (park) 3. Pull back from Canary Wharf skyscrapers in distance to Rapier missiles on Blackheath common 4. Local people walk past fenced-off area containing missiles 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Colonel John Campbell, Commander, Ground-Based Air Defence: "You've used the word 'nightmare scenario'. I wouldn't necessarily use that. But we have to put ourselves in circumstances where someone has deliberately taken on themselves to do something horrible at the Olympic Games in the summer, and we here have an option to be able to deal with it." 6. Soldier operating HVM air defence missile battery 7. Wide of HVM missile battery in park 8. Various of local residents taking their children to see the missiles 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, Victoria Forrow, Blackheath resident: "I think it's a good idea, personally. We've got to be safe. I'm going there myself so it's best they're deployed somewhere like this than in the middle of a housing estate." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Bow, east London 10. Police guarding Bow Quarter apartment block 11. Bow Quarter water tower on which missiles may be deployed AMATEUR VIDEO VIA BRIAN WHELAN - AP CLIENTS ONLY/TWO WEEKS NEWS ACCESS ONLY ++AP HAS NO MEANS TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY ACCURACY OF THIS VIDEO++ Bow, east London 12. Military equipment for 2012 Games said to have been left unguarded on Bow Quarter housing estate AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Bow, east London 13. Brian Whelan walks past Bow Quarter towards Olympic Park 14. SOUNDBITE (English) Brian Whelan, Bow Quarter resident who filmed military equipment there: "The soldiers who were supposed to be guarding it were the other side of the pond, out of the line of sight. I walked over to the equipment, I spent at least 30 seconds standing filming the equipment, having a look at it, before they realised and came over. That's not top security. That's not acceptable." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Blackheath, south east London 15. Various of Rapier missiles in Blackheath 16. SOUNDBITE (English) Colonel John Campbell, Commander, Ground-Based Air Defence: "All I would say is that particular location was at Lexington. Lexington is inside a secure compound. You can't go in and out without a swipe card - that's what we were doing - and indeed we've had no indications of any threat against us or our detachment either from people who wish to make a particular point, or indeed from more sinister elements trying to remove our equipment. So one mustn't be complacent, one will learn from it, but that's what we're doing at this moment in time." 17. Pan left across common to missiles, traffic moving along road flanking heath 18. Close-up missiles STORYLINE The British army stationed ground-to-air missiles in the middle of a London park on Thursday in a high-profile demonstration of its resolve to safeguard the forthcoming Olympic Games. Rapier and HVM (Hyper-Velocity Missile) systems, fitted with dummy missiles, were displayed in Blackheath, south east London, as part of a week-long exercise to test Olympic security. The Rapier system has the power to take down a Boeing 747 full of passengers, if necessary, to protect a stadium full of Olympic spectators. It's designed to hit large fixed-wing aircraft and cruise missiles. But Colonel John Campbell, in charge of ground-based air defence, said the British army hadn't fired such a weapon for 30 years, and the likelihood of using it during the Olympics was extremely low. "We have to put ourselves in circumstances where someone has deliberately taken on themselves to do something horrible at the Olympic Games in the summer, and we here have an option to be able to deal with it," he said. Alongside the Rapier were the much smaller shoulder-launched HVM missiles, which target smaller aircraft. Blackheath residents looked on in surprise as the missile batteries - more usually deployed in war zones - were displayed on their local common, the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf in the background. Some were reassured to see them. "We've got to be safe," said Victoria Forrow. "I'm going there myself so it's best they're deployed somewhere like this than in the middle of a housing estate." But that's exactly where some other Rapier missiles could be deployed. The Bow Quarter is a gated residential community situated just a few hundred metres from the Olympic Park in east London. One of the Bow Quarter buildings, Lexington, has a high water tower that overlooks the Olympic Stadium, so the army plans to station missiles on top of it. That's infuriated Bow Quarter resident Brian Whelan, who said he filmed missile parts lying unguarded at the bottom of the water tower earlier on Thursday. "The soldiers who were supposed to be guarding it were out of the line of sight," he said. "I spent at least 30 seconds standing filming the equipment, having a look at it, before they realised and came over. That's not top security. That's not acceptable." Colonel Jon Campbell insisted there had been no security breach, but acknowledged that lessons would be learned from the incident. Britain's defence ministry has identified six sites where ground to air missiles may be based during the Games - including Blackheath and Bow Quarter - but it says a final decision won't be made until closer to the time. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 05-04-12 0335EDT
London Skyline Shard The City Panorama Canary Wharf in background United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
4K Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf
4K Footage Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people using escalator for traveling to work at Canary Wharf, London, United Kingdom, business and transportation of British culture concept
London Skyline Shard The City Panorama Canary Wharf in background United Kingdom - Aerial video by
Hosiho
Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people walking after working in rush hour in Canary Wharf
4K Footage Time lapse of Crowded Commuter business office people walking after working in rush hour in Canary Wharf, London, United Kingdom, business and transportation of British culture concept
World Markets 4 - WRAP Markets open in Tokyo, Sydney, Seoul, HKong, UK ADDS Germany
NAME: WOR MARKETS 4 20081021Ix TAPE: EF08/1066 IN_TIME: 11:15:31 DURATION: 00:04:05 SOURCES: AP/LSE/SKY AUSTRALIA DATELINE: Various, 21 Oct 2008 RESTRICTIONS: Check shotlist for details SHOTLIST AP Television London, UK 1. Pan down of building near Canary Wharf Station 2. Commuters coming out of station LSE London, UK 3. FTSE opening for trading AP Television London, UK 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Howard Wheeldon, Senior strategist BGC Partners: "We're accepting, markets are accepting, that the authorities have done their job that this will do the trick and that we can transition now into the recession based concerns in the knowledge that the authorities, governments and central banks, will continue to pump in money or and to cut interest rates or indeed put in fiscal plans such as tax cuts to help push us into a shorter and shallower recession than many of us have feared." AP Television London, UK 5. Various of traders working AP Television Frankfurt, Germany 6. Various interiors of Frankfurt stock market 7. SOUNDBITE (German) Oliver Roth, Director Equities Trading Close Brothers Seydler AG: "The financial package of the government is not working quite yet but there are signs that the market will stabilise. The state banks have started to form up to jointly accept the package but we are worried about the private banks which is causing insecurity in the markets." 8. Various of traders working AP Television Seoul, South Korea 9. Wide pan of computer screens and stock board 10. Close up of KOSPI 11. Tilt up of stock board 12. Pan of stock board AP Television Tokyo, Japan 13. Tilt down of trading at Tokyo Stock Exchange 14. Mid of traders on trading floor 15. Various of price board Sky News Australia - No Access Australia Sydney, Australia 16. Wide of Australian Stock Exchange stock board 17. Close-up of stock board 18. Close-up of stock ticker 19. Close-up of stock board AP Television Hong Kong 20. Wide of trading floor with alarm sounding for opening 21. Mid of traders 22. Close-up of electronic stock board showing Heng Seng Index 23. SOUNDBITE: (English) Francis Lun, General Manager of Fulbright Securities: "The bluechip traders opened about 300 points higher, but at the higher level there was some selling pressure. Don't forget the index rose 700 points yesterday, so there's a substantial rise within two days, so there is some profit-taking." 24. Pan of trading floor AP Television London, UK 25. Mid of traders working ++PLEASE NOTE THIS SHOT WAS TRANSMITTED IN ERROR++ STORYLINE STORYLINE European stock markets opened modestly higher on Tuesday following Asian gains overnight, as lower interbank lending rates fuelled hope that credit markets are returning to normal. The FTSE 100 index of leading British shares was 2.53 points higher, or 0.1 percent, higher at 4,285.20. Germany's DAX was up 30.76 points, or 0.6 percent, at 4,865.77. The German Cabinet on Monday approved terms that banks will have to accept in order to benefit from its 645 (b) billion US dollar bailout plan, including a salary cap of 670,200 US dollars for top bank managers. France's CAC-40 index of leading shares rose more strongly after the French government said it would inject a total of 14 (b) billion US dollars into the country's six largest banks by year-end to help counter the effects of the global financial crisis. The CAC was up 77.69 points or 2.3 percent, at 3,526.20, with banks in demand. BNP Paribas SA was up nearly 8 percent, Societe Generale SA nearly 10 percent and Credit Agricole SA over 14 percent. Europe's gains follow the 3.3 percent advance on Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index and the 413.20 point, or 4.7 percent, jump in the Dow Jones index on Monday to 9,265.43. Stock markets have been buoyed this week by the fall in interbank lending rates in light of the flurry of government efforts to put money into banks, and by coordinated interest rate reductions and massive short-term credits to banks by central banks. Overnight, the Hong Kong interbank offered rate, also known as Hibor, for three-month loans continued to slide, falling from 3.66 percent to 3.35. Hibor's decline follows Monday's 0.36 percent drop in the equivalent three-month dollar loans to 4.06 percent. Abnormally high interbank lending rates have been a sign of distress in credit markets and been the catalyst for the crisis in the financial markets over recent weeks. High interbank rates can choke off credit to businesses and individuals, hurting the economy. Even if Libor rates continue to decline, analysts say stock markets will not be out of the woods given the sharp economic slowdown likely to occur over the coming months, which will become more and more evident as companies report their latest earnings. Hopes are also growing that lawmakers in the U.S. will unveil a new stimulus package to limit the extent of the recession. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said on Monday that additional steps might help ease the country's economic weakness. In Asia earlier, Japan's Nikkei rose 300.66 points, or 3.34 percent, to close at 9,306.25, marking the third consecutive day of gains. While shares in most other countries moved higher, several key stock measures sold off early gains to close in the red. Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index lost 1.84 percent, Shanghai's benchmark fell 0.8 percent and South Korea's index shed about 1 percent. Hong Kong's benchmark was dragged down after conglomerate Citic Pacific Ltd. warned that it could face losses of nearly 2 (b) billion US dollars after a top executive made unauthorised bets against the US dollar. In Australia, the main index gained 3.9 percent after the country's central bank chief said he believed coordinated global action to tackle the financial crisis had helped to avert a worldwide catastrophe. Resource giant Rio Tinto helped lead the way, soaring more than 12 percent.
Europe Markets 2 - WRAP London, Frankfurt, Moscow markets up, analysts
NAME: EUR MARKETS2 20081017I TAPE: EF08/1055 IN_TIME: 10:59:41:09 DURATION: 00:03:46:06 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION/LSE DATELINE: Various - 17 Oct 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION London, UK 1. Mid of 'Gherkin' building in London's financial district, tilt down to road below 2. Close up of window cleaner on building 3. Mid of Canary Wharf Underground station entrance 4. Various of city workers emerging from tube LONDON STOCK EXCHANGE 5. Mid of electronic screens showing opening of London Stock Exchange AP TELEVISION London, UK 6. Various of traders working at their desks 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tom Hougaard, City Analyst: "We are in a situation where, I like to call it the panic phase. The panic phase is always classified by exceptionally wild mood swings, exceptionally wild news stories that drives the market up and down in extreme ranges, that's exactly what we're in. So today is a positive range but by the end of the day it could be a negative range." 8. Various of traders working at their desks AP TELEVISION Frankfurt, Germany 9. Wide top shot of interior of Frankfurt Stock Exchange 10. Wide top shot of traders at desks 11. Wide of DAX electronic board 12. Various of traders 13. SOUNDBITE: (German) Robert Halver, Head of Market Research, Baader Wertpapierhandelsbank AG: "Every bank will think many times whether to get the financial injection or not because first - if I take it, Mr. Steinbrueck (German finance minister) will be in the controlling board which means the government will then control and influence them and secondly it is not going to be good for the stock prices because when the state is in the boat some profit promising idea will not be developed, which really means every bank will consider three or four times before accepting this involvement." 14. Various cutaways of traders 15. Wide of electronic stock board AP TELEVISION Moscow, Russia 16. Exterior of the Moscow Interbank Currency Exchange (MICEX) 17. Entrance and sign of the Exchange 18. Wide interior pan of the trading floor 19. Mid of trader at desk 20. Rear shot of trader examining graph 21. SOUNDBITE:(Russian) Alexei Gerasyuk, MICEX spokesman: "The market today opened trading in regular fashion. Trading started at 10:30 and at the present moment the index, which is the key indicator of the state of the market, has fallen by 4.5 percent." 22. Clocks showing different time zones 23. Close up of stock exchange bell 24. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Alexei Gerasyuk, MICEX spokesman: "It all depends on the attitude (of foreign investors), to which markets they think they should be investing in right now and which they should not be in. And right now it seems to be the trend that they think they not be in Russian stocks." 25. Wide of street with pedestrians and signs displaying foreign exchange rates in background 26. Various of couple outside currency exchange, looking at exchange rates on board STORYLINE: European stock markets were modestly higher on Friday after Wall Street rebounded strongly overnight and Japan's Nikkei recovered from its historic fall in the previous day's session. The FTSE 100 index of leading British shares was 42.03 points, or 1.1 percent, higher at 3,903.42, while Germany's DAX was up 11.38 points, or 0.3 percent, at 4,634.19. One UK analyst predicted more swings in the market as uncertainty over the global financial markets continues. France's CAC-40 was up 37.28 points, or 1.2 percent, at 3,218.28. Even though stock markets were up on Friday, traders remained nervous after an extremely volatile week when massive gains on Monday and Tuesday were mostly erased in the following two sessions. That volatility was evident on Thursday on Wall Street where a late wave of buying lifted the Dow Jones index 4.7 percent to 8,979.26, a swing of more than 800 points over the day. The Dow remains up 528 points, or 6.3 percent, for the week. The DAX stock market index of Germany's 30 biggest companies has also risen as investors look ahead to the likely approval of a 500 (b) billion euro (675.35 (b) billion US dollar) financial rescue package later on Friday. German analyst Robert Halver however said banks would be in two minds whether or not to accept the financial injection, as it could mean greater government control over the institutions and decreased flexibility. Russia's battered stock benchmarks were still on their losing streak, with the MICEX dropping 6 percent and the RTS index down 4.7 percent by 1:30 pm (0930 GMT). Falling oil prices and concerns over the country's troubled banking sector contributed to a sharp drop Thursday on Russia's two main stock exchanges, sending the MICEX and RTS nine percent down. The MICEX and RTS posted modest gains Friday morning but started going down a few hours after the trading's opening. A MICEX spokesman said he believes foreign investors are staying out away from the Russian market at the moment. Much of Friday's session may depend on US housing starts data later. The decline in the housing market has affected nearly all sectors of the economy, causing unemployment to rise, consumers to cut back on spending and the credit market to seize, sending the stock market plunging. The long-term key is whether the flurry of activity by governments over the last week or so can actually break the logjam in credit markets. Despite the coordinated interest rate reductions announced last week, and massive liquidity boosts, the rates at which banks lend remain abnormally high, despite some easing in rates and spreads this week. That could in turn make it harder for businesses and consumers to get the credit they need and hurt the economy. Concerns about the global economic outlook have taken their toll on the oil price, which fell on Thursday to a 14-month before rallying just over a dollar this morning to 70.97 US dollars.