ROUND ONE TO THE GUN LOBBY GEORGIA LEGISLATURE BLOCKS ATLANTA'S LAWSUIT
FTG FOR REBECCA CHASE CS VO ON GEORGIA LEGISLATURE ACTION TO BLOCK ATLANTA'S LAWSUIT AGAINST THE GUN INDUSTRY 03:00:34 LS OF GEORGIA STATE CAPITAL DOMES BUILDING / ATLANTA SKYLINE IN BG / TRAFFIC ON HIGHWAY IN FG / NATSOT 03:01:31 TIGHT SHOT OF GOLD DOMED STATE CAPITAL 03:02:24 TIGHT SHOT OF SIGN ABOVE BUILDING ENTRANCE READING ATLANTA CITY HALL 03:02:43 WS OF CITY HALL ENTRANCE / PEOPLE STAND IN FG 03:04:07 LS OF ATLANTA SKYLINE / HIGHWAY IN FG
DN-LB-533 Beta SP
Universal Newsreels
ATLANTA
00:00:00:00 WS of Atlanta traffic and skyline 1:55/ CU pan out of gold dome of Capitol 1:04/ WS Atlanta Traffic and Skyline 1:46/ WS "Fly Delta" sign :16/ unidentified skyscraper / WS an ...
Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral at night
Night cityscape of Tbilisi Georgia and Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral.
ROUND ONE TO THE GUN LOBBY GEORGIA LEGISLATURE BLOCKS ATLANTA'S LAWSUIT
FTG FOR REBECCA CHASE CS VO ON GEORGIA LEGISLATURE ACTION TO BLOCK ATLANTA'S LAWSUIT AGAINST THE GUN INDUSTRY 03:00:34 LS OF GEORGIA STATE CAPITAL DOMES BUILDING / ATLANTA SKYLINE IN BG / TRAFFIC ON HIGHWAY IN FG / NATSOT 03:01:31 TIGHT SHOT OF GOLD DOMED STATE CAPITAL 03:02:24 TIGHT SHOT OF SIGN ABOVE BUILDING ENTRANCE READING ATLANTA CITY HALL 03:02:43 WS OF CITY HALL ENTRANCE / PEOPLE STAND IN FG 03:04:07 LS OF ATLANTA SKYLINE / HIGHWAY IN FG
Aerial approaching city/ pan zoom in State Capitol building/ Atlanta, Georgia
ATLANTA/ABORTION MAR
00:00:00:00 B-roll anti abortionists march w/ posters front GA capitol. Gold dome in some shots. Generic 15th anniv SCOTUS abortion decision. (0:00) /
GEORGIA FLOODS
COVERAGE FOR AN AL DALE CS VO ABOUT FLINT RIVER FLOODWATERS HITTING BAINBRIDGE, GEORGIA. 02:00:25 NATURAL SOUND EXT FTG. FTG OF HOME OWNER WOODIE WARR CLIMBING LADDER LEADING UP TO WATER PUMP ON SIX FOOT DIKE HE BUILT AROUND HIS DREAM HOUSE. 02:01:01 FTG OF WOODIE OPERATING WATER PUMPING MACHINE. 02:01:12 CU WOODIE WATCHING SCENE. 02:01:22 CU MACHINE AND GREEN PUMP. 02:01:36 CU PUMP SUCKING OUT WATER. 02:01:46 LAS WOODIE SQUATTING ON DECK AS MACHINE WORKS AWAY. 02:02:16 FTG OF THE WATER GETTING SUCKED OFF OF WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:02:53 WS WOODEN BEAMS SUPPORTING WOODEN WALLS OF WOODIE'S IMPRESSIVE FORTRESS. 02:03:32 CU DETAIL OF WOODWORK ON WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:04:00 PULL IN ON WOODIE STANDING WATCH ON DECK. 02:04:25 LAS BEAMS DIGGING INTO GRASS. 02:04:46 FTG OF HIGH FLOOD WATER OUTSIDE WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:05:07 CU BLACK PLASTIC TARP COVERING SANDBAGS OUTSIDE WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:05:43 FTG OF ACRES OF DEEP FLOODWATER EXTENDING THROUGHOUT WIDE VALLEY. 02:06:33 WS DIKE ENCIRCLING WOODIE'S ESTATE. 02:07:10 FTG OF WOODIE'S NEIGHBORS' FLOODED ESTATES SITTING SUBMERGED IN DEEP WATER. 02:09:11 MS WOODIE'S PARTNER, JAKE, SITTING ATOP DECK KEEPING WATCH ON WATER. 02:09:57 PULL IN ON AMERICAN FLAG FLYING OVER WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:10:31 CU STARS AND STRIPES ON FLAG AS IT WAVES GENTLY. 02:10:59 WS WOODIE CLIMBING HIS DIKE AS FLAG WAVES IN BG. 02:11:14 FTG OF WOODIE GREETING A VISITOR. 02:11:43 PULL IN ON MASSIVE TARP COVERING WOODIE'S SANDBAGS. 02:12:15 MS FLAG FLYING OVER WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:12:43 CU MAKESHIFT SIGN POSTED TO TREE ON WOODIE'S PROPERTY W/ A SMILE SIGN URGING "KEEP OFF THE SANDBAGS AND PLASTIC COVERING". 02:13:31 PULL OUT ON ANOTHER ESTATE SUBMERGED IN THE HIGH FLOODWATER. 02:14:04 PULL OUT ON MONUMENT TO GENERAL ROBERT E LEE AND GAZEBO IN BG OF SMALL PARK. 02:14:50 WS GAZEBO. 02:15:19 LAS GEORGIA STATE FLAG FLYING BENEATH AMERICAN FLAG. 02:15:42 PULL OUT ON WS OF RUSTIC CIVIL WAR ERA TOWER W/ GOLD DOME AND CLOCK IN CENTER OF TOWN. 02:17:03 MS WOODEN ROCKING CHAIRS OUTSIDE STORE. 02:17:42 FTG OF TRAFFIC DRIVING PAST QUAINT TWO STORY SHOPS. 02:18:11 PULL OUT ON AMERICAN FLAGS WAVING BEFORE STOREFRONTS.
Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral at night
Night cityscape of Tbilisi Georgia and Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral.
Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral at night
Night cityscape of Tbilisi Georgia and Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral.
GEORGIA FLOODS
COVERAGE FOR AN AL DALE CS VO ABOUT FLINT RIVER FLOODWATERS HITTING BAINBRIDGE, GEORGIA. 02:00:25 NATURAL SOUND EXT FTG. FTG OF HOME OWNER WOODIE WARR CLIMBING LADDER LEADING UP TO WATER PUMP ON SIX FOOT DIKE HE BUILT AROUND HIS DREAM HOUSE. 02:01:01 FTG OF WOODIE OPERATING WATER PUMPING MACHINE. 02:01:12 CU WOODIE WATCHING SCENE. 02:01:22 CU MACHINE AND GREEN PUMP. 02:01:36 CU PUMP SUCKING OUT WATER. 02:01:46 LAS WOODIE SQUATTING ON DECK AS MACHINE WORKS AWAY. 02:02:16 FTG OF THE WATER GETTING SUCKED OFF OF WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:02:53 WS WOODEN BEAMS SUPPORTING WOODEN WALLS OF WOODIE'S IMPRESSIVE FORTRESS. 02:03:32 CU DETAIL OF WOODWORK ON WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:04:00 PULL IN ON WOODIE STANDING WATCH ON DECK. 02:04:25 LAS BEAMS DIGGING INTO GRASS. 02:04:46 FTG OF HIGH FLOOD WATER OUTSIDE WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:05:07 CU BLACK PLASTIC TARP COVERING SANDBAGS OUTSIDE WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:05:43 FTG OF ACRES OF DEEP FLOODWATER EXTENDING THROUGHOUT WIDE VALLEY. 02:06:33 WS DIKE ENCIRCLING WOODIE'S ESTATE. 02:07:10 FTG OF WOODIE'S NEIGHBORS' FLOODED ESTATES SITTING SUBMERGED IN DEEP WATER. 02:09:11 MS WOODIE'S PARTNER, JAKE, SITTING ATOP DECK KEEPING WATCH ON WATER. 02:09:57 PULL IN ON AMERICAN FLAG FLYING OVER WOODIE'S DIKE. 02:10:31 CU STARS AND STRIPES ON FLAG AS IT WAVES GENTLY. 02:10:59 WS WOODIE CLIMBING HIS DIKE AS FLAG WAVES IN BG. 02:11:14 FTG OF WOODIE GREETING A VISITOR. 02:11:43 PULL IN ON MASSIVE TARP COVERING WOODIE'S SANDBAGS. 02:12:15 MS FLAG FLYING OVER WOODIE'S PROPERTY. 02:12:43 CU MAKESHIFT SIGN POSTED TO TREE ON WOODIE'S PROPERTY W/ A SMILE SIGN URGING "KEEP OFF THE SANDBAGS AND PLASTIC COVERING". 02:13:31 PULL OUT ON ANOTHER ESTATE SUBMERGED IN THE HIGH FLOODWATER. 02:14:04 PULL OUT ON MONUMENT TO GENERAL ROBERT E LEE AND GAZEBO IN BG OF SMALL PARK. 02:14:50 WS GAZEBO. 02:15:19 LAS GEORGIA STATE FLAG FLYING BENEATH AMERICAN FLAG. 02:15:42 PULL OUT ON WS OF RUSTIC CIVIL WAR ERA TOWER W/ GOLD DOME AND CLOCK IN CENTER OF TOWN. 02:17:03 MS WOODEN ROCKING CHAIRS OUTSIDE STORE. 02:17:42 FTG OF TRAFFIC DRIVING PAST QUAINT TWO STORY SHOPS. 02:18:11 PULL OUT ON AMERICAN FLAGS WAVING BEFORE STOREFRONTS.
Tsminda Sameba Cathedral
Aerial view of Tsminda Sameba Cathedral, Tbilisi Georgia. Taken via drone.
APTN 1830 PRIME NEWS NORTH AMERICA
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Wednesday, 24 March 2010 North America Prime News ++US Russia 03:01 AP Clients Only NEW White House reax to report that US, Russia will sign new arms treaty ++US Exchange Rate 03:09 See Script NEW House Ways and Means committee hearing on Chinese Yuan ++Norway Crash 01:11 No Access Norway NEW Railway cars break loose from cargo train and crash killing at least 3 Europe Economy 03:59 AP Clients Only REPLAY Euro at low point against US dollar over Greece debt crisis; Rehn sbite, tourists Vatican Resignation 02:28 AP Clients Only REPLAY Pope accepts resignation of Irish Bishop in sex abuse scandal Germany Abuse 01:29 AP Clients Only REPLAY German government to establish panel on alleged sexual abuse Georgia Guantanamo 02:05 AP Clients Only REPLAY Opposition denounces transfer of detainees from Gitmo to Georgia SKorea US Detainee 2 01:17 AP Clients Only REPLAY US man faces trial in NKorea; Civil rights activists comment Africa Gorillas 01:51 AP Clients Only REPLAY UN report says Central African gorillas in danger from trade UK Manuscripts 01:57 AP Clients Only REPLAY Christies unveil manuscripts, incl one from French King Francois B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 03-24-10 1456EDT -----------End of rundown----------- AP-APTN-1830: ++US Russia Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:++US Russia- NEW White House reax to report that US, Russia will sign new arms treaty LENGTH: 03:01 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/HOST TV STORY NUMBER: 641063 DATELINE: Washington DC/Prague, 24 March 2010/FILE LENGTH: 03:01 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY HOST TV - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: AP Television - AP Clients ONLY Washington, DC, USA - March 24, 2010 1. Mid of White House spokesman Robert Gibbs walking to podium 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House spokesman: "I've said on many occasions that we are making strong progress toward getting an agreement. We are, I think, very close to having an agreement on a START treaty but won't have one until President Obama and his counterpart Mr Medvedev have a chance to speak again." (Question: Is that scheduled?) "I think they will likely speak in the next few days." 3. Wide of reporters 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House spokesman: "I would categorise this as having made very strong progress. You know the president spoke personally on March 13th to Mr. Medvedev and I think we are very close to getting an agreement." 5. Pan from reporters to Gibbs 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House spokesman: "I've said several times that we wanted to get this treaty right and I am sure their perspective would be the same. But we wanted to get this treaty right for the United States of America. It has taken a little extra time for us to get that, but I think the President believes we are close. And I would say this, the President has been deeply involved personally in moving this process forward and along throughout that process." 7. Wide shot, reporters Gibbs at podium 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Gibbs, White House spokesman: (Question: The Czechs have said that there is to be a signing ceremony in Prague on April 8th for the START treaty. Is that premature?) "Well, we've always discussed internally returning to the city, the President outlined a speech in last year, envisioning a world without nuclear weapons. We believe that a new START treaty begins to take many important steps between the two greatest holders of those nuclear weapons, so I would anticipate that when we have something to sign it will be in Prague." 9. Close up of reporters HOST TV - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Prague, Czech Republic, April 5 2009 10. Czech President Vaclav Klaus walking on red carpet with US President Barack Obama 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Barack Obama, US President: (++OVERLAID WITH VARIOUS OF SPEECH++) "First, the United States will take concrete steps towards a world without nuclear weapons. To put an end to Cold War thinking, we will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy and urge others to do the same." 12. Klaus and Obama with wives on red carpet STORYLINE: The White House said on Wednesday that the US and Russia are "very close" to signing a new nuclear arms treaty. A senior Kremlin official said on Wednesday that the United States and Russia have reached an agreement on "all documents" necessary to sign a new nuclear arms treaty, but stopped short of saying both sides were ready to sign. US officials have only said the final language is close. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs and a Kremlin official said a final agreement is not likely until Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev speak again, most likely in the coming days. The Kremlin source, speaking by telephone to The Associated Press, said the documents included the treaty and protocol. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said last week that the treaty was 20 pages long, with an extensive protocol attached. Czech officials announced earlier on Wednesday that Prague will host the signing of the new US-Russian treaty to reduce long-range nuclear weapons that would replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. Asked whether the announcement was premature, Gibbs said, "we believe that a new START treaty begins to take many important steps between the two greatest holders of those nuclear weapons, so I would anticipate that when we have something to sign it will be in Prague." It was in that city where Obama committed the United States last April to seeking "a world without nuclear weapons." As part of that strategy, he shook hands with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev last year on plans to reduce sharply their countries' nuclear stockpiles. Obama and Medvedev had hoped to enshrine new limits in a replacement for the 1991 START accord, but that treaty expired in December as the talks dragged on. The expired START treaty, signed by Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and former US President George H.W. Bush, required each country to cut its nuclear warheads by at least one-fourth, to about 6,000, and to implement procedures for verifying that each side was sticking to the agreement. Obama spent an hour on Wednesday in the White House Situation Room with Democratic Senator John Kerry, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and Senator Richard Lugar, the committee's ranking Republican. Both would play major roles in Senate ratification of the emerging treaty. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1447EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++US Exchange Rate Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:++US Exchange Rate- NEW House Ways and Means committee hearing on Chinese Yuan LENGTH: 03:09 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AGENCY POOL STORY NUMBER: 641038 DATELINE: Washington DC, 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 03:09 AGENCY POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of committee hearing room 2. Wide of US Congressmen in hearing 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Niall Ferguson, Professor of Economic History, Harvard University: ++STARTS ON MID SHOT++ "Let me begin with a direct question and direct answer. Is China a currency manipulator? Yes. Is its currency fundamentally misaligned? Yes. In the absence of currency intervention by the Chinese monetary authorities, the renminbi-dollar exchange rate would be significantly different, I believe." 4. Congressman asking question 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Fred Bergsten, Director, Peterson Institute for International Economics: "The economic situation has changed. The US is still facing high unemployment, but we're now sufficiently out of the crisis so that an effort with the Chinese, I think, would not be viewed as a wrecker to the world economy, or even to the markets. I think people understand and actually expect the United States to pursue an initiative of this type." 6. Cutaway of committee 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Niall Ferguson, Professor of Economic History, Harvard University: "And the reason that they're not simply doing what we would like them to do is that they have good reason to be cautious about what could go wrong in their economy. And, if something goes wrong in China right now, it's very bad news not only for the US, but for the whole world because China's now the engine of growth." 8. Cutaway of committee 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bill Pascrell, Representative of New Jersey: "But this is an even bigger problem in terms of how our goods have become less competitive. And you tell this to the computer industry, the electronic equipment industry in the United States, and parts industries, that they have to continue to wait and be destroyed as the textile industry was destroyed in this country. And we think we're going to solve all these problems diplomatically? I don't think that works." 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Niall Ferguson, Professor of Economic History, Harvard University: "I think an important issue that's been raised in our discussion this morning is what's the best channel to go through might be, and we've expressed scepticism about legislative action, retaliatory tariffs for good reason. You may dismiss the parallel with the 1930s as somehow irrelevant, but I can assure you any further blows to global demand dealt by errors of US fiscal, monetary or trade policy, would harm your constituents even more severely than they've so far been harmed." 11. Cutaway of committee 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Niall Ferguson, Professor of Economic History, Harvard University: "The main beneficiaries of ending the renminbi-dollar peg would not, in fact, be the United States, but would be China's trade competitors in emerging markets who are the real losers. They're the ones who have been losing market share when you look at the structure of US imports." 13. Wide of end of hearing STORYLINE: A panel of economic experts told a US Congressional hearing on Wednesday that China's undervaluation of its currency is distorting world markets and gives Beijing an unfair competitive advantage over trading partners. Members of the House Ways and Means Committee heard testimony from economists and an economic historian about the potential benefits and pitfalls of attempts to revalue the Chinese renminbi against the United States dollar. There was general agreement that Beijing is manipulating the value of the renminbi, or yuan as it is also known, against other currencies. Professor Niall Ferguson, an economic historian at Harvard University, said China's currency was "fundamentally misaligned" with the US dollar. China has come in for increasing criticism over its exchange rate policy, which keeps the renminbi pegged to the US dollar. Beijing faces rising pressure to ease the controls, which Washington and other trading partners say keep its currency undervalued, swelling its trade surplus and boosting exports. Fred Bergsten, Director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, told the committee that Washington should "pursue an initiative" to deal with the problem. He said the worst of the global financial crisis was now over and an "effort with the Chinese, I think, would not be viewed as a wrecker to the world economy, or even to the markets." But Ferguson warned that China had "good reason to be cautious about what could go wrong in their economy" if the renminbi was revalued, and said it would be "bad news" for the whole world if China's economy suffered. He said there was "good reason" to be sceptical about taking legislative action or imposing "retaliatory tariffs" on Chinese exports to the US. "I can assure you any further blows to global demand dealt by errors of US fiscal, monetary or trade policy, would harm your constituents even more severely than they've so far been harmed," he said. US President Barack Obama has said he will press for an end to currency systems that he says depress export prices and hurt American companies. The four members of the expert panel said the US Congress should not attempt to legislate actions that might complicate the Obama administration's efforts to reach a currency parity agreement. One economist suggested that the undervalued renminbi was one reason companies were choosing to locate new investments in China. The committee was told that a revaluation of even as much as five percent might be presented as flexibility on the part of China, but that this would have no real significance in terms of the distortion of the markets. Several members of the panel pointed to estimates of increased unemployment in the United States as evidence of China's distortion of the market. China's central bank governor acknowledged earlier this month that Beijing was using its exchange-rate controls to cope with the global financial crisis and said it would be cautious about retreating from the policy. China has held the yuan steady against the US dollar since late 2008 in an apparent effort to help China's exporters compete abroad, though authorities have never openly confirmed that. Some American companies are pressing the US Congress to enact punitive tariffs on Chinese goods if Beijing fails to act. Critics say the yuan is undervalued by up to 40 percent. The yuan's value was tied to the dollar for decades, but Beijing broke that link in 2005 and allowed the currency to rise by about 20 percent through late 2008. That rise was halted after the global crisis hit. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1620EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++Norway Crash Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:++Norway Crash- NEW Railway cars break loose from cargo train and crash killing at least 3 LENGTH: 01:11 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Norway TYPE: Norwegian/Nat SOURCE: TV2 STORY NUMBER: 641041 DATELINE: Oslo - 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 01:11 TV2 - NO ACCESS NORWAY SHOTLIST 1. Tracking shot of derailed railway car 2. Tracking shot of emergency services wheeling stretcher with body 3. SOUNDBITE: (Norwegian) Thor Langli, Task manager, Oslo Police: "We are continuing the search because one person is missing. We have confirmed that three have died, and four are injured. Out of those four, three were taken to the hospital and one to the casualty clinic." 4. Various of wreckage at Oslo port terminal, zoom into police at scene STORYLINE At least three people died and four more were injured when sixteen empty railway cars broke loose from a cargo train and crashed into a port terminal in Oslo, Norway, at high speed on Wednesday, according to officials and witnesses. The runaway train cars accelerated as they rolled downhill for about 3 miles (5 kilometres) before slamming into the terminal on the edge of the Oslo fjord, where some of them fell into the water, police and railroad officials said. Police and rescue workers were searching through the rubble of the shattered building and in the water for an additional missing worker. "We are continuing the search because one person is missing. We have confirmed that three have died, and four are injured. Out of those four, three were taken to the hospital and one to the casualty clinic," said Thor Langli, the task manager for Oslo Police. The victims had been working in or around the building, which collapsed from the impact, a police spokeswoman said. National broadcaster NRK aired images showing at least two train cars in the water and a collapsed one-storey concrete building. An eyewitness who works for a transport company at the port in the Sjursoeya district of Oslo said he heard a loud screech and looked out the window to see several empty cargo train cars speed past. Estimating their speed at more than 100 kilometres an hour (62 miles per hour), the witness said several cars derailed and one hit a dump truck. The driver was injured but conscious when rescue workers put him into an ambulance, he said. A police spokeswoman confirmed that the train cars were travelling "very fast" when they hit the port, but didn't know their exact speed. The runaway carriages struck several trucks and cars in the port area before crashing into the building that was used to register transport vehicles and cargo, the spokeswoman said. The Norwegian National Rail Administration said a group of train cars had come loose at the Alnabru cargo terminal, though it was not immediately clear how. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1534EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Europe Economy Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:Europe Economy- REPLAY Euro at low point against US dollar over Greece debt crisis; Rehn sbite, tourists LENGTH: 03:59 FIRST RUN: 1630 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/German/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640999 DATELINE: Various, 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 03:59 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST Berlin, Germany 1. Man taking euro notes out of wallet 2. Man sorting through euro coins 3. Close-up of euro coins 4. Man putting euro note into wallet Brussels, Belgium 5. Flags outside European Commission 6. European Union Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs Olli Rehn entering briefing on European economic stability 7. Wide pan of briefing 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Olli Rehn, European Union Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs: "Euro is a sustainable currency and it is a major cornerstone for the European economy. It has shielded us from very difficult waters and winds in recent times. But yes, it is facing a critical litmus test and therefore it will be essential to reach a political decision on a European framework for coordinated and conditional assistance if needed and if requested." Frankfurt, Germany 9. Wide of interior of Frankfurt Stock Exchange 10. Various of traders in front of screens 11. SOUNDBITE: (German) Fidel Peter Helmer, Chief of Trading at private bank Hauck and Aufhaeuser: "We are still dealing with the issue of Greece, and no solution has been found so far - which would be much appreciated by now. The situation became even more problematic today when the Fitch ratings agency downgraded Portugal's debt, leading to a strong decline in prices, because Portugal is a more important contestant than Greece." 12. Close-up of trader at computer 13. SOUNDBITE: (German) Fidel Peter Helmer, Chief of Trading at private bank Hauck and Aufhaeuser: "I think that if a solution is found for the issue of Greece - and at the moment it seems that a solution will soon be found - then the euro will stabilise again." Athens, Greece 14. Wide of Acropolis 15. People looking in souvenir shops in city centre 16. Close-up of sign of money exchange shop 17. Close-up of exchange rate board 18. People exchanging money at counter 19. Close-up of person holding wallet 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop, Lina Bogazale, Tourist from Jordan: "Well, actually I came from Jordan, so, it's my first exchange I do here in Greece. And I think I changed 400 (US) dollars for 283 euros, which is very low." 21. People outside money exchange shop 22. Close-up of fountain in city centre 23. People exchanging money 24. Close-up of exchange rate board 25. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop, Jena Hyrant, Tourist from California, United States: "We're told with your ATM card, is the best rate and we haven't tried that one yet." 26. Close-up of exchange board 27. Close-up man looking at rates at exchange office 28. Tourists resting under tree opposite Acropolis 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop, Nick (last name not given), Tourist from Wisconsin, United States: "It's 1.34 right now, I think - isn't too bad of an exchange rate, so it's been kind of nice." 30. Acropolis seen through trees STORYLINE The sinking euro and a downgrade of Portugal's debt on Wednesday put renewed pressure on European leaders to come up with a bailout plan for Greece and stem the government debt crisis undermining their shared currency. The euro hit a 10-month low against the US dollar on Wednesday on the Portuguese downgrades and the uncertainty over Europe's dithering over Greece. Greece says it will need eurozone or IMF help if markets keep charging it painfully high costs to borrow. But agreement remained elusive as a Thursday summit approached. Markets increasingly expect any bailout for Greece to involve the International Monetary Fund - and EU governments are discussing whether they would permit that and add financial help from eurozone nations. The EU Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs, Olli Rehn, insisted that EU leaders must act now because the euro is "facing a critical litmus test" and the financial stability of the currency union is under threat. "It will be essential to reach a political decision on a European framework for coordinated and conditional assistance if needed and if requested," he said of the Greece bailout package. Greece's debt crisis has undermined the euro by showing that the rules supporting it have not prevented governments from overspending, hitting public accounts. Athens' woes are also putting pressure on other eurozone countries with troubled finances, such as Portugal and Spain. Germany is holding back a deal, reluctant to put taxpayer money on the line for Greece. But failure to help an indebted eurozone country would be an admission that Europe can't halt the crisis in its currency union. The latest vote of no confidence in vulnerable eurozone economies came with Fitch Ratings' downgrade on Wednesday of Portugal's debt. The credit ratings agency said Portugal's prospects for recovery were weaker than others in the eurozone and it faces problems shrinking its budget deficit. European stock markets had started the day off fairly brightly following big gains on Wall Street and a general advance in Asia, but the ongoing woes afflicting the euro dragged prices down by early afternoon. During Wednesday's trading, the euro fell to 1.3335 US dollars, its lowest level since last May. While US tourists in Greece and other euro countries were able to take advantage of the current exchange rate, calls for a solution to Greece's debt crisis were mounting. Fidel Peter Helmer, the chief of trading at private bank Hauck and Aufhaeuser, said a solution to the Greek issue would be "much appreciated." Helmer said the downgrading of Portugal's debt had compounded the euro's problems "because Portugal is a more important contestant than Greece." But he added that he thought the euro would stabilise if a solution was found. European diplomats speaking on condition of anonymity said Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero is heading efforts to get the 16 eurozone nations to meet separately on Thursday on the crisis surrounding Greece, in addition to the meeting by all 27 EU member governments. Eurozone leaders have only met once for a summit before at the height of the banking crisis in 2008. EU President Herman Van Rompuy is also asking for a eurozone summit, said another EU official. He met French President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris on Wednesday, Sarkozy's office said. However, Germany is not keen, with a senior government official in Berlin saying a decision on aid for Greece should not be made at the summit. The German government wants the IMF to be "significantly involved" in any bailout because it believes that it could face a legal challenge from the country's powerful constitutional court unless it can prove that that any European or German aid is the last option left to Greece. A Greek government spokesman said on Wednesday that Greece was waiting for a detailed EU plan that would mean that Greece could borrow money when it needed to. He stressed that Greece was "not seeking financial help from anyone" but needed an option to avoid crippling interest rates that are undermining Greek efforts to shave (b) billions of euros from its budget this year. The countries that use the euro pledged last month to help Greece if the stability of the currency zone were threatened - but agreed no details. Germany says it doesn't need to fulfill that promise yet, especially not to save Greece from years of overspending and faking its budget numbers. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Vatican Resignation Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:Vatican Resignation- REPLAY Pope accepts resignation of Irish Bishop in sex abuse scandal LENGTH: 02:28 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Eng/Ita/Nats SOURCE: Various STORY NUMBER: 640995 DATELINE: Various, 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 02:28 AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only AP PHOTOS - No Access Canada/ For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile INTERNET - AP Clients Only VATICAN TV - AP Clients Only SHOTLIST: AP PHOTOS - No Access Canada/ For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile Date and location unknown 1. STILL of recently resigned Irish Bishop John Magee INTERNET - AP Clients Only Internet - 24 March 2010 2. Internet page showing Vatican statement VATICAN TV - AP Clients Only Vatican - 24 March 2010 3. Wide top shot of Saint Peter's square 4. Pan of Pope Benedict XVI waving at people from Popemobile 5. People in Saint Peter's Square waving 6. Tilt down from Saint Peter's dome to the square AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only Vatican - 24 March 2010 7. Various of the Vatican Daily bulletin 8. Iacopo Scaramuzzi, Vatican journalist, coming out of Vatican press office holding bulletin 9. Close of hands 10. SOUNDBITE: (Italian) Iacopo Scaramuzzi, Vatican journalist: "The resignation of Monsignor Magee, which is the second resignation of an Irish Bishop that has been accepted by the Pope since the case of the paedophile priests broke out, confirms the fact that Pope Benedict XVI is taking this whole affair seriously, in the sense that he is not just writing a letter to the Irish Catholics, but he is taking concrete action." 11. Pope waving at people from Popemobile 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dorothee from Germany, Vox pop: "I think this is a good decision. To make this clear." 13. Wide of crowd in Saint Peter's square 14. SOUNDBITE: (Italian) Rosanna, Italian resident, Vox Pop: "If they resign it is the right thing to do, this scandal must stop with the boys and girls, these children." 15. Pope waving goodbye as he leaves Saint Peter's square STORYLINE Pope Benedict XVI has accepted the resignation of Bishop John Magee, a former papal aide who stands accused of endangering children by failing to follow the Irish church's own rules on reporting suspected paedophile priests to police. Magee apologised to victims of any paedophile priests who were kept in parish posts since he took charge of the southwest Irish diocese of Cloyne in 1987. The 73-year-old Magee said in a statement on Wednesday: "To those whom I have failed in any way, or through any omission of mine have made suffer, I beg forgiveness and pardon." Iacopo Scaramuzzi, a Vatican journalist, said the pope's acceptance of Magee's resignation showed "that Pope Benedict XVI is taking this whole affair seriously" and is "taking concrete action." People on the streets of Rome welcomed the move, with one woman saying "this scandal must stop with the boys and girls, these children." The Vatican is on the defensive over ever-unfolding accusations that its leaders protected child abusers for decades in many countries, nowhere more so than Ireland, a predominantly Catholic country that once exported priests worldwide. Irish society is still debating the merits of an unprecedented letter from Benedict Saturday, which apologised for decades of unchecked child abuse by priests, nuns and other clerics. The letter criticised Irish bishops, promised a Vatican inspection of unspecified dioceses and religious orders in Ireland, but accepted no Vatican responsibility for promoting a culture of cover-up. Benedict has yet to accept resignation offers from three other Irish bishops who were linked to cover-ups of child-abuse cases in the Dublin Archdiocese, the subject of a government-ordered investigation that published its findings four months ago. Magee, however, had been expected to resign ever since an Irish church-commissioned investigation into the mishandling of child-abuse reports in Cloyne ruled two years ago that Magee and his senior diocesan aides failed to tell police quickly about two 1990s cases. The church and government suppressed publication of that report's findings until December 2008, when Magee faced immediate calls to quit from victims' rights activists and some parishioners. They accused him of ignoring an Irish church policy enacted in 1996 requiring all abuse cases to be reported to police. Magee remained Cloyne bishop in name but transferred day-to-day responsibilities to his superior, Archbishop Dermot Clifford, in March 2009. Magee said Wednesday he submitted his resignation to the Vatican two weeks ago. Magee, who was born in the Northern Ireland border town of Newry, served as a private secretary to three successive popes, Paul VI, John Paul I and John Paul II, from 1969 to 1982. He then served as the pope's master of ceremonies until 1987. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Germany Abuse Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:Germany Abuse- REPLAY German government to establish panel on alleged sexual abuse LENGTH: 01:29 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound/German SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640996 DATELINE: Berlin, 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 01:29 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of German Education Minister Annette Schavan, German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheus?ser-Schnarrenberger, and German Family Minister Kristina Schroeder before news conference 2. Mid of ministers 3. Wide of news conference 4. SOUNDBITE: (German) Sabine Leutheus?ser-Schnarrenberger, German Justice Minister: "The enforcement of the state's right to criminal punishment, which is of particular concern to me as Justice Minister, is one of the important issues, one the pillars of the panel. We will also examine whether there were different conditions in place, which meant the state's right to criminal punishment was not always enforced as would have been necessary." 5. Close up of photographers 6. SOUNDBITE: (German) Annette Schavan, German Education Minister: "With today's decision, the Federal Government has made it clear that it supports all measures that help to expose, clear up, and process violence and sexual abuse of children and young adults. We are talking about crimes that are buried deep in the souls of young people, we are talking about perpetrators who have abused situations of trust and dependence in a reprehensible way." 7. Wide of news conference STORYLINE The German government on Wednesday established an expert panel in response to the recent spate of sexual abuse allegations in the Roman Catholic church and elsewhere. The group will examine past abuses and re-evaluate Germany's current statute of limitations on sex crimes as well as possible compensation for abuse victims, officials said. It will present its findings by the end of this year. German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheus?ser-Schnarrenberger, said the panel's purpose was to prevent future abuse and investigate the past. In addition, the panel would examine whether in the past, "there were different conditions in place, which meant the state's right to criminal punishment was not always enforced as would have been necessary." Education Minister Annette Schavan said that it was important to pay attention to the victims' needs and demands. "We are talking about crimes that are buried deep in the souls of young people, we are talking about perpetrators who have abused situations of trust and dependence in a reprehensible way," Schavan said. Germany has been rocked by a sexual abuse scandal at Roman Catholic and secular schools for several weeks with more than 250 victims having come forward. The panel being formed will be headed by the ministries of Justice, Family and Education and first meet on April 23. It will include 40 experts from the government, the church, charities and educational and legal institutions. The government also announced that it has assigned an independent commissioner for the fight against sexual abuse to serve as a contact person for abuse victims and make possible suggestions about material and other aid for the victims. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Georgia Guantanamo Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:Georgia Guantanamo- REPLAY Opposition denounces transfer of detainees from Gitmo to Georgia LENGTH: 02:05 FIRST RUN: 1330 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Georgian/Nat/English SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640994 DATELINE: Tbilisi - 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 02:05 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Exterior of Georgia's Ministry of Internal Affairs 2. Mid of Shota Utiashvili, Head of analytical department of Georgia's Interior Ministry sitting at desk 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Shota Utiashvili, Head of analytical department of Georgia's Interior Ministry: "So yesterday morning, three detainees from Guantanamo have been transferred to Georgia. They come from Middle Eastern countries. We have held negotiations with the American partners for more than six months now about the case. They won't be under detention in Georgia, they will enjoy the full right of civil liberties and rights as long as they are in Georgia, except for the won't have the right to leave the country. They will have the right to contact their families, to bring their families if they wish so. We have checked their medical and psychological condition, which seems to be quite satisfactory. We know that more than fifty countries all over the world have accepted detainees from Guantanamo. We have not heard of anybody posing any security problems so we think the same will be the case in Georgia." 4. Wide of Utiashvili sitting at desk 5. Exterior Georgian Labour party building 6. Wide Khakha Dzagania, Chairman of the Georgian Labour party, entering the room 7. SOUNDBITE: (Georgian) Kakha Dzagania, Chairman of the Georgian Labour Party: "This step (transfer of detainees) poses a great threat to Georgian security. We think that it was not necessary to bring prisoners to Georgia and it is not within the framework of the US - Georgian strategic partnership agreement. We do not think that it has to be in the interest of a self-respecting president to give the possibility to its partners to transfer its country into the zone of allocation of foreign prisoners." 8. Wide of Kakha Dzagania at news conference STORYLINE: Georgia's Interior Ministry said on Wednesday that three former Guantanamo Bay detainees transferred to the ex-Soviet nation will live in freedom but won't be allowed to leave the country. Ministry spokesman Shota Utiashvili said that the three detainees, "from Middle Eastern countries", would be allowed to contact their families and enjoy other freedoms, but could not travel abroad. Kakha Dzagania, the Chairman of the Georgian Labour Party, denounced the transfer of detainees from Guantanamo Bay, saying on Wednesday the transfer "poses a great threat to Georgian security." "We think that it was not necessary to bring prisoners to Georgia and it is not within the framework of the US - Georgian strategic partnership agreement," he added. Utiashvili denied the detainees presented a security risk. "We know that more than fifty countries all over the world have accepted detainees from Guantanamo. We have not heard of anybody posing any security problems so we think the same will be the case in Georgia," said Utiashvili. The US Justice Department said the identities of the three detainees sent to Georgia on Tuesday are being withheld for security and privacy reasons. Since 2002 when the US prison for terror suspects was opened in Cuba, more than 580 detainees have been moved from there to other destinations. At least 38 countries have accepted Guantanamo detainees. The transfers leave 183 detainees at Guantanamo. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: SKorea US Detainee 2 Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:SKorea US Detainee 2- REPLAY US man faces trial in NKorea; Civil rights activists comment LENGTH: 01:17 FIRST RUN: 1130 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Korean/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 641003 DATELINE: Seoul, 24 March 2010/FILE LENGTH: 01:17 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 24 MARCH 2010) Seoul - March 24, 2010 1. Head of civil human rights activist group in South Korea 'Pax Koreana,' Jo Sung-rae (on left) talking with reporters 2. Close-up of Jo 3. Mid of Jo with reporters 4. Close-up of photo on computer screen of American detained in North Korea, Aijalon Mahli Gomes 5. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) Jo Sung-rae, head of Pax Koreana: "The full name (of Aijalon Mahli Gomes) came out, and it said Aijalon. After that, I looked it up and it was the 'Aijalon' who was with us (during the anti-North Korea rallies). I was really surprised, too." ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 24 MARCH 2010) FILE: Seoul - December 30, 2009 6. Tilt-up of anti-North Korea rally to poster of US President Barack Obama; Gomes can be seen to right of poster 7. Wide of rally with Gomes at back to the left of Obama poster ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 24 MARCH 2010) Seoul - March 24, 2010 8. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) Jo Sung-rae, head of Pax Koreana: "Last December 30th in front of MBC (South Korean broadcasting company), he (Gomes) also participated in the rally. I remember him dropping scalding tears and praying there. I also remember him being really inspired by Robert Park. He did not mention to me (about the purpose of going to North Korea), but my assumption is that he had the same purpose as Robert Park." (FIRST RUN 0730 NEWS UPDATE - 24 MARCH 2010) FILE: Imjingak - January 12, 2010 9. Close-up of Gomes during anti-North Korea rally 10. Tilt-down from leaflet balloons to activist rally with Jo speaking into microphone, and Gomes holding sign in the middle STORYLINE: A South Korean human rights activist on Wednesday said that the American missionary detained in North Korea had participated with him in anti-North Korea rallies. Jo Sung-rae, head of the civil human rights group Pax Koreana said that Aijalon Mahli Gomes, a missionary from Boston, had been "really inspired by Robert Park", a fellow Christian from Arizona who crossed into North Korea at Christmas in a bold bid to draw attention to the communist country's human rights situation. According to Jo, Gomes did not mention any purpose to go to North Korea, "but my assumption is that he had the same purpose as Robert Park," he told AP Television in Seoul. "I remember him dropping scalding tears and praying there" Jo said of Gomes' attendance at a rally in December last year. In the days after Park's arrest, Gomes attended at least two rallies in Seoul calling for Park's release, Jo said. North Korea announced on Monday that Gomes, 30, would stand trial after entering the country illegally. The trial date and charges were not mentioned in a brief report in state media. It was not immediately clear why Gomes, who taught English in South Korea, went to the communist country. Park, 26, of Tucson, was released last month after more than 40 days in North Korean custody, with the North's state media saying he offered an apology for his transgressions. In Washington, a State Department spokesman said on Tuesday that the United States had not been formally notified about charges against the American. According to the State Department, Swedish diplomats have had four meetings with him recently. Sweden represents the US in consular issues since Washington and Pyongyang do not have diplomatic relations. Gomes is the fourth American detained in North Korea, one of the world's most closed countries, in the past year. In addition to Park, American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee were arrested a year ago near the Chinese border and sentenced to 12 years of hard labour for illegal entry and engaging in "hostile acts." They were freed in August after former President Bill Clinton made a high-profile humanitarian visit to Pyongyang to negotiate their release. Gomes, a Boston native who graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine, had been in South Korea for several years teaching English, family spokeswoman Thaleia Schlesinger said. He was dedicated to his students and a devout Christian who attended church every Sunday, a friend said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1446EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Africa Gorillas Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:Africa Gorillas- REPLAY UN report says Central African gorillas in danger from trade LENGTH: 01:51 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/UN STORY NUMBER: 641032 DATELINE: Various, 17/24 March 2010 LENGTH: 01:51 UN - AP Clients Only AP TELEVISION - AP Clients Only SHOTLIST: UNTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, March 17 2010 1. Wide shot of forest 2. Various of gorillas in forest AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya, March 24 2010 3. Establishing shot of UN Environmental program's Christian Nellemann 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Christian Nellemann, United Nations Environmental Programme: "What we are seeing now is that previous estimates from 2002, that only 10 percent of the gorillas would remain by 2030 were too optimistic. So we fear now that the gorillas may become extinct over most parts of their range within, perhaps less than 15 years from now." UNTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, March 17 2010 5. Various of gorillas in forest AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Nairobi, Kenya, March 24 2010 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Christian Nellemann, United Nations Environmental Programme: "We also have just received the astonishing new survey of 750 new eastern lowland gorillas in the middle of the conflict zone. What we are worried about is that these gorillas are disappearing faster than we can actually mobilise resources to survey them." UNTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, March 17 2010 7. Various of gorillas in forest STORYLINE: Gorillas in central Africa are in danger from illegal logging, mining and from hunters, who are killing the great apes for meat, said a joint report from the United Nations and Interpol released on Wednesday. A previous report in 2002 estimated that only 10 percent of gorillas would remain by 2030. The author of the 2002 report and of the newly released one said that estimate now appears too optimistic. "We fear now that the gorillas may become extinct over most parts of their range within, perhaps less than15 years from now," UN Environmental Programme's Christian Nellemann said on Wednesday in Kenya. One of the dangers gorillas now face is a large increase in logging for timber, which is destroying their natural environment. The timber is mostly destined for Asia, particularly China, said Nellemann, who is also the editor-in-chief of the newly released report "The Last Stand of The Gorilla." Militant factions have also taken over the gorillas' habitat, making the protection of gorillas extremely difficult, he said. Increasing human populations and the deadly Ebola virus are also killing gorillas. Achim Steiner, executive director of UNEP, said that logging and mining camps hire poachers to supply displaced people and markets with the meat of wild animals, including gorillas. The report calls for greater scrutiny of European and Asian companies using subsidiaries to extract timber and minerals from central Africa. The UN report, however, contained some good news as well. An unpublished survey of one area of eastern Congo in the centre of the conflict zone discovered 750 previously unknown critically endangered eastern lowland gorillas. "What we are worried about is that these gorillas are disappearing faster than we can actually mobilise resources to survey them," said Nellemann, who called for increased resources for UNEP and Interpol to protect great apes. The report also found that the number of mountain gorillas in the Virungas, a trans-boundary national park, has risen 12 percent since 2007 as a result of strengthened law enforcement. There are four distinct types of gorilla. Three are listed as critically endangered and one is listed as endangered. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: UK Manuscripts Wednesday, 24 March 2010 STORY:UK Manuscripts- REPLAY Christies unveil manuscripts, incl one from French King Francois LENGTH: 01:57 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 640997 DATELINE: London, 24 March 2010 LENGTH: 01:57 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Tilt down exterior of Christie's auction house 2. Mid shot of Christie's flag on building 3. People walk into building 4. Mid shot of Margaret Ford, Christie's head of manuscripts, holding personal prayer book of France's King Francois I 5. Close up of Ford's face 6. Various of personal prayer book of France's King Francois I 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Margaret Ford, Christie's head of manuscripts: "Well this is a wonderful collection of illuminated manuscripts and early printed books. And illuminated manuscripts are particularly lovely because it's like a gallery of paintings, of old master paintings, each page can be decorated by hand in the Middle Ages and will be glittering with gold. Gold is usually laid on the pages and they are absolutely lovely. We have a wonderful collection, it is the most important collection of medieval manuscripts to be sold at auction." 8. Various of personal prayer book of France's King Francois I 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Margaret Ford, Christie's head of manuscripts: "Well, we're very fortunate in this collection to have the Book of Hours to be made for Francois the first. He was a great patron of the arts, he was a Renaissance king of France and he was a patron of Leonardo (Leonardo da Vinci, painter of the Mona Lisa) and he was the first owner of the Mona Lisa." 10. Tilt down from books on table to personal prayer book of France's King Francois I 11. Mid of books on table STORYLINE: British auction house Christie's is to auction off a set of illuminated manuscripts in London on July 7, including the personal prayerbooks of King Francois I of France and Elizabeth de Bohun, great-grandmother of King Henry V of England. "It is the most important selection of medieval manuscripts to be sold at auction," Margaret Ford, Christie's head of manuscripts said on Wednesday. The collection, once owned by kings and aristocrats, is expected to sell for up to 23.4 (m) million dollars The manuscripts are owned by an anonymous US collector, who has spend the last 30 years gathering them together. The illuminated manuscripts are handwritten books with illustrations and decorations painted in brilliant colours and gold. "Books Of Hours" were personal prayerbooks for wealthy individuals to own. King Francois was one of the foremost patrons of the arts during the Renaissance, and Leonardo da Vinci spent the end of his career in the king's service. Francois acquired da Vinci's famous painting The Mona Lisa from the artist's estate after he died. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 03-24-10 1435EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------
Tsminda Sameba Cathedral
Aerial view of Tsminda Sameba Cathedral, Tbilisi Georgia. Taken via drone.
JOHN LEWIS MEMORIAL SERVICE - SWITCHED FEED 1250 - 1440
1250 LEWIS CAPITOL CEREMONY SWITCHED FS22 72 SWITCHED FEED OF CONGRESS MEMBERS HOLDING A CEREMONY IN THE ROTUNDA FOR REP. JOHN LEWIS. >> Good afternoon. Family and many friends acknowledge his life. Ebenezer. >> Let us bow our heads in a word of prayer. Eternal god, O father, I come to you today in the name of Jesus. Thank you for that many different faiths that had to [2:09:26 PM] celebrate the life and the legacy of John there was. We come today thanking you for the foundations that has mother and father established in Troy, Alabama. We thank you for his leadership in the March on Washington. We thank you for how he is was bloodied for us, bruise for us, sign in for us, was willing to give up his life, that we might have life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Today, colleagues, friends, especially family members, lay him in this hallowed rotunda. Committing ourselves to Marge as he marched to ballot boxes and for voting rights and for civil rights and for human rights, and we will keep doing that until righteousness is like a mighty stream, and finally, we want to say thank you, that he crossed another bridge, we pray that one day will be named for John there was memorial bridge, [2:10:28 PM] but the bridge from Earth to glory, that when he got there, Elijah Cummings and the congressional cloud of witnesses welcomed him home as they marched down that street pavement of gold, we want to say thank you from Emmett till to George Floyd, thank you for allowing our deaths not to be in vain, and we want to say thank you. Well done, that good and faithful servant. Do you have found the good fight, kept your eyes on the prize, and now to the joy of the lord, and Gabriel told the angels to lift their voices. We heard Dr. King in the background saying free at last, free at last. The consciousness of congress is free at last. In Jesus' name we pray it, amen. >> The honorable Mitch Mcconnell, majority leader of the United States senate. [2:11:35 PM] >> Leader Mcconnell: Please be seated. Memoirs, John Lewis described her childhood at home that was quite different from a place he lies today. That farmhouse in Alabama had no running water or electricity. It stood on the first land his father's family had ever owned, and a part of the countries where segregation had led to almost total isolation along racial lines. It would have been hard to conceive back then that the young child tending his family's chickens would, by age 23, be leading the movement to redeem American society. That he'd be addressing hundreds of thousands of civil rights marchers from the steps of the Lincoln memorial. [2:12:35 PM] I was lucky enough to be there that day. I marveled at the massive crowds. The site gave me hope for our country, that was John's doing. Even on that day, as his voice echoed across the mall, I wondered how many dared to imagine that young man would walk the halls of the congress. America's original slavery was allowed to fester for far too long. It left a long week of pain, violence, and brokenness, that has taken great efforts from great heroes to address. John's friend, Dr. Martin Luther king Jr., famously said the ark of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice. But that is never automatic. History only been to towards what's right because people like [2:13:35 PM] John paid the price. He paid that prius at every Nashville lunch counter where his leadership made segregation impossible to ignore. Every jail cell where he waited out hatred and oppression. He paid that price and harassment, and beatings from a bus station in South Carolina, to the bridge. John Lewis lived and worked with urgency because the task was urgent. But even though the world around him gave him every cause for bitterness, he stubbornly treated everyone with response and love. Also that, as his friend Dr. King, once put it, we could build a community at peace with itself. [2:14:36 PM] Today, we pray and trust that this peacemaker himself now rests in peace. All of jn's colleague stand with his son, John miles. Their family and the entire country, and thanking god that he gave our nation this hero is needed so badly. May all of us, that he would leave behind, pray for a fraction of John's strength, to keep bending that arc on towards justice. >> Ladies and gentlemen, the honorable Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the United States house of representatives. >> Speaker Pelosi: To the family of John Lewis, welcome to the rotunda, under the dome of the U.S. Capital, we have bid [2:15:38 PM] farewell to some of the greatest Americans and our history. It is fitting that John joins this pantheon, resting with president Abraham Lincoln. John revered president Lincoln. It was clear. 57 years ago, at the shadow of the Lincoln memorial, where John declared our minds, souls, and hearts cannot rest until freedom and justice IST for all people. Words that ring true today. Between then and now, John Lewis became a titan of the civil rights movement and of the conscious of the congress. Here in congress, John was revered and beloved on both sides of the aisle. On both sides of the capitol. We knew that he always worked on [2:16:39 PM] the side of the angels, and now we know that he is with them. We are confident that out that he is with his beloved. It is a comfort that his son, John miles, and the entire Lewis family, Michael Collins, the entire staff, that they mourn their loss and are praying for them at this sad time. God truly blessed America with the life and leadership of John Lewis. We thank you for sharing him with us. May he rest in peace. John Lewis often spoke about the loving community, a vision that he shared with Dr. Martin Luther king Jr., a community and uplifted by faith, hope, and charity. Indeed, he believes that every person has a spark of divinity, making them worthy of respect. And he had faith in the charity of others, which is what gave him so much hope. As he wrote in his Bo relieve [2:17:47 PM] all bitterness, only love and peace in your heart, knowing the battle for good to overcome evil is already won. John, the optimist. He was a person of greatness. He was also a person of great humility, always giving credit to others in the movement. John committed his life to advancing justice and understood that to build a better future, we had to acknowledge the past. Exactly one year ago, members of the congressional black caucus, they held a pilgrimage to observe 400 years since the arrive of the first from Africa. Some of the descendants of those would fill this capitol. I wish you could have seen their [2:18:48 PM] response that John received when he was introduced to the Ghana parliament. My colleagues are shaking their heads. It was overwhelming. Overwhelming. I wish you could have seen him. Enslaved people were sent through, the death ships, to cross the atlantic. I wish you could have seen what it meant to him. He knew that the door of no return was a central part of American history, just as is the bridge, the March on Washington, Selma March. When he made his speech 57 years ago, he was the youngest speaker. How fitting it is that in the final days of his life, he summoned the strength to acknowledge the young people peacefully protesting in the same spirit of that March, taking up the unfinished work of [2:19:48 PM] racial justice. Helping complete the journey begun more than 55 years ago. We've all seen the photographs of John being thoroughly beaten in Selma, which painted an iconic picture of injustice. What a beautiful contrast to see them with us today at the black lives matter plaza, standing in solidarity with the protesters. An iconic picture of justice. That will endure and will inspire a nation for years to come. John firmly focused on the future, on how to inspire the next generation to join the fight for justice. In his quote,to find a way to get in the way." As one of the youngest leaders, the March to Montgomery, he understood the power of young people to change the future. When asked what someone can do [2:20:49 PM] who is 19 or 20 years old, the age that he was when he set out to desegregate Nashville, he replied "A young person should be speaking out for what is fair, what is just, what is right. Speak out for those who have been left out and have been left behind. That is how the movement goes forward," John said. Imagine the great joy he had traveling the country to share that message of action with young people. No need to imagine. It is my personal privilege right now for me to yield to our beloved colleague, the distinguished gentleman from Georgia, congressman John Lewis. >> It's I grew up in rural Alabama. A little place called Troy. My father was a farmer. But back in 1944 when I was only [2:21:49 PM] four years old, my father had saved $300, and with the $300, he bought 110 acres of land. My family still owns that land today. How many of you remember when you were four? What happened to the rest of us? It was many, many yrs ago. In the little town of Troy, we visited Birmingham. I saw the signs, white men, colored women, I would come home and asked my mother, my father, my grandparents, my great-grandparents, why? Don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. But one day, in 1955, 15 years old, in the tenth grade, I heard about Rosa parks. [2:22:52 PM] I heard the words of martin Luther king Jr. On the radio. 1957. I met Rosa parks at the age of 72. In 1958, I met martin Luther king Jr., and these two individuals inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. So I come here to say to you this morning, on this beautiful campus, you must find a way to get in the way. You must find a way to get in trouble. [Applause] Use your education. You have wonderful teachers. Wonderful professors. Use what you have. Use your learning. Use your tools. Help make our country, help make [2:23:53 PM] our world a better place, where no one will be left out or left behind. You can do it, and you must do it. It is your time. [Applause] In a few short days, we will commemorate what we call the Mississippi summer project. For more than 1,000 students, all over America, many made a trip to Mississippi to encourage people to register to vote. And on June 21st 1964, 3 young men that I now, one African-American, investigating the burning of an African-American church that was used for registration, these [2:24:54 PM] three young men taken to jail, taken out of jail, turned over to the Klan, and they were beaten, shot, and killed, and these men did not die in Vietnam. They didn't die in the Middle East or eastern Europe. They didn't die and Africa. They died right here in our own country, trying to help all of our citizens become participants in our democratic process. As young people, you must understand that they want to take us back to another period, but you must say that we are not going back. We've made too much progress. There may be some setbacks, some delays, some disappointment, but you must never, ever give up or give in. You must keep the faith and keep your eyes on the prize. That is your mission. [2:25:56 PM] That is your moral obligation. That is your mandate. Get out there and do it. Get in the way. [Applause] In the final analysis, we all must learn to live together as brothers and sisters. We all live in the same house. And it doesn't matter whether we are black or white. Latino, asian-american. It doesn't matter if we are straight or gay. We are all one family. We live in the same house. Be bold. Be courageous. Stand up, speak up. Speak out, and find a way to create the beloved community. In the beloved world. A world of peace. [2:26:58 PM] World that recognizes dignity. Of all humankind. Never become hostile. Never hate. To live in peace. One people. One loves. Thank you very much. ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? >> Please rise. From the house of representatives -- >> God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and that was dumb to the difference. Living one day at a time, accepting hardships as a pathway to peace. Taking, as he did, the central world as it is. Not as I would have it. Trusting that he will make all [2:44:50 PM] things Ryan if I surrender to his well. I may be reasonably happy in this life and supremely happy with him forever. . In the next. Amen. >> Ladies and gentlemen, please remain in your seats until your escorted to pay your respects by the sergeant at arms. [Silence]
APTN 1830 PRIME NEWS NORTH AMERICA
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Saturday, 13 February 2010 North America Prime News ++Canada Oly Memorial 02:00 AP Clients Only NEW Memorial, held after death of Georgian luge member Iraq Violence 01:31 AP Clients Only REPLAY Security tight after more attacks on Shiite pilgrims Canada Oly Highlights 06:08 Olympic Restrix Apply - Pls Check Script REPLAY Highlights of opening ceremony, IOC and Georgia reax re luger's death Afghanistan Marjah 01:12 AP Clients Only REPLAY AP embed pix of NATO offensive against Taliban +Afghanistan UK Operation 03:17 AP clients Only WRAP NATO troops offensive against Taliban ADDS reax Afghanistan Presser 3 01:30 AP Clients Only REPLAY NATO spokesman on military offensive against Taliban Dom Rep Bus 00:53 AP Clients Only REPLAY 11 dead, 15 injured after bus tumbles into ocean US Samoa 00:24 AP Clients Only REPLAY Graphic shows eye of tropical cyclone hitting territory Germany Dresden 02:16 AP Clients Only REPLAY Scuffles as Neo-Nazis and opponents mark WW2 anniversary ++Canada Oly Reax 03:22 See Script NEW International Luge Federation comments on death of luge rider B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 02-13-10 1357EST -----------End of rundown----------- AP-APTN-1830: ++Canada Oly Memorial Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:++Canada Oly Memorial- NEW Memorial, held after death of Georgian luge member LENGTH: 01:59 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636990 DATELINE: Whistler - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 01:59 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST : 1. Wide of people in front of Olympic symbol 2. People looking at makeshift memorial to Georgian luge team member Nodar Kumaritashvili, who was killed on Friday 3. Close up of card and candles in memorial 4. Close up of candle being lit 5. Mid of woman placing candle in memorial 6. Close up of candle burning 7. People looking at memorial ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 8. SOUNDBITE (English) David Egydy, Olympic Games spectator : "We just came to this place to take a picture and we saw people putting candles and we just decided to buy two candles in memory of this guy." 9. Wide of village 10. People performing in village 11. Canadian flag waving 12. Various of crowd gathered to celebrate Olympics 13. Children seated 14. SOUNDBITE (English) Ken Bailey, Olympic Games spectator : "I think the best part of the evening is just the camaraderie and all of the flags and, most importantly, all of the red (shows Canadian flag on his glove)." 15. Various of crowd celebrating Olympics STORYLINE : Fans laid flowers and lit candles on Friday at a makeshift memorial for Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili at Vancouver's Whistler resort. The 21-year-old was killed on Friday during a training run at Whistler's Olympic sliding course. Entering the final straight of a training run, Kumaritashvili died after smashing into an unpadded steel girder. Olympic fan David Egydy said he and his girlfriend were passing by and decided to pay tribute to the Georgian athlete. Organisers of the Winter Games dedicated Friday's opening ceremony to Kumaritashvili. Officials have since made changes to the luge track modifying the ice in the 16th curve and erecting a wooden wall to cover the row of steel beams running alongside the finish area. On Friday evening crowds of people were gathered in Whistler to celebrate the Games and watch the entertainment provided. One spectator Ken Bailey said he was enjoying the evening and the spirit of friendship the Games brought to Whistler. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1417EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Iraq Violence Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Iraq Violence- REPLAY Security tight after more attacks on Shiite pilgrims LENGTH: 01:31 FIRST RUN: 1130 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Arabic/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636948 DATELINE: Various - 12/13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 01:31 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST Najaf - 13 February 2010 1. Wide exterior of Imam Ali holy shrine in Najaf 2. Mid of dome and minaret of shrine 3. Various of Shiite pilgrims walking 4. Wide of police checkpoint 5. Police searching female pilgrims 6. Exterior of al Sadr teaching hospital in Najaf 7. Sign reading (Arabic): al Sadr Teaching Hospital 8. Various of injured man on hospital bed 9. Wide of injured men on beds 10. Various of injured boy sitting on bed 11. Zoom in on another injured boy lying on bed Kufa - 12 February 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Pan of scene of blast 13. Close up of scattered clothes at scene 14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Faraj Ali, Eyewitness: "The first ambulance was full of injured people. Later two trucks came, each one loaded with approximately 15 injured. The second blast was very loud and the third was louder and I saw two injured people falling to the ground." 15. Ambulance driving through streets STORYLINE Security was tight in the holy city of Najaf on Saturday after a string of attacks on Shiite pilgrims travelling to the Iraqi city. Police checkpoints were set up on the roads into the southern city as the pilgrims arrived. On Friday six Shiite pilgrims were killed and at least 40 people wounded after three bombs exploded near the city of Kufa, according to the director of the Najaf medical centre. He said the bombs exploded on the road to Kufa, 100 miles (160 kilometres) south of Baghdad, one of the main routes to Najaf. The director said those killed were pilgrims walking to Najaf. Some of the injured, including children, were taken to the al-Sadr Teaching Hospital in Najaf. An eyewitness to the bomb blasts, Faraj Ali, said he saw emergency vehicles taking many injured people away from the scene. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1346EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Canada Oly Highlights Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Canada Oly Highlights- REPLAY Highlights of opening ceremony, IOC and Georgia reax re luger's death LENGTH: 06:08 FIRST RUN: 1030 RESTRICTIONS: Olympic Restrix Apply - Pls Check Script TYPE: English/French/Nat SOURCE: OLYMPIC MATERIAL STORY NUMBER: 636917 DATELINE: Vancouver - 12 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 06:08 SOURCE: IOC. RESTRICTIONS: Olympic Material is subject to full IOC copyright. All use of Olympic Material is strictly subject to the following restrictions: 1. Olympic Material may be used only as a part of regularly scheduled daily news programmes of which the actual news element constitutes the main feature "programmes". Programmes shall not be positioned or promoted as Olympic programmes. 2. 3 x 2 x 3 Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations may use a total of six minutes of Olympic Material per day subject to the following provisions: a) Olympic Material may appear in no more than three programmes per day. b) No more than two minutes of Olympic Material may be used in any one programme. c) These programmes must be separated by a period of at least three hours. d) No more than one third of any individual event may be used in any one programme with a maximum broadcast time of 30 seconds for any individual event. 3. 6 x 1 x 2 In the case of an all-news network, the network may use Olympic Material during multiple news programmes, as long as a) the Olympic Material is used in accordance with Clause 2 (3 x 2 x 3). or b) in no more than six news programmes per day and does not exceed a total of one minute in any one programme. These bulletins must be separated by a period of at least two hours. The other provisions of clause 2 above continue to apply. 4. Should any fair dealing or similar provisions contained in any applicable national law permit the use by Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations of any footage of previous Olympic Games, then such footage will be included in the total of six minutes per day. 5. Olympic Material may only be used for a period of 48 hours from the earliest time at which broadcast of such Olympic Material by the Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations may begin. After such period, Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations may only transmit archive Olympic Material with the express prior written agreement of the IOC. 6. Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations may broadcast Olympic Material in accordance with the other conditions contained in these News Access Rules, as follows: a) The later of (i) immediately following the broadcast of an Olympic event by the local Rights Holding Broadcaster on free to air television in that territory, or (ii) such longer period of time after such broadcast that the Rights Holding Broadcaster may wish to impose in accordance with applicable national law. b) At the end of the broadcast day (i.e. 24:00 hours local time) if not broadcast by the local Rights Holding Broadcaster on free to air television in that territory on the day (local time) during which the Olympic event concluded. c) At such time as may be agreed by the Rights Holding Broadcaster for its particular territory and that particular Olympic event. d) Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations can only transmit Olympic Material prior to these times with the specific written agreement with the local Rights Holder Broadcaster. 7. Non-Rights Holding Broadcast Organisations shall respect the following provisions: a) They shall not make available or provide Olympic Material to any third party. b) They shall ensure that no advertising, promotion, publicity or other message appears at the same time (be it superimposed or on a split screen or otherwise) as Olympic Material and/or at the same time as any other coverage of the Olympic Games which contains any Olympic imagery or Olympic marks. c) They shall ensure that no advertising or other message is placed before, during or after the broadcast of Olympic Material, in such a manner as to imply an association or connection between any third party, or third party's product or service, and Olympic Material or the Olympic Games. d) They must give an on screen credit to the Rights Holding Broadcaster in their particular territory during each broadcast of Olympic Material. The credit shall be in the form of leaving on the Rights Holding Broadcaster watermark, or, should the Olympic Material not be sourced through the Rights Holding Broadcaster, a super video credit of at least five seconds to read as follows: "Courtesy of (Name of Rights Holding Broadcaster)" 8. Any dispute, controversy or claim arising from or in connection with the execution or interpretation of these News Access Rules or breach thereof not resolved after exhaustion of the legal remedies established by the IOC and which cannot be settled amicably, shall be submitted exclusively to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) for final and binding arbitration in accordance with the Statute and Regulations of the CAS. The decisions of the CAS shall be final, binding and cannot be appealed. SHOTLIST: Vancouver 1. Various aerial shots of Vancouver and the BC Place Stadium. 2. Start of the 2010 Olympic Games opening ceremony Whistler 3. Various of snowboarder and people on mountain Vancouver 4. Snowboarder coming through Olympic Logo and welcoming world to Vancouver 2010 Winter Games 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jacques Rogge, IOC President "I now have the honour to ask the Right Honourable Michaelle Jean, Governor-General of Canada, to open the 21st Winter Olympic Games. Thank you." 6. Michaelle Jean, Governor-General of Canada, on stage 7. SOUNDBITE: (French/English) Michaelle Jean, Governor-General of Canada "I declare open the Games of Vancouver - celebrating the 21st Olympic Winter Games." 8. Various of the torch ceremony to light the Olympic Flame 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jacques Rogge, IOC President "This is a very sad day. The IOC is in deep mourning. Here you have a young athlete who lost his life in pursuing his passion. He had a dream to participate in the Olympic Games, he trained hard and he had this fatal accident. I have no words to say what we feel." 10. Mid of news conference Whistler 11. Nodar Kumaritashvili of Georgia at the start during the first training day for the men's singles luge Vancouver 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Furlong, Chief Executive of the Vancouver Organising Committee (VANOC): (++PART OVERLAID OVER PREVIOUS SHOT++) "Nodar Kumaritashvili came to Canada with hopes and dreams that this would be a magnificent occasion in his life. I'm told by members of his federation that he was an incredibly spirited young person. He came here to be able to feel what it is like to be able to call yourself an Olympian." Whistler 13. Various of Kumaritashvili completing his fifth practice run Vancouver 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Furlong, Chief Executive of the Vancouver Organising Committee (VANOC): (++SOUNDBITE STARTS OVER PREVIOUS SEQUENCE++) "We are heartbroken beyond words. To be sitting here, I am so sorry to be in this position, to be reporting this to you. It's not something I had prepared for, or ever thought I would need to be prepared for. My team has been devastated by this and our thoughts and prayers are now with Nodar's family, his friends and the athletes from Georgia and we turn now to do everything we can to assist then, to support them, to help them in the most Canadian way that we can." 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nikolos Rurua, Georgian Minister for Culture and Sport "As to the questions of the Georgian team's participation in the Olympics, you know, during the Summer Olympics in 2008 in Beijing, Georgia was invaded by Russia and our team, despite of that fact, persevered and stayed and competed and won several medals in Beijing. So, our sportsmen and our athletes decided to be loyal to the spirit of the Olympic games and they will compete and dedicate their performance to their fallen comrade." Whistler 16. STILL: Nodar Kumaritashvili (fades to black) STORYLINE: The opening ceremony of the XXI Olympic Winter Games took place on Friday after a spectacular show in Vancouver - but the first day of the Winter Games didn't turn out as the organisers hoped, or planned. With just hours to go before the opening ceremony, Nodar Kumaritashvili, a 21-year-old luger from Georgia, was killed after he lost control of his sled on the infamously fast track at Whistler and crashed into a steel pole. Tributes followed from an emotional Jacques Rogge, the IOC President, John Furlong, the Chief Executive of the Vancouver Organising Committee (VANOC). Nikolos Rurua, Georgian Minister for Culture and Sport said that the Georgian Olympic team would remain at the Games and will "dedicate their performance to their fallen comrade." It had been billed as a spectacular opening ceremony, but by the time the pyrotechnics and stage show began, the nation was already in mourning following Kumaritashvili's death. As an estimated global audience of more than a (b) billion watched the event, with the theme a "landscape of a dream," the audience was transported across Canada, from the Prairies to the peaks of mountain tops, the depths of the ocean, and through its varied seasons as the BC Place Stadium was transformed into many different landscapes. The night's celebrations had started with a daring jump by snowboarder Johnny Lyall through a giant set of Olympic Rings - after the live audience had been engaged in the dramatic countdown to the start of the ceremony. Then more than 2,600 athletes from 82 National Olympic Committees entered the stadium, led by their country's flagbearer. Out of respect for Kumaritashvili, flags were lowered to half-mast during the opening ceremony and the Georgian National Olympic Committee and its athletes wore black armbands and a black mark was placed on the Georgian flag to symbolise their mourning. Rogge, on behalf of the IOC, International Federations (IF) and VANOC, then asked Michaelle Jean, Governor General of Canada to officially declare the XXI Olympic Winter Games open. Next came the symbolic lighting of the Olympic Flame. Rick Hansen, Canada's 'Man in Motion', passed off the flame to Catriona LeMay Doan (multiple Olympic gold medallist in speed skating) who, along with Steve Nash (Olympian and National Basketball Association MVP), Nancy Greene Raine (Olympic gold medallist in alpine skiing) and Wayne Gretzky (one of the most celebrated ice hockey players) lit a contemporary cauldron that emerged from the field of play. Despite the fact that one of four pillars supporting the Olympic cauldron, due to be lit by LeMay Doan, failed to rise to the occasion and emerge from the floor's trap-door, Gretzky started the ignition of the 9.7-metre (32-foot) structure and the flame spread as planned. To ensure the Olympic Flame burns for the full 17 days of the Games, an external cauldron was also lit by Gretzky who carried the flame from BC Place to the Vancouver waterfront. Then Rogge's thoughts turned to back to the late Kumaritashvili, and he described the IOC as being in "deep mourning". Georgia has seven other athletes entered in the games; including three freestyle skiers and another men's luger, Levran Guereshidze. The 2010 Olympic Winter Games run in Vancouver and Whistler from February 12th to 28th, 2010. The same locations will then host the Paralympic Winter Games which run from from March 12th to 21st, 2010. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1348EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Afghanistan Marjah Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Afghanistan Marjah- REPLAY AP embed pix of NATO offensive against Taliban LENGTH: 01:12 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636977 DATELINE: Marjah - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 01:12 PLEASE IGNORE SCRIPT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH FOLLOWING, WHICH UPDATES STORYLINE WITH DEATHS OF NATO TROOPS AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++PLEASE NOTE THIS FOOTAGE WAS SHOT BY A CAMERAMAN EMBEDDED WITH THE US MILITARY AND SUBJECT TO US MILITARY RESTRICTIONS++ SHOTLIST 1. Wide of US soldiers moving in file across outskirts of town 2. Wide of heavily-armed US soldiers moving into town 3. Close-up of US soldier carrying rifle, standing still in town 4. Wide of US soldier with rifle outside mud-built home in town 5. Close-up of US soldier smoking whilst looking through rifle sights 6. Wide of US soldier on guard, sheltering against rock formation 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Lieutenant Ryan Engle, US army "It was an early day today but 3-6 Lima Company, we came into the north west area of Marjah and took this intersection of the canals. It was limited resistance. No real resistance - much less than was expected. We did find several IEDs and bombs and things like that." 8. UPSOUND (English) Corporal John Beatley, US army talking to local via interpreter "Tell the Taliban that they are not welcome in this area anymore. Tell him that we are here now and we want to help them get their freedom back." 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Corporal John Beatley, US army "We are here in Marjah, Afghanistan. It's the first time American forces have been over here in a while. We are here to get rid of the Taliban and give the people of Marjah their freedom back." 10. Wide of US soldiers resting by low wall, one of them appearing to be unwell 11. Close-up of US soldier being unwell STORYLINE Thousands of US marines and Afghan soldiers stormed the Taliban stronghold of Marjah by air and ground on Saturday, meeting only scattered resistance but facing a daunting thicket of bombs and booby traps that slowed the allied advance through the town. Thousands of British, US and Canadian troops also swept into Taliban areas to the north of Marjah, seeking to clear a wide swath of villages that had been under militant control for several years. The massive offensive was aimed at establishing Afghan government authority over the biggest southern town under militant control and breaking the Taliban grip over a wide area of their southern heartland. The NATO commander of forces in southern Afghanistan said coalition and Afghan troops, aided by 60 helicopters, made a "successful insertion" into Marjah in southern Helmand province and added the operation was going "without a hitch". Lieutenant Ryan Engle of the US army's 3-6 Lima Company was among the troops who entered Marjah. He said his men encountered "no real resistance" but "did find several IEDs and bombs and things like that". Two NATO troops have been killed in the coalition offensive. A NATO statement said one service member died in an IED strike, while another died from small-arms fire. It gave no further details on their nationalities. They are the first reported coalition casualties from the offensive At least 20 insurgents were reported killed in the Helmand operation, according to the commander of Afghan forces in the region, who added that troops recovered Kalashnikov rifles, heavy machine guns and grenades from 11 insurgents captured so far. A Taliban spokesman on Saturday dismissed the NATO accounts of the offensive as "propaganda" and insisted the insurgents were still resisting the allied assault and that Marjah remained under their control. Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone, the spokesman declined to say how many Taliban fighters remained in the town. The few civilians who ventured out to talk to the coalition forces in Marjah said Taliban fighters were falling back deeper into the town, perhaps to try to regroup and mount harassment attacks to prevent the government from rushing in aid and public services - a key step in the operation. The long-awaited assault on Marjah is the biggest offensive since the 2001 US-led invasion of Afghanistan and is a major test of a new NATO strategy focused on protecting civilians. The attack is also the first major combat operation since President Barack Obama ordered 30-thousand US reinforcements in December to try to turn the tide of the war. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1356EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: +Afghanistan UK Operation Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:+Afghanistan UK Operation- WRAP NATO troops offensive against Taliban ADDS reax LENGTH: 03:17 FIRST RUN: 1630 RESTRICTIONS: AP clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: MoD STORY NUMBER: 636987 DATELINE: Marjah/London - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 03:17 UK MINISTRY OF DEFENCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY (FIRST RUN 0630 ASIA PRIME NEWS - 13 FEBRUARY 2010) UK MINISTRY OF DEFENCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY Near Marjah, Afghanistan - 13 February 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Night vision of helicopters flying overhead, during launch of "Operation Moshtarak" 2. Various night vision shots of joint forces launching the assault ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 13 FEBRUARY 2010) UK MINISTRY OF DEFENCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY London, UK - 13 February 2010 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Major General Gordon Messenger, British Army Officer: "We've certainly dislocated the Taliban in those areas but no one is suggesting they've been defeated, that they have permanently put down their weapons. They remain a threat and the guys in the ground will be very alert to that in the days ahead." Question: So what's been achieved? "Well so far we have successfully secured the areas militarily. What's important now is what happens next. We don't conduct military operations for the sake of military operations, and it's not just about us versus the Taliban. So what happens next is engaging with the locals, providing some immediate support to the locals and following it up with more substantial projects that essentially mean that the Afghan people there start to look to the Afghan government for their support and succour." (FIRST RUN 0930 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 13 FEBRUARY 2010) UK MINISTRY OF DEFENCE - AP CLIENTS ONLY Near Marjah, Afghanistan - 13 February 2010 4. Various of soldiers walking 5. Helicopter flying 6. Soldiers seen in darkness 7. Lights of helicopter seen flying over 8. Various of soldiers seen walking in darkness 9. Head of Task Force in Helmand Brigadier James Cowan addressing troops 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brigadier James Cowan, Head of Task Force in Helmand; "It's about numbers and those numbers come from a number of different sources. First of all British government has increased the size of our force, as you know, before Christmas, secondly, the McChrystal reinforcements approved by President Obama, and third and perhaps most importantly, the numbers of Afghan soldiers now being recruited, and here in Helmand the opening of the Helmand police training centre. We're training 500 new policemen every eight weeks. So this is about numbers. I think some people worry that numbers, more soldiers equals more casualties. Actually it's the other way around. The more you have the more you can suppress the enemy and the fewer the casualties you take." 11. Various of crowds of troops listening STORYLINE More than 1,000 U.K. troops participating in a NATO offensive against the Taliban in southern Afghanistan have secured their objectives amid scattered resistance, a British military spokesman said on Saturday. Major General Gordon Messenger told reporters at Britain's Ministry of Defence that the British forces "have successfully secured the area militarily" with only sporadic resistance from Taliban forces. He said "low numbers" of rebels had been killed during the attacks - but that efforts by British troops in the area of Chah-e-Anjir had been successful. But he added that the Taliban were still a threat. "No one is suggesting they've been defeated, that they have permanently put down their weapons. They remain a threat and the guys in the ground will be very alert to that in the days ahead." British troops are among the thousands of NATO and Afghan soldiers who stormed the Taliban stronghold of Marjah by air and ground Saturday. The massive offensive is aimed at establishing Afghan government authority over the biggest southern town under militant control and breaking the Taliban grip over a wide area of their southern heartland. Messenger said the assault had so far had gone well as it could have done but added that everyone understood the hard part came next in reassuring the public. "What happens next is engaging with the locals, providing some immediate support to the locals and following it up with more substantial projects that essentially mean that the Afghan people there start to look to the Afghan government for their support and succour," he said. He was unable to say whether British forces suffered any casualties in the advance. In a separate incident one British soldier from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards was killed by an explosion while on vehicle patrol in Nad-e-Ali District of Helmand province, the Ministry of Defence said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1343EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Afghanistan Presser 3 Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Afghanistan Presser 3- REPLAY NATO spokesman on military offensive against Taliban LENGTH: 01:30 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636978 DATELINE: Kabul - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 01:30 PLEASE IGNORE SCRIPT SENT EARLIER AND REPLACE WITH FOLLOWING, WHICH UPDATES STORYLINE WITH DEATHS OF NATO TROOPS AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Wide of start of news conference 2. Mid of reporters and officials 3. Mid of Mark Sedwill, NATO spokesman and Afghan military official 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Sedwill, NATO spokesman: "The military phase of the operation, as you know, began today and so far the news from the ground appears to be positive, but we are only in the first day, and as these gentleman around me, with much more experience of military operations, will know one should never predict an outcome too early in an operation." 5. Close up of hand writing 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Sedwill, NATO spokesman: "I can't yet say how long it will take for this military phase to get to the point when we can bring in the civilian support from the Afghan government - we hope that will happen quickly - and that civilian support, the district development teams, is ready to go and is ready to come in on to the ground with the district governor under the leadership of the provincial government, meshing together the provincial and the national services on the ground as soon as the security situation there permits it and we hope that will be very shortly, but it would be wrong for me to predict an exact timeline at this stage." 7. Close up of miniature NATO flag on desk 8. Wide of news conference STORYLINE NATO officials were cautiously optimistic on Saturday following the start of a massive offensive aimed at establishing Afghan government authority over the biggest southern town under militant control and breaking the Taliban grip over a wide area of their southern heartland. Spokesman Mark Sedwill said that "so far the news from the ground appears to be positive" but added that "one should never predict an outcome too early in an operation." Earlier thousands of US Marines and Afghan soldiers stormed the Taliban stronghold of Marjah by air and ground, meeting only scattered resistance but facing a daunting thicket of bombs and booby traps that slowed the allied advance through the town. Thousands of British, U.S. and Canadian troops also swept into Taliban areas to the north of Marjah, seeking to clear a wide swath of villages that had been under Taliban control for several years. The massive offensive was aimed at establishing Afghan government authority over the biggest southern town under militant control and breaking the Taliban grip over a wide area of their southern heartland. Two NATO troops have been killed in the coalition offensive. A NATO statement said one service member died in an IED strike, while another died from small-arms fire. It gave no further details on their nationalities. They are the first reported coalition casualties from the offensive At least 20 militants have been reported killed in the Helmand operation, said General Sher Mohammad Zazai, the commander of Afghan forces in the region. The few civilians who ventured out to talk to the Marines said teams of Taliban fighters were falling back deeper into the town, perhaps to try to regroup and mount harassment attacks to prevent the government from rushing in aid and public services - a key step in the operation. Sedwill said on Saturday that it was not clear when the civilian part of the operation could begin. "Civilian support, the district development teams, is ready to go and is ready to come in on to the ground with the district governor under the leadership of the provincial government ... and we hope that will be very shortly." The long-awaited assault on Marjah is the biggest offensive since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan and is a major test of a new NATO strategy focused on protecting civilians. The attack is also the first major combat operation since US President Barack Obama ordered 30,000 U.S. reinforcements in December to try to turn the tide of the war. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1345EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Dom Rep Bus Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Dom Rep Bus- REPLAY 11 dead, 15 injured after bus tumbles into ocean LENGTH: 00:53 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636997 DATELINE: Santo Domingo - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 00:53 ++AP Television - AP Clients Only++ SHOTLIST: ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of bodies laid out on rocks near ladders being used as bridges 2. Various of crowd of rescuers at water's edge 3. People being pulled out of water 4. Close up of exhausted woman being pulled to shore 5. Wide of divers in water 6. Divers on shore 7. Wide of crowd on shore 8. Wide of person being pulled out of water STORYLINE: Eleven people died after a bus plunged into the ocean in the Dominican Republic late on Friday night, authorities said. At least eight women are among the dead, including one who was pregnant, a Civil Defence spokesman said. Fifteen people were seriously injured, he added. Authorities say the bus tumbled off Las Americas highway, which links the capital Santo Domingo with the island country's eastern region. Rescuers at the scene of the crash used ladders to create bridges across rocks allowing them to bring the bodies to shore. The rescue operation was conducted at night with flashlights and spotlights directed into the sea to assist rescuers. Divers pulled crying victims out of the water, while a crowd of onlookers watched from the shore. Authorities say the bus driver's assistant believes a broken steering rod may have caused the crash. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1354EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: US Samoa Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:US Samoa- REPLAY Graphic shows eye of tropical cyclone hitting territory LENGTH: 00:24 FIRST RUN: 1130 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Mute SOURCE: NOAA STORY NUMBER: 636946 DATELINE: American Samoa - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 00:24 NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Graphic showing eye of tropical cyclone hitting territory between approximately 0500-0800 GMT STORYLINE A Pacific storm with hurricane-force winds churned across sparsely populated islands of American Samoa on Saturday and took aim for the capital region of the US territory, still recovering from a deadly autumn tsunami. Tropical Cyclone Rene hit the Manu'a islands on Friday, before growing in strength with winds reaching 86 miles per hour (138 kph) and gusts to 103 miles per hour (166 kph) by late evening. Several Manu'a residents reached by phone by The Associated Press said the winds had been extremely strong but had not heard of any reports of injury. However, telephone links have been intermittent across the islands. Emergency officials in the capital reported that high winds had downed some trees and electrical lines. They said one death was indirectly caused by Rene - a 50-year-old man died on Friday after falling from a two-storey building while boarding it up to protect it from the storm. By 2300 local time Friday (1000 GMT Saturday), the storm was centred about 100 miles (161 kilometres) northeast of Pago Pago. The National Weather Service forecaster in Pago Pago said Rene swirled for a time around the Manu'a islands before it settled north, adding the capital region should begin feeling some of the storm's force before dawn on Saturday. Cyclone Heta, the last major cyclone to smash through the region, hit Samoa and American Samoa in January 2004, damaging more than 46-hundred homes in American Samoa, the American Red Cross said at the time. It also devastated up to 90 percent of the crops on Samoa. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1352EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Germany Dresden Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:Germany Dresden- REPLAY Scuffles as Neo-Nazis and opponents mark WW2 anniversary LENGTH: 02:16 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 636975 DATELINE: Dresden - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 02:16 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST ++SHOTS 1 TO 6 ARE ONE CONTINUOUS SHOT++ 1. Tracking shot of left wing protesters attacking what they think is the bus carrying right wing protesters, 2. Protesters hitting bus with sticks and signs 3. Police in riot gear arriving, spraying protesters 4. Camera wobble and shot of ground as cameraman is sprayed 5. Close up of police 6. Police van arriving with siren on 7. Various of overturned car with shattered windows 8. Police in street 9. Various of police arresting left wing protesters 10. Rubbish burning in street 11. Left-wing protesters walking past rubbish 12. Close up of rubbish, pull out to police in riot gear 13. Firefighter with hose putting out fire 14. Protesters in street 15. Various of police in street 16. Wide of scene STORYLINE Thousands of neo-Nazis and their left-wing opponents protested on Saturday in the eastern German city of Dresden on the 65th anniversary of the deadly Allied bombing at the end of World War II. Heavy security was in place to prevent clashes between the two groups, with five police helicopters flying overhead to monitor the crowds. Though some stones and snowballs were thrown, police said, the two sides were largely kept separate. Far-right organisers have characterised the event as a "mourning march" and the left-wing protesters made up of mainstream political parties and civic groups were equally determined to protest far-right attempts to exploit the city's painful history. Police braced for up to 7,000 far-right supporters from Germany and other European countries but only some 1,300 had arrived, police said. About 2,000 left-wing counter-demonstrators gathered a few hundred yards (metres) away, with many trying to block roads to prevent far-right supporters from reaching their assembly point. Leaders of Germany's far-right fringe have caused outrage in the past by comparing the bombing of Dresden to the Holocaust. The far right is marginal in Germany and has no seats in the national parliament. However, Saxony, where Dresden is located, is one of two eastern German states where the far-right National Democratic Party has seats in the regional legislature. On February 13 -14, 1945 three successive waves of British and US bombers set off firestorms and destroyed Dresden's centuries-old baroque city centre. The total number of people killed in the Dresden bombing has long been uncertain. In 2008, a panel commissioned by state officials found that the firebombing killed no more than 25,000 people, far fewer than scholars' previous estimates that ran as high as 135,000. Dresden has been rebuilt painstakingly over the years. Its landmark domed 'Frauenkirche', or Church of Our Lady, for decades no more than a mound of rubble, reopened in 2005. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1351EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++Canada Oly Reax Saturday, 13 February 2010 STORY:++Canada Oly Reax- NEW Olympic luge course designers says walls may have to be raised LENGTH: 03:22 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/German/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 637006 DATELINE: Whistler - 13 Feb 2010 LENGTH: 03:22 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Wide shot, news conference 2. Mid shot, media at news conference 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Svein Romstad, Secretary-General, International Luge Federation: "The run of Nodar (Kumaritashvili) appeared to be routine until curve 15 . At that time ,he came out late of the exit of the curve. This resulted in a late entrance into curve 16 - the finish curve. Although he attempted to correct the situation, he shot up into the roof of curve 16. The angle in which he did so resulted in him experiencing a G-force that literally collapsed his body, rendering it difficult to control the sled, which in this case he was not able to do. Once this happened he was literally at the mercy of the path of the sled. At the exit of curve 16 he hit the wall. This resulted in Nodar being catapulted onto the top of the wall resulting in the fatal crash." 4. Wide news conference 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Svein Romstad, Secretary-General, International Luge Federation: "As for moving forward, the jury has made a decision to lower the men's competition start to the current women's start. The track crew has also overnight raised the wall where the accident happened, in addition to some ice profile changes that was made at the site as well. 6. Person wearing 'Vancouver 2010' logo 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tim Gayda, VANOC Vice President of Sport: "We are quite confident on the number of runs that we did provide all the teams, both starting in 2008 and then leading into the 2009 and the Games. So, from a safety perspective, we went thoroughly through all that and feel confident that we got the right number of runs for the teams." 8. Pan of news conference 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Svein Romstad, Secretary-General, International Luge Federation: "None of our athletes have experienced what they have experienced. They have lost a.....(pauses)...they lost a friend yesterday. It is emotional for everyone." 10. Mid shot of Josef Fendt, President of International Luge Federation at news conference 11. SOUNDBITE: (German) Josef Fendt, President of International Luge Federation: "Regarding the fastest speed on the track, I never said it was 137 kilometres per hour (85 miles per hour) and that is not my exact number. But we know that all tracks that are set up for 137 or 140 kilometres per hour (85 or 87 miles per hour) now are getting faster over time. For example, we know that in St. Moritz and Salt Lake City, the tracks went well beyond 140 kilometres per hour (87 miles per hour) they went to 144 kilometres per hour (89 miles per hour). What I have said in the past is the the planning of future tracks we have to make sure that the tracks do not go over 140 kilometres per hour (87 miles per hour)." 12. Various of end of news conference. STORYLINE The start of men's Olympic luge competition has been moved farther down the track, international luge officials said on Saturday, a decision made with the "emotional component" of athletes in mind following the death of a Georgian competitor. They reiterated that the lightning-fast track was safe for competition, and Olympic officials said they were "completely satisfied" with the adjustments. An extra session of men's training, as well as all four runs of the men's event - two on Saturday, two on Sunday - will begin from the women's start ramp. It means speeds, at least for the men, will be a bit lower at the Whistler Sliding Track, where 21-year-old Nodar Kumaritashvili crashed and died in a training run on Friday after his body flew over the track wall and smashed into a steel pole. "The run of Nodar appeared to be routine until curve 15," Svein Romstad, Secretary-General of the International Luge Federation told a news conference. "At that time,he came out late of the exit of the curve. This resulted in a late entrance into curve 16 - the finish curve. Although he attempted to correct the situation, he shot up into the roof of curve 16. The angle in which he did so resulted in him experiencing a G-force that literally collapsed his body, rendering it difficult to control the sled, which in this case he was not able to do." Romstad said once this happened, Kumaritashvili was literally at the mercy of the path of the sled. "At the exit of curve 16 he hit the wall. This resulted in Nodar being catapulted onto the top of the wall resulting in the fatal crash." The decision to change the start's location seemed to have the desired effect. None of the 36 sliders who took a sixth practice run broke 90 miles per hour (144.84 kilometres per hour) after speeds routinely surpassed 95 miles per hour (152.88 kilometres per hour) earlier in the week. Other changes were made overnight, including raising the wall at Curve 16, the area where Kumaritashvili crashed; some modifications were also made to the surface of the ice itself. When training resumed from the lower start, American Tony Benshoof - the first man to slide in the session - navigated the track without incident. Kumaritashvili's teammate, Levan Gureshidze, did not take his sixth run down the course. There was no official word on why he did not slide or if he had withdrawn from the field. "None of our athletes have experienced what they have experienced. They have lost a ... they lost a friend yesterday. It is emotional for everyone," Romstad said. Kumaritashvili's death was believed to be the first on a sanctioned luge track since December 1975, the federation said. It remains unknown if the start positions will be changed for upcoming bobsled and skeleton competitions, a decision that will be made in consultation with the governing body for those sports and not the FIL. Including past training sessions starting last November, Kumaritashvili had 26 runs down the icy chute in all, and data distributed by the FIL indicated that he crashed at least three times around the area of the final curve. From the men's luge start, which won't be used going forward during these Olympics, Kumaritashvili crashed four times in 16 tries. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 02-13-10 1539EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------
Aerial view of Fireworks above Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral at night
Aerial view of Fireworks above Tbilisi Sameba Holy Trinity Cathedral at night
PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN INAUGURATION POOL 1 SWITCHED 1105-1315 BIDEN AND HARRIS TAKE OATH
AVS NOTE AMANDA GORMAN SPEECH - JENNIFER LOPEZ AND LADY GAGA PERFORMANCES ARE NOT FOR LICENSE FS21 CAP HILL SWITCH POOL 1 1105 NBC POOL SWITCHED POOL FEED OF THE US CAPITOL FOR THE INAUGURATION OF JOE BIDEN AND KAMALA HARRIS 111826 [JOE BIDEN AND JILL BIDEN ENTER] Full Transcripts below AMY KLOBUCHAR 112003 KLOBUCHAR>> Vice President Pence, Mr. President-Elect, Madam vice President-Elect, members of Congress and the Judicial branch, former Presidents and First Ladies, Vice Presidents, leaders from abroad and a whole bunch of Bidens, America, welcome to the 59th Presidential inauguration where, in just a few moments, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will take their solemn oaths. [cheers] 112034 This ceremony is the culmination of 244 years of a democracy. It is the moment when leaders brought to the stage by the will of the people promise to be faithful to our constitution, to cherish it and defend it. It is the moment when they become, as we all should be, guardians of our country. 112058 Have we become too jaded, too accustomed to the ritual of the passing of the torch of democracy to truly appreciate what a blessing and a privilege it is to witness this moment? I think not. Two weeks ago when an angry violent mob staged an insurrection and desecrated this temple of our democracy, it awakened us to our responsibilities as Americans. 112128 This is the day when our democracy picks itself up, brushes off the dust, and does what America always does: goes forward as a nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. [ Cheers and applause ] 112149 This conveyance of a sacred trust between our leaders and our people takes place in front of this shining Capitol dome for a reason. When Abraham Lincoln gave his first inaugural address in front of this Capitol, the dome was only partially constructed, braced by ropes of steel. He promised he would finish it. He was criticized for spending funds on it during the Civil War. 112215 To those critics, he replied, "if the people see the Capitol going on, it is a sign we intend the union shall go on." And it did, and it will. [applause] 112229 Generations of Americans gave their lives to preserve our republic in this place. Great legislation to protect civil rights and economic security and lead the world was debated and crafted under this dome. Now it falls on all of us, not just the two leaders we are inaugurating today, to take up the torch of our democracy, not as a weapon of political arson but as an instrument for good. 112259 We pledge today never to take our democracy for granted as we celebrate its remarkable strength. We celebrate its resilience, its grit. We celebrate the ordinary people doing extraordinary things for our nation. The doctors and nurses on the front line of this pandemic, the officers in the capitol, a new generation never giving up hope for justice. We celebrate a new president, Joe Biden, who vows to restore the soul of America and cross the river of our divides to a higher plane. 112335 And we celebrate our first African American, first Asian American and first woman Vice President [applause] Kamala Harris, who stands on the shoulders of so many on this platform, who have forged the way to this day. When she takes the oath of office, little girls and boys across the world will know that anything and everything is possible. 112402 And in the end, that is America, our democracy, a country of so much good, and today, on these Capitol steps and before this glorious field of flags, we rededicate ourselves to its cause. Thank you. [ Applause ] It is now my honor to introduce to you the Senator who has worked with me and so many others to make this ceremony possible, my friend and the chair of the inaugural committee, Missouri senator, Roy Blunt. SEN. ROY BLUNT 112502 BLUNT>> Well, I should have known when senator klobuchar got involved, at least there would be a touch of snow up here this morning. Of all the things we considered, I don't think snow was on my agenda until I walked out the door a moment ago. But thank you senator klobuchar, and thanks to the other members of the joint congressional committee on the inauguration, as we officially begin the 59th inaugural ceremony. I also want to thank the joint committee staff and our partners, particularly our security partners for they've -- the way they've dealt with unprecedented circumstances. 112536 When I chaired the inauguration four years ago, I shared President Reagan's 1981 description of this event as "commonplace and miraculous." Commonplace because we've done it every four years since 1789, miraculous because we've done it every four years since 1789. Americans have celebrated this moment during war, during depression and, now, during pandemic. Once again, all three branches of our government come together as the Constitution envisions. 112614 Once again, we renew our commitment to our determined democracy, forging a more perfect union. That theme of this inauguration, our determined democracy, forging a more perfect union, was announced by the joint committee before the election with the belief that the United States can only fulfill its promise and set an example for others if we are always working to be better than we have been. 112643 The constitution established that determined democracy with its first three words, declaring the people as the source of the government. The articles of confederation hadn't done that. The magna carta hadn't done that. Only the constitution says the government exists because the people are the source of the reason it exists. 112705 They immediately followed those first three words with the words "To form a more perfect union." The Founders did not say, "to form a perfect union." They did not claim that in our new country nothing would need to be improved. Fortunately, they understood that always working to be better would be the hallmark of a great democracy. 112728 The freedoms we have today, the nation we have today is not here just because it happened, and they aren't complete -- a great democracy, working through the successes and failures of our history, striving to be better than it had been, and we are more than we have been, and we are less than we hope to be. 112755 The assault on our Capitol at this very place just two weeks ago, reminds us that a government designed to balance and check itself is both fragile and resilient. 112809 During the last year, the pandemic challenged our free and open society and called for extraordinary determination and sacrifice and still challenges us today. Meeting that challenge head on have been and our(?) health care workers, scientists, first responders, essential frontline workers and so many others we depend on in so many ways. Today we come to this moment. People all over the world, as we're here, are watching and will watch what we do here. 112843 Our government comes together. The congress and the courts join the transition of executive responsibility. One political party more pleased today, and on every inaugural day, than the other. But this is not a moment of division. It's a moment of unification. A new administration begins and brings with it a new beginning. 112906 And with that, our great national debate goes forward, and a determined democracy will continue to be essential in pursuit of a more perfect union and a better future for all Americans. What a privilege for me to join you today. Thank you. [applause] I'm pleased to call to the podium a longtime friend of the President Elect and his family, Father Leo O'Donovan to lead us in an invocation. 112937 Please stand if you're able and remain standing for the National Anthem and the pledge to our flag. FATHER LEO O'DONOVAN 113003 O'DONOVAN>> Thank you. 113018 Gracious and merciful god, at this sacred time, we come before you in need, indeed, on our knees. But we come still more with hope and with our eyes raised anew to the vision of a more perfect union in our land, a union of all our citizens to promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity. 113049 We are a people of many races, creeds and colors, national backgrounds, cultures and styles, now far more numerous and on land much faster than when Archbishop John Carroll wrote his prayer for the inauguration of George Washington 232 years ago. 113111 Archbishop Carroll prayed that you, O creator of all, would assist with your holy spirit of counsel and fortitude the president of these United States, that his administration may be conducted in righteousness and be eminently useful to your people. Today we confess our past failures to live according to our vision of equality, inclusion and freedom for all. Yet we resolutely commit still more now to renewing the vision, to caring for one another in word and deed, especially the least fortunate among us. 113159 And so becoming a light for the world. There is power in each and every one of us that lives by turning to every other one of us. A trust of the spirit to cherish and care and stand by others and, above all, those most in need. It is called love. And its path is to give evermore of itself. Today, it is called American patriotism, born not of power and privilege but of care for the common good, with malice toward none and with charity for all. 113242 For our new president, we beg of you the wisdom, solemn, and sought when he knelt before you and prayed for an understanding heart so that I can govern your people and know the difference between right and wrong. We trust in the counsel of the letter of James. If any of you likes wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. 113313 Pope Francis has reminded us how important it is to dream together. "By ourselves," he wrote, "we risk seeing mirages, things that are not there. Dreams, on the other hand, are built together." Be with us, holy mystery of love, as we dream together. Help us, under our new President, to reconcile the people of our land, restore our dream, and invest it with peace and justice and the joy that is the overflow of love. 113358 To the glory of your name, forever, Amen. 113503 [PRESENTATION OF COLORS] 113555 [LADY GAGA ARRIVES] 113646 [LADY GAGA - NATIONAL ANTHEM] 113913 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome from the city of South Fulton, Georgia Fire and Rescue Department, president of the International Association of Firefighters local 3920, fire captain Andrea M. Hall for the reciting of the pledge of allegiance. 113932 HALL [SIGNING AND SPEAKING]>>> I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic, for which it stands, one nation under god indivisible with liberty and justice for all. [applause] 114015 KLOB>> What you are all about to be part of, America, is a historic moment of firsts. To administer the oath to our first African-American, our first asian-american and our first woman vice president Kamala Harris, it is my great privilege to welcome to the inaugural stage, the first Latina to ever serve on the supreme court of the United States of America, justice Sonia Sotomayor. 114051 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing for the oath of office followed by musical honors. 114107 SOTOMAYOR>> Please raise your right hand and repeat after me. I, Kamala Devi Harris, do solemnly swear. HARRIS>> I Kamala Devi Harris do solemnly swear. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States. HARRIS>> That I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States. 114126 SOTOMAYOR>> Against all enemies foreign and domestic. HARRIS>> Against all enemies foreign and domestic. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. HARRIS>> That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. 114137 SOTOMAYOR>> That I take this obligation freely. HARRIS>> That I take this obligation freely. SOTOMAYOR>> Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. 114145 HARRIS>> Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will well and faithfully discharge HARRIS> That I will well and faithfully discharge. SOTOMAYOR>> The duties of the office on which I am about to enter. HARRIS>> The duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. 114159 SOTOMAYOR>> So help me god. HARRIS>> So help me god. [ Cheers and applause ]. BIDEN>> All right! 114249 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. Please welcome Jennifer Lopez to perform "This Land is Your Land" and "America, the Beautiful," accompanied by members of the president's own United States Marine Band. 114313 [JENNIFER LOPEZ ENTERS] 114354 [SONG BEGINS] 114659 KLOB>> Well, that was great. The sun is shining and, Mr. President-Elect, this is the first inauguration in the history of America where J. Lo was the warm-up act for Chief Justice Roberts. [laughter] With that, it is now my distinct honor to introduce the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, John Roberts, to administer the presidential oath to the next president of the United States, Joseph R. Biden. [ Cheers and applause ]. 114739 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the oath of office followed by musical honors. 114810 ROBERTS>> Please raise your right hand and repeat after me. I, Joseph Robinette, Jr., do solemnly swear. BIDEN>> I, Joseph Robinete Biden Jr. do solemnly swear. 114821 ROBERTS>> That I will faithfully execute. BIDEN>> That I will faithfully execute. ROBERTS>> The office of president of the United States. BIDEN>> The office of president of the United States. ROBERTS>> And will to the best of my ability. BIDEN>> And will to the best of my ability. ROBERTS>> Preserve, protect and defend. BIDEN>> Preserve, protect and defend. 114838 ROBERTS>> The constitution of the United States. BIDEN>> The constitution of the United States. ROBERTS>> So help you god? BIDEN>> So help me god. ROBERTS>> Congratulations, Mr. President. [cheers] 114949 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. 115112 KLOB>> My fellow Americans, a moment we have all been waiting for, it is now my great privilege and high honor to be the first person to officially introduce the 46th president of the United States, Joseph R. Biden, Jr. PRESIDENT JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR 115153 BIDEN>> [inaud] Chief Justice Roberts, Vice President Harris, [cheers] Speaker Pelosi, leader Schumer, Leader McConnell, Vice President Pence, and my distinguished guests, my fellow Americans, this is America's day. This is democracy's day, a day of history and hope, of renewal and resolve. Through a crucible for the ages, America has been tested anew. 115233 And America has risen to the challenge. Today we celebrate the triumph, not of a candidate, but of a cause, the cause of democracy. The people, the will of the people, has been heard, and the will of the people has been heeded. 115252 We've learned again that democracy is precious. Democracy is fragile. And at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed. [ Applause ] 115308 So now, on this hallowed ground, where just a few days ago violence sought to shake the Capitol's very foundation, we come together as one nation under God, indivisible, to carry out the peaceful transfer of power as we have for more than two centuries. As we look ahead in our uniquely American way, restless, bold, optimistic, and set our sights on the nation we know we can be and we must be. 115344 I thank my predecessors of both parties for their presence here today. I thank them from the bottom of my heart. [applause] And I know -- [ applause cont. ] And I know the resilience of our constitution and the strength, the strength of our nation, as does President Carter who I spoke with last night, who cannot be with us today, but whom we salute for his lifetime in service. 115421 I've just taken the sacred oath each of those patriots have taken. The oath first sworn by George Washington. But the American story depends not on any one of us, not on some of us, but on all of us, on we the people, who seek a more perfect union. This is a great nation. We are good people. And over the centuries, through storm and strife, in peace and in war, we've come so far, but we still have far to go. 115501 We'll press forward with speed and urgency, for we have much to do in this winter of peril and significant possibilities. Much to repair, much to restore, much to heal, much to build, and much to gain. Few people in our nation's history have been more challenged or found a time more challenging or difficult than the time we're in now. 115530 Once in a century virus that silently stalks the country. It's taken as many lives in one year as America lost in all of World War II. Millions of jobs have been lost, hundreds of thousands of businesses closed, a cry for racial justice some 400 years in the making moves us. The dream of justice for all will be deferred no longer. [ Applause ] 115603 A cry for survival comes from planet itself. A cry that can't be any more desperate or any more clear, and now a rise of political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat. [Applause] 115626 To overcome these challenges, to restore the soul and secure the future of America, requires so much more than words. It requires the most elusive of all things in a democracy, unity. Unity. In another January, on New Year's Day in 1863, Abraham Lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation. When he put pen to paper, the president said, and I quote, "if my name ever goes down into history, it'll be for this act, and my whole soul is in it." 115706 "My whole soul is in it." Today, on this January day, my whole soul is in this: bringing America together, uniting our people, uniting our nation. And I ask every American to join me in this cause. [applause] 115729 Uniting to fight the foes we face, anger, resentment and hatred, extremism, lawlessness, violence, disease, joblessness and hopelessness. With unity, we can do great things, important things. F 115749 We can right wrongs. We can put people to work in good jobs. We can teach our children in safe schools. We can overcome the deadly virus. We can reward -- reward work and rebuild the middle class and make health care secure for all. We can deliver racial justice and we can make America once again the leading force for good in the world. 115812 I know speaking of unity can sound to some like a foolish fantasy these days. I know that the forces that divide us are deep and they are real. But I also know they are not new. Our history has been a constant struggle between the American ideal that we all are created equal, and the harsh ugly reality that racism, nativism, fear, demonization have long torn us apart. 115848 The battle is perennial, and victory is never assured. Through civil war, the great depression, World War, 9/11, through struggle, sacrifices, and setbacks, our better angels have always prevailed. In each of these moments, enough of us -- enough of us -- have come together to carry all of us forward, and we can do that now. 115917 History, faith, and reason show the way, the way of unity. We can see each other, not as adversaries, but as neighbors. We can treat each other with dignity and respect. We can join forces, stop the shouting, and lower the temperature.For without unity, there is no peace, only bitterness and fury. 115943 No progress, only exhausting outrage. No nation, only a state of chaos. This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge, and unity is the path forward. And we must meet this moment as the United States of America. If we do that, I guarantee you, we will not fail. We have never, ever, ever, ever failed in America when we've acted together. 120016 And so today, at this time, in this place, let's start afresh, all of us. Let's begin to listen to one another again. WASH 6 PRESIDENT BIDEN INAUGURATION CAPITOL ISO POOL 01202021 120000 120028 Hear one another. See one another. Show respect to one another. Politics doesn't have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path. Every disagreement doesn't have to be a cause for total war. And we must reject the culture in which facts themselves are manipulated, and even manufactured. [ Applause ] 120101 My fellow Americans, we have to be different than this. America has to be better than this, and I believe America is so much better than this. Just look around. Here we stand, in the shadow of the Capitol dome, as it was mentioned earlier, completed amid the civil war, when the union itself was literally hanging in the balance. Yet, we endured. We prevailed. 120126 Here we stand, looking out on the great mall where Dr. King spoke of his dream. Here we stand where, 108 years ago at another inaugural, thousands of protesters tried to block brave women marching for the right to vote. And today, we mark the swearing of the first woman in American history elected to national office, Vice President Kamala Harris. 120155 Don't tell me things can't change! [applause] 120201 Here we stand, across the Potomac, from Arlington Cemetary, where heroes who gave the last full measure of devotion, rest in eternal peace. And here we stand, just days after a riotous mob thought they could use violence to silence the will of the people, to stop the work of our democracy, to drive us from this sacred ground. It did not happen. It will never happen. Not today. Not tomorrow. Not ever. 120234 Not ever. [ Cheers and applause ] To all those who supported our campaign, I'm humbled by the faith you've placed in us. To all of those who did not support us, let me say this. Hear me out as we move forward. Take a measure of me and my heart. 120259 If you still disagree, so be it. That's democracy. That's America. The right to dissent peaceably. Within the guardrails of our republic it's perhaps this nation's greatest strength. Yet hear me clearly, disagreement must not lead to disunion. And I pledge this to you, I will be a president for all Americans, all Americans. [ Applause ] 120331 And I promise you, I will fight as hard for those who did not support me as for those who did. [ Applause ] Many centuries ago, St. Augustin, a saint in my church, wrote that a people was a multitude defined by the common objects of their love. Defined by the common objects of their love. What are the common objects we as Americans love, that define us as Americans? 120402 I think we know. Opportunity, security, liberty, dignity, respect, honor and, yes, the truth. [Applause] The recent weeks and months have taught us a painful lesson. There is truth and there are lies, lies told for power and for profit. 120427 And each of us has a duty and a responsibility as citizens, as Americans, and especially as leaders, leaders who have pledged to honor our Constitution and protect our nation, to defend the truth and defeat the lies. [applause] 120446 Look -- [Applause] -- I understand that many of my fellow Americans view the future with fear and trepidation. I understand they worry about their jobs. I understand like my dad, they lay in bed wondering, can I keep my health care, can I pay my mortgage. Thinking about their families, about what comes next. I promise you, I get it. 120518 But the answer is not to turn inward, to retreat into competing factions, distrusting those who don't look like -- look like you or worship the way you do or don't get their news from the same source as you do. We must end this uncivil war that pits red against blue, rural versus -- rural versus urban, conservative versus liberal. We can do this if we open our souls instead of hardening our hearts. 120553 If we show a little tolerance and humility, and if we are willing to stand in the other person's shoes -- as my mom would say -- just for a moment, stand in their shoes. Because here's the thing about life: there's no accounting for what fate will deal you. 120616 Some days, when you need a hand. There are other days when we're called to lend a hand. That's how it has to be. That's what we do for one another. 120630 And if we are this way, our country will be stronger, more prosperous, more ready for the future. And we can still disagree. My fellow Americans, in the work ahead of us, we're going to need each other. We need all our strength to preserve -- to persevere through this dark winter. We're entering what may be the toughest and deadliest period of the virus. 120657 We must set aside politics and finally face this pandemic as one nation, one nation. And I promise you this. As the bible says, "weep, ye may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the factmorning." We will get through this together. Together. Look, folks, all my colleagues that I served with in the house and the senate up here, we all understand, the world is watching, watching all of us today. So here's my message to those beyond our borders. 120741 America has been tested, and we've come out stronger for it. We will repair our alliances and engage with the world once again. Not to meet yesterday's challenges, but today's and tomorrow's challenges. [ Applause ] 120800 And we'll lead not merely by the example of our power, but by the power of our example. [ Applause ] We'll be a strong and trusted partner for peace, progress, and security. 120816 Look, you all know, we've been through so much in this nation. In my first act as president, I'd like to ask you to join me in a moment of silent prayer to remember all those who we lost in this past year to the pandemic, those 400,000 fellow Americans -- moms, dads, husbands, wives, sons, daughters, friends, neighbors, and co-workers. We'll honor them by becoming the people and the nation we know we can and should be. 120850 So, I ask you, let's say a silent prayer for those who have lost their lives and those left behind and for our country. 120858 [MOMENT OF SILENCE] 120908 BIDEN>> Amen. Folks, this is a time of testing. We face an attack on our democracy and on truth. A raging virus, growing inequity, the sting of systemic racism, a climate in crisis. America's role in the world. Any one of these would be enough to challenge us in profound ways. But the fact is, we face them all at once. Presenting this nation with one of the gravest responsibilities we've had. Now we're going to be tested. 120945 Are we going to step up, all of us? It's time for boldness, for there is so much to do. And this is certain. I promise you, we will be judged, you and I, by how we resolve these cascading crises of our era. We will rise to the occasion, is the question. Will we master this rare and difficult hour? 121013 Will we meet our obligations, and pass along a new and better world to our children? I believe we must. I'm sure you do as well. I believe we will. And when we do, we'll write the next great chapter in the history of the United States of America, the American story, a story that might sound something like a song that means a lot to me. It's called "American Anthem." And there's one verse that stands out, at least for me. 121044 And it goes like this: "The work and prayers of century have brought us to this day. What shall be our legacy? What will our children say? Let me know in my heart when my days are through. America, America, I gave my best to you." Let's add. Let's, us, add our own work and prayers to the unfolding story of our great nation. 121115 If we do this, then when our days are through, our children and our children's children will say of us, they gave their best, they did their duty, they healed a broken land. My fellow Americans, I close the day where I began, with a sacred oath before God and all of you. I give you my word, I will always level with you. I will defend the Constitution. I'll defend our democracy. I'll defend America. 121150 And I'll give all, all of you, keep everything you -- I do in your service, thinking not of power but of possibilities, not of personal injuries but the public good. And together we shall write an American story of hope, not fear. Of unity, not division. Of light, not darkness. A story of decency and dignity, love and healing, greatness and goodness. 121219 May this be the story that guides us, the story that inspires us, and the story that tells ages yet to come that we answered the call of history, we met the moment. Democracy and hope, truth and justice, did not die on our watch, but thrived, that America secured liberty at home and stood once again as a beacon to the world. That is what we owe our forebears, one another, and generations to follow. 121253 So, with purpose and resolve, we turn to those tasked of our time, sustained by faith, driven by conviction, and devoted to one another and the country we love with all our hearts. May God bless America and may God protect our troops. Thank you, America. [ Cheers and applause ] 121350 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Garth Brooks to perform "Amazing Grace." 121409 [GARTH BROOKS ENTERS] 121418 ["AMAZING GRACE" STARTS] 121605 BROOKS>> I'd like to ask you to sing this last verse with me, not just the people here but the people at home, at work, as one, united. ["AMAZING GRACE" CONT.] 121728 ANNOUNCER>> (inuad.) 121744 BLUNT>> Hard not to be reminded of president Obama's singing that same song at the mother Emanuel church. [ Applause ] The song that in our culture is as close to both poetry and prayer as you could possibly come. 121800 And we're going to finish with those two things. Let me introduce Amanda Gorman, our nation's first ever national poet laureate. [ Applause ] AMANDA GORMAN - AVS Note - This speech is not for license - 121840 GORMAN>> Mr. President, Dr. Biden, Madam Vice President, Mr. Emhoff, Americans and the world, when day comes, we ask ourselves where can we find light in this never ending shade? The loss we carry, a sea we must wade. We braved the belly of the beast. 121906 We've learned that quiet isn't always peace and the norms and notions of what just is, isn't always justice. And yet the dawn is hours before we knew it, somehow we do it, somehow we've weathered and witnessed a nation that isn't broken but simply unfinished. 121933 We, the successors of a country and a time, where a skinny black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president, only to find herself reciting for one. 121950 And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine, but that doesn't mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect. We are striving to forge our union with purpose, to compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters, and conditions of man. And so we lift our gazes not to what stands between us but what stands before us. We close the divide because we know to put our future first. We must first put our differences aside. 122027 We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another We seek harm to none and harmony for all. Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true, that even as we grieved, we grew. That even as we hurt, we hoped. That even as we tired, we tried. That we'll forever be tied together, victorious, not because we will never again know defeat, but because we will never again sow division. 122102 Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree, and no one shall make them afraid. 122111 If we're to live up to our own time, then victory won't lighten the blade but in all the bridges we've made, that is the promise to glade, the hill we climb if only we dare, it's because being American is more than a pride we inherit. It's the past we stepped into and how we repair it. 122134 We've seen a force that would shatter our nation rather than share it, would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy. 122144 And this effort very nearly succeeded. But while democracy can be periodically delayed, it can never be permanently defeated. In this truth, in this faith, we trust. For while we have our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us. 122204j This is the era of just redemption. We feared -- at its deception. We did not feel prepared to be the heirs of such a terrifying hour, but within it we found the power to author a new chapter, to offer hope and laughter to ourselves. 122221 So, while once we asked, "how could we possibly prevail over catastrophe?", now we assert, "how could catastrophe possibly prevail over us?" We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be, a country that is bruised but whole, benevolent but bold, fierce and free. We will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation. 122251 Because we know our inaction and inertia will be the inheritance of the next generation. Our blunders become their burdens. But one thing is certain. If we merge mercy with might and might with right, then love becomes our legacy and change, our children's birth right. 122316 So let us leave behind a country better than one we were left with, every breath from my bronze pounded chest, we will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one. We will rise through the gold-limbed hills in the west, we will rise from the windswept northeast where our forefathers first realized revolution. We will rise from the lake-rimmed cities of the midwestern states. 122340 We will rise from the sun baked south. We will rebuild, reconcile, and recover, in every known nook of our nation, in every corner called our country, our people diverse and beautiful, will emerge battered and beautiful. When day comes, we step out of the shade, aflame and unafraid. 122400 The new dawn blooms as we free it for there is always light if only we're brave enough to see it, if only we're brave enough to be it. [Applause] 122434 BLUNT>> Thank you, Amanda Gorman. Now, for our benediction, I'm pleased to introduce Reverend Dr. Silvester Beaman, the pastor of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Wilmington, Delaware, a friend of President Biden for 30 years. REV. DR SILVESTER BEAMAN 122514 BEAMAN>> As a nation and people of faith, gathered in this historical moment, let us unite in prayer. God, we gather under the beauty of your holiness and the holiness of your beauty. We seek your face, your smile, your warm embrace. 122540 We petition you once more in this celebration. We pray for divine favor upon our president, Joseph R. Biden, and our first lady, Dr. Jill Biden and their family. We further ask that you would extend the same favor upon our vice president, Kamala D. Harris, and our second gentleman, Doug Emhoff, and their family. 122610 More than ever, more than ever, they and our nation need you. We need you, for in you we discover our common humanity. In our common humanity, we will seek out the wounded, and bind their wounds. We will seek healing for those who are sick and diseased. We will mourn our dead. 122641 We will befriend the lonely, the least, and the left out. We will share our abundance with those who are hungry. We will do justly to the oppressed. Acknowledge sin and seek forgiveness, thus grasping reconciliation. In discovering our humanity, we will seek the good in and for all our neighbors. We will love the unlovable, remove the stigma of the so-called untouchables. We will care for our most vulnerable, our children, the elderly, emotionally challenged, and the poor. 122720 We will seek rehabilitation beyond correction. We'll extend opportunities to those locked out of opportunity. We will make friends of our enemies. We will make friends of our enemies. People, your people, shall no longer raise up weapons against one another. We will, rather, use our resources for the national good, and become a beacon of life and goodwill to the world. 122753 And neither shall we learn hatred anymore. We will lie down in peace and not make our neighbors afraid. In you, oh, god, we discover our humanity. In our humanity, we discover our commonness beyond the difference of color, creed, origin, political party, ideology, geography, and personal preferences. 122819 We'll become greater stewards of your environment, preserving the land, reaping from it a sustainable harvest, and securing its wonder and miracle giving power for generations to come. 122837 This is our benediction. That from these hallowed grounds, where slaves labored to build this shrine and citadel to liberty and democracy, let us all acknowledge from the indigenous native American to those who recently received their citizenship, from the African-American to those whose foreparents came from Europe and every corner of the globe, from the wealthy to those struggling to make it, every human being regardless of their choices, that this is our country. As such, teach us, oh, god. 122923 As such, teach us, oh, God, to live in it, love in it, be healed in it, and reconcile to one another in it, lest we miss kingdom's goal. To your glory, majesty, dominion, and power forever. Hallelujah, glory hallelujah. In the strong name of our collective faith, amen. 123000 ANNOUNCER>> Please remain standing as the Armed Forces Color Guard retires our national colors. 123017 [RETIRING OF THE COLORS] 123105 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated and remain in your seats while the President and the official party depart the platform. For safety reasons, your ushers will release your sections in an organized manner, following the playing of our national march, the Stars and Stripes Forever. 123122 [SONG STARTS] 123130 [PRESIDENT BIDEN AND PRESIDENT OBAMA HUG] 123146 [PRESIDENT BUSH TOUCHES PRESIDENT BIDEN'S SHOULDER] 123157 [PRESIDENT BIDEN SPEAKS TO PRESIDENT CLINTON] 123250 [PRESIDENT BIDEN AND DR JILL BIDEN GO INSIDE] 123336 BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you all. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Appreciate it. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Did a lot of work for me, thank you all. Thank you. 123437 BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Hey, guys. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Hello. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> How are you? BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> Congratulations. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you very much. BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> (unintell.) BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. 123509 BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> Congratulations. HARRIS (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you all. Thank you very much. Thank you. 123613 [BARACK OBAMA AND BILL CLINTON GREET EACH OTHER] 123633 [PRESIDENT OBAMA AND HILLARY CLINTON HUG] 123815 [PRESIDENT OBAMA AND LADY GAGA HUG] 123840 [AMANDA GORMAN AND BILL CLINTON CHAT] 124110 [HILLARY CLINTON TALK WITH LAURA BUSH] 124126 [HILLARY CLINTON AND LADY GAGA HUG & CHAT] 124304 BARACK OBAMA (EXITING)>> Fantastic, how are you? Good to see you, Elizabeth. Nice to see you! How you been, my brother? You know [inaud] Good to see you! Hold down the fort in Delaware. You doing alright? [inaud] Everybody's good? Alright. Good to have you, Elizabeth. You're doing a really good job. Good to see you again. We'll catch up. I've got some thoughts and ideas [inaud]. 124355 [MICHELLE OBAMA, COREY BOOKER, AND ROSARIO DAWSON CHATTING IN BG] 124416 [EMHOFF CHILDREN EXIT] 124453 [ELIZABETH WARREN AND BILL CLINTON SHAKE HANDS] 124741 [GAGA ESCORTED UP STEPS, EXITS] #### WASH 5 PRESIDENT BIDEN INAUGURATION CAPITOL SWITCHED POOL 1 01202021 120000 (exiting) 123336 BIDEN>> Thank you all. JILL>> Appreciate it. BIDEN>> Did a lot of work for me, thank you all. Thank you. 123415 [KAMALA HARRIS AND DOUG EMHOFF ENTER BUILDING] 123437 BIDEN>> Hey, guys. JILL>> Hello. BIDEN>> How are you? BYSTANDER>> Congratulations. BIDEN>> Thank you. JILL>> Thank you very much. BYSTANDER>> (unintell.) BIDEN>> Thank you. JILL>> Thank you. 123509 BYSTANDER>> Congratulations. HARRIS>> Thank you all. Thank you very much. Thank you. 123601 [MIKE AND KAREN PENCE ENTER BUILDING] 123722 [NANCY PELOSI ENTERING BUILDING] 123731 [MIKE PENCE TALKING WITH AMY KLOBUCHAR] 123756 [OBAMA SHAKING HANDS WITH AMANDA GORMAN] 123800 [OBAMA SHAKING HANDS WITH LADY GAGA] 123840 [BILL CLINTON TALKING WITH AMANDA GORMAN] 124830 (on capitol steps) HARRIS>> .. at least more than the last (?). PAUL PELOSI>> So, Robert (?) says to me hello and my pal Lindel(?) is (?) yesterday and -- >>Keys? HARRIS>> Okay. [HARRIS' ENTER BUILDING] PAUL PELOSI>> Alright. PELOSI>> Congratulations. Congratulations. PAUL PELOSI>> Well done. Almost there. --
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN INAUGURATION POOL 2 ISO HEADON 1125 - 1330 BIDEN AND HARRIS TAKE OATH
AVS NOTE AMANDA GORMAN SPEECH - JENNIFER LOPEZ AND LADY GAGA PERFORMANCES ARE NOT FOR LICENSE FS22 INAUGURATION SPEAKER HEAD ON P00L 2 1125 NBC POOL ISO POOL FEED OF THE US CAPITOL FOR THE INAUGURATION OF JOE BIDEN AND KAMALA HARRIS HIGH SHOT, GUEST BEGIN ARRIVING TO BE SEATED Full Transcripts below 11:36 LADY GAGA 11:41 KAMALA HARRIS TAKES OATH - ADMINISTERED BY SUPREME COURT JUSTICE SONIA SOTOMAYOR 11:43 JENNIFER LOPEZ SINGS "THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND" 11:47 BIDEN SWORN IN BY SUPREME COURT CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS 11:51 BIDEN SPEECH SEN. ROY BLUNT 112502 BLUNT>> Well, I should have known when senator klobuchar got involved, at least there would be a touch of snow up here this morning. Of all the things we considered, I don't think snow was on my agenda until I walked out the door a moment ago. But thank you senator klobuchar, and thanks to the other members of the joint congressional committee on the inauguration, as we officially begin the 59th inaugural ceremony. I also want to thank the joint committee staff and our partners, particularly our security partners for they've -- the way they've dealt with unprecedented circumstances. 112536 When I chaired the inauguration four years ago, I shared President Reagan's 1981 description of this event as "commonplace and miraculous." Commonplace because we've done it every four years since 1789, miraculous because we've done it every four years since 1789. Americans have celebrated this moment during war, during depression and, now, during pandemic. Once again, all three branches of our government come together as the Constitution envisions. 112614 Once again, we renew our commitment to our determined democracy, forging a more perfect union. That theme of this inauguration, our determined democracy, forging a more perfect union, was announced by the joint committee before the election with the belief that the United States can only fulfill its promise and set an example for others if we are always working to be better than we have been. 112643 The constitution established that determined democracy with its first three words, declaring the people as the source of the government. The articles of confederation hadn't done that. The magna carta hadn't done that. Only the constitution says the government exists because the people are the source of the reason it exists. 112705 They immediately followed those first three words with the words "To form a more perfect union." The Founders did not say, "to form a perfect union." They did not claim that in our new country nothing would need to be improved. Fortunately, they understood that always working to be better would be the hallmark of a great democracy. 112728 The freedoms we have today, the nation we have today is not here just because it happened, and they aren't complete -- a great democracy, working through the successes and failures of our history, striving to be better than it had been, and we are more than we have been, and we are less than we hope to be. 112755 The assault on our Capitol at this very place just two weeks ago, reminds us that a government designed to balance and check itself is both fragile and resilient. 112809 During the last year, the pandemic challenged our free and open society and called for extraordinary determination and sacrifice and still challenges us today. Meeting that challenge head on have been and our(?) health care workers, scientists, first responders, essential frontline workers and so many others we depend on in so many ways. Today we come to this moment. People all over the world, as we're here, are watching and will watch what we do here. 112843 Our government comes together. The congress and the courts join the transition of executive responsibility. One political party more pleased today, and on every inaugural day, than the other. But this is not a moment of division. It's a moment of unification. A new administration begins and brings with it a new beginning. 112906 And with that, our great national debate goes forward, and a determined democracy will continue to be essential in pursuit of a more perfect union and a better future for all Americans. What a privilege for me to join you today. Thank you. [applause] I'm pleased to call to the podium a longtime friend of the President Elect and his family, Father Leo O'Donovan to lead us in an invocation. 112937 Please stand if you're able and remain standing for the National Anthem and the pledge to our flag. FATHER LEO O'DONOVAN 113003 O'DONOVAN>> Thank you. 113018 Gracious and merciful god, at this sacred time, we come before you in need, indeed, on our knees. But we come still more with hope and with our eyes raised anew to the vision of a more perfect union in our land, a union of all our citizens to promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity. 113049 We are a people of many races, creeds and colors, national backgrounds, cultures and styles, now far more numerous and on land much faster than when Archbishop John Carroll wrote his prayer for the inauguration of George Washington 232 years ago. 113111 Archbishop Carroll prayed that you, O creator of all, would assist with your holy spirit of counsel and fortitude the president of these United States, that his administration may be conducted in righteousness and be eminently useful to your people. Today we confess our past failures to live according to our vision of equality, inclusion and freedom for all. Yet we resolutely commit still more now to renewing the vision, to caring for one another in word and deed, especially the least fortunate among us. 113159 And so becoming a light for the world. There is power in each and every one of us that lives by turning to every other one of us. A trust of the spirit to cherish and care and stand by others and, above all, those most in need. It is called love. And its path is to give evermore of itself. Today, it is called American patriotism, born not of power and privilege but of care for the common good, with malice toward none and with charity for all. 113242 For our new president, we beg of you the wisdom, solemn, and sought when he knelt before you and prayed for an understanding heart so that I can govern your people and know the difference between right and wrong. We trust in the counsel of the letter of James. If any of you likes wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. 113313 Pope Francis has reminded us how important it is to dream together. "By ourselves," he wrote, "we risk seeing mirages, things that are not there. Dreams, on the other hand, are built together." Be with us, holy mystery of love, as we dream together. Help us, under our new President, to reconcile the people of our land, restore our dream, and invest it with peace and justice and the joy that is the overflow of love. 113358 To the glory of your name, forever, Amen. 113503 [PRESENTATION OF COLORS] 113555 [LADY GAGA ARRIVES] 113646 [LADY GAGA - NATIONAL ANTHEM] 113913 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome from the city of South Fulton, Georgia Fire and Rescue Department, president of the International Association of Firefighters local 3920, fire captain Andrea M. Hall for the reciting of the pledge of allegiance. 113932 HALL [SIGNING AND SPEAKING]>>> I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic, for which it stands, one nation under god indivisible with liberty and justice for all. [applause] 114015 KLOB>> What you are all about to be part of, America, is a historic moment of firsts. To administer the oath to our first African-American, our first asian-american and our first woman vice president Kamala Harris, it is my great privilege to welcome to the inaugural stage, the first Latina to ever serve on the supreme court of the United States of America, justice Sonia Sotomayor. 114051 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing for the oath of office followed by musical honors. 114107 SOTOMAYOR>> Please raise your right hand and repeat after me. I, Kamala Devi Harris, do solemnly swear. HARRIS>> I Kamala Devi Harris do solemnly swear. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States. HARRIS>> That I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States. 114126 SOTOMAYOR>> Against all enemies foreign and domestic. HARRIS>> Against all enemies foreign and domestic. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. HARRIS>> That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. 114137 SOTOMAYOR>> That I take this obligation freely. HARRIS>> That I take this obligation freely. SOTOMAYOR>> Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. 114145 HARRIS>> Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. SOTOMAYOR>> That I will well and faithfully discharge HARRIS> That I will well and faithfully discharge. SOTOMAYOR>> The duties of the office on which I am about to enter. HARRIS>> The duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. 114159 SOTOMAYOR>> So help me god. HARRIS>> So help me god. [ Cheers and applause ]. BIDEN>> All right! 114249 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. Please welcome Jennifer Lopez to perform "This Land is Your Land" and "America, the Beautiful," accompanied by members of the president's own United States Marine Band. 114313 [JENNIFER LOPEZ ENTERS] 114354 [SONG BEGINS] 114659 KLOB>> Well, that was great. The sun is shining and, Mr. President-Elect, this is the first inauguration in the history of America where J. Lo was the warm-up act for Chief Justice Roberts. [laughter] With that, it is now my distinct honor to introduce the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, John Roberts, to administer the presidential oath to the next president of the United States, Joseph R. Biden. [ Cheers and applause ]. 114739 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the oath of office followed by musical honors. 114810 ROBERTS>> Please raise your right hand and repeat after me. I, Joseph Robinette, Jr., do solemnly swear. BIDEN>> I, Joseph Robinete Biden Jr. do solemnly swear. 114821 ROBERTS>> That I will faithfully execute. BIDEN>> That I will faithfully execute. ROBERTS>> The office of president of the United States. BIDEN>> The office of president of the United States. ROBERTS>> And will to the best of my ability. BIDEN>> And will to the best of my ability. ROBERTS>> Preserve, protect and defend. BIDEN>> Preserve, protect and defend. 114838 ROBERTS>> The constitution of the United States. BIDEN>> The constitution of the United States. ROBERTS>> So help you god? BIDEN>> So help me god. ROBERTS>> Congratulations, Mr. President. [cheers] 114949 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. 115112 KLOB>> My fellow Americans, a moment we have all been waiting for, it is now my great privilege and high honor to be the first person to officially introduce the 46th president of the United States, Joseph R. Biden, Jr. PRESIDENT JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR 115153 BIDEN>> [inaud] Chief Justice Roberts, Vice President Harris, [cheers] Speaker Pelosi, leader Schumer, Leader McConnell, Vice President Pence, and my distinguished guests, my fellow Americans, this is America's day. This is democracy's day, a day of history and hope, of renewal and resolve. Through a crucible for the ages, America has been tested anew. 115233 And America has risen to the challenge. Today we celebrate the triumph, not of a candidate, but of a cause, the cause of democracy. The people, the will of the people, has been heard, and the will of the people has been heeded. 115252 We've learned again that democracy is precious. Democracy is fragile. And at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed. [ Applause ] 115308 So now, on this hallowed ground, where just a few days ago violence sought to shake the Capitol's very foundation, we come together as one nation under God, indivisible, to carry out the peaceful transfer of power as we have for more than two centuries. As we look ahead in our uniquely American way, restless, bold, optimistic, and set our sights on the nation we know we can be and we must be. 115344 I thank my predecessors of both parties for their presence here today. I thank them from the bottom of my heart. [applause] And I know -- [ applause cont. ] And I know the resilience of our constitution and the strength, the strength of our nation, as does President Carter who I spoke with last night, who cannot be with us today, but whom we salute for his lifetime in service. 115421 I've just taken the sacred oath each of those patriots have taken. The oath first sworn by George Washington. But the American story depends not on any one of us, not on some of us, but on all of us, on we the people, who seek a more perfect union. This is a great nation. We are good people. And over the centuries, through storm and strife, in peace and in war, we've come so far, but we still have far to go. 115501 We'll press forward with speed and urgency, for we have much to do in this winter of peril and significant possibilities. Much to repair, much to restore, much to heal, much to build, and much to gain. Few people in our nation's history have been more challenged or found a time more challenging or difficult than the time we're in now. 115530 Once in a century virus that silently stalks the country. It's taken as many lives in one year as America lost in all of World War II. Millions of jobs have been lost, hundreds of thousands of businesses closed, a cry for racial justice some 400 years in the making moves us. The dream of justice for all will be deferred no longer. [ Applause ] 115603 A cry for survival comes from planet itself. A cry that can't be any more desperate or any more clear, and now a rise of political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat. [Applause] 115626 To overcome these challenges, to restore the soul and secure the future of America, requires so much more than words. It requires the most elusive of all things in a democracy, unity. Unity. In another January, on New Year's Day in 1863, Abraham Lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation. When he put pen to paper, the president said, and I quote, "if my name ever goes down into history, it'll be for this act, and my whole soul is in it." 115706 "My whole soul is in it." Today, on this January day, my whole soul is in this: bringing America together, uniting our people, uniting our nation. And I ask every American to join me in this cause. [applause] 115729 Uniting to fight the foes we face, anger, resentment and hatred, extremism, lawlessness, violence, disease, joblessness and hopelessness. With unity, we can do great things, important things. F 115749 We can right wrongs. We can put people to work in good jobs. We can teach our children in safe schools. We can overcome the deadly virus. We can reward -- reward work and rebuild the middle class and make health care secure for all. We can deliver racial justice and we can make America once again the leading force for good in the world. 115812 I know speaking of unity can sound to some like a foolish fantasy these days. I know that the forces that divide us are deep and they are real. But I also know they are not new. Our history has been a constant struggle between the American ideal that we all are created equal, and the harsh ugly reality that racism, nativism, fear, demonization have long torn us apart. 115848 The battle is perennial, and victory is never assured. Through civil war, the great depression, World War, 9/11, through struggle, sacrifices, and setbacks, our better angels have always prevailed. In each of these moments, enough of us -- enough of us -- have come together to carry all of us forward, and we can do that now. 115917 History, faith, and reason show the way, the way of unity. We can see each other, not as adversaries, but as neighbors. We can treat each other with dignity and respect. We can join forces, stop the shouting, and lower the temperature.For without unity, there is no peace, only bitterness and fury. 115943 No progress, only exhausting outrage. No nation, only a state of chaos. This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge, and unity is the path forward. And we must meet this moment as the United States of America. If we do that, I guarantee you, we will not fail. We have never, ever, ever, ever failed in America when we've acted together. 120016 And so today, at this time, in this place, let's start afresh, all of us. Let's begin to listen to one another again. WASH 6 PRESIDENT BIDEN INAUGURATION CAPITOL ISO POOL 01202021 120000 120028 Hear one another. See one another. Show respect to one another. Politics doesn't have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path. Every disagreement doesn't have to be a cause for total war. And we must reject the culture in which facts themselves are manipulated, and even manufactured. [ Applause ] 120101 My fellow Americans, we have to be different than this. America has to be better than this, and I believe America is so much better than this. Just look around. Here we stand, in the shadow of the Capitol dome, as it was mentioned earlier, completed amid the civil war, when the union itself was literally hanging in the balance. Yet, we endured. We prevailed. 120126 Here we stand, looking out on the great mall where Dr. King spoke of his dream. Here we stand where, 108 years ago at another inaugural, thousands of protesters tried to block brave women marching for the right to vote. And today, we mark the swearing of the first woman in American history elected to national office, Vice President Kamala Harris. 120155 Don't tell me things can't change! [applause] 120201 Here we stand, across the Potomac, from Arlington Cemetary, where heroes who gave the last full measure of devotion, rest in eternal peace. And here we stand, just days after a riotous mob thought they could use violence to silence the will of the people, to stop the work of our democracy, to drive us from this sacred ground. It did not happen. It will never happen. Not today. Not tomorrow. Not ever. 120234 Not ever. [ Cheers and applause ] To all those who supported our campaign, I'm humbled by the faith you've placed in us. To all of those who did not support us, let me say this. Hear me out as we move forward. Take a measure of me and my heart. 120259 If you still disagree, so be it. That's democracy. That's America. The right to dissent peaceably. Within the guardrails of our republic it's perhaps this nation's greatest strength. Yet hear me clearly, disagreement must not lead to disunion. And I pledge this to you, I will be a president for all Americans, all Americans. [ Applause ] 120331 And I promise you, I will fight as hard for those who did not support me as for those who did. [ Applause ] Many centuries ago, St. Augustin, a saint in my church, wrote that a people was a multitude defined by the common objects of their love. Defined by the common objects of their love. What are the common objects we as Americans love, that define us as Americans? 120402 I think we know. Opportunity, security, liberty, dignity, respect, honor and, yes, the truth. [Applause] The recent weeks and months have taught us a painful lesson. There is truth and there are lies, lies told for power and for profit. 120427 And each of us has a duty and a responsibility as citizens, as Americans, and especially as leaders, leaders who have pledged to honor our Constitution and protect our nation, to defend the truth and defeat the lies. [applause] 120446 Look -- [Applause] -- I understand that many of my fellow Americans view the future with fear and trepidation. I understand they worry about their jobs. I understand like my dad, they lay in bed wondering, can I keep my health care, can I pay my mortgage. Thinking about their families, about what comes next. I promise you, I get it. 120518 But the answer is not to turn inward, to retreat into competing factions, distrusting those who don't look like -- look like you or worship the way you do or don't get their news from the same source as you do. We must end this uncivil war that pits red against blue, rural versus -- rural versus urban, conservative versus liberal. We can do this if we open our souls instead of hardening our hearts. 120553 If we show a little tolerance and humility, and if we are willing to stand in the other person's shoes -- as my mom would say -- just for a moment, stand in their shoes. Because here's the thing about life: there's no accounting for what fate will deal you. 120616 Some days, when you need a hand. There are other days when we're called to lend a hand. That's how it has to be. That's what we do for one another. 120630 And if we are this way, our country will be stronger, more prosperous, more ready for the future. And we can still disagree. My fellow Americans, in the work ahead of us, we're going to need each other. We need all our strength to preserve -- to persevere through this dark winter. We're entering what may be the toughest and deadliest period of the virus. 120657 We must set aside politics and finally face this pandemic as one nation, one nation. And I promise you this. As the bible says, "weep, ye may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the factmorning." We will get through this together. Together. Look, folks, all my colleagues that I served with in the house and the senate up here, we all understand, the world is watching, watching all of us today. So here's my message to those beyond our borders. 120741 America has been tested, and we've come out stronger for it. We will repair our alliances and engage with the world once again. Not to meet yesterday's challenges, but today's and tomorrow's challenges. [ Applause ] 120800 And we'll lead not merely by the example of our power, but by the power of our example. [ Applause ] We'll be a strong and trusted partner for peace, progress, and security. 120816 Look, you all know, we've been through so much in this nation. In my first act as president, I'd like to ask you to join me in a moment of silent prayer to remember all those who we lost in this past year to the pandemic, those 400,000 fellow Americans -- moms, dads, husbands, wives, sons, daughters, friends, neighbors, and co-workers. We'll honor them by becoming the people and the nation we know we can and should be. 120850 So, I ask you, let's say a silent prayer for those who have lost their lives and those left behind and for our country. 120858 [MOMENT OF SILENCE] 120908 BIDEN>> Amen. Folks, this is a time of testing. We face an attack on our democracy and on truth. A raging virus, growing inequity, the sting of systemic racism, a climate in crisis. America's role in the world. Any one of these would be enough to challenge us in profound ways. But the fact is, we face them all at once. Presenting this nation with one of the gravest responsibilities we've had. Now we're going to be tested. 120945 Are we going to step up, all of us? It's time for boldness, for there is so much to do. And this is certain. I promise you, we will be judged, you and I, by how we resolve these cascading crises of our era. We will rise to the occasion, is the question. Will we master this rare and difficult hour? 121013 Will we meet our obligations, and pass along a new and better world to our children? I believe we must. I'm sure you do as well. I believe we will. And when we do, we'll write the next great chapter in the history of the United States of America, the American story, a story that might sound something like a song that means a lot to me. It's called "American Anthem." And there's one verse that stands out, at least for me. 121044 And it goes like this: "The work and prayers of century have brought us to this day. What shall be our legacy? What will our children say? Let me know in my heart when my days are through. America, America, I gave my best to you." Let's add. Let's, us, add our own work and prayers to the unfolding story of our great nation. 121115 If we do this, then when our days are through, our children and our children's children will say of us, they gave their best, they did their duty, they healed a broken land. My fellow Americans, I close the day where I began, with a sacred oath before God and all of you. I give you my word, I will always level with you. I will defend the Constitution. I'll defend our democracy. I'll defend America. 121150 And I'll give all, all of you, keep everything you -- I do in your service, thinking not of power but of possibilities, not of personal injuries but the public good. And together we shall write an American story of hope, not fear. Of unity, not division. Of light, not darkness. A story of decency and dignity, love and healing, greatness and goodness. 121219 May this be the story that guides us, the story that inspires us, and the story that tells ages yet to come that we answered the call of history, we met the moment. Democracy and hope, truth and justice, did not die on our watch, but thrived, that America secured liberty at home and stood once again as a beacon to the world. That is what we owe our forebears, one another, and generations to follow. 121253 So, with purpose and resolve, we turn to those tasked of our time, sustained by faith, driven by conviction, and devoted to one another and the country we love with all our hearts. May God bless America and may God protect our troops. Thank you, America. [ Cheers and applause ] 121350 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Garth Brooks to perform "Amazing Grace." 121409 [GARTH BROOKS ENTERS] 121418 ["AMAZING GRACE" STARTS] 121605 BROOKS>> I'd like to ask you to sing this last verse with me, not just the people here but the people at home, at work, as one, united. ["AMAZING GRACE" CONT.] 121728 ANNOUNCER>> (inuad.) 121744 BLUNT>> Hard not to be reminded of president Obama's singing that same song at the mother Emanuel church. [ Applause ] The song that in our culture is as close to both poetry and prayer as you could possibly come. 121800 And we're going to finish with those two things. Let me introduce Amanda Gorman, our nation's first ever national poet laureate. [ Applause ] AMANDA GORMAN 121840 GORMAN>> Mr. President, Dr. Biden, Madam Vice President, Mr. Emhoff, Americans and the world, when day comes, we ask ourselves where can we find light in this never ending shade? The loss we carry, a sea we must wade. We braved the belly of the beast. 121906 We've learned that quiet isn't always peace and the norms and notions of what just is, isn't always justice. And yet the dawn is hours before we knew it, somehow we do it, somehow we've weathered and witnessed a nation that isn't broken but simply unfinished. 121933 We, the successors of a country and a time, where a skinny black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president, only to find herself reciting for one. 121950 And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine, but that doesn't mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect. We are striving to forge our union with purpose, to compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters, and conditions of man. And so we lift our gazes not to what stands between us but what stands before us. We close the divide because we know to put our future first. We must first put our differences aside. 122027 We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another We seek harm to none and harmony for all. Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true, that even as we grieved, we grew. That even as we hurt, we hoped. That even as we tired, we tried. That we'll forever be tied together, victorious, not because we will never again know defeat, but because we will never again sow division. 122102 Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree, and no one shall make them afraid. 122111 If we're to live up to our own time, then victory won't lighten the blade but in all the bridges we've made, that is the promise to glade, the hill we climb if only we dare, it's because being American is more than a pride we inherit. It's the past we stepped into and how we repair it. 122134 We've seen a force that would shatter our nation rather than share it, would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy. 122144 And this effort very nearly succeeded. But while democracy can be periodically delayed, it can never be permanently defeated. In this truth, in this faith, we trust. For while we have our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us. 122204j This is the era of just redemption. We feared -- at its deception. We did not feel prepared to be the heirs of such a terrifying hour, but within it we found the power to author a new chapter, to offer hope and laughter to ourselves. 122221 So, while once we asked, "how could we possibly prevail over catastrophe?", now we assert, "how could catastrophe possibly prevail over us?" We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be, a country that is bruised but whole, benevolent but bold, fierce and free. We will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation. 122251 Because we know our inaction and inertia will be the inheritance of the next generation. Our blunders become their burdens. But one thing is certain. If we merge mercy with might and might with right, then love becomes our legacy and change, our children's birth right. 122316 So let us leave behind a country better than one we were left with, every breath from my bronze pounded chest, we will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one. We will rise through the gold-limbed hills in the west, we will rise from the windswept northeast where our forefathers first realized revolution. We will rise from the lake-rimmed cities of the midwestern states. 122340 We will rise from the sun baked south. We will rebuild, reconcile, and recover, in every known nook of our nation, in every corner called our country, our people diverse and beautiful, will emerge battered and beautiful. When day comes, we step out of the shade, aflame and unafraid. 122400 The new dawn blooms as we free it for there is always light if only we're brave enough to see it, if only we're brave enough to be it. [Applause] 122434 BLUNT>> Thank you, Amanda Gorman. Now, for our benediction, I'm pleased to introduce Reverend Dr. Silvester Beaman, the pastor of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Wilmington, Delaware, a friend of President Biden for 30 years. REV. DR SILVESTER BEAMAN 122514 BEAMAN>> As a nation and people of faith, gathered in this historical moment, let us unite in prayer. God, we gather under the beauty of your holiness and the holiness of your beauty. We seek your face, your smile, your warm embrace. 122540 We petition you once more in this celebration. We pray for divine favor upon our president, Joseph R. Biden, and our first lady, Dr. Jill Biden and their family. We further ask that you would extend the same favor upon our vice president, Kamala D. Harris, and our second gentleman, Doug Emhoff, and their family. 122610 More than ever, more than ever, they and our nation need you. We need you, for in you we discover our common humanity. In our common humanity, we will seek out the wounded, and bind their wounds. We will seek healing for those who are sick and diseased. We will mourn our dead. 122641 We will befriend the lonely, the least, and the left out. We will share our abundance with those who are hungry. We will do justly to the oppressed. Acknowledge sin and seek forgiveness, thus grasping reconciliation. In discovering our humanity, we will seek the good in and for all our neighbors. We will love the unlovable, remove the stigma of the so-called untouchables. We will care for our most vulnerable, our children, the elderly, emotionally challenged, and the poor. 122720 We will seek rehabilitation beyond correction. We'll extend opportunities to those locked out of opportunity. We will make friends of our enemies. We will make friends of our enemies. People, your people, shall no longer raise up weapons against one another. We will, rather, use our resources for the national good, and become a beacon of life and goodwill to the world. 122753 And neither shall we learn hatred anymore. We will lie down in peace and not make our neighbors afraid. In you, oh, god, we discover our humanity. In our humanity, we discover our commonness beyond the difference of color, creed, origin, political party, ideology, geography, and personal preferences. 122819 We'll become greater stewards of your environment, preserving the land, reaping from it a sustainable harvest, and securing its wonder and miracle giving power for generations to come. 122837 This is our benediction. That from these hallowed grounds, where slaves labored to build this shrine and citadel to liberty and democracy, let us all acknowledge from the indigenous native American to those who recently received their citizenship, from the African-American to those whose foreparents came from Europe and every corner of the globe, from the wealthy to those struggling to make it, every human being regardless of their choices, that this is our country. As such, teach us, oh, god. 122923 As such, teach us, oh, God, to live in it, love in it, be healed in it, and reconcile to one another in it, lest we miss kingdom's goal. To your glory, majesty, dominion, and power forever. Hallelujah, glory hallelujah. In the strong name of our collective faith, amen. 123000 ANNOUNCER>> Please remain standing as the Armed Forces Color Guard retires our national colors. 123017 [RETIRING OF THE COLORS] 123105 ANNOUNCER>> Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated and remain in your seats while the President and the official party depart the platform. For safety reasons, your ushers will release your sections in an organized manner, following the playing of our national march, the Stars and Stripes Forever. 123122 [SONG STARTS] 123130 [PRESIDENT BIDEN AND PRESIDENT OBAMA HUG] 123146 [PRESIDENT BUSH TOUCHES PRESIDENT BIDEN'S SHOULDER] 123157 [PRESIDENT BIDEN SPEAKS TO PRESIDENT CLINTON] 123250 [PRESIDENT BIDEN AND DR JILL BIDEN GO INSIDE] 123336 BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you all. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Appreciate it. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Did a lot of work for me, thank you all. Thank you. 123437 BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Hey, guys. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Hello. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> How are you? BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> Congratulations. BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you very much. BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> (unintell.) BIDEN (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. JILL (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you. 123509 BYSTANDER (OFF-SCREEN)>> Congratulations. HARRIS (OFF-SCREEN)>> Thank you all. Thank you very much. Thank you. 123613 [BARACK OBAMA AND BILL CLINTON GREET EACH OTHER] 123633 [PRESIDENT OBAMA AND HILLARY CLINTON HUG] 123815 [PRESIDENT OBAMA AND LADY GAGA HUG] 123840 [AMANDA GORMAN AND BILL CLINTON CHAT] 124110 [HILLARY CLINTON TALK WITH LAURA BUSH] 124126 [HILLARY CLINTON AND LADY GAGA HUG & CHAT] 124304 BARACK OBAMA (EXITING)>> Fantastic, how are you? Good to see you, Elizabeth. Nice to see you! How you been, my brother? You know [inaud] Good to see you! Hold down the fort in Delaware. You doing alright? [inaud] Everybody's good? Alright. Good to have you, Elizabeth. You're doing a really good job. Good to see you again. We'll catch up. I've got some thoughts and ideas [inaud]. 124355 [MICHELLE OBAMA, COREY BOOKER, AND ROSARIO DAWSON CHATTING IN BG] 124416 [EMHOFF CHILDREN EXIT] 124453 [ELIZABETH WARREN AND BILL CLINTON SHAKE HANDS] 124741 [GAGA ESCORTED UP STEPS, EXITS] #### WASH 5 PRESIDENT BIDEN INAUGURATION CAPITOL SWITCHED POOL 1 01202021 120000 (exiting) 123336 BIDEN>> Thank you all. JILL>> Appreciate it. BIDEN>> Did a lot of work for me, thank you all. Thank you. 123415 [KAMALA HARRIS AND DOUG EMHOFF ENTER BUILDING] 123437 BIDEN>> Hey, guys. JILL>> Hello. BIDEN>> How are you? BYSTANDER>> Congratulations. BIDEN>> Thank you. JILL>> Thank you very much. BYSTANDER>> (unintell.) BIDEN>> Thank you. JILL>> Thank you. 123509 BYSTANDER>> Congratulations. HARRIS>> Thank you all. Thank you very much. Thank you. 123601 [MIKE AND KAREN PENCE ENTER BUILDING] 123722 [NANCY PELOSI ENTERING BUILDING] 123731 [MIKE PENCE TALKING WITH AMY KLOBUCHAR] 123756 [OBAMA SHAKING HANDS WITH AMANDA GORMAN] 123800 [OBAMA SHAKING HANDS WITH LADY GAGA] 123840 [BILL CLINTON TALKING WITH AMANDA GORMAN] 124830 (on capitol steps) HARRIS>> .. at least more than the last (?). PAUL PELOSI>> So, Robert (?) says to me hello and my pal Lindel(?) is (?) yesterday and -- >>Keys? HARRIS>> Okay. [HARRIS' ENTER BUILDING] PAUL PELOSI>> Alright. PELOSI>> Congratulations. Congratulations. PAUL PELOSI>> Well done. Almost there. --
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Status of Iraq War Hearing SWITCHED 1800 - 1900
Joint hearings of the House Armed Services and House Foreign Affairs committee with General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker. CLEAN HEARING TRANSCRIPT OF THE 18:00-19:00 HOUR WITHOUT TIME CODE GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, first, if I could just start out and note that there is no question that al Qaeda Iraq is part of the greater al Qaeda movement. We have intercepted numerous communications between al Qaeda senior leadership, AQSL as they're called, and the -- REP. ACKERMAN: Isn't it true, General, that al Qaeda in Iraq formed in 2005, two years after we first got there? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, I'm not saying when it started. I'm saying merely that al Qaeda Iraq clearly is part of the overall greater al Qaeda network. REP. ACKERMAN: But they didn't exist until we -- (inaudible). GEN. PETRAEUS: We have intercepted numerous communications, and there is no question also but that al Qaeda Iraq is a key element in igniting the ethnosectarian violence. They have been in effect an element that has poured gas on burning embers with the bombing of the Golden Dome Mosque, for example, and with efforts that they have tried recently, for example, bombing the poor Yazidi villages in northwestern Iraq and so forth. REP. ACKERMAN: Are they a threat to us? GEN. PETRAEUS: Al Qaeda Central is a threat to us. I don't know what the result would be if we left Iraq and left al Qaeda Iraq in place. That is very, very hard to say. REP. ACKERMAN: Then how could you -- GEN. PETRAEUS: I don't know where they would go from here. Again, I'm not trying to -- REP. ACKERMAN: Then how could you suggest that we leave after the sectarian violence stops? REP. SKELTON: (Sounds gavel.) Go ahead and answer the question. GEN. PETRAEUS: I'm not sure I understand that question, Congressman. REP. ACKERMAN: The question is, your testimony appears to indicate that our mission is to end the sectarian violence. If we end the sectarian violence, how can we leave without killing everybody who we've identified as part of a terrorist organization such as al Qaeda in Iraq? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, al Qaeda again, as I mentioned, Congressman, is part of the sectarian violence. They really are the fuel -- important, most important fuel on the Sunni Arab side of this ethnosectarian conflict -- REP. ACKERMAN: Question again is, how do we leave? GEN. PETRAEUS: The way to leave is to stabilize the situations in each area, and each area will require a slightly different solution. The solution in Anbar province, as an example, has been one that is quite different from what -- one that might be used in a mixed sectarian area. But stabilizing the area, trying to get the violence down, in some cases literally using cement T-walls to secure neighborhoods and then to establish a sustainable security arrangement that increasingly is one that Iraqis can take over by themselves. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman. The gentleman from New York, Mr. McHugh. REP. JOHN MCHUGH (R-NY): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Gentlemen, let me add my words of deep appreciation and respect for the amazing job you've done. Whether one agrees with our current circumstances in the Middle East or not, I would hope no one of any thinking, responsible mind would question your devotion to country and dedication to duty. I appreciate it. General, I enjoyed that back and forth with my fellow New Yorker, but let me put it a little bit more simply. Is Iraq an important part on the global war on terror in your mind? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, I think that defeat of al Qaeda in Iraq would be a huge step forward in the global war on terror, and I think that failing to do that would be a shot of adrenaline to the global Islamic extremist movement. REP. MCHUGH: Then I assume you agree with the conclusions of the National Intelligence Estimate, that if we were to leave Iraq precipitously from a military perspective, that the likelihood would be of a return to effectiveness, if you will, of AQI, al Qaeda in Iraq. Is that something you agree with? GEN. PETRAEUS: I do. If we were to leave before we and Iraqi forces had a better handle on al Qaeda-Iraq, that likely would be the outcome. We've made substantial progress against al Qaeda, as I mentioned in my opening statement, but as I also mentioned, al Qaeda remains very dangerous and certainly still capable of horrific mass- casualty sensational attacks. REP. MCHUGH: A lot of good people believe that -- and you've heard a little bit, and I suspect you'll hear more today -- good people believe that we have an opportunity by abandoning the mission in, they would argue, a thoughtful way, in Iraq and redirecting our attention entirely against Afghanistan would be the best thing to do in the war on terror. From what you know on the circumstances for the moment, would taking that step, abandoning the current conditions in Iraq for a total commitment to Afghanistan -- (inaudible) -- plus or minus in the war on terror? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, as I mentioned, allowing al Qaeda-Iraq to really rejuvenate, to regain its sanctuaries would certainly lead to a resumption of the kinds of ethnosectarian-fueling attacks that they were conducting on a much more regular basis than they have been able to conduct since the surge of offensives that we have launched in particular. I'm not sure what, you know, a huge injection of assets would do in the Afghanistan portion -- the portion of Afghanistan that is directed against al Qaeda, and I think in fairness that's probably a better question for General McChrystal, the commander of the Joint Special Operations Command, or Admiral Fallon, the combatant commander. REP. MCHUGH: Thank you, sir. Ambassador Crocker, you've said it, I think everyone on this panel feels it, probably most if not all Americans feel a great deal of frustration toward the Iraqi government and the slowness in which they've taken steps that are commensurate with the military side of this equation, and I certainly share those. Folks talk about sending a message to the Iraqi government. There's few things we can see an effect, such as military reductions, that we perceive as perhaps being helpful in turning the screws, encouraging them to make those hard decisions. Advise us, sir. What can we do effectively to send a message to facilitate positive steps by Maliki and the government that's currently in power? AMB. CROCKER: It's a great question, and certainly it's one that General Petraeus and I wrestle with almost every day. First, on the issue of troop reductions as a lever. I think we have to be very careful about this. If the Iraqis develop the sense that we're prepared for a non-conditions-based withdrawal of substantial numbers of our troops, my view is that it would make them less inclined to compromise and not more. And the reason for that is that if they see us coming out, they're still going to be there. And they are then going to be looking over -- increasingly over the tops of our heads, over the horizon to figure out how they're going to survive and how they're going to get through the coming massive sectarian conflict. So it's -- it's the kind of thing we got to think very carefully about, and I'm extremely cautious in ever putting that out on the table. I find that what I kind of need to do on a day-to-day basis is first try to understand, and that's why I spent some time in my statement on how things got to be the way they are in Iraq. That doesn't mean saying, well, you're an abused child so it's okay to do whatever you want, but it does help to understand why these things are difficult; with that understanding, then figuring out where some pressure works, what kinds of pressure, where encouragement works, where some fresh thinking works. And we employ all of that on a fairly regular basis. And one example of a small success was our encouragement for the Anbar forum that took place just last Thursday that brought federal and provincial leaders together in Anbar. REP. SKELTON: Before I -- the gentleman's time has expired. I thank the gentleman. Before I call Mr. Manzullo, the gentleman from Illinois, let me add a footnote. That we speak about benchmarks, and we've had testimony in the Armed Services Committee that the benchmarks are really commitments made by the Maliki government. Mr. Manzullo. Five minutes. REP. DONALD MANZULLO (R-IL): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General Petraeus, media reports refer to U.S. plans to build a military base near the Iran-Iraq border to curtail the flow of weapons into Iraq. Could you please elaborate on these plans? And is Iran the greatest threat to Iraqi security or is al Qaeda the greatest threat? And is the U.S. presence, and thus our massive resources in Iraq, hindering our ability to eradicate al Qaeda worldwide? GEN. PETRAEUS: First of all, Congressman, there is already a base in the area that I think -- I haven't seen that article, but there is a base southeast of Baghdad in Kut, which is where, in fact, the new contribution from the country of Georgia, a brigade, is going to be based. And that is probably what that was referring to. There is an effort to work with the Iraqis to try to interdict the flow, as I mentioned earlier, of these arms, ammunition and other assistance -- lethal assistance coming from Iran that are being funneled to these breakaway rogue militias/special groups associated with the Jaish al-Mahdi, the Sadr militia. You've asked a great question about which is the biggest threat, if you will. We tend to see al Qaeda-Iraq the wolf closest to the sled, because it is the threat that carries out the most horrific attacks in Iraq that cause the very high casualties, that attempt to reignite ethno-sectarian violence, as they did in fact with the February 2006 bombing of the gold dome mosque. And you saw how the security incidents just climbed and climbed and climbed and climbed, and really all the way until just the last several months, before they started to come down. They are still dangerous. They're off-balance. They have lost the initiative in a number of areas. We have taken away sanctuaries in a number of important areas. But they still remain very, very lethal and very dangerous, and they will certainly try to reconstitute. So that is, in a sense, what we see as the immediate and most pressing threat, and we've put great emphasis on that, with our Iraqi counterparts, because they are very much in this. It was the Iraqi army that killed the emir of Mosul, as an example, and has actually had a number of other successes recently against al Qaeda elements. The long-term threat may well be the Iranian-supported militia extremists in Iraq. If these could become a surrogate in the form of a Hezbollah-like element, these are very worrisome. We have learned a great about Iran since we captured the head of the special groups and the deputy commander of Lebanese Hezbollah, Department 2800. They have shared with us. They have explained, as have a number of others that we have captured -- explained the level of assistance, training, equipping, funding and so forth. And we captured documents with them that documented the attacks that they had carried out and clearly were so detailed because they were in fact giving those to prove what they had done to justify the further expenditure of funds from Iran. Prime Minister Maliki, I think, sees that as perhaps THE biggest threat, and a number of the Iraqi leaders, just as we have learned a great deal more in recent months, have also learned a great deal more. And they have been very worried about what they have seen, despite the fact, as was mentioned earlier, that a number of them have quite a long history with Iran, and in some cases many years in exile in Iran. REP. MANZULLO: The last question was, is our presence in Iraq hindering our ability to fight al Qaeda worldwide? GEN. PETRAEUS: Again, I think that's probably a better question for the commander who is charged with the overall counterterrorist effort of the United States, Lieutenant General Stan McChrystal, who spends a great deal of time in Iran, has very sizable assets -- in Iraq -- has very sizable aspects -- assets in Iraq as well. And I think he would be the one who would best be able to answer whether the relative mix against Iraq or Afghanistan or elsewhere, because there are certainly al Qaeda affiliates. And we do track this with him every week. In fact, we get together and discuss not just al Qaeda in Iraq, but al Qaeda in the Levant and in other areas, the Horn of Africa and so forth as well. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman from Illinois. Mr. Taylor, gentleman from Mississippi. REP. GENE TAYLOR (D-MS): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Thank you, General and Mr. Ambassador, for being here. General, we hear a lot of talk about there being a partnership with the Iraqis and building up Iraqi capabilities. When I looked around your headquarters at the Water Palace at Easter, it sure looked like an all-American show to me. In fact, I don't recall the presence of a single Iraqi there. Given the talk of standing them up so that we can create a situation where at some point the Americans can come home, at what point does it become more of a partnership in reality as opposed to a partnership in words? GEN. PETRAEUS: Thanks, Congressman. In fact, right across from our headquarters is the Iraqi ground force headquarters, which is really the equivalent of the Multinational Corps Iraq and which has partnered very closely with Lieutenant General Odierno and his headquarters. We have a substantial number of transition team advisers in that headquarters and, in fact, we have Iraqi liaison in our headquarters as well. Our biggest effort really, certainly from my level, is with the Iraqi joint headquarters, which is in their Ministry of Defense building, which is contiguous, literally, with a door right between the wall, contiguous to the Multinational Security Transition Command Iraq headquarters, General Dubik's headquarters, which is the organization that is charged with supporting the development of the ministry and the joint headquarters. And that is how we work with them. I also provide a substantial number of officers from staff sections in the Multinational Force headquarters, the intelligence operations and others, who are actually partnered with the Iraqis there and also at the Baghdad Operational Command headquarters. REP. TAYLOR: General, in your conversations with the Iraqis, do you ever point at a calendar, whether this year, next year, the following year, the year after that, and say, "We expect you to be an operational force by this date"? What I fail to see, and I'd like you to enlighten me, is a target date. We hear numbers of Iraqis trained; we hear dollars spent on equipment. What I don't hear or see is a target date where you expect them to be able to police their own country and defend their own country. And if I'm missing that, I would certainly like you to point that out. GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, in fact, that transition has been going on. And in fact, the dates are usually mutually agreed. There is a joint Multinational Force Iraq/government of Iraq committee that has representation from the different security ministries and in fact determines the dates, for example, for provincial Iraqi control. Even during the surge -- REP. TAYLOR: And those dates are, sir? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, those are always -- they're agreed by province. As an example, a couple of months ago, we did it for Maysan province. The three Iraqi Kurdish provinces were just recently done. Several provinces were done before the surge as well. And Karbala, for example, is coming up right after Ramadan, about a month or so from now. Now, we have dates on a schedule that we work out with this committee, and it lays out the projected time frames for when this process of provincial Iraqi control will go forward, and we have that for each of the different provinces out there. Sometimes the dates have slipped. There's no question about that. In the case of, for example, Diyala province, which experienced real difficulties as Baqubah was on the verge of becoming the new capital of a caliphate of al Qaeda, that slipped. On the other hand, Anbar province, all the sudden, which was not one that we were looking forward to at all, actually now has a date, and I think it's something like January of 2008. So that process has been ongoing. There are numbers of provinces in which there are few if any coalition forces. Several have no coalition forces. Others have a single special forces team or what have you. REP. TAYLOR: General, for the record, could you supply us that timeline by province to this committee? GEN. PETRAEUS: I'd be happy to give you the provincial Iraqi control schedule that we have right now, yes, sir. REP. TAYLOR: Okay, thank you. Thank you again for your service. REP. SKELTON: Let me ask a question. Would that be classified or unclassified? GEN. PETRAEUS: Sir, I think it is classified. Again, whatever it is, we'll get it to you. REP. SKELTON: We would appreciate that. I thank the gentleman from Mississippi. REP. TAYLOR: Thank you again, General Petraeus. GEN. PETRAEUS: Thank you, sir. REP. SKELTON: Thank you. The gentleman from American Samoa, Mr. Faleomavaega, please. DEL. ENI FALEOMAVAEGA (D-AS): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I want to thank both of you gentlemen for your service to our country. I keep hearing that our active duty and Marine forces are overstretched. And I also express the very serious concerns about the capacity of our current (ready ?) Reservists and National Guard organization, and which was confirmed by General Keane, who expressed some real serious concerns about the way we are using our (ready ?) Reservists and National Guardsmen. And gentlemen, with the tremendous strain and shortages in military equipment, preparedness and training of our (ready ?) Reservists and National Guardsmen and women, who are obligated now to serve in Iraq, does our military currently have the capacity to fight two fronts, in Iraq and Afghanistan? And do we have enough added strategic reserves to fight another potential war front like Iran, the Taiwan Straits, or even to have the situation that's now brewing between the Kurds and our ally, Turkey? With the crisis now brewing there in that northern part of the country in Iraq, I wanted to know if we have the capacity -- it seems like we have all the military personnel available to do what everyone wanted to do to perform the military mission. And I'd like to hear your professional judgment on that, General Petraeus. GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, thank you. First of all, I very much share the concern over the strain on our military forces, and in particular on our ground forces and other so-called high-demand, low-density assets. As I mentioned, that was one of the factors that informed my recommendations to draw down the five Army brigade combat teams, the Marine expeditionary unit and the two Marine battalions, between now and next summer. I also am on the record as offering the opinion that our ground forces are too small. And I did that before the approval of the expansion of those. And I am gratified to see, frankly, the support that this body has given to the effort to expand our ground forces because of the strain that has put on them and, by the way, of course, on their families. With respect to your question, sir, again, with respect, I'm just not the one to answer that. I am pretty focused on the mission in Iraq and not really equipped to answer whether or not -- what else is out there for other contingencies, although I know in a general sense, obviously, that there is very little else out there. DEL. FALEOMAVAEGA: Thank you, General. I have the highest respect for our men and women in military uniform. And I could not agree more with my good friend from California when he mentioned statements by General MacArthur about duty, honor and country. And General Petraeus, one of your colleagues, the former chief of staff for the Army, General Eric Shinseki, was vilified and humiliated by civilian authority because he just wanted to offer a professional judgment on the situation there in Iraq. He recommended that we should have at least 250,000 soldiers if we really wanted to do a good job from the very beginning. Now they put him out to dry. General Taguba also was another good soldier vilified and humiliated by civilian authority of what he felt was doing his job and his duty to our country. It's been estimated that because there are 6 million people living in Baghdad that it would require at least 100,000 soldiers to bring security, real security, to the people living in that city. Could I ask for your opinion, General Petraeus, if you think that 160,000 soldiers that you now command is more than sufficient in capacity to do what you need to do right now in Iraq? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, there's never been a commander in history, I don't think, who would not like to have more forces, more money, more allies and perhaps a variety of other assets. I have what we have in the military, what the military could provide for the surge. Beyond that, we certainly an increasing number of Iraqis, by the way. I might that add that in fact one of Prime Minister Maliki's initiatives has been to expand the number of forces in general and also the manning of each division so that it is at 120 percent of authorized strength so that with their leave policy, which is a must -- and remember, these guys don't ever go home except on leave with their pay. They are in the fight until it is over, and if they don't take their pay home at the end of the four weeks or so or whatever that period is that was worked out for them, they will not get that pay. But I have also again recommended today reductions in our force levels that I believe will be prudent, based on what we have achieved and what I believe we will have achieved together with our Iraqi counterparts. REP./DEL. : Thank you, General. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman. The gentleman from American Samoa raises the issue of readiness. We have had in the Armed Services Committee extensive testimony and documentation, particularly in the Readiness Subcommittee under my friend from Texas, Mr. Ortiz, on the strains, particularly on the ground forces of the Army and Marines. And I tell my friend from American Samoa, it's very, very serious. Thank you for raising that issue. Mr. Bartlett. REP. ROSCOE G. BARTLETT (R-MD): Thank you folks very much for your service and your testimony. Remembering all those years I sat in the bottom row and never had a chance to ask my question, I'm going to yield most of my time to the most junior member on our side of the aisle, but first I must ask a very brief question and then make a brief comment. The brief question is, General, in an attempt to discredit your testimony today, The New York Times is quoted as saying that "The Pentagon no longer counts deaths from car bombings." And The Washington Post is reported as saying that we -- that you will only count assassinations if the bullet entered the back of the heard and not the front. Unless you interrupt me to say that I'm wrong, I'm going to assume that both of these allegations are false. GEN. PETRAEUS: They are false, that's correct. REP. BARTLETT: Thank you for confirming my suspicions. GEN. PETRAEUS: We have a formula for ethnosectarian violence. There's a very clear definition about it. It's acts taken by individuals of one ethnic or sectarian grouping against another ethnosectarian grouping in general for an ethnosectarian reason. It is not that complicated, candidly. If al Qaeda bombs a neighborhood that is Shi'a, that is an ethnosectarian incident, and it is adjudged as such. And where this idea of the bullet entering comes into it is not something I'm aware of. REP. BARTLETT: Thank you, sir. I just didn't want those allegations out there without the opportunity to refute them. Mr. Ambassador, on page four of your testimony, you note the tension between deciding whether or not the power ought to be in the center or the periphery. Some see the devolution of power to regions and provinces as being the best insurance against the rise of a future tyrannical figure in Baghdad. Others see Iraq with its complex demographics as in need of a strong authority. I would submit, Mr. Ambassador, this is the essential question, and unless we know which of those roads we ought to be traveling, I think that the probability of success is enormously diminished. If we haven't already, I hope we can decide which of those roads we ought to be traveling on because they are very different processes, sir. Let me yield the balance of my time now, I believe, (to) our most junior member, Mr. Geoff Davis from Kentucky. (Short pause.) (Cross talk off mike.) REP. GEOFF DAVIS (R-KY): With the chairman's indulgence, I'll ask that the time for the power failure not be counted against -- REP. SKELTON: Please proceed. REP. DAVIS: Thank you very much. Yes, it is somewhat ironic with our challenges today that we provide the criticism to our Arabic partners. I find it ironic that the Iraqi national assembly has been more legislatively effective this year than the United States Congress in passing laws, so our criticism should also measure ourselves. First, General Petraeus, I want to commend you on your application of classic counterinsurgency principles, working with the localized social and cultural networks to build from the bottom-up -- or as Speaker Tip O'Neill used to say, all politics is local. I've heard feedback from across the theater from friends of more than 30 years ranging down to young soldiers and their perspectives, and I think the people on both ends of the political spectrum are trying to oversimplify, to define as black-and-white issues that are best measured in shades of gray. You both have inherited a situation in which our instruments of power were initially employed with flawed assumptions and now in which any course of action has potentially significant second-and third- order effects, and there's areas that I would appreciate if you could comment on. First, one closer to home. I have often heard from troops at all levels, ranging from Central Command staff all the way down to platoon members, in Sadr City that the military is at war, but the nation is not. You mentioned the need to fight in cyberspace, and I assume meaning an information campaign explaining both to the world our ideas and also to the people. And I guess the question there would be: What would you tell the American people, not Congress, is the reason that we should support the recommendations of both of you? And then, following on that, given the effects that these decisions will have on the future, do you have some suggestions on key reforms to our national security or interagency process that you'd recommend to better integrate and facilitate our instruments of national power? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, first of all, if I could, I do believe that our leaders get it in Iraq more than we ever have before. Part of that is just sheer experience. Just about every battalion or brigade commander, most company commanders have served in Iraq at least one tour before, some more than one. We've made mistakes along the way; we've learned a lot of lessons the hard way. But we've made significant changes in our institutional Army, Marine Corps, in particular, and the other services, in terms of our doctrine, the education of our commissioned, non-commissioned officers, the preparation at the combat training centers, the entire road-to-deployment process. And I think that that has made a change in adopting some of the counterinsurgency practices that we are using. With respect to who is at war and who isn't, I would merely associate myself with the remarks of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Pace, who has said on a number of occasions, I believe, before the House Armed Services Committee among them, that he believes that the military obviously is at war, but that he's not so sure about all of the other agencies. Although I would certainly say that State and AID are very much in the same camp. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. But it's not just the military that's at war. It's their families, General. GEN. PETRAEUS: That is exactly -- REP. SKELTON: And we appreciate their sacrifices. GEN. PETRAEUS: Right. REP. SKELTON: Next on my list I have the gentleman from California, Mr. Royce. REP. EDWARD ROYCE (R-CA): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General Petraeus, I would just like to ask you your thoughts on al Qaeda in Iraq. You mentioned the reduction of the popular level of support. And I think General Jones's commission bears that out, his finding that that support level in Anbar had decreased dramatically. And it sort of begs the question: Where does al Qaeda in Iraq draw it's support today? And how do those fighters get into the country? And what could we be doing? In theory, what could we be doing? Now, let's say in Saudi Arabia, you have a young man buying a one-way plane ticket into Damascus. It shouldn't be that hard to figure out what might be going on. What could we be doing in these countries, and I ask the ambassador the same question, in order to deter then influx? I'd also like just some stats. I mean, is it 40 percent Saudi, 30 percent North African? If you've taken out 2,500 of their fighters and 100 of their officer corps recently, then clearly focusing on how they get into the country would be a question that I'd be interested in. And lastly when you look at your plan to draw down the force of five brigades here over the ensuing months, and then as you step down to a few brigades left in Iraq for the purpose of overwatch, all of that is based upon how well the Iraqi military performs. The numbers you've given us would indicate now that there soon will be a half-million soldiers or security people in Iraq under the Iraqi military. But what type of progress -- give us your unvarnished opinion of the progress that's being made or not being made by these Iraqi military units, because the success of your plan to reach a position where you draw down to a few brigades left for overwatch is dependent upon their success. Thank you, General. Thank you, Ambassador Crocker. GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, by the way, the reduction for -- of support for al Qaeda extends well beyond Anbar as well. It now is manifested, as we mentioned, both in Abu Ghraib, other areas that used to be sanctuaries for Iraq, three important neighborhoods in particular: Amiriyah, Ghazalia and Adhamiya. In each one of those at varying stages, the first two in particular, local individuals have stood up, literally generated local forces that have now been tied into our forces. Prime Minister Maliki has directed his army to work with them and coordinate with them, and the next step would be to work to get them into a legitimate Iraqi security force institution. Al Qaeda continues to get its support from a variety of means. Certainly it gets direction, money and expertise from the outside. It does send in from the outside foreigners to try to help rejuvenate areas. In fact, we killed the three -- we call them the al-Turki brothers. These were individuals who had spent time in Afghanistan in the past, who had come into Iraq. We missed them. They came in again. And that time we were able to -- literally to kill them. And so they were not able to do what they were supposed to do, which was to help in northern Iraq, which was under big pressure. So there is outside support, and there's also this flow of these foreign fighters, a number of whom do end up being suicide bombers. We still estimate that -- and it's very hard to tell, but somewhere -- 80 percent or so of the suicide bombers are from outside Iraq. And that was what we were talking about earlier, the importance of the diplomatic offensive, to work with source countries, to work with the countries through whom these fighters can transit to make it more difficult, as you say. And there's a variety of mechanisms. We believe, for example, that Saudi Arabia has taken steps in fact to make it tougher. The last Saudi foreign fighter we captured had actually had to take a bus to Damascus and then got into the network that eventually brought him into the country. We believe that Saudi Arabia is still probably the largest country in terms of the foreign fighters, although that again may be diminishing somewhat. And there are certainly others that come from North Africa, Jordan, Syria and so forth into Iraq. The Iraqi security forces range in quality from exceptionally good, at the very high end, with the Iraqi counterterrorist force, which is a true special mission unit in its capability, equipment, training, and is probably more active, undoubtedly more active than any other such unit in the region; the Iraqi commando battalion, which is expanding substantially and now has forces positioned outside Baghdad as well; and other elements of the Iraqi special operations force brigade; the national police emergency response unit, also very, very active; and the special tactics unit. It then ranges all the way down through units that are variously good and aggressive, including special units typically in most of the provinces with whom we partner special forces teams, who do an absolutely superb job, and Prime Minister Maliki, in fact, personally has come to place greater importance on those because it was these high-end units and special units that he literally took with him. Actually we moved some of them down by air, others by ground, and then he took a column of about 40 vehicles personally to go to Karbala and to restore peace and stability to that situation after the confrontation between the militia of Sadr and the shrine security guards. But this runs all the way down -- it runs the gamut to -- and I have to be up front and say there are still some units, particularly in the national police, but also a handful in the Iraqi army, that were formed literally out of sectarian militias or were hijacked, in the case of some of the national police units, during the height of the sectarian violence. And those still have issues that have to be addressed. And again, especially in the wake of this militia -- the militia problems, where Sadr's militia is very clearly linked to the assassination of one, and likely two, governors in southern provinces, they have become a huge concern to him and to the government of Iraq. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. The gentleman from Hawaii, Mr. Abercrombie. REP. NEIL ABERCROMBIE (D-HI): Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. Gentlemen, thank you for being here. Aloha to both of you. Mr. Chairman, in the course of the questioning so far, I think I have some answers that I was seeking. I would like to just make two observations based on that and yield what time I have left to Representative Castor as the junior-most member. REP. SKELTON: Certainly. REP. ABERCROMBIE: Very quickly, two points. I'll submit for the record statements from General Petraeus starting in 2004 through General Casey in 2005, General Abizaid in 2006, and looping back to General Petraeus today. Not with the idea of trying to say this is what you said then, this is what you say now. On the contrary. I think that what it shows is is that the general remarks concern from the military point of view is that we were making steady progress but the Iraqis are not ready to take over, and this was true in '04, '05, '06 and '07. Our problem is, is what do we do under those circumstances? The problem is, Mr. Chairman, that four years later, the number of U.S. troops being killed continues to climb, thousands more Iraqis are dead and the cost of the war continues to escalate and the refugees continue to stream out of Iraq. My concern is is that lost in all the statistics is the question of a very simple yet heartbreaking fact: The rate and overall number of U.S. troops killed in Iraq has gone up, not down, from 2006 to 2007. From January to August 2006, 462 U.S. troops; from January to August 2007, 740. The problem, I think, Mr. Chairman, is that we are in a situation in which in effect we are saying is is that there's only one plan for Iraq, militarily speaking -- indefinite occupation by U.S. troops. That's not a comment on the military; it's a comment on the politics, which leaves me, Ambassador, to my second statement, quickly. In your very statement today, events have caught up with your and are riding you. Your statements about oil, your statements about the oil revenues, of central government and the regional government -- today we find out the Hunt Corporation of Texas has signed an oil exploration agreement with Kurdistan. The central government is cut out. At the same time, we read that the Commerce Department is seeking an international legal adviser to draft laws and regulations that will govern Iran's oil -- Iraq's oil and gas sector. We are going to be doing the drafting of the oil protocols. Iraq is not a sovereign country. This adviser that's being sought by the Commerce Department has a contract that'll run through 2008 with an option extension to 2010. We're occupying that country politically and militarily and are going to suffer the results. I will yield the rest of my time to Representative Castor. (Light Applause.) REP. SKELTON: (Sounds gavel.) REP. KATHY CASTOR (D-FL): And I thank my colleague. Thank you, Mr. Abercrombie, and thank you, gentlemen, for your service. Gentlemen, Admiral Michael Mullen, the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told Congress last month that unless Iraq has achieved political unity, no amount of troops and no amount of time will make much of a difference. He also warned that the United States risks breaking the Army if the Pentagon decided to maintain its present troop level in Iraq beyond next spring. Add onto that last week's report by a commission of retired senior U.S. military officers, where they said that Iraq's army, despite some progress, will be unable to take over internal security from the U.S. forces in the next 12 to 18 months. The report also said that the 25,000-member Iraqi national police force is dysfunctional and so riddled with sectarianism and corruption that it should be disbanded. And the latest NIE -- the consensus view of all U.S. intelligence agencies said that the modest military gains achieved by the troop surge will mean little or nothing unless there is a fundamental shift in the factors driving Iraqi political and security developments. Gentlemen, while the American people have great confidence in the troops and our brave men and women in uniform, they have totally lost confidence at the top of our national government. There's a complete lack of credibility coming from the White House. The latest -- you know, it first justified the war by claiming that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, none were found. Then the war was about establishing a model democracy in the Arab world, some model. After that, it was necessary to fight on to defeat al Qaeda, which sprouted a local branch in Iraq. The troop surge was supposed to give Iraqi leaders the security and time to bring about national reconciliation, it didn't happen. Now the president's latest spin is a withdrawal could result in another Vietnam. I think the American people want to know, as we're in the fifth year of this war, how much longer, how many billions of dollars more, while we are growing a global strategic risk? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congresswoman, if I could, one reason that I did recommend the reduction of forces is because of the recognition of the strain on our ground forces. Again, that was an important operational -- strategic consideration that did inform the recommendations that I made. I might point out, by the way, that we could have literally run this surge all the way until April. That's the first time that a surge brigade hits 15 months. But because of a variety of considerations and also, frankly, the battlefield geometry of figuring out how to most efficiently and with minimal release in place and so forth get to where we need to be by mid-July, we recommended the reduction of the brigade combat teams in addition to the Marine Expeditionary Unit that will come out later this month without replacement, but that the reduction of the brigade combat teams begin in mid-December. I could -- if I could also point out again that Iraqis are taking over considerable responsibility. The recent celebration of the death of the Seventh Imam, which results in the convergence of about typically approaching a million pilgrims to a(n) important shrine in North-Central Baghdad, the Kadhimiya Shrine, this year was planned and executed by Iraqi forces in a true interagency effort, overseen by the Baghdad Operational Center and its commander, but also involving not just army and police but also emergency services, other transportation assets, medical assets and so forth. Two years ago, there were nearly a thousand pilgrims who were stampeded to death when rumors of enemy action or perhaps actual activities resulted in that particular event. Every other year, there have been dozens of individuals killed by terrorist activities. This year, we are not aware of any deaths due to extremist activity. And the only deaths at all were from accidents, just normal accidents that took place on that day. So again there is progress. There are locations where Iraqis are exclusively maintaining security in their areas. Although you rightly note, and I share it frankly, the frustration particularly during -- what happened during the period of ethnosectarian violence, the sectarian violence of 2006, when some units literally took steps backward, and the effort took steps backward. And that was a tragedy and it is something that we are helping the Iraqis deal with now. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentlelady. To follow through on a thought that the gentlelady raised, your recommendations for cutting back the numbers, General, do they go below the number of troops that we had prior to the so-called surge? GEN. PETRAEUS: They do not right now, Mr. Chairman, and that is something that we are working on, and let me explain why that is. There have been other forces that have come into Iraq for a variety of other tasks. One is connected with an improvised explosive device effort. Others provide additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance assets. These are assets that we would have wanted regardless of whether we were surging or not. And then the largest is probably the additional military police for the growing detainee population, so that we do not run a catch- and-release program and just turn around and have a revolving door where we're taking in terrorists and then letting them back into society without having gone through a rehabilitation or pledge process. Which, by the way, we are now doing and is one thing that I mentioned that I thanked the Congress for the resources for. Because this is a very, very important effort, that we not just have the clock run out on these individuals, and the they go back to their neighborhoods and resume what they were doing before, but that they have gone through some process that prepares them to re-enter society. And by the way, we have about 800 juveniles as well and we recently created a school that will help them as well. And then we have a pledge-and-guarantor process that tries to tie tribes and sheikhs and other civic leaders into this, so that there is a sense of responsibility at the local level for individuals who have been returned who are their family or tribal members. REP. SKELTON: The gentleman from New Jersey, Mr. Payne. REP. DONALD PAYNE (D-NJ): Thank you very much. And let me thank both of you for this very important report. I simply have a couple of quick questions. I wonder, General Petraeus, if the support of the tribal leaders against al Qaeda -- is that irreversible, or is it that that may change possibly in the future? The second thing that does disturbance me about the GAO report and the vast difference in the calculation of the sectarian violence. And I just wonder -- I know you answered a question by one of my colleagues that The Times was just wrong, but is there any way that reconciling can be, since the two of you seem to be so far apart on that? And further, I just wonder why it has taken the Iraqi army so long to try to become proficient? Now I understand the war with Iraq and Iran -- they say that a(n) estimated million Iranians were killed. Now was it -- I know we were assisting Iraq. Was it our military's superiority or our weaponry that was sort of the dark force that made the appearance of Iraqi competence? Because it seems to be confusing that after year after year after year, the police -- they'd say that the entire police department in one area needs to be reconstructed, but that's the national police, not the local police. The soldiers have performed poorly. And so what -- why is there such a disconnect between their Iraq-Iran conflict and the fact that they can't seem to put a sustainable offensive together to weed out Qaeda and these bandits that have come in, who were not there, of course, before we went in. Therefore, I guess Iraq is worse off than it was before al Qaeda came in. So I just get confused at -- why is it taking so long? Do they -- have they just gone on strike or let somebody else do the fighting because it's easier to let someone else do it and keep your powder dry and your head down? And you know, what's missing in this picture? GEN. PETRAEUS: Thank you, Congressman. Sir, the -- first of all, on the tribal leaders, they want to be part of the new Iraq. The Sunni Arabs in Anbar province, as an example, went through various stages of post-liberation, feeling disrespected, unemployed, disgusted and even boycotting the elections and then realizing that they had made a huge mistake and were left out, in many respects, of the new Iraq. A number of them were resistance fighters during that time, as they like to use the term, and tacitly or actively supported al Qaeda, until they came to really come to grips with the Taliban-like ideology of al Qaeda. The ambassador talked about some of the practices that al Qaeda inflicted on the people. And they recognized the indiscriminate violence that was a part of what al Qaeda was doing, and they said, "No more." And then they realized that, okay, we're not going to run Iraq again, but it wouldn't be a bad thing if the Euphrates River Valley were a decent place in which we could live, work, and raise a family. And that seems to be their objective, in addition to certainly having their place at the table in Baghdad and getting their share of the resources. And although there is not a revenue-sharing law agreed, interestingly, there is revenue sharing; oil revenue sharing is taking place. And the ambassador mentioned now they've even learned the term "supplemental," because Anbar province got a supplemental for its provincial budget. With respect to the GAO report, their data cutoff, the answer is the data cutoff. At the very least, their data cutoff was five weeks ago and in some cases, I think -- we might check this, but in some cases I think it was nine weeks ago. But at the very least, these last five weeks, as we showed you on the slides, have actually been very significant. Remembering that we launched the surge of offensives in mid-June, it took a couple weeks to start seeing the results, and that's why I mentioned that eight of the last 12 weeks, in fact, the level of security incidents has come down. And that's -- we don't -- I don't know how far you have to go back to see that kind of trend; it is certainly a couple of years. And as I mentioned, the level of attacks, sort of a sub-set of incidents, is actually the lowest -- lowest last week that it's been since April. With respect to the Iraqi army that defeated Iran, or held their own against Iran, there are some remnants of that army still around, and there actually are some very highly professional Iraqi army and air force and naval officers who have been taken from the old army, the old air force, and so forth. But that's 15 years ago, and during that time, of course, they were defeated by the United States and coalition forces in Desert Storm, suffered years of sanctions, of course, then were disestablished and, of course, literally had to start from the bottom. In fact, there was no ministry of defense, literally. No building, in fact, when I took over as the Multi-National Security Transition Command Iraq commander in the summer of 2004. It was being rebuilt, but it was not even reoccupied for a number of months later. There were no battalions at that -- or maybe one battalion operational, despite heroic efforts by Major Paul Eaton, whose effort had been largely inadequately resourced up to that time as well. This has been building, you know, the world's largest aircraft while in flight and while being shot at. And it takes us a year just to reconstitute a brigade that has actually already been in the fight, keep some 40 (percent) to 50 percent of its members. But just to get it ready to go back, the road to deployment is we want to get at least to a year and, ideally, more. And they are starting, as I said, very much from scratch and just don't have a sufficient number of commissioned and noncommissioned officers who are out there from that old army, again, given the number of years. And even just since the army was disestablished in the summer of 2003, that in itself is a number of years, and these individuals are not necessarily fighting fit, shall we say, if they have been on the sidelines for most of the time since then. Thank you, sir. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. We will take a five-minute break and return, call upon Mr. McKeon and Mr. Chabot. (Raps gavel.) (Recess.) REP. SKELTON: We will come to order. We were told previously that the witnesses had a hard stop at 6:30. I have just spoken with General Petraeus and I hope that the ambassador will agree with his decision to extend the time for an additional 20 minutes -- wherever the ambassador is. (Pause.) Will somebody find the ambassador, please? Mr. McKeon will be next. (Pause.) Mr. McKeon and Mr. Chabot, in that order. Now the gentleman from California, Mr. McKeon. REP. HOWARD P. "BUCK" MCKEON (R-CA): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker, I'd like to join with my colleagues in thanking you for your exemplary service. At the outset, I'd like to associate myself with the remarks of Mr. Hunter and Ms. Ros-Lehtinen in their opening comments. Specifically, I've been deeply saddened by the attacks that have been made on General Petraeus for the last week or two -- citing what he was going to say, and how he was going to say it, and what his recommendations were going to be. I have here General Petraeus' statement that he gave us after the meeting started. If I might quote, "Although I have briefed my assessment and recommendations to my chain of command, I wrote this testimony myself. It has not been cleared by, or shared with anyone in the Pentagon, the White House, or Congress." It just, I think, indicates how some would like to politicize this war on terror and our war in Iraq and Afghanistan, and I'm sorry that you've become a target for things. I read in a report that you have a 63 percent rating with the American people, and I guess this is an attempt to tear you down to our level. And I'm sure that will not work. Anybody that's had a chance to see you here today will know of your integrity and your devotion to duty, and that you're giving us your best assessment of the situation. General, I've heard the comment that the Army is broken. You talked about how the enlistment is going among the troops. Would you care to talk a little bit about the Army, and is it broken? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, sir, the part of the Army that I can talk about knowledgably at this point is, of course, that which is in Iraq. And that is an Army that has sacrificed great deal, and whose family members have sacrificed a great deal. A number of those great soldiers, sailors, marines, airmen and Coast Guardsmen -- and so in addition to our soldiers, certainly, are on a second or perhaps third tour -- some of them shorter tours and are on even more over time. We have asked an enormous amount of these individuals and, candidly, what impresses me so enormously in return is that they do continue to raise their right hand and to serve additional tours, to volunteer for additional tours in uniform. That is not just because of the tax-free bonuses, I can assure you. There's no compensation that can make up for some of the sacrifices that some of our soldiers and their families have endured. On July 4th, in fact, we had a large reenlistment ceremony -- 588 members of different services raised their right hand, and it was a pretty inspiring sight. As I mentioned, it far exceeded the goals for the units that are under the Multi-National core, Iraq already with several weeks to go. And as you know when reenlistment times often the last few weeks of the fiscal year are a pretty frantic affair as soldiers have sorted out all the options and then finally make their choice. Our soldiers are not starry-eyed idealists. In fact, at this point, I prefer not to be a pessimist or an optimist, but to be a realist. And I think a lot of our soldiers are that way. Morale is solid. But candidly morale is an individual thing, so is the view on what's going on in Iraq sometimes. You know, there's 165,000 different American views of Iraq right now and a lot of it depends on where you are and how things are going where you are. And the perspective of someone again in Anbar province where there has been success that we did not expect or someone who's in one of the very tough ethno-sectarian fault line areas -- say, in West Rasheed of Baghdad or East Rasheed -- has a very different perspective. And morale, frankly, is an individual thing. And it often comes down to the kind of day that you're having. I am not immune from those same swings. On days when we have had tough casualties, those are not good days. Morale is not high on those days. And I think the same is true of all of our forces. But with all of that -- with the heat, with this really challenging, barbaric, difficult enemy who is allusive and hard to find and employs sniper tactics, improvised explosive devices, suicide bombs against us, our Iraqi colleagues and innocent civilians -- against all of that, our soldiers continue to ruck up and go out each day from their patrol basis, combat outpost, joint security stations and they do it ready for a hand grenade or a handshake. And if they get the handshake, they'll take it. If they get the hand grenade, they know what to do in that case as well. Thank you, sir. REP. SKELTON: Thank you very much. The gentleman from Ohio, Mr. Chabot. REP. STEVE CHABOT (R-OH): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General, first of all, thank you very much for your service to our country. We first met in Iraq a few years back. One of the more memorable incidents for me was when we were in a Blackhawk over Mosul and you pointed out the house where Saddam's murderous sons had met their end, Uday and Qusay. And Qusay, let's not forget was directly responsible for the deaths of thousands of Shi'a, and hundreds of them at this own hand. And Uday's -- one of his favorite pastimes was abducting young women off the streets of Baghdad, many of whom were never seen alive again. And these were to be Iraq's future leaders. They learned well from their father. General, my question is this -- in July of 2007, you told the New York Post that troop morale had remained high because soldiers understood they're, quote, "engaged in a critical endeavor," unquote. Many of those supporting a precipitous withdrawal from Iraq have regarded low troop morale as a reason for leaving. Could you comment on the current morale of our troops in Iraq? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, again, as I mentioned, Congressman, I believe that morale is solid. But it is an individual thing and it depends on the kind of day that that individual has had. Our soldiers are determined. They know how important this task is, and that is a crucial factor in what they're doing. When they raise their right hand again, as so many have, they do it knowing that they may be called upon to serve again in Iraq or Afghanistan, for them and their family to make further sacrifices in addition to those that they have already made. I'm going to be up front. You know, none of us want to stay in Iraq forever. We all want to come home. We all have days of frustration and all the rest of that. But what we want to do is come home the right way, having added, I guess, to the heritage of our services, accomplished the mission that our country has laid out for us. And again, I think that that's a very important factor in what our soldiers are doing, in addition to the fact that, frankly, they also just respect the individuals with whom they are carrying out this important mission, the men and women on their right and left who share very important values, among them selfless service and devotion to duty. And that, indeed, is a huge factor in why many of us continue to serve and to stay in uniform, because the privilege of serving with such individuals is truly enormous. MR. CHABOT: Thank you, General. And finally, could you comment on the significance of Shi'ite militia leader Maqtada al-Sadr's decision from his hideaway in Iran to suspend the operations of the Mahdi Army for six months? Does this indicate that he clearly feels threatened, is on the run? And what should U.S.-Iraqi military and political response be? And given its involvement in brutal crimes against civilians and its pronounced support for violence against the U.S., should the Mahdi Army be declared a foreign terrorist organization? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, first of all, we think that the action by Maqtada al-Sadr, his declaration from Iran, is because of a sense of embarrassment over what happened in the Shi'a holy city of Karballa, where in the -- one of the most holy celebrations of the year, individuals associated with his militia confronted shrine guards and the result was a shootout and, eventually, loss of life. That, again, was an enormous embarrassment for all of Iraq, but in particular for his militia and for the Shi'a Arabs in Iraq. And it was one reason that Prime Minister Maliki personally went to Karballa the next morning, after having deployed Iraqi special operations forces in the middle of the night by helicopter and others by ground. In response to that, frankly, we have applauded that. Again, we are not going to kill our way out of all these problems in Iraq. You're not going to kill or capture all of the Sadr militia anymore than we are going to kill or capture all the insurgents in Iraq. And in fact, what we have tried very hard to do is to identify who the irreconcilables are, if you will, on either end of the spectrum, Sunni and Shi'a, and then to figure out where do the reconcilables begin and try to reach out to the reconcilables. Some of this is a little bit distasteful. It's not easy sitting across the table, let's say, or drinking tea with someone whose tribal members may have shot at our forces or in fact drawn the blood -- killed our forces. We learned a bit, in fact, about this from my former deputy commander, Lieutenant General Graham Lamb (sp), former head of 22 SAS and the director of Special Forces in the United Kingdom, and he reminded us that you reconcile with your enemies, not with your friends. That's why it's called reconciliation. And he talked about how he sat across the table from individuals who were former IRA members who had been swinging pipes at his lads, as he put it, just a few years earlier. That was quite instructive for us. He in fact headed some of the early efforts that we had in the early part of this year and into the spring, and then it was one of -- part of his initiative that the ambassador and I established this engagement -- strategic engagement cell of a senior diplomat -- senior United Kingdom two-star again and others supporting them who have reached out to individuals that could be reconciled and then helped connect them with the Iraqi government. Some of that will have to be done with members of the Jaish al-Mahdi, with the -- Sadr's militia. The question is: Who are the irreconcilables? And so on the one hand, we have applauded; we have said we look forward to the opportunity to confirm the excellence of your militia in observing your pledge of honor, and that has enormous meaning in the Iraqi culture. And indeed a number of them have in fact obeyed what he said. However, there are a number of others who have not, and those are now regarded as criminal. We're not taking on Jaish al- Mahdi; we are with the Iraqi counterparts going after criminals who have violated Sadr's order and have carried out attacks on our forces, innocent civilians or Iraqi forces. Thank you, sir. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman. We are trying to get as many members as possible under the five- minute rule. The ambassador and the general have agreed for additional 20 minutes. I might point out that I'm told there will be a vote called shortly after 6:30. I have also requested the -- will be held open a few moments longer for us, and also remind the members of the two committees that there is a ceremony that's supposed to begin at 7:00. Mr. Reyes? REP. SILVESTRE REYES (D-TX): Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and General and Ambassador, thank you both for your service to our country. I was curious in your statement, General Petraeus, you made mention that the Iraqis have taken the lead in many areas, that many operate with minimal coalition support, so -- which is contrary to what General Jones' observations were last week, when he said that they're probably 12 to 18 months away from being able to operate independently. Can you give us your opinion or your assessment of that -- GEN. PETRAEUS: I can indeed. REP. REYES: -- particularly in relation to General Jones' statement? GEN. PETRAEUS: I sure can. And in fact, he and I had a lot of conversations during his time in Iraq, and he, by the way, did a superb assessment and spent the time in Iraq, I might add, that is needed to do that type of assessment with his commissioners. What he is talking about is something different from what I was talking about in the statement. What he's talking about is the institutions of the Iraqi security forces being able to truly support their forces throughout the country -- REP. REYES: So it's to be able to spend alone on their own? GEN. PETRAEUS: But we're talking about the institutions doing that as opposed to what I was talking about, is the fact that there are many Iraqi force units who are operating on their own. In Samawa, for example, in Muthanna province in the south, there are no coalition forces whatsoever. They're on their own. Now, occasionally they will call our Special Forces team that is actually in an adjacent province and ask for some assistance. The same is largely true in Nasiriyah. There's a superb Australian unit there, largely focused on civil military operations. And again, when the Iraqi units in that area have been challenged with something they couldn't handle, they just call our Special Forces team, and we bring some enablers to bear, if you will -- close air support, attack helicopters or what have you. The same is true in Najaf. There's only a single U.S. Special Forces team in Najaf. Karbala has no forces. A very small contingent -- and so forth -- REP. REYES: So -- because -- GEN. PETRAEUS: So there are a number of places where Iraqi forces are operating on their own -- and by the way, they may not -- those battalions in those areas may not be operational readiness assessment number one. In other words, they may not be rated as meeting the readiness requirements for operating on their own, but de facto -- the fact is they are operating on their own, but they might be short equipment, leaders, maintenance standards or what have you. REP. REYES: So just the -- of the total force -- GEN. PETRAEUS: What General Jones was getting at was the institutional support. What he's talking about is the ability to support these forces with a logistical system, with depots, with maintenance, with administrative and all the rest of that. That is the challenge. Again, we have found that it's challenging to build battalions, but it's really hard to rebuild an entire army and all of its institutions that go into supporting that battalion or -- you know, way over a hundred battalions, the brigades, the divisions and all the rest of that with command and control communications, intelligence systems, combat enablers, medevac and all the rest of that makes up a force as we know it, as opposed to forces that are unable to do that. REP. REYES: Well, thank you, General. Ambassador, you made mention about the Provincial Reconstruction Teams and the fact that we went from 10 to 25. As I think all of us know, we're having a very tough time recruiting people from the different agencies that make up these teams. Can you briefly tell us -- going from 10 to 25 in a country the size of California, that's not as good news as it seems, is it? AMB. CROCKER: Well, it is a very substantial increase, and a lot of that has been in the areas of greatest population and greatest challenges, like Baghdad itself. So the surge of Provincial Reconstruction Teams into the Baghdad area -- and incidentally, all of those teams are embedded with brigade combat teams and -- REP. REYES: It's because of the security situation. AMB. CROCKER: Exactly -- although what we've discovered is that it makes for a tremendous unity of effort, and it's actually a force multiplier to have them together, so we're taking a look at the rest of the landscape and basically seeking to replicate kind of the embedded concepts for almost all of the PRTs, because that fusion really works. And it helps to coordinate objectives so that we don't have a military unit kind of working in the same area as a PRT without the kind of coordination you need. So that's been tremendously effective. Now, in terms of staffing these up, that's something I've given my particular personal focus to. The surge in PRT personnel that this operation is requiring is to be an additional 283 people in place by the end of the year. And to the annoyance of my staff, I check this three times a week, and also back with Washington, and I am firmly assured that we are on track to meet that requirement by December 31st. Now this includes a lot of military personnel, which will then be backfilled as we move into 2008. But as a report delivered by the special inspector general for Iraq just last week indicated, the PRT program is one of the most valuable programs the U.S. runs in Iraq. Now, that was the special inspector general's comment, so we're clearly on to a good thing here, and we will continue to expand the limits of this endeavor to deliver the most effective response we can to capacity-building needs, particularly on budget execution. I'd make one final comment because I do think that it's important: that as drawdowns and redeployments take place, a challenge we both have is being sure that PRTs continue to be able to do their mission where required, even as the military footprint changes. So we don't have all the answers to that. It's a work in progress, but something we're very much focused on. REP. SKELTON: Mr. Sherman. REP. BRAD SHERMAN (D-CA): Thank you. Mr. Chairman, the ultimate question for our country is how much of the resources available to fight the global war on terror should be deployed in Iraq. That decision cannot be made in Baghdad, because our fine gentlemen from Baghdad don't receive reports on what's going on in Afghanistan, Somalia, the Tri-Borders area of Paraguay, or Sudan. It's a shame that those with global perspectives, the leaders here in Washington, so lack credibility that they're unwilling to really step forward in front of the cameras and say that Iraq is the central front in the war on the terror. So instead they imply that Iraq is the central front by telling us that the decision of how much of our resources to put into Iraq should be dependent upon a report drafted in Baghdad. In effect, we've substituted global perspective for battlefield valor. Now, General Petraeus, when I -- as a general, you're always planning for possible contingencies. The counterinsurgency manual is filled with hypothetical situations and possible responses. And General, you're sworn to defend our Constitution, and you've carried out that oath with honor. Your duty to defend the Constitution would become more complex if we had a constitutional crisis here in Washington. Assume that Congress passes a law stating that no government funds should be used after March of next year, except for certain limited purposes, such as force protection, or for training. The president of the United States instead orders you to conduct U.S.- led offensive military operations, a purpose for which Congress has said we have appropriated no funds. Under those circumstances, what do you do? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, and not trying to be flip, what I would do is consult my lawyer. And again, I'm not trying to make light of this at all, but I would literally have to talk to my lawyer, and obviously talk to my chain of command and get some advice and counsel on what in fact to do. And if I could mention, perhaps, Congressman, on -- REP. SHERMAN: So General, you're saying you might very well disobey an order from the president of the United States on the advice of your legal counsel? GEN. PETRAEUS: I did not say that, Congressman. What I said is I'd have to figure out what I was going to do. If I could just follow up on one item you did say, Congressman -- REP. SHERMAN: General, I did have one -- GEN. PETRAEUS: For what it's worth, al Qaeda believes that Iraq is the central front in the global war on terrorism. REP. SHERMAN: Well, al Qaeda is telling us that they think it's the central front. They might be lying. GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, and also -- REP. SHERMAN: They've been known to do so, General. And if we allow Ahmadinejad and bin Laden to tell us where to fight them, they may not give us their best advice. But I do have one more question and very limited time. GEN. PETRAEUS: Yes, sir. REP. SHERMAN: On about September 15th, this nation's going to get a long, detailed report, well over 100 pages, I would guess. And the press is going to call it the Petraeus report. Now you know and I know that the White House has exercised editorial control over the report that will be released later this week. The country wants the Petraeus report. They want a long, detailed report, written in Baghdad, without edits from the Pentagon or the White House. Are you willing to give to these committees your detailed report, the documents you gave to the White House for them to create the report that they plan to release later this week? And -- GEN. PETRAEUS: Can I answer that so I can -- First of all, on the benchmarks report, my understanding is that the law states that that report is submitted by the president with the input from the ambassador and myself. So at least it is the Petraeus- Crocker report. REP. SHERMAN: General, if you -- my question was carefully couched. I realize months ago, Congress may have asked for a report from the White House, and we'll be happy to get it and read it. But what I said was what the country really wants right now, not months ago but right now -- GEN. PETRAEUS: Right. REP. SHERMAN: -- is the Petraeus report. We want hundreds of pages written in Baghdad, edited by you, without edits from the Pentagon and the White House. Can you get it to us? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, first of all, what I've tried to do today, Congressman, with respect, is to give the Petraeus report. And then I would add to that that Ambassador Crocker and I did submit extensive input for the benchmarks report. The draft that I saw most recently -- because like any of these reports, it does go up and it is then provided back to us for comment, is that it is essentially unchanged. REP. SHERMAN: But in any case, you are warning us that if 100 pages or so is released by the White House later this week, they've done the final edit, and it may or may not be your report as written. GEN. PETRAEUS: I don't think that there is any substantive change in that report, according to the draft that I saw the other day. My guys had a copy, checked it against what we submitted, that the ambassador and I collaborated on. And there was nothing substantive whatsoever that was different in that report. You may want to mention, Ambassador. AMB. CROCKER: No, that's -- that is my understanding of it as well. The September 15th benchmark report will be an update of the July report. And the procedure for drafting it is exactly the same as it was in July. We provide input, but it is a White House report. So it is going to be again procedurally exactly the same as the July report. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. The gentleman from Texas, Mr. Thornberry, please. REP. MAC THORNBERRY (R-TX): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. And I appreciate both of your service and your professionalism, especially in the light of personal attacks against you. Ambassador Crocker, how do you make elected representatives of the people to compromise with each other and reach agreement? We seem to have some difficulty with that. How do you make that happen in Baghdad? AMB. CROCKER: I will very carefully restrict myself to commenting about the situation in Baghdad, because it is a serious issue. It is at the core ultimately of what kind of future Iraq is going to have, whether its representatives, elected and otherwise, are able to come together and reconcile. Process in this is as important, in some ways, as actual results. And the -- one of the elements out of this summer's activity that does give me some cautious encouragement is that representatives, mainly from the parliament, from the Council of Representatives, of the five major political blocs showed an ability to come together and night after night and work their way through a lot of the major issues. The issues they were able to get close to agreement on, they teed up to their leaders, and that's what was embodied in that August 26th declaration that, in addition to the points I've already mentioned, also included commitments on reforms regarding detainees, how they're held, what the conditions are, when they see a judge, when they're released, as well as how to deal with armed groups. The five got agreement on those points as well. But it's the way they did it. Each evening for weeks, representatives -- Sunni, Shi'a and Kurds -- came together and showed an ability to work quite productively together. And that is what I am hoping is going to carry forward in the months ahead as they deal with other issues. The real answer, of course, is, you can't compel it. People have to see their interests served by a process of accommodation. And that's what we're seeing, I think, at least the hopeful beginnings of. REP. THORNBERRY: Thank you. General Petraeus, what do we do about Iran? You -- in answer to previous questions, you said the last time Ambassador Crocker went and talked to them, then the flow of arms accelerated. So some people suggest we need to have a diplomatic surge and go talk to them intensely. I'm a little skeptical that that's going to make a difference. What do we do about the arms, the training, the money that comes from Iran and undermines our efforts? GEN. PETRAEUS: Well, inside Iraq, which is where my responsibility lies, we obviously are trying to interdict the flow of the arms, the training network, the money and so forth, and also to disrupt the networks that carry that out. It was very substantial, for example, to capture the head of the special groups in all of Iraq and that deputy commander of the Lebanese Hezbollah department that I talked about earlier that exists to support the Qods Force effort in supporting these special groups inside Iraq that are offshoots of the Sadr militia. Beyond that, it does obviously become a regional problem. It is something that I have discussed extensively with Admiral Fallon and with others in the chain of command. And there certainly is examination of various contingencies, depending on what does happen in terms of Iranian activity in Iraq. But our focus is on interdicting the flow and on disrupting, killing or capturing those individuals who are engaged in it. We also in fact killed the head of the network that carried out the attacks on our soldiers in Karbala, where five of our soldiers were killed back in January. That was yet another effort in that overall offensive against those individuals. REP. SKELTON: Mr. Pence from Indiana. REP. MIKE PENCE (R-IN): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. And I want to thank General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker for your service to the nation. The old book tells us if you owe debts, pay debts; if honor, than honor; if respect, then respect. And having met with both of you on several occasions downrange in different assignments, I know this nation owes you a debt of honor and a debt of respect. And I want to appreciate the way my colleagues have addressed this hearing today. General Petraeus, just for clarification sake, it seems to me you opened your testimony today with a very emphatic declarative. I think your words were, "This is my testimony." I think you added that it had not been cleared by the White House or the Department of Defense. And I just -- again, we're getting the Petraeus report. GEN. PETRAEUS: That is correct. As I stated, I obviously have given recommendations, and I gave an assessment of the situation as part of those recommendations during a week of video teleconferences, consultations with Admiral Fallon, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, the secretary of Defense and then ultimately the president. But the testimony that I provided today, this statement, is one that I eventually took control of the electrons about two weeks ago and, as I mentioned, has not been shared with anybody outside of my inner circle. REP. PENCE: Well, thank you. Thanks for clarifying that. I think it's important. Two quick points. First on the subject of joint security stations. When I was there in April in Baghdad with you, General Petraeus, we visited a joint security station downtown. I think your testimony today suggests that now the joint security stations are, to use your phrase, are across Iraq. I wondered if you might comment for these committees about the extent to which embedding, if you will, American and Iraqi forces together -- living together, deploying together -- in neighborhood areas has expanded beyond the scope of Baghdad the impact that it's having. And for Ambassador Crocker, just for the sake of efficiency, when I was in Ramadi in that same trick, we met with Sheikh Sattar, some of the leaders of the Iraqi Awakening Movement. It was at that time, I think, 20 of the 22 sheikhs in Al Anbar province had organized that effort. The transformation of Al Anbar has been extraordinary. You made a provocative comment today, saying that that movement is, quote, "unfolding" in other parts of Iraq, and I think you mentioned Diyala and Nineveh provinces. I wonder if you might -- each of you severally -- touch on that. I saw those things in their nascent form this spring, and it seems like both of them have expanded well beyond expectations, to the good of U.S. interests and stability in Iraq. General? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, the concept, again, is that if you're going to secure the population, you have to live with the population. You can't commute to this fight. And the idea is that, wherever possible, to do it together with our Iraqi counterparts, in some cases police, some cases army, sometimes all of the above. The idea of the joint security stations is to be really command and control hubs typically for areas in which there are coalition forces, Iraqi army and Iraqi police, and sometimes now even these local volunteers, who -- again, by directive of Prime Minister Maliki -- are individuals with whom the Iraqi army is supposed to deal as well. There are a number of other outposts, patrol bases and other small bits of infrastructure, if you will, that have also been established to apply this idea that is so central to counterinsurgency operations of again positioning in and among the population. And you see it in Ramadi. For example, in Ramadi there are a couple of dozen, I think, is the last count of police stations, patrol bases, combat outposts, you name it, many of which have both coalition, either U.S. Army or U.S. Marines together, with Iraqi police or Iraqi soldiers, or in some cases still local volunteers who are in the process of being transitioned into one of the security ministries. We see the same in Fallujah. In Fallujah, though it is police stations and there are 10 precincts now established in Fallujah -- the last one was just completed -- in each of those there's typically a Marine squad or a force of about that size, and over time we've been able to move -- (Chairman Skelton sounds gavel) -- our main force elements out of Fallujah and also now to move two of the three battalions in the Iraqi army that were in that area, which frees them up to actually go up and replace the Marine Expeditionary Unit that's coming out and continue the pressure on al Qaeda-Iraq up in the Lake Tharthar area. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman. Try and move along -- next, we have Dr. Snyder, Mr. Wexler, Mr. Jones, Mr. Flake -- REP. PENCE: Mr. Chairman? With your indulgence, I had posed a question to Ambassador Crocker. I don't think he had a chance to respond. REP. SKELTON: I'm sorry. I didn't catch that. Ambassador, please answer as quickly as possible. AMB. CROCKER: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. We're seeing the phenomenon of Anbar repeated elsewhere of Iraqis deciding they've had enough of terrorists. Anbar itself, the whole way it unfolded there is unique to Anbar, and we've got to have the, again, the area smarts and the tactical flexibility to perceive what opportunities are with their regional differences. So Diyala, for example, is much more complicated than Anbar because instead of being just Sunni, that Sunni, Shi'a, Kurd intermixed and has required much more careful handling which, I must say, the military has done an absolutely brilliant job of in an incredibly complex political- military context. But you know, again, in Anbar and Abu Ghraib, west of Baghdad, in Baghdad, the three neighborhoods that General Petraeus mentioned in Diyala, which is a little bit to the northeast and also in Nineveh to the north and in Salahuddin, a process under way that is conceptually similar to what happened in Anbar but has in each case its particular differences that have to be taken into account by us and by the Iraqis. REP. SKELTON: Thank you very much. Dr. Snyder. REP. VIC SNYDER (D-AR): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Gentlemen, I have a question for each of you if you will each answer briefly. I then want to brag on you. So if you -- the quicker you all answer my questions, the quicker I can get to bragging on the two of you. First, General Petraeus, on the chart that you passed out here earlier, the one that talks about the recommended force reduction mission shift, does it go out the timeline here at the end, General Petraeus? We have a straight line at the end. How far out does that line go? The specific question is: How many years do you anticipate U.S. troops will be in Iraq if you had Ambassador Crocker's crystal ball? GEN. PETRAEUS: And I'm afraid that I do not. In fact, that is an illustrative document with respect to both the mission mix and the stair step there. As I mentioned, there is every intention and recognition that forces will continue to be reduced after the mid-July time frame when we have reached the 15 Army Brigade Combat Team level and Marine RCT level. What we need to do is get a bit closer to that time to where, with some degree of confidence, we can make an assessment and make recommendations on that. REP. SNYDER: Thank you. Ambassador Crocker, you mentioned the Provincial Reconstruction Teams, and I appreciate you bringing them up. I had a different recollection, though, of the testimony last week of the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction. One of the staff people was Ginger Cruze. When she testified, she actually testified that by the end of this year, State Department will have identified 68 percent of the State Department personnel to be on board. So they will not necessarily be on board; they will have just identified two-thirds of their staff requirements. So while I appreciate your attentiveness to this, I think we still -- I think the State Department is letting you down, and that somehow we've got to grapple with this issue of how to get the other agencies to step forward and assist the work that General Petraeus and his people are doing, the work that you want to do. So you may need to have another meeting with them and talk about now what exactly are we going to be having at the end of December, because they said that there was only identified two-thirds of them by the end of this year. The reason I want to brag on the two of you, I think you-all have done a good job here today and have done a great job throughout your careers. I don't know if the two of you are going to be able to solve these problems, the challenges you have before you, but you are the all-star team. And if anybody can do it, you can do it. I think that's why some of us find some of the stuff that's been said the last week or so pretty offensive. But we talk about reconciliation. You know, both in the Congress and in the country, we've been going through kind of a soft partition into D's and R's, the soft partition, the red state and the blue state. I think you-all can be part of this reconciliation because our country will do better in foreign policy if we're more united. I put Secretary Gates in that category, too. And what I like about Secretary Gates is, reports that I get back from the Pentagon is that more junior generals actually feel like they can tell him when they think he's wrong or when they have other ideas. And I don't want you to respond to this, but I know that has not been the case for the first -- for the last six years. And so I think there is some process stuff going on that may help get some of this reconciliation. An example of this has been this report that General Jones' group put out last week, that's been referred to several times. Now, it's like everything else in life, we pick and choose. And several people that are critical of what's going on have brought out some of the criticisms of the police and the Iraqi army. But the very -- the last paragraphs, the concluding thoughts -- and I'm going to quote from the report -- quote: "While much remains to be done before success can be confidently declared, the strategic consequences of failure or even perceived failure for the United States and the coalition are enormous. We approach a truly strategic moment in this still-young century. Iraq's regional geostrategic position, the balance of power in the Middle East, the economic stability made possible by a flow of energy in many parts of the world, and the ability to defeat and contain terrorism where it is most manifest are issues that do not lend themselves to easy or quick solution. How we respond to them, however, could well define our nation in the eyes of the world for years to come." And that's the end of the quote. And so those of us who, on whatever side we come down to now or in the last several years on what you-all are about, we've got to start looking at this, I think, this bigger picture. And I would -- my one question for you, Ambassador Crocker. There's a lot of criticism that we do not have the right strategic diplomatic picture that helps you do the work that you're doing. In fact, maybe I won't even put that as a question but just leave that as a comment. I think we've got a lot of work to do in the Congress and the administration to give you that kind of strategic diplomacy for that whole region. Thank you for your service. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. Mr. Wexler. REP. ROBERT WEXLER (D-FL): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General Petraeus, Ambassador Crocker, I vehemently opposed the surge when the president announced it last winter, and instead I called for our troops to be withdrawn. In your testimony today, you claim that the surge is working and that you need more time. With all due respect, General, among unbiased, nonpartisan experts, the consensus is stark; the surge has failed based on most parameters. In truth, war-related deaths have doubled in Iraq in 2007 compared to last year. Tragically, it is my understanding that seven more American troops have died while we've been talking today. Cherry- picking statistics or selectively massaging information will not change the basic truth. Please understand, General Petraeus, I do not question your credibility. You are a true patriot. I admire your service to our nation. But I do question your facts. And it is my patriotic duty to represent my constituents and ask you, question you about your argument that the surge in troops be extended until next year, next summer, especially when your testimony stating that the dramatic reduction in sectarian deaths is opposite from the National Intelligence Estimate, the Government Accounting Office and several other non-biased, nonpartisan reports. I am skeptical, General. More importantly, the American people are skeptical because four years ago very credible people both in uniform and not in uniform came before this Congress and sold us a bill of goods that turned out to be false. And that's why we went to war based on false pretense to begin with. This testimony today is eerily similar to the testimony the American people heard on April 28th, 1967, from General William Westmoreland, when he told the American people America was making progress in Vietnam. General, you say we're making progress in Iraq, but the Iraqi parliament simply left Baghdad and shut down operations last month. You say we're making progress, but the nonpartisan GAO office concluded that the Iraqi government has failed to meet 15 of the 18 political, economic and security benchmarks that Congress mandated. You say we're making progress, but war-related deaths have doubled. And an ABC-BBC poll recently said that 70 percent of Iraqis say the surge has worsened their lives. Iraqis say the surge is not working. I will conclude my comments, General, and give you a chance to respond, but just one more thing, if I may. We've heard a lot today about America's credibility. President Bush recently stated we should not have withdrawn our troops from Vietnam, because of the great damage to America's credibility. General, there are 58,195 names etched into the Vietnam War Memorial. Twenty years from now, when we build the Iraq war memorial on the National Mall, how many more men and women will have been sacrificed to protect our so-called credibility? How many more names will be added to the wall before we admit it is time to leave? How many more names, General? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, first of all, I have not said that the surge should be extended. In fact, my recommendations are that the surge be curtailed earlier than it would have been. The forces of the surge could have run all the way till April before we began pulling them out, and that would be if we did not recommend its continuation beyond that. My recommendations, in fact, include the withdrawal of the Marine expeditionary unit this month without replacement and then a brigade starting in mid-December and then another one about every 45 days. And that's a considerable amount prior to, in fact, how far the surge could have run if we'd just pushed everybody for 15 months. REP. WEXLER: Respectfully, General -- GEN. PETRAEUS: In fact, I am -- and with respect to the facts that I have laid out today, I very much stand by those. As I mentioned, the GAO report actually did cut off data at least five weeks and in some cases longer than that in the assessment that it made. And in fact those subsequent five weeks have been important in establishing a trend that security incidents have gone down, as they have, and have reached, as I mentioned, the lowest level since June 2006, with respect to incidents, and with April 2006, in terms of attacks. I stand by the explanation of the reduction in ethno-sectarian deaths and so forth. And lastly, I would say, Congressman, that no one is more conscious of the loss of life than the commander of the forces. That is something I take and feel very deeply. And if I did not think that this was a hugely important endeavor and if I did not think that it was an endeavor in which we could succeed, I would not have testified as I did to you all here today. Thank you, sir. REP. SKELTON: I thank the gentleman. Before I call on Mr. Jones, the gentleman from California, Mr. Hunter, has a unanimous consent. REP. HUNTER: Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I just -- I'm requesting unanimous consent that the questions of Mr. Graves of Missouri be submitted to General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker. REP. SKELTON: Thank you. Without objection. Mr. Jones. REP. WALTER JONES (R-NC): Mr. Chairman, thank you very much. And General Petraeus, thank you. And Ambassador Crocker, thank you as well. And let me just say that many of the comments you've heard today about our troops and thank you again for your leadership. But we had General Barry McCaffrey before the oversight committee chaired by Chairman Snyder about five or six weeks ago. And I have Camp Lejeune down in my district, and from time to time I have a chance to see some of the Marines who are, you know, out of uniform at certain locations and have conversations. What Barry McCaffrey said was that by April or May of 2008, that the Marine Corps, the Army, the Reserves and the National Guard will start to unravel; that they are absolutely stressed and worn out. And General, you have acknowledged that, so let me make that clear. My question primarily is going to be for Ambassador Crocker. I want to start by reading a quote by Army Lieutenant General Jay Garner, first U.S. official in charge of postwar Baghdad. This is his quote: "I don't know that the Iraqi government has ever demonstrated ability to lead the country, and we should not be surprised. You will never find in my lifetime one man that all Iraqis will coalesce around. Iraqis are too divided among sectarian, ethnic and tribal loyalties, and their loyalties are regional, not national." Mr. Ambassador, I know you have over 20-some years in foreign service with the State Department, and I respect that very much. You made mention of Lebanon, where we had Marines killed there at the barracks. You are dealing with a country that is not national; it is regional. It is a tribal system that has been part of that history of what is now Iraq. And I listened to you carefully and appreciated your comments. You made some statements like "we see some signs of," "we're encouraged," and, you know, those kind of statements which sound good in your written testimony. But my question is, for the American people, I mean, this is a huge investment. And I realize that it is a war on terrorism; I mean, many of us questioned whether we should have gone into Afghanistan, stayed in Afghanistan, gone after bin Laden and al Qaeda instead of diverting to Iraq, but that damage is done. As Colin Powell said, if you break it, you own it. Well, we own it -- sadly, mainly, with blood. My question is to you is, where -- how can you say or how can you hope to encourage a national government when, in this testimony today and in the days before, people have talked about the great successes in Anbar, and that's not because of the national government? How can you take a country that has never had nationalism and believe that we can bring these people together when, as someone said before -- I've spoke -- I mean, they broke and decided not to meet with some of their responsibilities for 30 days. And that sent a bad signal to many people, maybe to our troops, maybe not to our troops. But how do you see this coming together, and how long will it take it to come together? AMB. CROCKER: Congressman, you pose, I think, the critical question. And that's why in my written testimony I focused a lot of attention on that. What kind of state is ultimately going to emerge in Iraq? Because that is still very much an issue under discussion, a work in progress, with some elements of the population, mainly the Sunnis, still focused on a strong central authority; and others, mainly but not exclusively Kurds and Shi'as, saying it needs to be a decentralized federalism. So you have those differences. And even within those two camps, often not a lot of detailed thought as to what either strong central authority or decentralized federalism would actually look like. So, you know, that is part of the challenge. Iraqis will have to work through this. Among the encouraging things I noted that I'd seen is that now among Sunnis there is a discussion that maybe federalism is the way this country needs to go. That has in part been conditioned by the experience in Anbar, but not exclusively. That is why I say this is going to take time, and it's going to take further strategic patience on our part and further commitment. There simply are no easy, quick answers. There are no switches to flip that are going to cause the politics to come magically together. It's going to have to be worked through. I believe that it can. I believe that the things that we have seen over the last six months and that I've described, General Petraeus has described, do hold out cause for hope. But it's going to take their resolve and our backing to actually make that happen. Now, you mention Anbar. I think that that can be a very interesting illustration in this process, where something got started out in Anbar that the central government certainly didn't precipitate, but then the central government found ways to connect to it, both by hiring police and by providing additional resources to the provincial budget. So, you know, this is going to be something that Iraqis are going to have to work through. I'd like to be able to say that we can get this done in six months or nine months or by next July; I can't sit here and do that. REP. SKELTON: Thank you. Mr. Flake. AMB. CROCKER: I can say that I think it's possible. REP. SKELTON: Mr. Flake. REP. JEFF FLAKE (R-AZ): I thank you both for your very enlightening testimony. Ambassador Crocker, you mentioned there's abundant evidence that the security gains have opened the door for meaningful politics. I think we all agree that the purpose of the surge was to create the space necessary for the politicians to do their work. Where -- how do you strike a balance between giving them space and providing a convenient excuse not to reach conclusion on some of these debates? They're talking about federalism, for example. I mean, we can have debates here on the topic, and we do have such debates. But where -- how do you respond to the criticism or the assumption that they would move faster if we had a more precipitous withdrawal or drawdown? AMB. CROCKER: I'd make two comments, sir. First, we are engaged in this process. I spend a lot of my time, as does my staff, working with political figures, sorting through issues, offering advice, twisting some arms from time to time, to help them get done what in many cases they've laid out as their own objectives, but find it a little hard to actually get it over the finish line. So we are involved in that and will continue to be. With respect to the point on using leverage -- using troops as leverage, to say we're going to start backing out of here regardless of whether you've got it done or not, as I said in a slightly different context earlier, I think we have to be very careful with that because if the notion takes hold among Iraqis that what we really do intend to do is just execute a non-conditions-based withdrawal -- say, the famous precipitous withdrawal -- I think it pushes them actually in the wrong direction. I think it creates a climate in which they are much less likely to compromise, because they'll be looking over our heads, concluding that the U.S. is about to pull, so they had better be getting ready for what comes next. And what comes next will be a giant street fight. It's not a climate, I think, that lends itself to compromise. REP. FLAKE: If I might, then, without us putting troops aside, then, what other leverage do we have? Is it aid that is contingent on them moving forward? Some of the -- you know, with regard to some of the benchmarks? What else is effective? Is there something that has been used in other scenarios, say, the peace process in Northern Ireland, or other -- anything that you've used in prior diplomatic efforts that would be more useful here? AMB. CROCKER: Again, like so much else in Iraq, the political dynamic there is probably not unique in world history, but it is pretty special. And while we're always looking for good lessons from outside, in the case of Northern Ireland, for example, where an international commission was formed to help the people work through issues, we've gotten the documentation on that, and we've made it available to Iraqi political figures as something that we and they might work with. They're -- they've got that under consideration. Clearly we do have leverage, and we do use it. I mean, the presence of 160,000 troops is a lot of leverage. And you know, we are using those troops for their security. That gives us, again, not only the opportunity but the obligation to tell them they've got to use the space they're getting to move forward. REP. FLAKE: In the remaining time I have, quickly, for the general, some argue that the presence of U.S. troops gives al Qaeda simply a target. Is there a difference between their attacks on U.S. troops as opposed to attacks on other coalition forces? I know there are different regions, but in Basra, for example, where the British have been, is there -- GEN. PETRAEUS: There are virtually no al Qaeda, really, in the southern part of Iraq because, of course, it's a Shi'a area and much less hospitable to them. REP. FLAKE: Right. GEN. PETRAEUS: They -- we think there have been attacks over time, occasionally, but nothing at all recently in the southern part of Iraq. REP. FLAKE: In other areas, is there any evidence that -- and I know we've performed different roles, the different coalition forces, but is there any evidence that they are more likely to attack Americans than other coalition forces? GEN. PETRAEUS: No. In fact, they're probably more likely to attack Iraqi forces right now. In fact, they're very concerned by the rise of particularly these local volunteers who have been assimilated into the Iraqi forces, because that represents a very, very significant challenge to them. It means that locals are invested in security, and of course they have an incentive that folks from the outside can never have. They are going to fight and die for their neighborhood, again, in a way that -- others who might come in from elsewhere would not be willing to do the same. So in fact we've seen a very substantial number of attacks on these forces as they have become more effective, trying to take out their checkpoints, attack their bases and so forth. REP. FLAKE: Thank you. REP. SKELTON: Thank the gentleman. Mr. Smith from Washington. REP. ADAM SMITH (D-WA): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. And thank you, General, Ambassador, for your service and for your testimony today. I want to explore something we haven't talked that much about, and that is to some degree -- Iraq, to a very large degree, is dividing along sectarian lines and has been for some time. I mean, if we're not there yet, we're pretty -- we pretty soon will be to the point where there's no such thing as a mixed Shi'a-Sunni neighborhood. So even while we're surging forward, this -- (inaudible) -- ethnic cleansing, division, whatever you want to call it, is going on. And I think there's a number of implications of that. You know, one is, it sort of underscores the difficulty of reaching a solution. You know, I, I guess, will be a minority among some of my colleagues here. I don't really so much blame the Iraqis for the situation. It's an intractable situation. It's not like if they stuck around in August in parliament they would have solved this. They, you know, have a deep division between Shi'a and Sunni that I think everybody in this room understands, and it's not a problem that leverage or anything is really going to solve. It is what it is, and it's a reality on the ground. And I'm concerned that we don't seem to be reacting very much to that reality, or as much as we should be. We still have this fantasy of a, you know, unity government in Iraq that we are supposedly fighting to create the space to come about. And I think most people would have to acknowledge at this point it is not going to happen. More on that in a second. I just want to -- one quick question for General Petraeus. So when you figure out what ethno-sectarian violence is, you don't count Shi'a on Shi'a and Sunni on Sunni. And that's a little troubling, in the sense that since this ethnic cleansing is going on and the neighbors have divided, a lot of the violence then comes down to once they've divided it that way, then it's, okay, which Shi'a are going to be in charge and which Sunni are going to be in charge? I mean, to some degree that's part of what's going on in Anbar. Sunnis -- GEN. PETRAEUS: First of all, Congressman, we count in the -- civilian deaths include all deaths, as I mentioned. REP. A. SMITH: Okay. But in the sectarian -- GEN. PETRAEUS: They are in there. REP. A. SMITH: In the sectarian violence. GEN. PETRAEUS: We are focused on sectarian violence, ethno- sectarian violence -- REP. A. SMITH: Right. GEN. PETRAEUS: -- because in some cases it's Arabs and Kurds as well -- because that is what eats at the fabric of Iraqi society. That is what tore the fabric of Iraqi society in the -- REP. A. SMITH: That could be, General, but if I may for just one minute -- GEN. PETRAEUS: -- latter part of 2006. If I could finish, sir. And it does not stop. It never stops until it is stopped by something else. And what we wanted to -- want to have happen is to have it stopped because there is a sustainable security situation. In some cases we help it stop by cement walls. REP. A. SMITH: That could well be, but what I said is essentially accurate, that you don't count -- in the chart that we showed, you weren't showing us civilian deaths, you were showing -- GEN. PETRAEUS: Oh, I did show you civilian deaths. That is -- REP. A. SMITH: Ethno-sectarian -- GEN. PETRAEUS: -- in the chart. There are civilian deaths. REP. A. SMITH: Okay. GEN. PETRAEUS: I showed that slide. And that has come down substantially. REP. A. SMITH: But for the purpose -- GEN. PETRAEUS: Now, it has not come down as much outside Baghdad because of the mass casualty attacks carried out by al Qaeda. And we count all of those, all civilian deaths. That's why I showed that slide and then showed the subset of that slide, which is the ethno- sectarian deaths REP. A. SMITH: Okay. GEN PETRAEUS: We focus on that because of the damage that ethno- sectarian violence does to neighborhoods, particularly, again, in Baghdad. And the problem with the discussion is that Baghdad is a mixed province, still, as are Babil, Wasat, Diyala and other areas of Iraq. REP. A. SMITH: If I could have -- GEN. PETRAEUS: And beyond that, beyond that, the resources are provided by a central government. So with the mechanism that exists now under the Iraqi constitution, there has to be representation of and responsiveness to all Iraqis in that government to ensure that all do get. Now -- REP. A. SMITH: My time is very limited. I wanted to ask Ambassador Crocker a question, if I may. I appreciate that -- GEN. PETRAEUS: Thank you for letting me answer that anyway. REP. A. SMITH: The question, then, is, what is the political solution that we are moving toward? And that's what is most concerning to us. And the bottom line is, even under General Petraeus's description, in July of 2007 we will have roughly the same number of troops in Iraq that we had in January of 2007. Now, a lot of progress has happened, but that is obviously a problem for us. What is the political solution that we are working towards where the conditions are in place that we can begin to end our occupation, keeping in mind the fact that this ethnic division is happening? And maybe, Ambassador Crocker, you can correct me if I'm wrong, but Baghdad is separating along ethnic lines, is it not? And how does that -- what are the implications for where we're headed with all of this? If you could take a stab at that. AMB. CROCKER: Baghdad, like so many other parts of Iraq, in spite of the sectarian violence that occurred, remains a very mixed area. And that is why, again, abruptly changing course now could have some extremely nasty humanitarian consequences. Iraq is still, to a large degree, an intermixed society. Now, that puts special weight on the question you ask. So, what kind of political society is it going to be? According to the constitution, Iraq is a federal state. The debate is over what kind of federal state. Iraqis are going to need to work through this. The encouraging news I see is that now all communities increasingly are ready to talk about translating federalism down to a practical level. And that's a conversation that very much does need to take place. As I tried to lay out in my testimony, there is a tremendous amount of unfinished business here. There is that debate. There is within that debate the whole question of how the center and the periphery relate. For example, a hot debate that I had a chance to witness among Iraq's leaders was over can a provincial governor under certain circumstances -- emergency circumstances -- command federal forces. That's a pretty big issue, and it's an unresolved issue. So that's why -- and everything I said, I tried to lay out that I see reasons to believe that Iraq can stabilize as a secure democratic federal state at peace with its neighbors, under the rule of law, an ally in the war on terrorism. But it's going to take a lot of work, and it's going to take time. REP. SKELTON: The chair recognizes the gentleman from New York, Mr. Engel. REP. ENGEL: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I want to say at the outset, gentlemen, that I respect both of you and I thank you for your service to the nation. I am respectful of our troops who put their lives on the line for us every day. But I really must disagree with a lot of what I've heard here today. The American people are fed up -- I'm fed up -- and essentially what I'm hearing from both of you today is essentially "stay the course in Iraq." How long can we put up with staying the course? Young Americans are dying in someone else's civil war, as far as I'm concerned. Ambassador Crocker, you mentioned that Iraq will slip into civil war if we leave. I mean, we're in civil war now. It's become apparent to me that the Iraqis will not step up until we step out, and as long as we have what seems to be an open-ended commitment, the Iraqis will never step up. So we have an open-ended commitment with many, many troops. At some point you have to ask, is this the best way to keep the U.S. safe? General Petraeus, you said that the Iraqi politicians were understanding more and more about the threat from Iran. Mr. Maliki is supported by a pro-Iranian parliamentarians in the parliament. That keeps his coalition in power, so how much can he really go against Iran? He's a product of Iran. His people that back him are supporters of Iran. You know, for years we keep hearing rosy, upbeat pictures about Iraq -- "Victory is right around the corner; things are going well" -- and it never seems to materialize. General Petraeus, I have an article here called "Battling for Iraq." It's an op-ed piece that you wrote three years ago in The Washington Post -- today -- three years ago, and I want to just quote some of the things you said. You said, "Now, however, 18 months after entering Iraq, I see tangible progress. Iraqi security elements are being rebuilt from the ground up." You wrote that -- you said, "The institutions that oversee them are being reestablished from the top down, and Iraqi leaders are stepping forward, leading their country and their security forces courageously in the face of an enemy that has shown a willingness to do anything to disrupt the establishment of a new Iraq." You talk about Iraqi police and soldiers, and you say they're "performing a wide variety of security missions. Training is on track and increasing in capacity." And finally, you said in this article -- op-ed piece three years ago, "I meet with Iraqi security forces every day. I have seen the determination and their desire to assume the full burden of security tasks for Iraq. Iraqi security forces are developing steadily, and they are in the fight. Momentum has gathered in recent months." So today you said -- and I'll just quote a few things -- "Coalition and Iraqi security forces have achieved progress in the security area. Iraqi security forces have also continued to grow and to shoulder more of the load." And finally you said, "The progress our forces have achieved with our Iraqi counterparts, as I noted at the outset, has been substantial." So I guess my question really is that, you know, why should we believe that your assessment today is any more accurate than it was three years ago in September 2004? Three years ago I was able to listen to the optimism, but frankly I find it hard to listen now, four years-plus into this war with no end in sight. Optimism is great, but reality is what we really need. GEN. PETRAEUS: Thank you, Congressman. I actually appreciate the opportunity to talk about that op-ed piece because I stand by it. I think what I said there was accurate. You -- there are also a number of items in there that talk about the challenges that Iraq faced, about hardships that lay ahead, and a number of other items that are included in that piece. And what I would note, by the way, is that Iraqis are dying in combat, are taking losses that are typically two to three -- closer to three -- times ours in an average month. They are stepping up to the plate. What did happen between that time and the progress that we started -- all I was doing was saying that we were getting our act together with the train and equip program and that we were beginning -- "Training is on track." That's what it was. It was on track and it was moving along. And over the course of the next six, eight, 12 months, in fact it generally continued to progress. And then along came sectarian violence and certainly the February bombing of the gold dome mosque in Samara, and you saw what that did to the country of Iraq. It literally tore the fabric of Baghdad society, Iraqi society at large between Sunni and Shi'a, and literally some of those forces that we were proud of in the beginning took enormous steps backward and were hijacked by sectarian forces and influences at that time. What I have tried to provide today is not a rosy picture. I have tried to provide an accurate picture. As I said, I have long since gone from being a pessimist or an optimist about Iraq. I'm a realist. We have learned lessons very much the hard way, and again the damage done by sectarian violence in particular has been a huge setback for the overall effort, and it resulted in the change that had to be carried out as a result of General Casey and Ambassador Khalilzad assessing in December of 2006 that the effort was failing to achieve its objectives. That's where we were. And as I mentioned, we have then made changes to that that have enabled the military progress that I have talked about. And that is military progress indeed that has emerged certainly most in the last three months, since the mid-June surge of offensives, but is something that we certainly are going to do all that we can to build on and to continue in the weeks and months ahead. Thank you -- (inaudible). REP. ENGEL: But General, that was three years ago, and this is three years later. REP. SKELTON: Whoa, whoa -- (inaudible). REP. ENGEL: Will we be saying the same thing three years from now? REP. SKELTON: Mr. Engel -- Mr. Engel, you're over a minute over your time. The chair recognizes the gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Akin. REP. AKIN: I wanted to say, General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker, thank you for your service. I thank you, and I know that my son who's had a little free time over in Fallujah would also thank you for your good service, as well. I also would like to compliment you on your testimony today. It is professional and credible, as we anticipated that it would be. But some of us sitting here were guessing, trying to figure out what you were going to say today, and one of the things that did surprise me a little bit was that you seem to be a little gentler on the Iraqi parliament and maybe not quite as aggressive on federalism, which seems to be working well and working with the local level. So I guess my question is this: instead of threatening, well, we're going to take our troops and go home, does it not make sense to a certain degree to say, look, if the national legislature can't figure out when to have elections in Anbar province, we'll help -- we'll take care of that for you; we'll go ahead and schedule those. And by the way, you need to understand that Anbar and the different provinces are going to be able to take care of their own garbage collection and police and all this, the type of things we think of as local government functions. And can we not be building at the local level at the same time as at the federal level, both in terms of political leverage to encourage and spur each one on, but also just because of the -- the local progress seems to be working pretty well? And my last question. It kind of goes -- if you comment on that, but the next piece would be, if we wanted to elect the equivalent of a mayor of a city or people to a city council that are not working at the -- you know, at the federal level, do we have the authority to do that, and can that process take place? And is that happening? AMB. CROCKER: That's a series of good questions. Let me start by saying that we are very much focused on how we can help in the provinces. In Anbar, for example, we've got three embedded PRTs as well as the main PRT out there, been working very closely with the Marines in just these kind of issues. Okay, you've got a municipality now. And by the way, of course, Iraq is now at the stage where Iraqis are forming their own municipal governments. REP. AKIN: Are they doing that right now? AMB. CROCKER: Yes, they -- REP. AKIN: Forming their own? AMB. CROCKER: Yes, sir. They -- REP. AKIN: Do they elect people to run those -- so that's going on right now? AMB. CROCKER: They do indeed, and that's been one of the other elements of the Anbar phenomenon that I think now every town of significance in Anbar has an elected mayor and municipal council. And the mission we've got is doing everything we can, military and civilians, to try to help these new councils learn to act like they're councils; to, you know, deliver services, to pick up the trash. That is a major priority, and it's important. At the same time, we do encourage, as I said, the linkages up and down the line so that the municipal councils are tied into the provincial council because that's where the provincial budget is executed, not just in Anbar but everywhere in the country, so that the municipalities are getting their share as well. And this is not as easy as it may sound in a country that at least since the '60s -- and you can argue all the way back to the creation of Iraq as a modern state -- has never had that kind of contract between its government and its people. So, again, it's part of the revolution and progress, if you will. But we have seen that as conditions -- as security conditions stabilize, a lot of things start happening like these municipal councils, like a focus on services, like linkages from top to bottom. And again, we've -- Iraqis talk about federalism, but what does that mean in a case where resources all flow from the center? You know, the budget for Anbar comes from Baghdad. They don't have the capacity to develop a revenue base independently. So all of those things are in play, and they have been in play, basically, just since security started to improve out there. A tremendous amount has happened in a fairly short time, which gives me, again, some encouragement that as security conditions stabilize in other parts of the country, you can see not the same process -- because, as I said earlier, each place has its own unique characteristics -- but, you know, roughly similar processes start to catch hold. REP. AKIN: Thank you very much. REP. JOHN BOOZMAN (R-AR): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. REP. TAYLOR: The gentleman from Arkansas, Mr. Boozman. REP. BOOZMAN: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. General Petraeus, when I was over and visiting not too long ago with you, two or three weeks ago, one of the real concerns that I had after I left was that, in visiting with the guys that had been there for a while, what I would call the backbone of the military, many of those guys were on their third deployment. And I'm pleased to hear that, because we are making progress, that we are going to be able to withdraw. Occasionally we'll have votes here that maybe mandate that you have to go over -- you know, you've got to come back for the same amount of time that you've gone. Besides the argument of not wanting to micro-manage the war from Congress, which I believe very strongly that we shouldn't do, what does that do to your flexibility if we were to actually pass something like that? GEN. PETRAEUS: Congressman, that's not really a question that I can answer. That would have to be one that the chief of staff of the Army or the commandant of the Marine Corps would have to address. My job, as you know, is to request forces and then try to make the best possible use of them, and I'm not really sufficiently knowledgeable in what the status is at this point in time of reaching a point where we can start extending the time that forces are at home and so forth. REP. BOOZMAN: Let me ask very quickly, Mr. Crocker, one of the frustrations I've had in traveling the area has been that the -- our efforts to try -- our Voice of America-type efforts that was so successful against the Soviet Union, sometimes the people in the region have not spoken very well of that through the years. Is that better, or can you tell us a little bit about what we're trying to do to get the hearts and minds through the media? AMB. CROCKER: Yes, sir, that has, of course, been something that we've been engaged in since 2003, and as you suggest with some fairly mixed results in trying to get this right. We've got a couple of vehicles out there for it. One of them is Al Hurra, which has, quite frankly, as I understand it, been involved in a few controversies and has gone through some high-level personnel changes. As well as, of course, VOA, which has been a stalwart all along, as you point out. It is a complex media environment in Iraq and in the region, and it requires having people in place who know how messages resonate and know how to put them together. I was in Iraq in 2003 for several months as we put together the Governing Council and our first media efforts, and coming back a little over four years later I've been impressed by the progress we have made. But to be completely frank with you, I think we still have a way to go both in Iraq and in the region in articulating an effective message to Arab audiences. REP. BOOZMAN: General Petraeus, I've got tremendous respect for you, tremendous respect for General Jones. A lot -- you know, people have alluded to that report. Well, it would be helpful, I think, to me and others if at some point that perhaps you could maybe respond through writing or whatever some of the ideas that he's got that differ than the ideas that you -- I would just encourage you -- again, that would be very helpful to me if at some point you could delineate the differences that you have and then why. I yield back. REP. SKELTON: The chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California, Ms. Sanchez. REP. LORETTA SANCHEZ (D-CA): Thank you, Mr. Chairman. And thank you, gentlemen, for being before us today. It's good to see you both again. As usual, I have tons of questions, General and Ambassador, but let me limit it to this one. The BBC released the results of a poll conducted in August that indicates that Iraqi opinion is at the gloomiest state ever since the BBC and ABC News polls began in February of 2004. According to the latest poll, between 67 and 70 percent of Iraqis say that the surge has made things worse in some key areas, including security and the conditions for political dialogue, reconstruction and economic development. Since the last BBC/ABC News poll in February, the number of Iraqis who think that the U.S.-led coalition forces should leave immediately has risen sharply, from 35 to 47 percent. And 85 percent of Iraqis say they have little or no confidence in the U.S. and U.K. forces. So I know a lot of politicians live by polls, and I realize that the U.S. policy in Iraq shouldn't simply follow the polls, because, you know, there can be a wide range of influence on some of this. Nevertheless, it's a fundamental principle of the U.S. Army counterinsurgency doctrine that the attitudes of the population are an important center of gravity in such a conflict. I think that was stated in our counterinsurgency manual. First -- I have three questions for you -- were you aware of the poll? Do you have your own polling? And why -- and what are your findings versus the attitude of the Iraqi public that we find in the BBC poll? Secondly, how do you explain the sharply negative perception of Iraqis regarding security conditions in Iraq since the surge began? If your data so indicates that dramatic and sharp declines in violence have happened in the last three months, then why isn't it reflected in the attitudes of the Iraqi citizens who are living this hell day by day? And third, one of the cornerstones of your counterinsurgency strategy is to deploy U.S. forces into the areas where they conduct operations, and the BBC poll indicates a dramatic increase in the percentage of Iraqis who want U.S.-led forces to leave Iraq. And that supports the finding of the independent commission by General Jones, that said massive troop presence and U.S. military facilities creates a negative perception among Iraqis that U.S. forces are a long-term occupying force. So, how concerned are you that this apparent decline in public confidence is happening due to that, and how do we address it? Is it a public relations problem or is there a substantive strategy issue that we need to face? And I'll start with the ambassador. AMB. CROCKER: Thank you very much, Congresswoman. No, I have not seen this particular poll. As you know, there are a lot of polls out there. And to say the least, I think polling in Iraq at this point is probably a fairly inexact science -- which is not to call into question, you know, this particular poll. I simply don't know. I know that I have seen -- REP. SANCHEZ: It's a BBC/ABC poll. They usually know how to conduct surveys quite well, I would say. AMB. CROCKER: Yeah. What -- REP. SANCHEZ: They certainly find that they count better than most of our generals count in Iraq. And General Petraeus will know what I mean by that. AMB. CROCKER: I have seen other national polling data that shows, for example, that the number of Iraqis who now feel secure in their own neighborhoods and indeed feel secure moving around the city has gone up significantly. I don't know whether that is accurate either. What I do know, since Iraq, with all of its problems and imperfections, is now an open political society where political figures do have a sense of where their constituencies are, that all of Iraq's principal leaders have registered the sense they have that there has been an improvement of security in the course of the surge. And they've also been very clear that they credit multi-national forces with much of that improvement, and that they don't want to see any marked precipitous reduction in how those forces are deployed until conditions sustain it. Another example I would give you is the communique of the leaders on the 26th of August, in which these five individuals, who have some pretty substantial differences among them, were all prepared to sign on to language that called for a long-term strategic relationship with the U.S. So, again -- REP. SANCHEZ: Well, sure. They want our money, and they want our -- you know, I mean, we're pumping lots of -- we're about the only thing going on in the economy. AMB. CROCKER: Well, actually, there's a lot starting to go on in the economy, and we've talked about what we're seeing in terms of provincial development; that's -- that's mainly coming from -- REP. SANCHEZ: Potential development. AMB. CROCKER: Provincial. REP. SANCHEZ: Provincial. AMB. CROCKER: Provincial development. That's coming out of the central treasury. And it is generating economic activity. We support that. We have a number of programs of our own that we work in coordination with Iraqi government. But there is economic activity. Again, it's anecdotal, but what I have noticed going around Baghdad is people, because they're feeling relatively better about their security conditions, are now asking, "Okay, so where are the services?" REP. SANCHEZ: Again, why is the poll so far off from your anecdotal? AMB. CROCKER: Ma'am, I -- you know, I haven't seen the poll. I don't know what the margin of error is or how it was conducted. REP. SANCHEZ: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. REP. SKELTON: Thank you. We have an ongoing vote. We're told they will hold the vote open for an extra two or three minutes for us. I don't believe we have time to call on an additional member, which I regret, and I thank you for staying the additional 20 minutes, Mr. Ambassador and General. I appreciate -- we all appreciate your being with us -- REP. ORTIZ: I was ready. REP. SKELTON: -- your professionalism and your duty to our country. With that, we'll adjourn the hearing. (Sounds gavel.) END.
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City
Drone view of Sameba Cathedral and Tbilisi City