AFP-149AW 16mm VTM-149AW Beta SP
MISC. EARLY NEWSREELS #11
BLUES MUSIC
FURRY LEWIS, GUS CANNON (NO AUDIO)
MARCH ON WASHINGTON 50TH ANNIVERSARY / HEAD ON P1
FTG OF THE LET FREEDOM RING CEREMONY COMMEMORATING THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON FOR JOBS AND FREEDOM LED BY MARTIN LUTHER KING JR / MLK JR / POOL SWITCHED FEED LOG: March on Washington 50th Anniversary "Let Freedom Ring" at Lincoln Memorial 11:00 am - 12:00 pm 11:09:25 Geraldo Marshall (Trumpet Call) 11:11:28 REMARKS/ INTRO INVOCATION (Soledad O'Brien, Hill Harper) 11:14:49 Pastor A.R. Bernard (Invocation) 11:20:17 INTRO AMB. YOUNG (Hill Harper) 11:20:39 Ambassador Andrew Young YOUNG: I don't know about you, but I "Woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind" -- come on, help me -- "stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu" -- come on (inaudible) -- "Hallelujah." Well, "I'm walking and talking with my mind -- my mind, it was, stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelujah." Now, 50 years ago when we came here, we came from a battle. We came from a battle in Birmingham. But that was just a few months before -- before Martin Luther King came through to speak of his dream. 11:22:11 He had been through bombings, jailings, beatings. He had been snatched from his jailhouse cell in DeKalb County, and put in chains, and taken down to Reidsville Penitentiary in the middle of the night, and thought it was going to be his last night on earth. 11:22:31 He went through the battles of Albany and Birmingham, and came out victorious. But we knew that the fight was just beginning. And we knew that we had a long, long way to go, and this was just the start. Now, he came here representing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, saying that we were going to redeem the soul of America from the triple evils of racism, war and poverty. He came, not talking so much about racism nor war. His speech was about poverty. And he said that the Constitution was a promissory note, to which all of us would fall heir, but that when men and women of color presented their check at the bank of justice, it came back marked, "insufficient funds." But then he said he knew that wasn't the end. But 50 years later, we're still here trying (ph) to cash that bad check. Fifty years later, we're still dealing with all kinds of problems. And so we're not here to claim any victory. We're here to simply say that the struggle continues. But a long time ago, when Ralph Abernathy would stand with him, and things would get difficult, Ralph would say, "Well, I don't know what the future may hold, but I know who holds the future." 11:24:02 And Martin would say that, "The moral arch of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice." And then he would say, "Truth forever on the scaffold; wrong forever on the throne. But the scaffold sways the future, for behind the dim unknown, standeth God beneath the shadows keeping watch above His own." 11:24:22 So I want to say to you this morning, I want to say, "I've got a feeling everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right, be all right, be all right, be all right." Pray on, and stay on, and fight on. 11:25:23 Robby Novak, Kid President, Jonathan B. Jarvis, 18th Director of the National Park Service, The Honorable Vincent C. Gray, Mayor of Washington 11:25:34 Robby Novak, Kid President remarks 11:25:59 Jonathan B. Jarvis, 18th Director of the National Park Service remarks 11:26:08 there are countless photographs of that historic day, one with a pair of rangers with Dr King. Image captures small moment in great event, but captures role of nat'l parks service. 11:26:49 each monument you find a familiar parks service arrowhead. We are there to welcome visitors and preserve American stories they represent. Places civil rights was organized are now preserved as nat'l parks. The power of these places is to inspire each generation to have a dream. 11:28:11 we are very proud of the 2 rangers who stood here 50 years ago. My promise to you is that we will protect all the places entrusted to us with the highest standard of stewardship 11:28:48 Vincent C. Gray, Mayor of Washington 11:28:52 on behalf of 632,000 residents of DC, allow me to welcome you 11:29:08 dr king borrowed a lyric from one of our favorite patriotic songs: let freedom ring. 11:29:33 there was one place DR king didn't mention in that speech but later spoke forcefully: DC. That's because full freedom and democracy are still denied to those who live within sight of capitol dome. We have no voting representative in our own congress. We pay 3.5 billion dollars in taxes but don't get final say. We send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy but don't get to practice here at home 11:30:47 I implore, I hope all of you will stand with me when we say let freedom ring from mt st Albans, the bridges of Anacostia, from Capitol Hill itself, until all of the residents are truly free. 11:31:25 please join hands with us and make every American free 11:31:45 Reverend Wintley Phipps, Sr. 11:36:00 U.S. Senator Angus King, Maine 11:36:10 KING: Fifty years ago, Americans marched to this place. They came from the Northeast, from the West, from the Midwest, and they came from the South. They came by rail; they came by bus; they came by car. One even roller-skated here from Chicago. They slept the night before in buses, in cars, on friends' floors, and in churches. 11:36:42 Fifty years ago this morning, we started in small rivulets of people on the side streets of this great city. We joined together in larger streams, moving toward the main arteries of Washington. Then we came together in a mighty river of people down to this place, old, young, black, white, Protestant, Catholic, and Jew. We stopped at the Washington Monument and heard Peter, Paul and Mary sing of the hammer of justice and the bell of freedom. 11:37:26 Fifty years ago, Americans came to this place around a radical idea, an idea at the heart of the American experience, an idea new to the world in 1776, tested in 1865, renewed in 1963, and an idea still new and radical today: all men and women are created equal. All men and women are created equal. 11:38:08 Fifty years ago, at this place, at this sacred place, Americans sent a message to their leaders and around the world that the promise of equality of opportunity, equality before the law, equality in the right to freely participate in the benefits and responsibilities of citizenship applied to everyone in this country, not just the lucky few of the right color or the accident of birth. This is what Martin Luther King meant when he said that his dream was deeply rooted in the American dream. 11:39:03 And 150 years ago -- 150 years ago this summer -- a mighty battle was fought not far from this place. And this idea, the idea of equality, the idea of America hung in the balance. One of the soldiers on those hot July days was a young college professor from Maine named Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. And returning to the battlefield at Gettysburg many years later, he expressed the power of the place where such momentous deeds were done. Here is what he said. Here is what Joshua Chamberlain said. 11:39:44 "In great deeds, something abides. On great fields, something stays. Forms change and pass, bodies disappear, but spirits linger to consecrate the ground for the vision-place of souls. Generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field, to this deathless place, to ponder and dream. And, lo, the shadow of a mighty presence will wrap them in its bosom and the power of the vision shall pass into their souls." 11:40:53 Fifty years ago today, this place was a battlefield. No shots were fired, no cannons roared, but a battlefield nonetheless, a battlefield of ideas, the ideas that define us as a nation. As it was once said of Churchill, Martin Luther King on that day mobilized the English language and marched it into war, and, in the process, caught the conscience of a nation. And here today on these steps, 50 years on, indeed, something abides and the power of the vision has surely passed into our souls. 11:41:57 The Honorable Johnny L. DuPree, Mayor of Hattiesburg, Mississippi and Secretary, National Council of Black Mayors 11:42:15 decades and decades ago, blood sweat and tears all culminated in a march 11:42:31 if someone would have told me this country boy would become a mayor, I'd say they fell off a truck 11:42:52 some of y'all never had the opportunity to take a bath in a #3 tin tub, I did that 11:43:19 we've been entrusted with making the lives better of people that we serve 11:43:39 at one point, struggle was to gain citizenship, then vote, for brief period, African Americans held elected office during reconstruction 11:44:00 now one of the challenges is the freedom to govern. We must to locally what obama did nationally 11:44:15 we must go back to individuals who helped get us here and encourage them to make their voices heard 11:44:34 we did not quiver or retreat in face of injustice 11:44:55 it is because of those who marched on, even though wearied and bloodied, until they did what people said couldn't be done 11:45:40 Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey with Trayvon Martin's parents and Newtown victim father Mark Barden 11:50:17 INTRO CHARLES STEELE JR and MELANIE CAMPBELL (Soledad O'Brien) 11:50:46 Charles Steele, president emeritus & CEO, Southern Christian Leadership Council 11:53:27 Melanie Campbell, president & CEO, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation 11:56:45 U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro, Texas (20th District) 11:56:55 CASTRO: It's an honor to be here with you today. I come as a son of the great state of Texas, the home to the president who signed the most sweeping and important civil rights legislation in our nation's history. I am 38 years old. I also speak to you as someone of a grateful generation, grateful for the struggles and the movements and the blood and tears and all of the work of the civil rights pioneers who stood here 50 years ago today, and those who marched in the streets of Selma, those who organized people in factories and farms, those who took their battles to the courts, like Thurgood Marshall and Gus Garcia, those who organized people to vote and exercise our rights, those like Willie Velasquez. My own parents in the 1960s were very involved in a movement inspired by Martin Luther King and the men and women who stood here. They were active in the Chicano movement, or the Latino civil rights movement. 11:58:08 And I want to say thank you to them, and thank you to all of you. And I also want to make a promise to you. As somebody of a younger generation of Americans, I want to promise you that all of the struggles and all of the fights and all of the work and all of the years that you put in to making our country a better place, to helping our leaders understand that freedom and democracy are prerequisites to opportunity, I want you to know that this generation of Americans will not let that dream go. That we will carry on, and make sure that this country lives up to the values and principles for which you fought so hard. Thank you very much.
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SALUTE TO AMERICA: STIX 1815 - END
1700 WH SALUTE TO AMERICA STIX FS23 83 1900 WH SALUTE TO AMERICA STIX FS23 83 NBC POOL Thursday, July 4, 2019 President Trump's Salute to America Remarks AR: 16x9 NYRS: WASH-3 18:38:39 Hello America. Hello. The first lady and I wish each and every one of you a happy Independence Day on this truly historic Fourth of July. Today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to America. We celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend our flag: the brave men and women of the United States military. We are pleased to have with us Vice President Mike Pence and his wonderful wife Karen. We're also joined by many hardworking members of Congress, acting secretary of defense Mark Esper and many other members of my Cabinet and also the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joe Dunford. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. 18:39:49 Lieutenant General Daniel Hokanson of the National Guard and distinguished leaders representing each branch of the United States Armed Forces: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines and, very soon, the Space Force. As we gather this evening in the joy of freedom, we remember that all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told: the story of America. It is the epic tale of a great nation whose people have risked everything for what they know is right and what they know is true. 18:40:35 It is the chronicle of brave citizens who never give up on the dream of a better and brighter future. And it is the saga of 13 separate colonies that united to form the most just and virtuous republic ever conceived. On this day, two hundred and forty three years ago, our founding fathers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to declare independence and defend God given rights. Thomas Jefferson wrote the words that forever changed the course of humanity: We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 18:41:44 With a single sheet of parchment and 56 signatures America began the greatest political journey in human history. But on that day the patriots, who would determine the ultimate success of the struggle, were a hundred miles away in New York. There the Continental Army prepared to make its stand. Commanded by the beloved General George Washington. As the delegates debated the declaration in Philadelphia, Washington's army watched from Manhattan as a massive British invading fleet loomed dangerously across New York Harbor. The British had come to crush the revolution in its infancy. Washington's message to his troops laid bare the stakes. He wrote, "the fate of unborn millions will now depend under God on the courage and conduct of this army. We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die." 18:43:04 Days later, General Washington ordered the declaration read aloud to the troops, the assembled soldiers just joined an excited crowd running down Broadway. They toppled a statue of King George and melted it into bullets for battle. The faraway king would soon learn a timeless lesson about the people of this majestic land. Americans love our freedom and no one will ever take it away from us. That same American spirit that emboldened our founders has kept us strong throughout our history. To this day that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot. It lives on and each and every one of you here today. It is this spirit, daring and defiance, excellence and adventure, courage and confidence, loyalty and love that built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world and our nation is stronger today than it ever was before. It is its strongest now. 18:44:50 That same righteous American spirit forged our glorious constitution. That rugged American character led the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark on their perilous expedition across an untamed continent. It drove others to journey west and stake out their claim on the wild frontier. Devotion to our founding ideals led American patriots to abolish the evil of slavery, secure civil rights and expand the blessings of liberty to all Americans. This is the noble purpose that inspired Abraham Lincoln to rededicate our nation to a new birth of freedom and to resolve that we will always have a government of, by, and for the people. 18:45:53 Our quest for greatness unleashed a culture of discovery that led Thomas Edison to imagine his light bulb, Alexander Graham Bell to create the telephone, The Wright brothers to look to the sky and see the next great frontier. We're Americans. Nothing is impossible. Exactly 50 years ago this month the world watched in awe as Apollo 11 astronauts launched into space with a wake of fire and nerves of steel and planted our great American flag on the face of the moon. Half a century later, we are thrilled to have here tonight the famed NASA flight director who led mission control during that historic endeavor. The renowned Gene Kranz. 18:47:13 Gene. I want you to know that we are going to be back on the moon very soon and someday soon we will plant the American flag on Mars. It's happening, Gene. It's happened. Our nation's creativity and genius lit up the lights of Broadway and the soundstages of Hollywood. It filled the concert halls and airwaves around the world with the sound of jazz, opera, country, rock and roll, and rhythm and blues. It gave birth to the musical, the motion picture, the Western, the World Series, the Super Bowl, the skyscraper, the suspension bridge, the assembly line, and the mighty American automobile. 18:48:05 It led our citizens to push the bounds of medicine and science to save the lives of millions. Here with us this evening is Dr. Emanuel Friar Reich. When Emanuel began his work. Ninety nine percent of children with leukemia died. Thanks largely to Dr. Fryer Reich's breakthrough treatments, currently 90 percent of those with the most common childhood leukemia survive. Doctor you are a great American hero. Thank you. 18:48:57 Americans always take care of each other. That love and unity held together the first pilgrims, it forged communities on the Great Plains, It inspired Clara Barton to found the Red Cross, and it keeps our nation thriving today. Here tonight from the Florida Panhandle is Tina Belcher. Her selfless generosity over three decades has made her known to all as Mrs. Angel. Every time a hurricane strikes, Mrs. Angel turns her tiny kitchen into a disaster relief center. On a single day after Hurricane Michael, she gave four hundred and seventy six people a warm meal. Mrs. Angel, your boundless heart inspires us all. Thank you. Thank you very much. 18:50:10 From our earliest days, Americans of faith have uplifted our nation. This evening we're joined by Sister Deirdre Byrne. Sister Byrne is a retired Army surgeon who served for nearly 30 years. On September 11 2001, the sister raced to Ground Zero through smoke and debris. She administered first aid and comfort to all. Today, Sister Byrne runs a medical clinic serving the poor in our nation's capital. Sister, thank you for your lifetime of service. Thank you. Our nation has always honored the heroes who serve our communities. The firefighters, first responders, police sheriffs, ICE, Border Patrol, and all of the brave men and women of law enforcement. 18:51:18 On this July 4, we pay special tribute to the military, service members, who laid down their lives for our nation. We are deeply moved to be in the presence this evening of Gold Star families whose loved ones made the supreme sacrifice. Thank you. Thank you very much. Throughout our history our country has been made ever greater by citizens who risked it all for equality and for justice. One hundred years ago this summer, the women's suffrage movement led Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. 18:52:31 In 1960, a thirst for justice led African-American students to sit down at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. It was one of the very first civil rights sit ins snd it started a movement all across our nation. Clarence Henderson was 18 years old when he took his place in history. Almost six decades later, he is here tonight in a seat of honor. Clarence. Thank you for making this country a much better place for all Americans. In 1963, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr stood here on these very steps and called on our nation to live out the true meaning of its creed and let freedom ring for every citizen all across our land. 18:53:42 America's fearless resolve has inspired heroes who defined our national character from George Washington, John Adams, and Betsy Ross to - Douglass - you know Frederick Douglass - the great Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower, Jackie Robinson, and, of course, John Glenn. It is willed our warriors up mountains and across minefields, it has liberated continents, split the atom, and brought tyrants and empires to their knees. Here with us this evening is Earl Morse. After retiring from the Air Force, Earl worked at a V.A. hospital in Ohio. Earl found that many World War Two veterans could not afford to visit their memorial on the National Mall. So Earl began the very first honor flights that have now brought over two hundred thousand World War Two heroes to visit America's monument. Thank you. We salute you. Thank you. 18:55:07 Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Our warriors from a hollowed roll call of American Patriots running all the way back to the first souls who fought and won American independence. Today just as it did, two hundred and forty three years ago the future of American freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it. We are proudly joined tonight by heroes from each branch of the US armed forces, including three recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you. They and thousands before us served with immense distinction. And they loved every minute of that service. To young Americans across our country, now is your chance to join our military and make a truly great statement in life. And you should do it. 18:56:24 We will now begin our celebration of the United States Armed Forces, honoring each branch's unique culture, rich history, service, song, and distinct legacy. I invite Acting Secretary, please Mark Esper, Secretary of Defense. And Chairman Dunford, head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Please join me. 18:57:04 In August of 1790, by request of George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Congress established a fleet of 10 swift vessels to defend our shores. These revenue cutters would fight pirates, stop smugglers, and safeguard our borders. They are the ancestors of our faithful Coast Guard. When our ships were seized and sailors kidnapped by foreign powers in 1812, it was a revenue cutter, the swift schooner Thomas Jefferson that swept in to capture the first British vessel of the war. In 1897, when two hundred and sixty five whalers were trapped in ice and the ice fields of Alaska were closing up, courageous officers trekked fifteen hundred miles through the frozen frontier to rescue those starving men from certain death. 18:58:06 In 1942, the Coast Guard manned landing craft were invasions in the Pacific. When the enemy attacked US Marines from the shores of Guadalcanal, Coast Guard singleman first class Douglas Munro used his own boat to shield his comrades from pounding gunfire. Munro gave his life. Hundreds of Marines were saved as he lay dying on the deck. His final question embodies devotion that sails with every coast guardsmen. Did they get off. 18:58:46 On D-Day, the Coast Guard's famous matchbox fleet served valiantly through every hour of the greatest amphibious invasion in the history of our country. One coxswain said the water boiled with bullets like a mud puddle in hailstone, but still the Coast Guard braved death to put our boys on Utah and Omaha beaches. Every coast guardsmen is trusted to put service before all. Coasties plunge from helicopters and barrel through pouring rain and crashing waves to save American lives. They secure our borders from drug runners and terrorists in rough seas at high speeds. Their sharpshooters take out smugglers engines with a single shot. They never miss when the red racing stripes of a Coast Guard vessel break the horizon. When their chopper blades pierced the sky, those in distress know that the help is on their way and our enemies know their time has come. Guardians of our waters stand. Semper Paradis. 19:00:10 They are always ready. They are the United States Coast Guard. Representing the Coast Guard today, you will soon see an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter based at Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater along with an HH-65 Dolphin from Air Station Atlantic City and an AC 140 Ocean Sentry from Air Station Miami. 19:02:10 Thank you. Thank you to the Coast Guard. On a cold December morning in 1903, a miracle occurred over the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. When two bicycle makers from Ohio defied gravity with a 12 horsepower engine, wings made of cotton, and just a few dollars in their pockets. Just six years later, America was training its first pilots to take these magnificent machines up and over the field of battle in World War One. Our flyboys rushed the skies of Europe, and aces like Eddie Rickenbacker filled hearts and headlines with tales of daring duels in the clouds. General Billy Mitchell saw the promise of this technology and risk court martial in his quest for an independent air force. He was proven right. When empires across the oceans tried to carve up the world for themselves and America stood in the way. We wouldn't let it happen. 19:03:23 After Pearl Harbor, Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle and his raiders flew B-25 bombers off a carrier deck in the deep Pacific in a daring feat of American resolve. And as President Roosevelt said, the Nazis built a fortress around Europe but they forgot to put a roof on it. So we crushed them all from the air. 177 liberator bombers flew dangerously low through broad daylight without fighter protection to cripple the Nazi war machine at inaudible more than 300 airmen gave their lives to destroy the enemy oil refineries and five pilots were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their actions in that single raid. 19:04:21 It was airman Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier. It was airmen, like Gus Grissom and Buzz Aldrin who traded their sabre jets for rockets to the stars. And it is our incredible airmen today who wield the most powerful weapon systems on the planet Earth. For over sixty five years, no enemy air force has managed to kill a single American soldier because the skies belong to the United States of America. No enemy has attacked our people without being met by a roar of thunder and the awesome might of those who bid farewell to earth. And soar into the wild blue yonder. They are the United States Air Force. Representing the Air Force you will soon see beautiful brand new F-22 Raptors from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. And one magnificent B-2 stealth bomber from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. 19:07:20 What a great country. In October of 1775, the continental Congress ordered the construction of two swift sailing vessels each carrying 10 cannons and 80 men to sail eastward. Our young fleet tested their sea legs against the most powerful navy the world has ever seen. John Paul Jones, America's first great naval hero, said I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm's way. He got his wish many times when his ship was shot into pieces off the coast of England by a British vessel and her four dozen guns. When demanded to surrender, Jones very famously declared I have not yet begun to fight. When our Navy begins fighting they finish the job. 19:08:30 The War of 1812, Captain James Lance fell with his brothers on the USS Chesapeake. His dying command gained immortality. Don't give up the ship. In the Battle of Mobile Bay, Admiral David Farragut lashed himself to the rigging of his flagship to see beyond the cannon smoke, crying "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." In World War 2, it was aviators launched from the carrier Enterprise, Hornet, Yorktown who filled the skies of Midway and turned the tide of the Pacific War. Nobody could beat us. Nobody could come close. On D-Day, CB engineers came ashore to destroy blockades and barriers making way for the invasion. Many lost their lives, but they took the German defenses with them and our men crushed upon the beaches like a mighty storm. 19:09:41 From the Naval demolition units of World War 2, a rose a force that became famous in the Mekong Delta. They don't want to see our force again. The very best of the very best: the Navy SEALs. It was SEALs who delivered vengeance on the terrorists who planned the September 11th attack on our homeland. It was the SEALs who stand ready to bring righteous retribution in mountain jungles desert to those who do us harm. America's sailors are not born. They are forged by the sea. Their traditions are rich with the salt and blood of three centuries when Old Glory crest the waves of foreign shores. Every friend and every foe knows that Justice sails those waters. It sails with the United States Navy. Representing our great Navy today will be two F-18 Super Hornets from Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia, along with two F35 Lightnings from Naval Air Station Lemoore in California. 19:11:56 So great. In November of 1775, the continental congress created two battalions of a new kind of warrior one who kept and would protect our ships and sailors and be at home both the shore and in the mast with musket in hand. Their versatility was proven in the War of Independence when two hundred and thirty four continental Marines conducted their first amphibious raid. capturing the British supply of gunpowder and cannons at Fort Nassau. Ever since Marines have fought in every American war. Their legend has grown and grown and grown with each passing year. It was the Marines who won America's first overseas battle vanquishing Barbary pirates on the shores of Tripoli. Their high stiff collar, which shielded them from the pirate sword earned them the immortal name Leatherneck. 19:13:05 It was the Marines who after two long days of battle marched through the halls of Montezuma. It was the Marines who took heavy casualties to kick the Kaiser's troops out of Bellwood in World War One, earning the title "Devil Dogs". And it was the Marines who raised the flag on the Black Sands of Iwo Jima. From the Chosin reservoir to Khe Sanh from Helmand to Baghdad, Marines have struck fear into the hearts of our enemies and put solace into the hearts of our friends. Marines always lead the way. After the 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Beirut, which claimed the lives of two hundred and forty one great U.S. servicemen, Marine Sergeant Jeffery Nashton lay in bandages, so badly wounded barely alive. When the commandant of the Marine Corps came to visit his hospital, Sergeant Nashton had to feel for the general's collar. He wanted to feel his four stars. He could not see and he could not speak. He signaled for pen and paper and with shaking hand he wrote two words Semper Fi. 19:14:50 That motto. Semper fidelis Always faithful burns in the soul of every Marine. A sacred promise. The Corps has kept since the birth of our country. They are the elite masters of air and land and sea on battlefields all across the globe. They are the United States Marines. Representing the Marine Corps today will be a brand new VH92, soon to serve as Marine One. Along with two V22 Ospreys from the famed HMX-1 helicopter squadron at Quantico, the Nighthawks. 19:17:04 In June of 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified army out of the revolutionary forces encamped around Boston and New York and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief. The Continental Army suffered a bitter winter of Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware, and seized victory from Cornwallis of Yorktown. Our army manned the air, it ran the ramparts, it took over the airports it did everything it had to do. And at Fort McHenry, under the rockets red glare, it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came their star spangled banner waved defiant. 19:18:00 At Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg our soldiers gave the last full measure of devotion for the true unity of our nation and the freedom of all Americans. In the trenches of World War One, an Army sergeant named Alvin York faced an inferno of enemy fire and refused to retreat. He said I won't leave. I won't stop. He shot his rifle 18 times killing 18 of the enemy. When they fixed bayonets and charged, he killed seven more. The entire German machine gun battalion surrendered because of one man Alvin York. 19:18:46 A generation later, the army returned to Europe and embarked upon a great crusade with knives and rifles in hand. The Rangers scaled the cliffs of Normandy, the 101st Airborne leapt into the danger from above illuminated only by enemy flares explosions and burning aircraft. They threw back the Nazi empire with lightning of their own from the turrets of Sherman tanks and the barrels of the M1 rifle. In the darkness of the Battle of the Bulge with Nazis on every side, one soldier is reported to have said they've got us surrounded again. The poor bastards. 19:19:41 Outnumbered American warriors fought through the bunkers of Pork Chop Hill and held the line of civilization in Korea. In the elephant grass of Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry made a stand amid a forest consumed in flames with enemies at every single turn. The army brought America's righteous fury down to al-Qaida in Afghanistan and cleared the bloodthirsty killers from their caves. They liberated Fallujah and Mosul and helped liberate and obliterate the ISIS caliphate just recently in Syria. One hundred percent gone. Through centuries our soldiers have always pointed toward home proclaiming this we'll defend. They live by the creed of Douglas MacArthur in war. There is no substitute for victory. They are the greatest soldiers on Earth. 19:21:48 Nearly 250 years ago. A volunteer army of farmers and shopkeepers, blacksmith, merchants, and militiamen risked life and limb to secure American liberty and self-government. This evening we have witnessed the noble might of the warriors who continue that legacy. They guard our birthright with vigilance and fierce devotion to the flag and to our great country. Now we must go forward as a nation with that same unity of purpose. As long as we stay true to our cause, as long as we remember our great history, as long as we never ever stop fighting for a better future, then there will be nothing that America can not do. We will always be the people who defeated a tyrant across the continent, harness science, took to the skies, and soared into the heavens because we will never forget that we are Americans and the future belongs to us. 19:23:27 The future belongs to the brave, the strong, the proud, and the free. We are one people chasing one dream and one magnificent destiny. We all share the same heroes, the same home, the same heart. And we are all made by the same Almighty God. On the banks of the Chesapeake to the cliffs of California. From the humming shores of the Great Lakes to the sand dunes of the Carolinas from the fields of the heartland to the Everglades of Florida, the spirit of American independence will never fade, never fail, but will reign for ever and ever and ever. 19:24:34 So once more, to every citizen throughout our land, have a glorious Independence Day. Have a great Fourth of July. I want to thank the Army band, The National Park Service, the Interior Department, the incredible pilots overhead. and those who are making possible the amazing fireworks display later this evening. Now as the band plays the Battle Hymn of the Republic, I invite the First Lady, Vice President and Mrs. Pence, the service secretaries, and military leaders to join me on stage for one more salute to America by the famous, incredible, talented Blue Angels. God bless you. God bless the military. And God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.
BLUES MUSIC
GUS CANNON introduced and speaks
BLUES MUSIC
FURRY LEWIS, GUS CANNON (NO AUDIO)
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SALUTE TO AMERICA: SWITCHED 1815 - END
1600 THREE CAM SWITCHED POOL FS1 81 1800 THREE CAM SWITCHED POOL FS1 81 NBC POOL Thursday, July 4, 2019 President Trump's Salute to America Remarks AR: 16x9 NYRS: WASH-3 18:38:39 Hello America. Hello. The first lady and I wish each and every one of you a happy Independence Day on this truly historic Fourth of July. Today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to America. We celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend our flag: the brave men and women of the United States military. We are pleased to have with us Vice President Mike Pence and his wonderful wife Karen. We're also joined by many hardworking members of Congress, acting secretary of defense Mark Esper and many other members of my Cabinet and also the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joe Dunford. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. 18:39:49 Lieutenant General Daniel Hokanson of the National Guard and distinguished leaders representing each branch of the United States Armed Forces: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines and, very soon, the Space Force. As we gather this evening in the joy of freedom, we remember that all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told: the story of America. It is the epic tale of a great nation whose people have risked everything for what they know is right and what they know is true. 18:40:35 It is the chronicle of brave citizens who never give up on the dream of a better and brighter future. And it is the saga of 13 separate colonies that united to form the most just and virtuous republic ever conceived. On this day, two hundred and forty three years ago, our founding fathers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to declare independence and defend God given rights. Thomas Jefferson wrote the words that forever changed the course of humanity: We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 18:41:44 With a single sheet of parchment and 56 signatures America began the greatest political journey in human history. But on that day the patriots, who would determine the ultimate success of the struggle, were a hundred miles away in New York. There the Continental Army prepared to make its stand. Commanded by the beloved General George Washington. As the delegates debated the declaration in Philadelphia, Washington's army watched from Manhattan as a massive British invading fleet loomed dangerously across New York Harbor. The British had come to crush the revolution in its infancy. Washington's message to his troops laid bare the stakes. He wrote, "the fate of unborn millions will now depend under God on the courage and conduct of this army. We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die." 18:43:04 Days later, General Washington ordered the declaration read aloud to the troops, the assembled soldiers just joined an excited crowd running down Broadway. They toppled a statue of King George and melted it into bullets for battle. The faraway king would soon learn a timeless lesson about the people of this majestic land. Americans love our freedom and no one will ever take it away from us. That same American spirit that emboldened our founders has kept us strong throughout our history. To this day that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot. It lives on and each and every one of you here today. It is this spirit, daring and defiance, excellence and adventure, courage and confidence, loyalty and love that built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world and our nation is stronger today than it ever was before. It is its strongest now. 18:44:50 That same righteous American spirit forged our glorious constitution. That rugged American character led the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark on their perilous expedition across an untamed continent. It drove others to journey west and stake out their claim on the wild frontier. Devotion to our founding ideals led American patriots to abolish the evil of slavery, secure civil rights and expand the blessings of liberty to all Americans. This is the noble purpose that inspired Abraham Lincoln to rededicate our nation to a new birth of freedom and to resolve that we will always have a government of, by, and for the people. 18:45:53 Our quest for greatness unleashed a culture of discovery that led Thomas Edison to imagine his light bulb, Alexander Graham Bell to create the telephone, The Wright brothers to look to the sky and see the next great frontier. We're Americans. Nothing is impossible. Exactly 50 years ago this month the world watched in awe as Apollo 11 astronauts launched into space with a wake of fire and nerves of steel and planted our great American flag on the face of the moon. Half a century later, we are thrilled to have here tonight the famed NASA flight director who led mission control during that historic endeavor. The renowned Gene Kranz. 18:47:13 Gene. I want you to know that we are going to be back on the moon very soon and someday soon we will plant the American flag on Mars. It's happening, Gene. It's happened. Our nation's creativity and genius lit up the lights of Broadway and the soundstages of Hollywood. It filled the concert halls and airwaves around the world with the sound of jazz, opera, country, rock and roll, and rhythm and blues. It gave birth to the musical, the motion picture, the Western, the World Series, the Super Bowl, the skyscraper, the suspension bridge, the assembly line, and the mighty American automobile. 18:48:05 It led our citizens to push the bounds of medicine and science to save the lives of millions. Here with us this evening is Dr. Emanuel Friar Reich. When Emanuel began his work. Ninety nine percent of children with leukemia died. Thanks largely to Dr. Fryer Reich's breakthrough treatments, currently 90 percent of those with the most common childhood leukemia survive. Doctor you are a great American hero. Thank you. 18:48:57 Americans always take care of each other. That love and unity held together the first pilgrims, it forged communities on the Great Plains, It inspired Clara Barton to found the Red Cross, and it keeps our nation thriving today. Here tonight from the Florida Panhandle is Tina Belcher. Her selfless generosity over three decades has made her known to all as Mrs. Angel. Every time a hurricane strikes, Mrs. Angel turns her tiny kitchen into a disaster relief center. On a single day after Hurricane Michael, she gave four hundred and seventy six people a warm meal. Mrs. Angel, your boundless heart inspires us all. Thank you. Thank you very much. 18:50:10 From our earliest days, Americans of faith have uplifted our nation. This evening we're joined by Sister Deirdre Byrne. Sister Byrne is a retired Army surgeon who served for nearly 30 years. On September 11 2001, the sister raced to Ground Zero through smoke and debris. She administered first aid and comfort to all. Today, Sister Byrne runs a medical clinic serving the poor in our nation's capital. Sister, thank you for your lifetime of service. Thank you. Our nation has always honored the heroes who serve our communities. The firefighters, first responders, police sheriffs, ICE, Border Patrol, and all of the brave men and women of law enforcement. 18:51:18 On this July 4, we pay special tribute to the military, service members, who laid down their lives for our nation. We are deeply moved to be in the presence this evening of Gold Star families whose loved ones made the supreme sacrifice. Thank you. Thank you very much. Throughout our history our country has been made ever greater by citizens who risked it all for equality and for justice. One hundred years ago this summer, the women's suffrage movement led Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. 18:52:31 In 1960, a thirst for justice led African-American students to sit down at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. It was one of the very first civil rights sit ins snd it started a movement all across our nation. Clarence Henderson was 18 years old when he took his place in history. Almost six decades later, he is here tonight in a seat of honor. Clarence. Thank you for making this country a much better place for all Americans. In 1963, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr stood here on these very steps and called on our nation to live out the true meaning of its creed and let freedom ring for every citizen all across our land. 18:53:42 America's fearless resolve has inspired heroes who defined our national character from George Washington, John Adams, and Betsy Ross to - Douglass - you know Frederick Douglass - the great Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower, Jackie Robinson, and, of course, John Glenn. It is willed our warriors up mountains and across minefields, it has liberated continents, split the atom, and brought tyrants and empires to their knees. Here with us this evening is Earl Morse. After retiring from the Air Force, Earl worked at a V.A. hospital in Ohio. Earl found that many World War Two veterans could not afford to visit their memorial on the National Mall. So Earl began the very first honor flights that have now brought over two hundred thousand World War Two heroes to visit America's monument. Thank you. We salute you. Thank you. 18:55:07 Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Our warriors from a hollowed roll call of American Patriots running all the way back to the first souls who fought and won American independence. Today just as it did, two hundred and forty three years ago the future of American freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it. We are proudly joined tonight by heroes from each branch of the US armed forces, including three recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you. They and thousands before us served with immense distinction. And they loved every minute of that service. To young Americans across our country, now is your chance to join our military and make a truly great statement in life. And you should do it. 18:56:24 We will now begin our celebration of the United States Armed Forces, honoring each branch's unique culture, rich history, service, song, and distinct legacy. I invite Acting Secretary, please Mark Esper, Secretary of Defense. And Chairman Dunford, head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Please join me. 18:57:04 In August of 1790, by request of George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Congress established a fleet of 10 swift vessels to defend our shores. These revenue cutters would fight pirates, stop smugglers, and safeguard our borders. They are the ancestors of our faithful Coast Guard. When our ships were seized and sailors kidnapped by foreign powers in 1812, it was a revenue cutter, the swift schooner Thomas Jefferson that swept in to capture the first British vessel of the war. In 1897, when two hundred and sixty five whalers were trapped in ice and the ice fields of Alaska were closing up, courageous officers trekked fifteen hundred miles through the frozen frontier to rescue those starving men from certain death. 18:58:06 In 1942, the Coast Guard manned landing craft were invasions in the Pacific. When the enemy attacked US Marines from the shores of Guadalcanal, Coast Guard singleman first class Douglas Munro used his own boat to shield his comrades from pounding gunfire. Munro gave his life. Hundreds of Marines were saved as he lay dying on the deck. His final question embodies devotion that sails with every coast guardsmen. Did they get off. 18:58:46 On D-Day, the Coast Guard's famous matchbox fleet served valiantly through every hour of the greatest amphibious invasion in the history of our country. One coxswain said the water boiled with bullets like a mud puddle in hailstone, but still the Coast Guard braved death to put our boys on Utah and Omaha beaches. Every coast guardsmen is trusted to put service before all. Coasties plunge from helicopters and barrel through pouring rain and crashing waves to save American lives. They secure our borders from drug runners and terrorists in rough seas at high speeds. Their sharpshooters take out smugglers engines with a single shot. They never miss when the red racing stripes of a Coast Guard vessel break the horizon. When their chopper blades pierced the sky, those in distress know that the help is on their way and our enemies know their time has come. Guardians of our waters stand. Semper Paradis. 19:00:10 They are always ready. They are the United States Coast Guard. Representing the Coast Guard today, you will soon see an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter based at Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater along with an HH-65 Dolphin from Air Station Atlantic City and an AC 140 Ocean Sentry from Air Station Miami. 19:02:10 Thank you. Thank you to the Coast Guard. On a cold December morning in 1903, a miracle occurred over the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. When two bicycle makers from Ohio defied gravity with a 12 horsepower engine, wings made of cotton, and just a few dollars in their pockets. Just six years later, America was training its first pilots to take these magnificent machines up and over the field of battle in World War One. Our flyboys rushed the skies of Europe, and aces like Eddie Rickenbacker filled hearts and headlines with tales of daring duels in the clouds. General Billy Mitchell saw the promise of this technology and risk court martial in his quest for an independent air force. He was proven right. When empires across the oceans tried to carve up the world for themselves and America stood in the way. We wouldn't let it happen. 19:03:23 After Pearl Harbor, Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle and his raiders flew B-25 bombers off a carrier deck in the deep Pacific in a daring feat of American resolve. And as President Roosevelt said, the Nazis built a fortress around Europe but they forgot to put a roof on it. So we crushed them all from the air. 177 liberator bombers flew dangerously low through broad daylight without fighter protection to cripple the Nazi war machine at inaudible more than 300 airmen gave their lives to destroy the enemy oil refineries and five pilots were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their actions in that single raid. 19:04:21 It was airman Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier. It was airmen, like Gus Grissom and Buzz Aldrin who traded their sabre jets for rockets to the stars. And it is our incredible airmen today who wield the most powerful weapon systems on the planet Earth. For over sixty five years, no enemy air force has managed to kill a single American soldier because the skies belong to the United States of America. No enemy has attacked our people without being met by a roar of thunder and the awesome might of those who bid farewell to earth. And soar into the wild blue yonder. They are the United States Air Force. Representing the Air Force you will soon see beautiful brand new F-22 Raptors from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. And one magnificent B-2 stealth bomber from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. 19:07:20 What a great country. In October of 1775, the continental Congress ordered the construction of two swift sailing vessels each carrying 10 cannons and 80 men to sail eastward. Our young fleet tested their sea legs against the most powerful navy the world has ever seen. John Paul Jones, America's first great naval hero, said I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm's way. He got his wish many times when his ship was shot into pieces off the coast of England by a British vessel and her four dozen guns. When demanded to surrender, Jones very famously declared I have not yet begun to fight. When our Navy begins fighting they finish the job. 19:08:30 The War of 1812, Captain James Lance fell with his brothers on the USS Chesapeake. His dying command gained immortality. Don't give up the ship. In the Battle of Mobile Bay, Admiral David Farragut lashed himself to the rigging of his flagship to see beyond the cannon smoke, crying "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." In World War 2, it was aviators launched from the carrier Enterprise, Hornet, Yorktown who filled the skies of Midway and turned the tide of the Pacific War. Nobody could beat us. Nobody could come close. On D-Day, CB engineers came ashore to destroy blockades and barriers making way for the invasion. Many lost their lives, but they took the German defenses with them and our men crushed upon the beaches like a mighty storm. 19:09:41 From the Naval demolition units of World War 2, a rose a force that became famous in the Mekong Delta. They don't want to see our force again. The very best of the very best: the Navy SEALs. It was SEALs who delivered vengeance on the terrorists who planned the September 11th attack on our homeland. It was the SEALs who stand ready to bring righteous retribution in mountain jungles desert to those who do us harm. America's sailors are not born. They are forged by the sea. Their traditions are rich with the salt and blood of three centuries when Old Glory crest the waves of foreign shores. Every friend and every foe knows that Justice sails those waters. It sails with the United States Navy. Representing our great Navy today will be two F-18 Super Hornets from Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia, along with two F35 Lightnings from Naval Air Station Lemoore in California. 19:11:56 So great. In November of 1775, the continental congress created two battalions of a new kind of warrior one who kept and would protect our ships and sailors and be at home both the shore and in the mast with musket in hand. Their versatility was proven in the War of Independence when two hundred and thirty four continental Marines conducted their first amphibious raid. capturing the British supply of gunpowder and cannons at Fort Nassau. Ever since Marines have fought in every American war. Their legend has grown and grown and grown with each passing year. It was the Marines who won America's first overseas battle vanquishing Barbary pirates on the shores of Tripoli. Their high stiff collar, which shielded them from the pirate sword earned them the immortal name Leatherneck. 19:13:05 It was the Marines who after two long days of battle marched through the halls of Montezuma. It was the Marines who took heavy casualties to kick the Kaiser's troops out of Bellwood in World War One, earning the title "Devil Dogs". And it was the Marines who raised the flag on the Black Sands of Iwo Jima. From the Chosin reservoir to Khe Sanh from Helmand to Baghdad, Marines have struck fear into the hearts of our enemies and put solace into the hearts of our friends. Marines always lead the way. After the 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Beirut, which claimed the lives of two hundred and forty one great U.S. servicemen, Marine Sergeant Jeffery Nashton lay in bandages, so badly wounded barely alive. When the commandant of the Marine Corps came to visit his hospital, Sergeant Nashton had to feel for the general's collar. He wanted to feel his four stars. He could not see and he could not speak. He signaled for pen and paper and with shaking hand he wrote two words Semper Fi. 19:14:50 That motto. Semper fidelis Always faithful burns in the soul of every Marine. A sacred promise. The Corps has kept since the birth of our country. They are the elite masters of air and land and sea on battlefields all across the globe. They are the United States Marines. Representing the Marine Corps today will be a brand new VH92, soon to serve as Marine One. Along with two V22 Ospreys from the famed HMX-1 helicopter squadron at Quantico, the Nighthawks. 19:17:04 In June of 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified army out of the revolutionary forces encamped around Boston and New York and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief. The Continental Army suffered a bitter winter of Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware, and seized victory from Cornwallis of Yorktown. Our army manned the air, it ran the ramparts, it took over the airports it did everything it had to do. And at Fort McHenry, under the rockets red glare, it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came their star spangled banner waved defiant. 19:18:00 At Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg our soldiers gave the last full measure of devotion for the true unity of our nation and the freedom of all Americans. In the trenches of World War One, an Army sergeant named Alvin York faced an inferno of enemy fire and refused to retreat. He said I won't leave. I won't stop. He shot his rifle 18 times killing 18 of the enemy. When they fixed bayonets and charged, he killed seven more. The entire German machine gun battalion surrendered because of one man Alvin York. 19:18:46 A generation later, the army returned to Europe and embarked upon a great crusade with knives and rifles in hand. The Rangers scaled the cliffs of Normandy, the 101st Airborne leapt into the danger from above illuminated only by enemy flares explosions and burning aircraft. They threw back the Nazi empire with lightning of their own from the turrets of Sherman tanks and the barrels of the M1 rifle. In the darkness of the Battle of the Bulge with Nazis on every side, one soldier is reported to have said they've got us surrounded again. The poor bastards. 19:19:41 Outnumbered American warriors fought through the bunkers of Pork Chop Hill and held the line of civilization in Korea. In the elephant grass of Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry made a stand amid a forest consumed in flames with enemies at every single turn. The army brought America's righteous fury down to al-Qaida in Afghanistan and cleared the bloodthirsty killers from their caves. They liberated Fallujah and Mosul and helped liberate and obliterate the ISIS caliphate just recently in Syria. One hundred percent gone. Through centuries our soldiers have always pointed toward home proclaiming this we'll defend. They live by the creed of Douglas MacArthur in war. There is no substitute for victory. They are the greatest soldiers on Earth. 19:21:48 Nearly 250 years ago. A volunteer army of farmers and shopkeepers, blacksmith, merchants, and militiamen risked life and limb to secure American liberty and self-government. This evening we have witnessed the noble might of the warriors who continue that legacy. They guard our birthright with vigilance and fierce devotion to the flag and to our great country. Now we must go forward as a nation with that same unity of purpose. As long as we stay true to our cause, as long as we remember our great history, as long as we never ever stop fighting for a better future, then there will be nothing that America can not do. We will always be the people who defeated a tyrant across the continent, harness science, took to the skies, and soared into the heavens because we will never forget that we are Americans and the future belongs to us. 19:23:27 The future belongs to the brave, the strong, the proud, and the free. We are one people chasing one dream and one magnificent destiny. We all share the same heroes, the same home, the same heart. And we are all made by the same Almighty God. On the banks of the Chesapeake to the cliffs of California. From the humming shores of the Great Lakes to the sand dunes of the Carolinas from the fields of the heartland to the Everglades of Florida, the spirit of American independence will never fade, never fail, but will reign for ever and ever and ever. 19:24:34 So once more, to every citizen throughout our land, have a glorious Independence Day. Have a great Fourth of July. I want to thank the Army band, The National Park Service, the Interior Department, the incredible pilots overhead. and those who are making possible the amazing fireworks display later this evening. Now as the band plays the Battle Hymn of the Republic, I invite the First Lady, Vice President and Mrs. Pence, the service secretaries, and military leaders to join me on stage for one more salute to America by the famous, incredible, talented Blue Angels. God bless you. God bless the military. And God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.
BLUES MUSIC
FURRY LEWIS, GUS CANNON (NO AUDIO)
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SALUTE TO AMERICA: CUTS 1815 - END
1700 WH SALUTE TO AMERICA CUTS FS24 74 1900 WH SALUTE TO AMERICA CUTS FS24 74 NBC POOL Thursday, July 4, 2019 President Trump's Salute to America Remarks AR: 16x9 NYRS: WASH-3 18:38:39 Hello America. Hello. The first lady and I wish each and every one of you a happy Independence Day on this truly historic Fourth of July. Today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to America. We celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend our flag: the brave men and women of the United States military. We are pleased to have with us Vice President Mike Pence and his wonderful wife Karen. We're also joined by many hardworking members of Congress, acting secretary of defense Mark Esper and many other members of my Cabinet and also the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joe Dunford. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. 18:39:49 Lieutenant General Daniel Hokanson of the National Guard and distinguished leaders representing each branch of the United States Armed Forces: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines and, very soon, the Space Force. As we gather this evening in the joy of freedom, we remember that all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told: the story of America. It is the epic tale of a great nation whose people have risked everything for what they know is right and what they know is true. 18:40:35 It is the chronicle of brave citizens who never give up on the dream of a better and brighter future. And it is the saga of 13 separate colonies that united to form the most just and virtuous republic ever conceived. On this day, two hundred and forty three years ago, our founding fathers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to declare independence and defend God given rights. Thomas Jefferson wrote the words that forever changed the course of humanity: We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 18:41:44 With a single sheet of parchment and 56 signatures America began the greatest political journey in human history. But on that day the patriots, who would determine the ultimate success of the struggle, were a hundred miles away in New York. There the Continental Army prepared to make its stand. Commanded by the beloved General George Washington. As the delegates debated the declaration in Philadelphia, Washington's army watched from Manhattan as a massive British invading fleet loomed dangerously across New York Harbor. The British had come to crush the revolution in its infancy. Washington's message to his troops laid bare the stakes. He wrote, "the fate of unborn millions will now depend under God on the courage and conduct of this army. We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die." 18:43:04 Days later, General Washington ordered the declaration read aloud to the troops, the assembled soldiers just joined an excited crowd running down Broadway. They toppled a statue of King George and melted it into bullets for battle. The faraway king would soon learn a timeless lesson about the people of this majestic land. Americans love our freedom and no one will ever take it away from us. That same American spirit that emboldened our founders has kept us strong throughout our history. To this day that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot. It lives on and each and every one of you here today. It is this spirit, daring and defiance, excellence and adventure, courage and confidence, loyalty and love that built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world and our nation is stronger today than it ever was before. It is its strongest now. 18:44:50 That same righteous American spirit forged our glorious constitution. That rugged American character led the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark on their perilous expedition across an untamed continent. It drove others to journey west and stake out their claim on the wild frontier. Devotion to our founding ideals led American patriots to abolish the evil of slavery, secure civil rights and expand the blessings of liberty to all Americans. This is the noble purpose that inspired Abraham Lincoln to rededicate our nation to a new birth of freedom and to resolve that we will always have a government of, by, and for the people. 18:45:53 Our quest for greatness unleashed a culture of discovery that led Thomas Edison to imagine his light bulb, Alexander Graham Bell to create the telephone, The Wright brothers to look to the sky and see the next great frontier. We're Americans. Nothing is impossible. Exactly 50 years ago this month the world watched in awe as Apollo 11 astronauts launched into space with a wake of fire and nerves of steel and planted our great American flag on the face of the moon. Half a century later, we are thrilled to have here tonight the famed NASA flight director who led mission control during that historic endeavor. The renowned Gene Kranz. 18:47:13 Gene. I want you to know that we are going to be back on the moon very soon and someday soon we will plant the American flag on Mars. It's happening, Gene. It's happened. Our nation's creativity and genius lit up the lights of Broadway and the soundstages of Hollywood. It filled the concert halls and airwaves around the world with the sound of jazz, opera, country, rock and roll, and rhythm and blues. It gave birth to the musical, the motion picture, the Western, the World Series, the Super Bowl, the skyscraper, the suspension bridge, the assembly line, and the mighty American automobile. 18:48:05 It led our citizens to push the bounds of medicine and science to save the lives of millions. Here with us this evening is Dr. Emanuel Friar Reich. When Emanuel began his work. Ninety nine percent of children with leukemia died. Thanks largely to Dr. Fryer Reich's breakthrough treatments, currently 90 percent of those with the most common childhood leukemia survive. Doctor you are a great American hero. Thank you. 18:48:57 Americans always take care of each other. That love and unity held together the first pilgrims, it forged communities on the Great Plains, It inspired Clara Barton to found the Red Cross, and it keeps our nation thriving today. Here tonight from the Florida Panhandle is Tina Belcher. Her selfless generosity over three decades has made her known to all as Mrs. Angel. Every time a hurricane strikes, Mrs. Angel turns her tiny kitchen into a disaster relief center. On a single day after Hurricane Michael, she gave four hundred and seventy six people a warm meal. Mrs. Angel, your boundless heart inspires us all. Thank you. Thank you very much. 18:50:10 From our earliest days, Americans of faith have uplifted our nation. This evening we're joined by Sister Deirdre Byrne. Sister Byrne is a retired Army surgeon who served for nearly 30 years. On September 11 2001, the sister raced to Ground Zero through smoke and debris. She administered first aid and comfort to all. Today, Sister Byrne runs a medical clinic serving the poor in our nation's capital. Sister, thank you for your lifetime of service. Thank you. Our nation has always honored the heroes who serve our communities. The firefighters, first responders, police sheriffs, ICE, Border Patrol, and all of the brave men and women of law enforcement. 18:51:18 On this July 4, we pay special tribute to the military, service members, who laid down their lives for our nation. We are deeply moved to be in the presence this evening of Gold Star families whose loved ones made the supreme sacrifice. Thank you. Thank you very much. Throughout our history our country has been made ever greater by citizens who risked it all for equality and for justice. One hundred years ago this summer, the women's suffrage movement led Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. 18:52:31 In 1960, a thirst for justice led African-American students to sit down at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. It was one of the very first civil rights sit ins snd it started a movement all across our nation. Clarence Henderson was 18 years old when he took his place in history. Almost six decades later, he is here tonight in a seat of honor. Clarence. Thank you for making this country a much better place for all Americans. In 1963, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr stood here on these very steps and called on our nation to live out the true meaning of its creed and let freedom ring for every citizen all across our land. 18:53:42 America's fearless resolve has inspired heroes who defined our national character from George Washington, John Adams, and Betsy Ross to - Douglass - you know Frederick Douglass - the great Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower, Jackie Robinson, and, of course, John Glenn. It is willed our warriors up mountains and across minefields, it has liberated continents, split the atom, and brought tyrants and empires to their knees. Here with us this evening is Earl Morse. After retiring from the Air Force, Earl worked at a V.A. hospital in Ohio. Earl found that many World War Two veterans could not afford to visit their memorial on the National Mall. So Earl began the very first honor flights that have now brought over two hundred thousand World War Two heroes to visit America's monument. Thank you. We salute you. Thank you. 18:55:07 Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Our warriors from a hollowed roll call of American Patriots running all the way back to the first souls who fought and won American independence. Today just as it did, two hundred and forty three years ago the future of American freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it. We are proudly joined tonight by heroes from each branch of the US armed forces, including three recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you. They and thousands before us served with immense distinction. And they loved every minute of that service. To young Americans across our country, now is your chance to join our military and make a truly great statement in life. And you should do it. 18:56:24 We will now begin our celebration of the United States Armed Forces, honoring each branch's unique culture, rich history, service, song, and distinct legacy. I invite Acting Secretary, please Mark Esper, Secretary of Defense. And Chairman Dunford, head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Please join me. 18:57:04 In August of 1790, by request of George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Congress established a fleet of 10 swift vessels to defend our shores. These revenue cutters would fight pirates, stop smugglers, and safeguard our borders. They are the ancestors of our faithful Coast Guard. When our ships were seized and sailors kidnapped by foreign powers in 1812, it was a revenue cutter, the swift schooner Thomas Jefferson that swept in to capture the first British vessel of the war. In 1897, when two hundred and sixty five whalers were trapped in ice and the ice fields of Alaska were closing up, courageous officers trekked fifteen hundred miles through the frozen frontier to rescue those starving men from certain death. 18:58:06 In 1942, the Coast Guard manned landing craft were invasions in the Pacific. When the enemy attacked US Marines from the shores of Guadalcanal, Coast Guard singleman first class Douglas Munro used his own boat to shield his comrades from pounding gunfire. Munro gave his life. Hundreds of Marines were saved as he lay dying on the deck. His final question embodies devotion that sails with every coast guardsmen. Did they get off. 18:58:46 On D-Day, the Coast Guard's famous matchbox fleet served valiantly through every hour of the greatest amphibious invasion in the history of our country. One coxswain said the water boiled with bullets like a mud puddle in hailstone, but still the Coast Guard braved death to put our boys on Utah and Omaha beaches. Every coast guardsmen is trusted to put service before all. Coasties plunge from helicopters and barrel through pouring rain and crashing waves to save American lives. They secure our borders from drug runners and terrorists in rough seas at high speeds. Their sharpshooters take out smugglers engines with a single shot. They never miss when the red racing stripes of a Coast Guard vessel break the horizon. When their chopper blades pierced the sky, those in distress know that the help is on their way and our enemies know their time has come. Guardians of our waters stand. Semper Paradis. 19:00:10 They are always ready. They are the United States Coast Guard. Representing the Coast Guard today, you will soon see an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter based at Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater along with an HH-65 Dolphin from Air Station Atlantic City and an AC 140 Ocean Sentry from Air Station Miami. 19:02:10 Thank you. Thank you to the Coast Guard. On a cold December morning in 1903, a miracle occurred over the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. When two bicycle makers from Ohio defied gravity with a 12 horsepower engine, wings made of cotton, and just a few dollars in their pockets. Just six years later, America was training its first pilots to take these magnificent machines up and over the field of battle in World War One. Our flyboys rushed the skies of Europe, and aces like Eddie Rickenbacker filled hearts and headlines with tales of daring duels in the clouds. General Billy Mitchell saw the promise of this technology and risk court martial in his quest for an independent air force. He was proven right. When empires across the oceans tried to carve up the world for themselves and America stood in the way. We wouldn't let it happen. 19:03:23 After Pearl Harbor, Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle and his raiders flew B-25 bombers off a carrier deck in the deep Pacific in a daring feat of American resolve. And as President Roosevelt said, the Nazis built a fortress around Europe but they forgot to put a roof on it. So we crushed them all from the air. 177 liberator bombers flew dangerously low through broad daylight without fighter protection to cripple the Nazi war machine at inaudible more than 300 airmen gave their lives to destroy the enemy oil refineries and five pilots were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their actions in that single raid. 19:04:21 It was airman Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier. It was airmen, like Gus Grissom and Buzz Aldrin who traded their sabre jets for rockets to the stars. And it is our incredible airmen today who wield the most powerful weapon systems on the planet Earth. For over sixty five years, no enemy air force has managed to kill a single American soldier because the skies belong to the United States of America. No enemy has attacked our people without being met by a roar of thunder and the awesome might of those who bid farewell to earth. And soar into the wild blue yonder. They are the United States Air Force. Representing the Air Force you will soon see beautiful brand new F-22 Raptors from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. And one magnificent B-2 stealth bomber from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. 19:07:20 What a great country. In October of 1775, the continental Congress ordered the construction of two swift sailing vessels each carrying 10 cannons and 80 men to sail eastward. Our young fleet tested their sea legs against the most powerful navy the world has ever seen. John Paul Jones, America's first great naval hero, said I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm's way. He got his wish many times when his ship was shot into pieces off the coast of England by a British vessel and her four dozen guns. When demanded to surrender, Jones very famously declared I have not yet begun to fight. When our Navy begins fighting they finish the job. 19:08:30 The War of 1812, Captain James Lance fell with his brothers on the USS Chesapeake. His dying command gained immortality. Don't give up the ship. In the Battle of Mobile Bay, Admiral David Farragut lashed himself to the rigging of his flagship to see beyond the cannon smoke, crying "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." In World War 2, it was aviators launched from the carrier Enterprise, Hornet, Yorktown who filled the skies of Midway and turned the tide of the Pacific War. Nobody could beat us. Nobody could come close. On D-Day, CB engineers came ashore to destroy blockades and barriers making way for the invasion. Many lost their lives, but they took the German defenses with them and our men crushed upon the beaches like a mighty storm. 19:09:41 From the Naval demolition units of World War 2, a rose a force that became famous in the Mekong Delta. They don't want to see our force again. The very best of the very best: the Navy SEALs. It was SEALs who delivered vengeance on the terrorists who planned the September 11th attack on our homeland. It was the SEALs who stand ready to bring righteous retribution in mountain jungles desert to those who do us harm. America's sailors are not born. They are forged by the sea. Their traditions are rich with the salt and blood of three centuries when Old Glory crest the waves of foreign shores. Every friend and every foe knows that Justice sails those waters. It sails with the United States Navy. Representing our great Navy today will be two F-18 Super Hornets from Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia, along with two F35 Lightnings from Naval Air Station Lemoore in California. 19:11:56 So great. In November of 1775, the continental congress created two battalions of a new kind of warrior one who kept and would protect our ships and sailors and be at home both the shore and in the mast with musket in hand. Their versatility was proven in the War of Independence when two hundred and thirty four continental Marines conducted their first amphibious raid. capturing the British supply of gunpowder and cannons at Fort Nassau. Ever since Marines have fought in every American war. Their legend has grown and grown and grown with each passing year. It was the Marines who won America's first overseas battle vanquishing Barbary pirates on the shores of Tripoli. Their high stiff collar, which shielded them from the pirate sword earned them the immortal name Leatherneck. 19:13:05 It was the Marines who after two long days of battle marched through the halls of Montezuma. It was the Marines who took heavy casualties to kick the Kaiser's troops out of Bellwood in World War One, earning the title "Devil Dogs". And it was the Marines who raised the flag on the Black Sands of Iwo Jima. From the Chosin reservoir to Khe Sanh from Helmand to Baghdad, Marines have struck fear into the hearts of our enemies and put solace into the hearts of our friends. Marines always lead the way. After the 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Beirut, which claimed the lives of two hundred and forty one great U.S. servicemen, Marine Sergeant Jeffery Nashton lay in bandages, so badly wounded barely alive. When the commandant of the Marine Corps came to visit his hospital, Sergeant Nashton had to feel for the general's collar. He wanted to feel his four stars. He could not see and he could not speak. He signaled for pen and paper and with shaking hand he wrote two words Semper Fi. 19:14:50 That motto. Semper fidelis Always faithful burns in the soul of every Marine. A sacred promise. The Corps has kept since the birth of our country. They are the elite masters of air and land and sea on battlefields all across the globe. They are the United States Marines. Representing the Marine Corps today will be a brand new VH92, soon to serve as Marine One. Along with two V22 Ospreys from the famed HMX-1 helicopter squadron at Quantico, the Nighthawks. 19:17:04 In June of 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified army out of the revolutionary forces encamped around Boston and New York and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief. The Continental Army suffered a bitter winter of Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware, and seized victory from Cornwallis of Yorktown. Our army manned the air, it ran the ramparts, it took over the airports it did everything it had to do. And at Fort McHenry, under the rockets red glare, it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came their star spangled banner waved defiant. 19:18:00 At Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg our soldiers gave the last full measure of devotion for the true unity of our nation and the freedom of all Americans. In the trenches of World War One, an Army sergeant named Alvin York faced an inferno of enemy fire and refused to retreat. He said I won't leave. I won't stop. He shot his rifle 18 times killing 18 of the enemy. When they fixed bayonets and charged, he killed seven more. The entire German machine gun battalion surrendered because of one man Alvin York. 19:18:46 A generation later, the army returned to Europe and embarked upon a great crusade with knives and rifles in hand. The Rangers scaled the cliffs of Normandy, the 101st Airborne leapt into the danger from above illuminated only by enemy flares explosions and burning aircraft. They threw back the Nazi empire with lightning of their own from the turrets of Sherman tanks and the barrels of the M1 rifle. In the darkness of the Battle of the Bulge with Nazis on every side, one soldier is reported to have said they've got us surrounded again. The poor bastards. 19:19:41 Outnumbered American warriors fought through the bunkers of Pork Chop Hill and held the line of civilization in Korea. In the elephant grass of Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry made a stand amid a forest consumed in flames with enemies at every single turn. The army brought America's righteous fury down to al-Qaida in Afghanistan and cleared the bloodthirsty killers from their caves. They liberated Fallujah and Mosul and helped liberate and obliterate the ISIS caliphate just recently in Syria. One hundred percent gone. Through centuries our soldiers have always pointed toward home proclaiming this we'll defend. They live by the creed of Douglas MacArthur in war. There is no substitute for victory. They are the greatest soldiers on Earth. 19:21:48 Nearly 250 years ago. A volunteer army of farmers and shopkeepers, blacksmith, merchants, and militiamen risked life and limb to secure American liberty and self-government. This evening we have witnessed the noble might of the warriors who continue that legacy. They guard our birthright with vigilance and fierce devotion to the flag and to our great country. Now we must go forward as a nation with that same unity of purpose. As long as we stay true to our cause, as long as we remember our great history, as long as we never ever stop fighting for a better future, then there will be nothing that America can not do. We will always be the people who defeated a tyrant across the continent, harness science, took to the skies, and soared into the heavens because we will never forget that we are Americans and the future belongs to us. 19:23:27 The future belongs to the brave, the strong, the proud, and the free. We are one people chasing one dream and one magnificent destiny. We all share the same heroes, the same home, the same heart. And we are all made by the same Almighty God. On the banks of the Chesapeake to the cliffs of California. From the humming shores of the Great Lakes to the sand dunes of the Carolinas from the fields of the heartland to the Everglades of Florida, the spirit of American independence will never fade, never fail, but will reign for ever and ever and ever. 19:24:34 So once more, to every citizen throughout our land, have a glorious Independence Day. Have a great Fourth of July. I want to thank the Army band, The National Park Service, the Interior Department, the incredible pilots overhead. and those who are making possible the amazing fireworks display later this evening. Now as the band plays the Battle Hymn of the Republic, I invite the First Lady, Vice President and Mrs. Pence, the service secretaries, and military leaders to join me on stage for one more salute to America by the famous, incredible, talented Blue Angels. God bless you. God bless the military. And God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.
BLUES MUSIC
GUS CANNON & MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - (no title available) MEMPHIS WILLIE B. & GUS CANNON PLAY THE BLUES. GUS CANNON PLAYS JUG. CANNON'S JUG BAND
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP DEPARTS WHITE HOUSE TO SALUTE TO AMERICA EVENT
1815 WH DEPART FS25 75 UNITED STATES PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP TAKES MOTORCADE TO NATIONAL MALL TO GIVE HIS SPEECH AT THE "SALUTE TO FREEDOM" EVENT [18:38:39] Hello America. Hello. The first lady and I wish each and every one of you a happy Independence Day on this truly historic Fourth of July. Today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to America. We celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend our flag: the brave men and women of the United States military. We are pleased to have with us Vice President Mike Pence and his wonderful wife Karen. We're also joined by many hardworking members of Congress, acting secretary of defense Mark Esper and many other members of my Cabinet and also the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joe Dunford. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. [18:39:49] Lieutenant General Daniel Hokanson of the National Guard and distinguished leaders representing each branch of the United States Armed Forces: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines and, very soon, the Space Force. As we gather this evening in the joy of freedom, we remember that all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told: the story of America. It is the epic tale of a great nation whose people have risked everything for what they know is right and what they know is true. [18:40:35] It is the chronicle of brave citizens who never give up on the dream of a better and brighter future. And it is the saga of 13 separate colonies that united to form the most just and virtuous republic ever conceived. On this day, two hundred and forty three years ago, our founding fathers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to declare independence and defend God given rights. Thomas Jefferson wrote the words that forever changed the course of humanity: We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness. [18:41:44] With a single sheet of parchment and 56 signatures America began the greatest political journey in human history. But on that day the patriots, who would determine the ultimate success of the struggle, were a hundred miles away in New York. There the Continental Army prepared to make its stand. Commanded by the beloved General George Washington. As the delegates debated the declaration in Philadelphia, Washington's army watched from Manhattan as a massive British invading fleet loomed dangerously across New York Harbor. The British had come to crush the revolution in its infancy. Washington's message to his troops laid bare the stakes. He wrote, "the fate of unborn millions will now depend under God on the courage and conduct of this army. We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die." [18:43:04] Days later, General Washington ordered the declaration read aloud to the troops, the assembled soldiers just joined an excited crowd running down Broadway. They toppled a statue of King George and melted it into bullets for battle. The faraway king would soon learn a timeless lesson about the people of this majestic land. Americans love our freedom and no one will ever take it away from us. That same American spirit that emboldened our founders has kept us strong throughout our history. To this day that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot. It lives on and each and every one of you here today. It is this spirit, daring and defiance, excellence and adventure, courage and confidence, loyalty and love that built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world and our nation is stronger today than it ever was before. It is its strongest now. [18:44:50] That same righteous American spirit forged our glorious constitution. That rugged American character led the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark on their perilous expedition across an untamed continent. It drove others to journey west and stake out their claim on the wild frontier. Devotion to our founding ideals led American patriots to abolish the evil of slavery, secure civil rights and expand the blessings of liberty to all Americans. This is the noble purpose that inspired Abraham Lincoln to rededicate our nation to a new birth of freedom and to resolve that we will always have a government of, by, and for the people. [18:45:53] Our quest for greatness unleashed a culture of discovery that led Thomas Edison to imagine his light bulb, Alexander Graham Bell to create the telephone, The Wright brothers to look to the sky and see the next great frontier. We're Americans. Nothing is impossible. Exactly 50 years ago this month the world watched in awe as Apollo 11 astronauts launched into space with a wake of fire and nerves of steel and planted our great American flag on the face of the moon. Half a century later, we are thrilled to have here tonight the famed NASA flight director who led mission control during that historic endeavor. The renowned Gene Kranz. [18:47:13] Gene. I want you to know that we are going to be back on the moon very soon and someday soon we will plant the American flag on Mars. It's happening, Gene. It's happened. Our nation's creativity and genius lit up the lights of Broadway and the soundstages of Hollywood. It filled the concert halls and airwaves around the world with the sound of jazz, opera, country, rock and roll, and rhythm and blues. It gave birth to the musical, the motion picture, the Western, the World Series, the Super Bowl, the skyscraper, the suspension bridge, the assembly line, and the mighty American automobile. [18:48:05] It led our citizens to push the bounds of medicine and science to save the lives of millions. Here with us this evening is Dr. Emanuel Friar Reich. When Emanuel began his work. Ninety nine percent of children with leukemia died. Thanks largely to Dr. Fryer Reich's breakthrough treatments, currently 90 percent of those with the most common childhood leukemia survive. Doctor you are a great American hero. Thank you. [18:48:57] Americans always take care of each other. That love and unity held together the first pilgrims, it forged communities on the Great Plains, It inspired Clara Barton to found the Red Cross, and it keeps our nation thriving today. Here tonight from the Florida Panhandle is Tina Belcher. Her selfless generosity over three decades has made her known to all as Mrs. Angel. Every time a hurricane strikes, Mrs. Angel turns her tiny kitchen into a disaster relief center. On a single day after Hurricane Michael, she gave four hundred and seventy six people a warm meal. Mrs. Angel, your boundless heart inspires us all. Thank you. Thank you very much. [18:50:10] From our earliest days, Americans of faith have uplifted our nation. This evening we're joined by Sister Deirdre Byrne. Sister Byrne is a retired Army surgeon who served for nearly 30 years. On September 11 2001, the sister raced to Ground Zero through smoke and debris. She administered first aid and comfort to all. Today, Sister Byrne runs a medical clinic serving the poor in our nation's capital. Sister, thank you for your lifetime of service. Thank you. Our nation has always honored the heroes who serve our communities. The firefighters, first responders, police sheriffs, ICE, Border Patrol, and all of the brave men and women of law enforcement. [18:51:18] On this July 4, we pay special tribute to the military, service members, who laid down their lives for our nation. We are deeply moved to be in the presence this evening of Gold Star families whose loved ones made the supreme sacrifice. Thank you. Thank you very much. Throughout our history our country has been made ever greater by citizens who risked it all for equality and for justice. One hundred years ago this summer, the women's suffrage movement led Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. [18:52:31] In 1960, a thirst for justice led African-American students to sit down at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. It was one of the very first civil rights sit ins snd it started a movement all across our nation. Clarence Henderson was 18 years old when he took his place in history. Almost six decades later, he is here tonight in a seat of honor. Clarence. Thank you for making this country a much better place for all Americans. In 1963, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr stood here on these very steps and called on our nation to live out the true meaning of its creed and let freedom ring for every citizen all across our land. [18:53:42] America's fearless resolve has inspired heroes who defined our national character from George Washington, John Adams, and Betsy Ross to - Douglass - you know Frederick Douglass - the great Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower, Jackie Robinson, and, of course, John Glenn. It is willed our warriors up mountains and across minefields, it has liberated continents, split the atom, and brought tyrants and empires to their knees. Here with us this evening is Earl Morse. After retiring from the Air Force, Earl worked at a V.A. hospital in Ohio. Earl found that many World War Two veterans could not afford to visit their memorial on the National Mall. So Earl began the very first honor flights that have now brought over two hundred thousand World War Two heroes to visit America's monument. Thank you. We salute you. Thank you. [18:55:07] Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Our warriors from a hollowed roll call of American Patriots running all the way back to the first souls who fought and won American independence. Today just as it did, two hundred and forty three years ago the future of American freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it. We are proudly joined tonight by heroes from each branch of the US armed forces, including three recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you. They and thousands before us served with immense distinction. And they loved every minute of that service. To young Americans across our country, now is your chance to join our military and make a truly great statement in life. And you should do it. [18:56:24] We will now begin our celebration of the United States Armed Forces, honoring each branch's unique culture, rich history, service, song, and distinct legacy. I invite Acting Secretary, please Mark Esper, Secretary of Defense. And Chairman Dunford, head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Please join me. [18:57:04] In August of 1790, by request of George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Congress established a fleet of 10 swift vessels to defend our shores. These revenue cutters would fight pirates, stop smugglers, and safeguard our borders. They are the ancestors of our faithful Coast Guard. When our ships were seized and sailors kidnapped by foreign powers in 1812, it was a revenue cutter, the swift schooner Thomas Jefferson that swept in to capture the first British vessel of the war. In 1897, when two hundred and sixty five whalers were trapped in ice and the ice fields of Alaska were closing up, courageous officers trekked fifteen hundred miles through the frozen frontier to rescue those starving men from certain death. [18:58:06] In 1942, the Coast Guard manned landing craft were invasions in the Pacific. When the enemy attacked US Marines from the shores of Guadalcanal, Coast Guard singleman first class Douglas Munro used his own boat to shield his comrades from pounding gunfire. Munro gave his life. Hundreds of Marines were saved as he lay dying on the deck. His final question embodies devotion that sails with every coast guardsmen. Did they get off. [18:58:46] On D-Day, the Coast Guard's famous matchbox fleet served valiantly through every hour of the greatest amphibious invasion in the history of our country. One coxswain said the water boiled with bullets like a mud puddle in hailstone, but still the Coast Guard braved death to put our boys on Utah and Omaha beaches. Every coast guardsmen is trusted to put service before all. Coasties plunge from helicopters and barrel through pouring rain and crashing waves to save American lives. They secure our borders from drug runners and terrorists in rough seas at high speeds. Their sharpshooters take out smugglers engines with a single shot. They never miss when the red racing stripes of a Coast Guard vessel break the horizon. When their chopper blades pierced the sky, those in distress know that the help is on their way and our enemies know their time has come. Guardians of our waters stand. Semper Paradis. [19:00:10] They are always ready. They are the United States Coast Guard. Representing the Coast Guard today, you will soon see an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter based at Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater along with an HH-65 Dolphin from Air Station Atlantic City and an AC 140 Ocean Sentry from Air Station Miami. [19:02:10] Thank you. Thank you to the Coast Guard. On a cold December morning in 1903, a miracle occurred over the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. When two bicycle makers from Ohio defied gravity with a 12 horsepower engine, wings made of cotton, and just a few dollars in their pockets. Just six years later, America was training its first pilots to take these magnificent machines up and over the field of battle in World War One. Our flyboys rushed the skies of Europe, and aces like Eddie Rickenbacker filled hearts and headlines with tales of daring duels in the clouds. General Billy Mitchell saw the promise of this technology and risk court martial in his quest for an independent air force. He was proven right. When empires across the oceans tried to carve up the world for themselves and America stood in the way. We wouldn't let it happen. [19:03:23] After Pearl Harbor, Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle and his raiders flew B-25 bombers off a carrier deck in the deep Pacific in a daring feat of American resolve. And as President Roosevelt said, the Nazis built a fortress around Europe but they forgot to put a roof on it. So we crushed them all from the air. 177 liberator bombers flew dangerously low through broad daylight without fighter protection to cripple the Nazi war machine at [inaudible] more than 300 airmen gave their lives to destroy the enemy oil refineries and five pilots were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their actions in that single raid. [19:04:21] It was airman Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier. It was airmen, like Gus Grissom and Buzz Aldrin who traded their sabre jets for rockets to the stars. And it is our incredible airmen today who wield the most powerful weapon systems on the planet Earth. For over sixty five years, no enemy air force has managed to kill a single American soldier because the skies belong to the United States of America. No enemy has attacked our people without being met by a roar of thunder and the awesome might of those who bid farewell to earth. And soar into the wild blue yonder. They are the United States Air Force. Representing the Air Force you will soon see beautiful brand new F-22 Raptors from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. And one magnificent B-2 stealth bomber from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. [19:07:20] What a great country. In October of 1775, the continental Congress ordered the construction of two swift sailing vessels each carrying 10 cannons and 80 men to sail eastward. Our young fleet tested their sea legs against the most powerful navy the world has ever seen. John Paul Jones, America's first great naval hero, said I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm's way. He got his wish many times when his ship was shot into pieces off the coast of England by a British vessel and her four dozen guns. When demanded to surrender, Jones very famously declared I have not yet begun to fight. When our Navy begins fighting they finish the job. [19:08:30] The War of 1812, Captain James Lance fell with his brothers on the USS Chesapeake. His dying command gained immortality. Don't give up the ship. In the Battle of Mobile Bay, Admiral David Farragut lashed himself to the rigging of his flagship to see beyond the cannon smoke, crying "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." In World War 2, it was aviators launched from the carrier Enterprise, Hornet, Yorktown who filled the skies of Midway and turned the tide of the Pacific War. Nobody could beat us. Nobody could come close. On D-Day, CB engineers came ashore to destroy blockades and barriers making way for the invasion. Many lost their lives, but they took the German defenses with them and our men crushed upon the beaches like a mighty storm. [19:09:41] From the Naval demolition units of World War 2, a rose a force that became famous in the Mekong Delta. They don't want to see our force again. The very best of the very best: the Navy SEALs. It was SEALs who delivered vengeance on the terrorists who planned the September 11th attack on our homeland. It was the SEALs who stand ready to bring righteous retribution in mountain jungles desert to those who do us harm. America's sailors are not born. They are forged by the sea. Their traditions are rich with the salt and blood of three centuries when Old Glory crest the waves of foreign shores. Every friend and every foe knows that Justice sails those waters. It sails with the United States Navy. Representing our great Navy today will be two F-18 Super Hornets from Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia, along with two F35 Lightnings from Naval Air Station Lemoore in California. [19:11:56] So great. In November of 1775, the continental congress created two battalions of a new kind of warrior one who kept and would protect our ships and sailors and be at home both the shore and in the mast with musket in hand. Their versatility was proven in the War of Independence when two hundred and thirty four continental Marines conducted their first amphibious raid. capturing the British supply of gunpowder and cannons at Fort Nassau. Ever since Marines have fought in every American war. Their legend has grown and grown and grown with each passing year. It was the Marines who won America's first overseas battle vanquishing Barbary pirates on the shores of Tripoli. Their high stiff collar, which shielded them from the pirate sword earned them the immortal name Leatherneck. [19:13:05] It was the Marines who after two long days of battle marched through the halls of Montezuma. It was the Marines who took heavy casualties to kick the Kaiser's troops out of Bellwood in World War One, earning the title "Devil Dogs". And it was the Marines who raised the flag on the Black Sands of Iwo Jima. From the Chosin reservoir to Khe Sanh from Helmand to Baghdad, Marines have struck fear into the hearts of our enemies and put solace into the hearts of our friends. Marines always lead the way. After the 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Beirut, which claimed the lives of two hundred and forty one great U.S. servicemen, Marine Sergeant Jeffery Nashton lay in bandages, so badly wounded barely alive. When the commandant of the Marine Corps came to visit his hospital, Sergeant Nashton had to feel for the general's collar. He wanted to feel his four stars. He could not see and he could not speak. He signaled for pen and paper and with shaking hand he wrote two words Semper Fi. [19:14:50] That motto. Semper fidelis Always faithful burns in the soul of every Marine. A sacred promise. The Corps has kept since the birth of our country. They are the elite masters of air and land and sea on battlefields all across the globe. They are the United States Marines. Representing the Marine Corps today will be a brand new VH92, soon to serve as Marine One. Along with two V22 Ospreys from the famed HMX-1 helicopter squadron at Quantico, the Nighthawks. [19:17:04] In June of 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified army out of the revolutionary forces encamped around Boston and New York and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief. The Continental Army suffered a bitter winter of Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware, and seized victory from Cornwallis of Yorktown. Our army manned the air, it ran the ramparts, it took over the airports it did everything it had to do. And at Fort McHenry, under the rockets red glare, it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came their star spangled banner waved defiant. [19:18:00] At Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg our soldiers gave the last full measure of devotion for the true unity of our nation and the freedom of all Americans. In the trenches of World War One, an Army sergeant named Alvin York faced an inferno of enemy fire and refused to retreat. He said I won't leave. I won't stop. He shot his rifle 18 times killing 18 of the enemy. When they fixed bayonets and charged, he killed seven more. The entire German machine gun battalion surrendered because of one man Alvin York. [19:18:46] A generation later, the army returned to Europe and embarked upon a great crusade with knives and rifles in hand. The Rangers scaled the cliffs of Normandy, the 101st Airborne leapt into the danger from above illuminated only by enemy flares explosions and burning aircraft. They threw back the Nazi empire with lightning of their own from the turrets of Sherman tanks and the barrels of the M1 rifle. In the darkness of the Battle of the Bulge with Nazis on every side, one soldier is reported to have said they've got us surrounded again. The poor bastards. [19:19:41] Outnumbered American warriors fought through the bunkers of Pork Chop Hill and held the line of civilization in Korea. In the elephant grass of Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry made a stand amid a forest consumed in flames with enemies at every single turn. The army brought America's righteous fury down to al-Qaida in Afghanistan and cleared the bloodthirsty killers from their caves. They liberated Fallujah and Mosul and helped liberate and obliterate the ISIS caliphate just recently in Syria. One hundred percent gone. Through centuries our soldiers have always pointed toward home proclaiming this we'll defend. They live by the creed of Douglas MacArthur in war. There is no substitute for victory. They are the greatest soldiers on Earth. [19:21:48] Nearly 250 years ago. A volunteer army of farmers and shopkeepers, blacksmith, merchants, and militiamen risked life and limb to secure American liberty and self-government. This evening we have witnessed the noble might of the warriors who continue that legacy. They guard our birthright with vigilance and fierce devotion to the flag and to our great country. Now we must go forward as a nation with that same unity of purpose. As long as we stay true to our cause, as long as we remember our great history, as long as we never ever stop fighting for a better future, then there will be nothing that America can not do. We will always be the people who defeated a tyrant across the continent, harness science, took to the skies, and soared into the heavens because we will never forget that we are Americans and the future belongs to us. [19:23:27] The future belongs to the brave, the strong, the proud, and the free. We are one people chasing one dream and one magnificent destiny. We all share the same heroes, the same home, the same heart. And we are all made by the same Almighty God. On the banks of the Chesapeake to the cliffs of California. From the humming shores of the Great Lakes to the sand dunes of the Carolinas from the fields of the heartland to the Everglades of Florida, the spirit of American independence will never fade, never fail, but will reign for ever and ever and ever. [19:24:34] So once more, to every citizen throughout our land, have a glorious Independence Day. Have a great Fourth of July. I want to thank the Army band, The National Park Service, the Interior Department, the incredible pilots overhead. and those who are making possible the amazing fireworks display later this evening. Now as the band plays the Battle Hymn of the Republic, I invite the First Lady, Vice President and Mrs. Pence, the service secretaries, and military leaders to join me on stage for one more salute to America by the famous, incredible, talented Blue Angels. God bless you. God bless the military. And God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.
United States House of Representatives 1414 - 1514
HOUSE FLOOR DEBATE: The House will meet at 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. Votes will be postponed until 6:30 p.m. Suspensions (8 bills): 1) H.R. 988 - To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 5757 Tilton Avenue in Riverside, California, as the "Lieutenant Todd Jason Bryant Post Office" (Rep. Calvert - Oversight and Government Reform); 2) H.R. 1425 - To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 4551 East 52nd Street in Odessa, Texas, as the "Staff Sergeant Marvin "Rex" Young Post Office Building" (Rep. Conaway - Oversight and Government Reform); 3) H.Res.273 - Supporting the goals and ideals of Financial Literacy Month, and for other purposes (Rep. Hinojosa - Oversight and Government Reform); 4) H.Con.Res.71 - Commemorating the 85th Anniversary of the founding of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA), a leading association for the Nation's 1.3 million American citizens of Greek ancestry, and Philhellenes (Rep. Maloney - Oversight and Government Reform); 5) H.Res.179 - Expressing support for a National Foster Parents Day (Rep. Boyda - Oversight and Government Reform); 6) H.Con.Res.88 - Honoring the life of Ernest Gallo (Rep. Cardoza - Oversight and Government Reform); 7) H.Res.252 - Recognizing the 45th anniversary of John Hershel Glenn, Jr.'s historic achievement in becoming the first United States astronaut to orbit the Earth (Rep. Space - Science and Technology); 8) H.Con.Res.76 - Honoring the 50th Anniversary of the International Geophysical Year (IGY) and its past contributions to space research, and looking forward to future accomplishments (Rep. Udall (CO) - Science and Technology) ) 14:07:09.9 one of the fastest growing modern economies on earth. and its number one trading partner is america. i am confident that the phenomenal economic transformation can lead to expanded freedoms so the people of vietnam and china. in conclusion, god bless our 14:07:26.0 troops, and we will never forget september 11. our prayers are with the virginia tech families. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from north carolina rise? ms. foxx: permission to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker. 14:07:40.2 the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. foxx: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the life of sergeant howard pluff who was killed last month while eafering a call from sheriff's deputies in winston-salem. he selflessly served his family 14:07:56.7 and community for more than 17 years in the winston-salem police department. he was dedicated to community development and service. he was an assistant coach in the southwest little league and was a member of the catholic 14:08:13.0 church. he permeated this great country, and i'm saddened by the profound loss that his death will be to his family, his police colleagues, his friends and our community. he grew up on long island, near new york city, joined the 14:08:28.5 winston-salem police department in 1989, and was promoted to sergeant in 1999. sergeant pluff's career as a police officer was punctuated by his commitment by serving our community in north carolina with distinction and honor. 14:08:44.6 he did not hesitate to go above and beyond the call of duty. in fact, during his time with the which iston salem police department, he was awarded the highest honor, the medal of valor in 2003, for helping prevent the suicide of a woman who threatened to jump to her 14:08:59.7 death from her apartment building. his death leaves a gaping hole, not only with his family, but within the ranks of winston-salem's police department. he left behind a loving wife joyce, who's a third grade teacher at southwest elementary school, and 13-year-old 14:09:16.1 daughter and 11-year-old daughter. mr. speaker, my thoughts and prayers are with sergeant pluff's wife and daughters and his extended family. may god bless them and comfort them during this confident time. -- difficult time. 14:09:31.6 he was a blessing to the many whose lives he touched. he will be sorely missed. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on 14:09:46.2 which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered, or on which the vote is objected to under clause 6 of rule 20. recorded votes are postponed. questions will be taken tomorrow. the chair lays before the house 14:10:17.8 a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, madam, this is to notify you formerly pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives that i have received a subpoena issued 14:10:34.9 in the county court for weld county, colorado, for testimony and documents in a criminal case. after consultation with the office of general counsel, i have determined that compliance with the subpoena is 14:10:48.3 inconsistent with the precedents and privileges of the house. signed sincerely, marilyn musgrave, member of congress. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the 14:11:04.4 speaker, house of representatives, madam, this is to formerly notify you pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives that i have been served with a judicial subpoena for documents issued by the united states district court for the district of columbia. 14:11:19.3 after consulting with the office of general counsel, i will make the determinations required by house rule 8. signed sincerely, darrell e. issa, member of congress. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a 14:11:34.9 communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, madam, this is to formerly notify you pursuant to rule 8 of the rules of the house of representatives that i have been served with a judicial subpoena for documents issued by the united states district court for the district 14:11:51.7 of columbia. after consulting with the office of general counsel, i will make the determinations required by house rule 8. signed sincerely dun caan hunter, member of congress. -- signed sincerely, duncan hunter, member of congress. 14:12:08.2 the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from california rise? 14:12:53.3 14:13:03.1 the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california. >> mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to h.r. 988. 14:13:16.0 the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 988, a bill to designate the if a a silt of the united states postal service located at 5757 tilton avenue in riverside, california, as the lieutenant 14:13:29.3 todd jason bryant post office. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from california, ms. watson, and the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, each control 20 minutes. the chair now recognizes the gentlewoman from california. 14:13:45.0 ms. watson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. watson: mr. speaker, h.r. 988, legislation introduced by 14:14:04.7 representative ken calvert, to designate the facility of the united states post office located at 5757 tilton avenue in riverside, california, as the lieutenant todd jason 14:14:19.3 bryant post office. on october 31, 2003, somewhere in the iraqi desert between fallujah and baghdad, first lieutenant todd jason bryant 14:14:35.7 was killed when his humvee was struck headon by a rocket-propelled grenade. his life was taken instantly at age 23. he was assigned to c company 134-ar. 14:14:52.8 where he assumed duties as platoon leader third platoon. first lieutenant todd bryant received the bronze star, the purple star, the service medal, the national defense service 14:15:09.7 medal and the army service ribbon for his distinguished service to his country. . first lieutenant todd bryant is survived by his wife, his parents, his brother, major 14:15:26.9 timothy bryant, usmc, and his sister. 14:15:33.0 the memory of this jovial, fun-loving man will live on forever through his family and friends. jennifer bryant said there was a lot more to him than just a soldier. 14:15:46.6 he was my best friend. his goal in life was to make people think that he was the most hilarious man alive. i support h.r. 988 and urge its passage. 14:16:05.9 mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i 14:16:16.8 may consume. lieutenant todd jason bryant was a proud and loyal american who served his country in fighting the war on terror. he made the ultimate sacrifice, defending freedom and liberty when he lost his life on october 14:16:35.7 31, 2003, in iraq. todd jason bryant was born in long beach, california, on january 14, 1980. as a young student he was very athletic and always involved in high school -- in school 14:16:50.1 activities. during high school he played football and golf and also played the tuba in the marching band. he was the youngest of three and was determined to follow in his siblings' path by enlisting in the military. at 17 he joined the army 14:17:05.4 reserves and completed boot camp before graduating from high school. he received his nomination to west point academy from the sponsor of this bill, congressman ken calvert, he graduated from west point in 2003 with a degree in political science. 14:17:20.6 he had said before his death that he dreamed of being either a member of congress or a high school football coach. his military training took him to installations in kentucky and kansas, only nine days before bryant was sent to support operation iraqi freedom in 2003, 14:17:39.9 he happily wed jennifer in pitston, pennsylvania. on friday, october 31, 2003, at the age of 23, lieutenant bryant was killed when a rocket-propelled grenade struck 14:17:53.8 his humvee while on patrol in fallujah. he was an ambitious man who was able to accomplish much in his short but meaningful lifetime. among his military awards are the bronze star, purple heart, meritorious service medal, 14:18:11.0 national defense service medal, and the army service ribbon. lieutenant bryant will always be remembered as a fun loving, humorous, cheerful, proud, and loyal friend, husband, son, and brother. he brought joy to all those 14:18:27.1 around him, easily making friends through his contagious laughter. lieutenant bryant was honored to serve his country and he served it well. let us honor his ultimate sacrifice by renaming this post office for him. 14:18:42.8 thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 14:18:58.6 gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: all time for debate has been yielded back. the question is, will the house 14:19:17.1 suspend the rules and pass h.r. 988. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, and the bill is passed. 14:19:32.5 without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. miss watt son: -- ms. watson: , mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to h.r. 273. the speaker pro tempore: the 14:19:50.6 clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 273, resolution supporting the goals and ideals of financial lilt acy month -- literacy month, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from california, ms. watson, and the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, each control 20 minutes. 14:20:07.5 the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent for all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without 14:20:23.2 objection. ms. watson: the importance of financial and fiscal responsibility cannot be 14:20:31.3 overstated. personal financial literacy is essential to ensure that individuals are prepared to manage money, credit, and debt and become responsible workers, heads of households, investors, entrepreneurs, business leaders, 14:20:47.5 and citizens, and that is why i'm pleased to support h.r. 273. personal savings as a percentage of personal income decreased from 7.5% in the early 1980's to a negative 0.2% in the last 14:21:07.1 quarter of 2005. as the resolution notes, 92% of college students acquire at least one credit card by their second year in college. yet only 26% of people between 14:21:23.5 the ages of 13 and 21 reported that their parents actively taught them how to manage money. the jump-start coalition for personal financial literacy 14:21:38.2 seeks to improve the personal, financial literacy of young adults. jump-start's purpose is to evaluate the financial literacy of young adults, develop, disseminate, and encourage the 14:21:54.1 use of financial education standards for grades k to 12, and promote the teaching of personal finance. to that end, jump-start has established 12 must-no personal financial principles for young 14:22:12.7 people to improve their financial future. these 12 principles should be followed by adults as well. the 12 financial principles stress during the financial 14:22:29.6 literacy month for youth are mapped out of -- for your financial future. they do not expect something for nothing, and high returns equal high risk. yet your take home 35eu -- pay 14:22:45.2 and compare interest rates, pay yourself first, and money doubles by the rule of 17, to determine how long it would take your money to double. divide the interest into 72, and 14:23:01.2 your credit past is your credit future. start saving young, stay insured, budget your money, do not borrow what you cannot repay, and let me add one more thing, pay all your taxes. 14:23:17.1 so, mr. speaker, i'm pleased to support this resolution, supporting the goals of financial literacy month, and urge all my colleagues to support it. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. and i yield back my time and, 14:23:37.2 mr. speaker, i do demand the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i 14:23:50.5 may consume. today many americans do not know how to balance a checkbook, intelligently invest their money, or financially plan for their retirement. studies have shown that few young adults living in this 14:24:07.0 country know how to responsibly use a credit card. this is a time when debt is on the rise and savings have dropped to negative 1% of personal income. it is clear that teaching financial literacy is imperative 14:24:22.9 for individuals to learn how to manage their money, credit, and debt. while many states require high schools to teach financial education, increased economic education is still necessary. m. res. -- h.res. 273 recognizes 14:24:39.5 the goals and ideals of financial literacy month and raises awareness of the importance of financial education. it is our hope that the president calls on the government, state, other 14:24:53.1 government organizations to observe the month with relevant programs and activities supporting financial education. learning about savings and investing is especially important for today's young generation. 14:25:06.4 because of the uncertainty of the future of social security. more so than ever, private savings play a larger role in determining one's retirement, and while there may be social security reform in the coming years, everyone must be able adequately to plan their savings 14:25:23.9 for the future. financial education has proved 14:25:28.0 very effective. simple projects such as stock market simulations help young people understand how to invest in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. it is our hope they will retain these skills when they begin investing their own money. 14:25:43.1 organizations such as the jump-start coalition for personal finance literacy to help spread awareness, especially in young -- in school-aged children. the national council on economic education has established many 14:25:58.6 programs which give teachers the tools to teach their students basic economic skills and help them apply their knowledge to daily life. these groups recognize the need for more widespread financial literacy, but it is necessary for commong to place more 14:26:14.9 emphasis -- for congress to place more emphasis on this idea and encourage other organizations to participate in this movement as well. with a solid background knowledge of financial literacy, we can raise america's youth to become responsible employees, 14:26:28.8 helds -- heads of households, entrepreneurs, and business leaders. thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time -- the gentlelady reserves the balance of her time. the gentlewoman from california. 14:26:43.7 ms. watson: mr. speaker, representative ruben hinojosa would speak, i yield itch -- him as much time as he will need. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. hinojosa: mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of house 14:27:01.4 resolution 273 that the gentlewoman from illinois, congresswoman judy biggert, and i introduced earlier this year. the legislation supports the ideals and goals of financial 14:27:16.3 literacy month which falls in april of each year. before i proceed, i want to take this opportunity to thank my good friend and colleague, congresswoman watson, from 14:27:34.2 california for managing time on this resolution for our side of the aisle. i also want to take this opportunity to thank all of my democratic colleagues who co-sponsored this important resolution this year. together with the tremendous 14:27:51.2 number of co-sponsors congresswoman biggert obtained, we broke our old record of 91 co-sponsors and garnered the support of 118 members of congress for this bill. 14:28:06.9 i am very pleased with this development. it shows that an increasing number of members of congress are beginning to see the light and come onboard financial literacy cause with me and congresswoman biggert. 14:28:22.8 it is imperative that we in congress pay more atext to the financial -- attention to the financial literacy rates to our citizens from prekindergarten all the way to retirement. the sooner that a person begins to learn good saving habits, the 14:28:38.7 better off he or she will be in the future. i'm especially pleased and honored to inform you that 18 cities and three counties in my congressional district have issued proclamations honoring 14:28:54.9 april 22 through the 28th of 2007 as financial -- as the national financial literacy awareness week. the sit zens in alphabetical order include the following, 14:29:10.6 beville, coal ms, donna, ed couch, edenburg, goliad, harlengin, la villa, mathis, 14:29:29.6 mcallen, mercedes, farr, santa rosa, weslico and also includes the three counties which are as follows -- duvall county, jim 14:29:44.5 wells county, and carns county. mr. speaker, i also want to take this opportunity to thank several state legislators for realizing the importance of financial literacy by taking action to address the diminishing understanding of 14:30:01.3 basic finance by u.s. high school students. a study completed in 2006 by the jump-start coalition for personal financial literacy found that high school seniors know less about principles of 14:30:17.5 basic personal finance than high school seniors did seven years earlier, and the average scores in both years in failing. . 14:30:28.2 our high school seniors are failing basic finance. add to that the fact that 55% of college students acquire their first credit card clurg their first year in college, 14:30:40.3 and 92% of college students acquire at least one credit card by their second year in college. yet 26% of people between the ages of 13 and 21 reported that their parents actively taught them how to manage money. 14:30:57.9 add all that together and you have a recipe for serious financial troubles down the road for college grad wits. luckily, in rinet -- graduates. luckry, in recent years state legislators around the country 14:31:12.4 have increasingly recognized the importance and effectiveness of financial education. as a result, an increasing number of states now require financial education during high school. i hope my colleagues and their staff are taking note on this 14:31:30.9 because the following states now require high school students to pass some form of financial education or literacy courses before they can graduate. those states include the following -- alabama, georgia, 14:31:46.8 idaho, illinois, kansas, kentucky, louisiana, missouri, new york, north carolina, ohio, south carolina, my great state of texas, utah, virginia, and 14:32:05.7 west virginia. i strongly recommend that my colleagues contact their state legislators and encourage them to impose similar requirements. mr. speaker, every day 14:32:24.5 consumers deal with money, from balancing a checking account to shopping for a mortgage, auto loan, researching way to get a 14:32:38.4 college education, saving money for retirement, understanding a credit report or simply deciding whether to pay cash or charge a purchase. the list goes on and on and on. 14:32:53.3 many consumers do not really understand their finances. now that we know that high school students are failing basic financial literacy exams. it is even more disconcerting 14:33:10.1 that adults are not fairing much better. high bankruptcy rates, foreclosures on homes, increased credit card debt, data security breeches and identity theft make it 14:33:25.8 imperative that all of us take an active role in providing financial and economic education during all stages of one's life. every year we here in congress discuss the future and solvency of social security, medicare, 14:33:41.6 and medicaid, and that concerns me considerably. but now that i've done some additional research into the demographics and financial standing of the baby boomers, i was shocked that the personal 14:33:58.3 savings as a percentage of income dropped a negative 1% in 2006, the lowest since the grate depression. even -- great depression. even worse, the average baby boomer has only $50,000 in 14:34:13.0 savings for retirement, apart from equity in their homes. these are very serious and disturbing facts that we in our state counterparts must address. to address these problems and 14:34:27.4 others, i co-founded and currently co-chair the congressional financial and economic literacy caucus with congresswoman judy biggert. the caucus seeks to address these issues head on by encreasing public awareness of 14:34:43.5 poor financial literacy rates and working to find the ways and means to improve those rates. the caucus has provided a forum for my colleagues to promote policies that advance financial literacy and economic 14:34:57.8 education. it is my hope that through the financial and economic literacy caucus we can continue to further educate americans about financial and economic topics ranging from the importance of saving, reducing credit card debt, obtaining a free annual 14:35:16.7 credit report, avoiding payday lenders, check cashers and especially these days predatory 14:35:26.1 lenders. hopefully the caucus can teach individuals to take care of their finances, to lead them down the path of homeownership. at this point, mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to enter 14:35:41.1 into today's record, letters in support of this resolution. they include letters from many, many groups. the speaker pro tempore: 14:35:56.0 without objection. mr. hinojosa: mr. speaker, all these letters that i'm holding include j.a. worldwide, national council on economic education, financial planning association, independent 14:36:12.4 bankers association of texas, master card, the american institute of certified public accountants, the national association of mortgage brokers , networks financial institute, the north american securities 14:36:30.8 administrators association. it includes hsbc, the independent community bankers of america, housing assistance council, national association of federal credit unions. it includes capital one as well 14:36:49.1 as visa, kerry schwab, financial services forum, financial services roundtable, national association of realtors, girls incorporated, 14:37:06.0 afsa fund, countrywide, first nations ouista, native americans. it includes the national association of affordable housing lenders, america's 14:37:20.0 community bankers, community bankers association, consumer mortgage coalition, texas credit union league, the state farm insurance company, freddie mac, wells fargo, and the 14:37:06.0 afsa fund, countrywide, first nations ouista, native americans. it includes the national association of affordable housing lenders, america's 14:37:20.0 community bankers, community bankers association, consumer mortgage coalition, texas credit union league, the state farm insurance company, freddie mac, wells fargo, and the 14:37:36.7 national youth involvement board. mr. speaker, several of these groups will be participating in the financial literacy day fair that will take place april 24 from noon to 4:00 p.m. here on the hill at the cannon caucus 14:37:52.2 room. it is my understanding that over 50 different groups will present their financial literacy products, their programs, and ideas during the fair. the last time we hosted the event, over 500 people attended the event, not only to take 14:38:08.9 advantage of the free financial literacy advice, but also to enjoy a wonderful buffet. i encourage my colleagues and their staff to attend the financial literacy day fair. again, i repeat it will be held april 24 from noon to 4:00 p.m. 14:38:25.9 in the cannon caucus room, and lunch will be served. on the same day after april 24, at 3:00 p.m. in room 2220 at the rayburn building, the 14:38:40.4 financial caucus is collaborating with visa on a different financial lit rass event. visa -- literacy event. visa is providing one person to respond to questions. 14:38:55.6 both members and staff are invited to this event at 22020 rayburn from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m., which i believe will be beneficial and a huge success. in closing, mr. speaker, our country is suffering 14:39:13.9 financially and our constituents are not armed with the tools they need to provide for a good future. for these reasons and more, i encourage my colleagues to support this resolution. with that i yield back the remainder of my time. 14:39:32.2 the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield as much time as she may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of illinois, mrs. biggert, the co-sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the 14:39:47.0 gentlewoman from illinois. mrs. biggert: thank you. i thank the gentlewoman for yielding. i rise in support of house resolution 273, to designate april as the financial literacy month. this has been the fourth year for working with my friend and colleague and fellow chair of 14:40:03.5 the house financial and economic literacy caucus, mr. hinojosa, to promote the goals and ideals of financial literacy month. i am amazed at the progress that we have made so far over the last few years in raising 14:40:19.4 awareness about the importance of greater financial literacy 14:40:24.3 and economic education. hundreds, if not thousands of public, private sector, nonprofit and community-based organizations across the country have established financial literacy programs. more than 50 of them will be on 14:40:38.1 hand in the cannon caucus room on april 24, to share the benefits of their knowledge and experience at the annual financial literacy day fair. and i encourage all of our colleagues to attend and learn more about these important 14:40:54.2 efforts. as mr. hinojosa mentioned, we have received dozens of letters in support of these efforts, and this financial resolution from different organizations. 14:41:08.4 i think this year we've set a new standard for unity on this issue with well over 100 members of congress co-sponsoring this resolution. in doing so, i think we send a clear and unambiguous message that the house is hoping to 14:41:26.5 help the most pressing needs. and while we make great strides in raising awareness, the need for the education in finances is never greater. consumer debt in america now exceeds $2.4 trillion. 14:41:42.5 according to the department of commerce, the personal savings rate in america recently dropped to negative 1.1%, a level that has not been seen since the great depression. the fact is that today's 14:41:58.0 marketplace have options for managing wealth. credit and investment opportunities are presented to consumers on a daily basis. for instance, by the time they reach their second year in school, the vast majority, 92% 14:42:13.9 of american college students have at least one credit card. and yet just a small fraction of those students have sat down with their parents and learned the basic principles of money management, like compound 14:42:27.2 interest and supply and demand. we have a responsibility to ensure that americans of all ages have access to the tools and resources they need to capitalize on their investment choices, succeed in today's sophisticated economic market, 14:42:43.4 and enjoy a secure financial future. and the key to the success continues to be basic financial education, starting early, during grades k-12. it's a testament to the progress we are making that 38 states now include personal 14:43:02.2 finance education in their curriculum guidelines. but we must continue building on this progress if we are to help today's students become tomorrow's successful investors, entrepreneurs and business leaders. the financial literacy and 14:43:19.0 education commission, established by congress in the fair and accurate credit transactions act of 2003, recently held a national summit to develop better methods of teaching money management skills. 14:43:33.5 i look forward to working with my colleagues on the education and labor committee to enhance economic initiatives as we work to re-authorize no child left behind in the coming year. i also look forward to working with my colleagues on legislation that will put young americans on the path to an 14:43:50.5 affordable education and a firm financial future. at the start of the 110th congress i introduced one such bill, h.r. 87, the 401 kids savings act of 2007. and this bill will allow parents and family members to 14:44:06.2 set aside money in a child's account that will accumulate interest, tax free, and can be used for college tuition, a first home or even retirement. mr. speaker, it is critically important that families have access to effective savings 14:44:24.0 mechanisms, like these, if they are to secure their financial futures. but it is even more important that americans have the know how and motivation to use them. and that is the goal of the financial literacy month and the resolution before us today. 14:44:40.1 mr. speaker, i'd like to take this opportunity to thank my good friend and distinguished colleague from texas, mr. hinojosa, for introducing this resolution, and for his dedication to improving financial literacy. i also would like to thank mr. 14:44:54.7 hinojosa's staff, especially greg davis, for all their hard work, diligent work in bringing this resolution to the floor. i would also like to thank the chairman and ranking member of the oversight and government reform committee, mr. waxman, and mr. tom davis, for helping 14:45:11.2 to move this resolution through their committee in such a timely and bipartisan manner. and finally, i'd like to thank the gentlelady from california, ms. watson, and the gentlelady 14:45:23.6 from north carolina, ms. foxx, for their support and for managing this resolution on the floor. mr. speaker, i strongly support this resolution and i urge my colleagues to do the same. i yield back the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the 14:45:37.1 gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: i have no further speakers, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 14:45:52.6 question is, will the house suspend the rules and agree to house resolution 273. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the resolution is agreed to, and without objection 14:46:09.7 the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having 14:46:24.3 arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed. for what purpose does the speaker of the house rise? mr. speaker -- ms. speaker: i ask unanimous 14:46:46.0 consent to speak to the house. it is with great sadness i rise to acknowledge that today our country has been struck by a terrible, terrible tragedy. the death toll at virginia tech now is over 30. this is reported to be over 30. 14:47:01.2 this is the worst campus shooting in the history of our country. as the virginia tech community struggles with the mourning and questioning that are certain to follow, continued prayers of 14:47:14.7 this congress are with the students, their families, the faculties, and the staff at virginia tech. leader boehner joins me in extending our condolences to all concerned. and we ask for a moment of 14:47:31.4 silence to be observed in this body. would we all please rise to observe the moment of silence. the speaker pro tempore: members will rise and observe a moment of silence. 14:48:00.5 14:48:07.1 ms. speaker: thank you, ms. speaker:. the gentlewoman from california. mr. speaker, i move that the 14:48:20.4 house suspend the rules and agree to h.c.r. 71. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the concurrent resolution. the clerk: house concurrent resolution 71. resolution commemorating the 85th anniversary of the founding of the american hellenic 14:48:38.9 educational progressive association, ahelpa, a leading association for the nation's 1.3 million american citizens of greek ancestry, and phil hell leans. the speaker pro tempore: 14:48:53.2 pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from california, ms. watson, and the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all 14:49:10.0 members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. miss watt son: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.c.r. 71 to commemorate the 85th anniversary of the founding of the american 14:49:27.1 hellenic educational progressive association, a leading association for millions, 1.3 million american citizens of greek ancestry, and 14:49:47.7 philhellenes. i'm proud to be an original co-sponsor of this resolution and i thank mrs. maloney for her leadership as the author of the resolution and as one of the chairs of the congressional 14:50:01.6 hellenic caucus. the american hellenic educational progressive association known as ahelpa, or ahepa, was born out of the cruelty and subjugation implored upon many minorities by hate 14:50:19.2 groups during the early 20th 14:50:23.0 century. the organization was founded in atlanta in 1922 to respond to growing attacks on greek americans and greek american businesses by the ku klux klan. it has since grown to become the 14:50:41.1 largest and oldest american based greek air taje grassroots membership organization -- heritage grassroots membership organization. ahep's initial interest were to cultivate greek-owned businesses 14:50:55.7 and help its members assimlate into american culture. today ahep's mission is to carry the legacy of greek culture throughout generations. the organization continues to do 14:51:13.1 this through diversification, language immersion, and educational enrichment. a helpa is known for its philanthropic resources which fund equal opportunity housing, 14:51:31.7 hospitals, specialty schools, and academic scholarships. while ahepa primarily is a membership organization for greek americans or americans of greek ascent, membership is open 14:51:50.0 to all americans who support the organization's mission. this is the finest tradition of philhellenism and reminds us that the modern relationship between the people of america 14:52:05.1 and of greece was forged by their parallel struggles for freedom from foreign tyranny and by the inspiration we both take from the democracy first developed are centuries ago in greece. 14:52:23.2 for 85 years the american hellenic educational progressive association has remained an organization that embodies the true meaning of america. i commend ahepa and ask that my 14:52:39.8 colleagues support this commendation and i urge all my colleagues to support h.r. -- h.c.r. 71 . and thank you i reserve the 14:52:54.2 balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the american hellenic 14:53:10.0 educational progressive association, ahepa, is the largest and oldest american-based greek charity grassroots membership organization. it was created on july 26, 1922 in response to the alarming number of local and national 14:53:26.0 groups whose missions were based on racism. the founders of ahepa were greek immigrants who strove to find ways to adapt to their new country and honor their heritage and cultural ideals. their mission is to promote 14:53:43.3 helenism, education, philanthropy, civic responsibility, and family and individual excellence. these efforts are made through community service and volunteerism. it is an organization with over 1.3 million participants, making 14:53:57.5 it the largest association for american citizens of greek ancestry. ahepa's commitment to education is one of its stronger components. over $4 million is endowed at the local district and national 14:54:13.5 levels toward the use of scholarships, and a half million dollars is awarded annually to thousands of students. by providing these scholarships it affords students the opportunity to educate and be educated on the rich cultural 14:54:29.1 history relations between greece and the united states. other ahepa achievements include securing funding for the, tribute to olympism unquote, the creation of the george c. 14:54:46.3 marshall statue at the united states embassy located in athens, greece, and the federal grant of $500 million providing affordable housing to senior citizens. a few of their successes include the restoration of the statue of 14:55:02.3 liberty at ellis island, and they continue to send care packages to our troops through the u.s.o. in their 85th year the american hellenic educational progressive association continues to promote its ideals of and sent greece 14:55:19.1 through community service and 14:55:21.5 volunteerism. the association has grown tremendously over the years and it is to be congratulated for its charitable contributions to society, both in the u.s. and throughout the world. thank you, ms. speaker:. i reserve the balance of my time. -- thank you, mr. speaker, i 14:55:36.5 reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back her time. the gentlewoman from north carolina. 14:55:50.0 ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield as much time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of florida, mr. bilirakis. mr. bilirakis: thank you. thank you, mr. speaker, appreciate it. it is with great greek american pride that i rise today to offer 14:56:07.7 my congratulations on the occasion of the 85th anniversary of the american hellenic educational progressive association. founded in atlanta, georgia, on july 26, 1922, as a reaction to racism and bigotry, ahepa is the 14:56:26.5 oldest and largest american hellenic organization in the united states today. its mission to promote helenism, education, fill lanthroppy, 14:56:39.9 civic responsibility, family, and individual excellence set the standard for ethnic organization and has helped greek americans become one of the most successful ethnic groups in the united states. ahepa's lists of commissionments 14:56:57.6 are amazing. it has endowed millions of dollars in academic scholarships and the family has contributed over $1 billion in national projects for such deserving entities as saint basil's academy, the special olympics, 14:57:15.3 and muscular dystrophy research. additionally, the ahepa national housing corporation has secured over $4 million to develop and complete over 70 housing projects for low-income seniors. 14:57:31.8 ahepa's patriotic endeavors have included helping thousands of greek imgrints assimlate -- immigrants into american light and four of those were my grandparents. 14:57:43.8 raising $253 million for the u.s. bond drive during world war ii. helping to restore the statue of liberty, providing tens of thousands of dollars to the 9/11 relief effort, and sending countless care packages to our troops overseas. 14:58:03.9 its good works are endless, mr. speaker. that is why i'm so proud to tell you that i'm a member of ahepa. and i'll tell you that i'm a member on the local level, the tarpon springs, chapter in 14:58:20.6 florida. which was founded in the 1920's. as co-chair of the caucus on hellenic affairs, will i continue to work closely with my co-chair, carolyn maloney, my fellow greek american congress men and women and gus james to 14:58:40.2 encourage the wonderful, educational, and phil lanthropic enkevers that -- philanthropic endeavors that have characterized ahepa for years. and i promise to strengthen u.s.-greece relations, secure 14:58:55.5 religious freedom and protection or the ecumenical patriarchy and promote solutions to the cyprus and phyrom issues. i wish them continued success 14:59:13.2 and a long life as it continues to serve as a beacon of hope. true and good things, that's what hellenic americans want. i appreciate it, ms. speaker:. -- mr. speaker. 14:59:29.3 thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all members to support the passage of h.con.res. 71. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the 14:59:44.3 question is, will the house suspend the rules and agree to house concurrent resolution 71. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to, and 15:00:01.5 without objection the motion to reconsider is is laid upon the table. . the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the 15:00:16.2 rules and agree to h.c.r. 88. 15:00:23.7 the clerk: house concurrent resolution 88, concurrent resolution honoring the life of ernest gallo. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the 15:00:32.8 gentlewoman from california, ms. watson, and the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from california. ms. watson: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend 15:00:50.4 their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. watson: mr. speaker, ernest gallo, who learned his craft of wine making from a recipe in the basement of the mow desso -- modesto public library, with 15:01:06.6 his brother julio, and with $5,900 of borrowed money, developed one of the largest wine empires in the world. they founded the e&j gallo winery in 1933 at the end of prohibition. 15:01:22.4 the gallos rented a building and made an ordinary wine for 50 cents a gallon. they made $30,000 their first year of business. mr. ernest gallo was an aggressive business leader who worked long hours and then went home and worked some more. 15:01:39.5 his company made wines under more than 40 labels and employed 4,600 workers with wine cells -- wine sales in over 90 countries. for decades, the name gallo was 15:01:56.2 sue none muss with california wine. mr. gallo bottled and battled that image with advertisements, with humor and to a large extent by buying up wineries with more exclusive labels than 15:02:10.3 his own company. robert mondave of napa valley and friend said ernest was a visionary. he was committed to making america a wine-drinking 15:02:25.9 country. mr. gallo lived and breathed wine. he aired wine commercials on tv and participated on wine promotion boards. he chaired the wine institute and mentored generations of 15:02:42.0 wine makers. he erected wine billboards and traveled the country checking on wine displays in supermarkets. he enjoyed brinking his own wine, particularly a product 15:02:58.9 that more ofed over time from table wine to cabernet satisfyon. he tapped into consumer's tastes with sweet products such as boons farm which was so 15:03:14.2 popular in the 1970's, which caused a worldwide shortage in the apple concentrate it was made from and other products like ripple and thunderbird. he moved upscale in 1974 introducing high-quality corked 15:03:33.7 finished wines. but the venture failed. he also developed e&j brandy and bartle's & jaymes wine coolers. additionally, mr. gallo 15:03:45.7 developed its gallo of sonoma line and began buying upscale competitors, including the moraso and lewis and martini labels and echo and other types 15:04:02.2 of wine. mr. gallo died unexpectedly in his modesto home on march 6 of this year. he lived to the ripe age of 97, and his brother, julio gallo, 15:04:21.9 passed in 1993. i commend the gentleman from california, mr. cardoza, for introducing h.c.r. 88, honoring 15:04:34.6 the life of ernest gallo, and i urge its swift passage. and, mr. mr. speaker -- and, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time and call up -- i reserve the balance of my 15:04:52.5 time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. today we honor the lifetime achievements of ernest gallo, one of the most celebrated american wine makers of the last century. 15:05:06.6 ernest gallo was the eldest of three brothers, born in the sierra nevada foothills from 15:05:18.3 italian parents. they learned wine maker from their father. upon their parents untimely death in 1933, ernest and his brother julio took over the 15:05:30.1 business. learning from pamphlets on wine making, they wanted to make their company nationally known for affordable and quality wine. they founded e&j winery with a humble investment of $5,900. over time they went on to 15:05:45.1 develop one of the largest wine empires in the world now employing 4,600 workers and selling to 90 different countries. in fact. his winery currently sells one out of every four bottles of wine that americans now 15:06:03.0 consume. along with founding e&j gallo winery, ernest gallo often supported the industry through philanthropic work. he established the ernest gallo clinic and research center at 15:06:18.9 the university of california at san francisco, which conducts numerous studies and research through genetic biochemical alcohol use. 15:06:34.0 along with great financial success, ernest gallo and his winery won numerous prestigious awards, including the wine industry's highest honor, the american society of anologist award in 1964 for outstanding leadership in the industry. 15:06:51.2 they won the gold vine award, the 1983 distinguished service award from wine spectator, and the winery of the year award in both 1996 and 1998 by the san francisco international wine competition. 15:07:06.3 after a long and successful careers, a wine maker, businessman and if i lont row pist, -- philantropist, he passed away in march of this year. 15:07:25.4 he deserves to be recognized and honored by the congress. thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves her time. the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: i call up representative dennis a. 15:07:42.4 cardoza for as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. car doze -- mr. cardoza: thank you. i am proud to say that ernest gallo was not only a constituent of mine, but he was also a dear friend. 15:07:59.3 over the years i served in the california state legislature and here in congress, ernest's deep commitment to california and to wine making was a constant presence that guided many of my legislative efforts. ernest gallo, along with his 15:08:17.7 brother julio, recognized the san joaquin weather, with the weather to fertile soil, to have a strong domestic wine industry. they had a small plot of land with just a few kinds of grape 15:08:33.3 varieties to a multinational beverage company that ranks second largest in the company. my district, california's 18th congressional district, grows nearly 250 different crops from aspare a gus to sweet potatoes to a number -- asparagus to 15:08:55.2 sweet potatoes, but none has had more impact on the tapestry of the valley than the gallo winery. it provides my constituents with high-skill improvement 15:09:06.6 opportunities and serves a solid foundation for continued growth in the region. the gallo family has contributed to countless community projects throughout the valley, and to medical research pro conducts developed -- products developed to 15:09:25.5 curbing alcoholism. what was once a boutique industry reserved for the upper crest of society, is now a billion dollar business by allowing the masses in wine drinking and wine making. 15:09:41.1 in his youth, ernest and his brother julio recognized an unmet need in the wine industry. ernest quickly challengized on the market gap and set -- capitalized on the market gat. the trend of affordable wines 15:09:59.2 -- market gap. the trend of affordable wines caught on. and gallo winery was one of the most respected companies. 15:10:22.1 furthermore, gallo's commitment to environmentally sustainable 15:10:25.0 farming permeates the wine grape growing industry even today and will surely be the standard for years to come. ernest and the entire gallo family have long partnered with the surrounding community, especially with the city of 15:10:38.9 modesto, to give back in a number of generous ways. for instance, gat low arts a center in modesto, which is under construction now, once completed we will attract quality art and entertainment performances where there had been virtually none before. 15:10:53.8 for the first time, valley residents can participate in a cultural experiences on par with our urban neighbors. however, above all, the achievement in his professional life, he must also be lotted 15:11:10.2 for his personal story. he was the son of italian immigrants who started out with nothing and armed with littless than an article on wine making from a library, he built an 15:11:27.0 empire. our culture praises individuals like ernest and rightly so. it is what we teach our children and our children's children that you can take nothing for granted, that you must take what you are given. and in ernest's case, it was 15:11:42.2 his keen business sense and turned that gift into something substantial. i'm proud to have represented ernest gallo all these years, and even more proud to have called him my friend. he will be remembered fondly for his contributions to the industry, to agriculture and to 15:11:57.6 the community. thank you, my colleagues, for your consideration. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all members to support the passage of h.con.res 88, and i yield back the balance of 15:12:17.2 my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back her time. the gentlewoman from california. ms. watson: mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back her time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to house concurrent resolution 88. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. 15:12:35.7 in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the 15:12:59.4 gentleman from ohio, mr. wilson, rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i rise to suspend the rules and pass the resolution for house concurrent resolution number 76. honoring the 50th anniversary of the sbersber -- interinter-- international geophysical year 15:13:19.8 and its past contributions to space research and looking forward to future accomplishments. the clerk: house concurrent resolution 76, honoring the 50th anniversary of the international geophysical year and its past contributions to space research, and looking 15:13:35.7 forward to future accomplishments. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from ohio, mr. wilson, and the gentleman from nebraska, mr. smith, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from ohio. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask 15:13:52.3 unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to include extraneous materials on house concurrent resolution 76. the resolution now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: 15:14:07.3 without objection. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i rise in support on house resolution 15:14:24.2 -- pardon me -- on house concurrent resolution 76, and would also take this opportunity to recognize chairman mark udall for his hard work on this resolution. the resolution honoring the 15:14:38.5 50th anniversary of the international geophysical year, the resolution marks the 50th anniversary of the international geophysical year, honors its contributions to space research and looks forward to future 15:14:54.1 accomplishments. mr. speaker, the international geophysical year of 1957 and 1958 was a highly successful international effort in involving 67 nations that came together during the cold war to
BLUES MUSIC
GUS CANNON - WALK RIGHT IN ( very short clip)
TV Variety
GLEN CAMPBELL - WALK RIGHT IN (SIT RIGHT DOWN) GLEN PLAYS FOLK BLUES CLASSIC ON HIS 12 STRING GUITAR. COVER OF GUS CANNON SONG.
MLK MARCH ANNIVERSARY CEREMONY ABC POOL CUTS CAM P1
EXT BROLL ABC POOL CUTS CAM POSITION LOW SHOT DURING 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MARCH CEREMONY Wednesday, August 28, 2013 LOG: March on Washington 50th Anniversary "Let Freedom Ring" at Lincoln Memorial SLUG: 0930 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 74 1530 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 71 AR: 16X9 DISC# NYRS: WASH HD 4 11:00 am - 12:00 pm 11:09:25 Geraldo Marshall (Trumpet Call) 11:11:28 REMARKS/ INTRO INVOCATION (Soledad O'Brien, Hill Harper) 11:14:49 Pastor A.R. Bernard (Invocation) 11:20:17 INTRO AMB. YOUNG (Hill Harper) 11:20:39 Ambassador Andrew Young YOUNG: I don't know about you, but I "Woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind" -- come on, help me -- "stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu" -- come on (inaudible) -- "Hallelujah." Well, "I'm walking and talking with my mind -- my mind, it was, stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelujah." Now, 50 years ago when we came here, we came from a battle. We came from a battle in Birmingham. But that was just a few months before -- before Martin Luther King came through to speak of his dream. 11:22:11 He had been through bombings, jailings, beatings. He had been snatched from his jailhouse cell in DeKalb County, and put in chains, and taken down to Reidsville Penitentiary in the middle of the night, and thought it was going to be his last night on earth. 11:22:31 He went through the battles of Albany and Birmingham, and came out victorious. But we knew that the fight was just beginning. And we knew that we had a long, long way to go, and this was just the start. Now, he came here representing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, saying that we were going to redeem the soul of America from the triple evils of racism, war and poverty. He came, not talking so much about racism nor war. His speech was about poverty. And he said that the Constitution was a promissory note, to which all of us would fall heir, but that when men and women of color presented their check at the bank of justice, it came back marked, "insufficient funds." But then he said he knew that wasn't the end. But 50 years later, we're still here trying (ph) to cash that bad check. Fifty years later, we're still dealing with all kinds of problems. And so we're not here to claim any victory. We're here to simply say that the struggle continues. But a long time ago, when Ralph Abernathy would stand with him, and things would get difficult, Ralph would say, "Well, I don't know what the future may hold, but I know who holds the future." 11:24:02 And Martin would say that, "The moral arch of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice." And then he would say, "Truth forever on the scaffold; wrong forever on the throne. But the scaffold sways the future, for behind the dim unknown, standeth God beneath the shadows keeping watch above His own." 11:24:22 So I want to say to you this morning, I want to say, "I've got a feeling everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right, be all right, be all right, be all right." Pray on, and stay on, and fight on. 11:25:34 Robby Novak, Kid President remarks 11:25:59 Jonathan B. Jarvis, 18th Director of the National Park Service remarks 11:26:08 there are countless photographs of that historic day, one with a pair of rangers with Dr King. Image captures small moment in great event, but captures role of nat'l parks service. 11:26:49 each monument you find a familiar parks service arrowhead. We are there to welcome visitors and preserve American stories they represent. Places civil rights was organized are now preserved as nat'l parks. The power of these places is to inspire each generation to have a dream. 11:28:11 we are very proud of the 2 rangers who stood here 50 years ago. My promise to you is that we will protect all the places entrusted to us with the highest standard of stewardship 11:28:48 Vincent C. Gray, Mayor of Washington 11:28:52 on behalf of 632,000 residents of DC, allow me to welcome you 11:29:08 dr king borrowed a lyric from one of our favorite patriotic songs: let freedom ring. 11:29:33 there was one place DR king didn't mention in that speech but later spoke forcefully: DC. That's because full freedom and democracy are still denied to those who live within sight of capitol dome. We have no voting representative in our own congress. We pay 3.5 billion dollars in taxes but don't get final say. We send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy but don't get to practice here at home 11:30:47 I implore, I hope all of you will stand with me when we say let freedom ring from mt st Albans, the bridges of Anacostia, from Capitol Hill itself, until all of the residents are truly free. 11:31:25 please join hands with us and make every American free 11:31:45 Reverend Wintley Phipps, Sr. 11:36:00 U.S. Senator Angus King, Maine 11:36:10 KING: Fifty years ago, Americans marched to this place. They came from the Northeast, from the West, from the Midwest, and they came from the South. They came by rail; they came by bus; they came by car. One even roller-skated here from Chicago. They slept the night before in buses, in cars, on friends' floors, and in churches. 11:36:42 Fifty years ago this morning, we started in small rivulets of people on the side streets of this great city. We joined together in larger streams, moving toward the main arteries of Washington. Then we came together in a mighty river of people down to this place, old, young, black, white, Protestant, Catholic, and Jew. We stopped at the Washington Monument and heard Peter, Paul and Mary sing of the hammer of justice and the bell of freedom. 11:37:26 Fifty years ago, Americans came to this place around a radical idea, an idea at the heart of the American experience, an idea new to the world in 1776, tested in 1865, renewed in 1963, and an idea still new and radical today: all men and women are created equal. All men and women are created equal. 11:38:08 Fifty years ago, at this place, at this sacred place, Americans sent a message to their leaders and around the world that the promise of equality of opportunity, equality before the law, equality in the right to freely participate in the benefits and responsibilities of citizenship applied to everyone in this country, not just the lucky few of the right color or the accident of birth. This is what Martin Luther King meant when he said that his dream was deeply rooted in the American dream. 11:39:03 And 150 years ago -- 150 years ago this summer -- a mighty battle was fought not far from this place. And this idea, the idea of equality, the idea of America hung in the balance. One of the soldiers on those hot July days was a young college professor from Maine named Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. And returning to the battlefield at Gettysburg many years later, he expressed the power of the place where such momentous deeds were done. Here is what he said. Here is what Joshua Chamberlain said. 11:39:44 "In great deeds, something abides. On great fields, something stays. Forms change and pass, bodies disappear, but spirits linger to consecrate the ground for the vision-place of souls. Generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field, to this deathless place, to ponder and dream. And, lo, the shadow of a mighty presence will wrap them in its bosom and the power of the vision shall pass into their souls." 11:40:53 Fifty years ago today, this place was a battlefield. No shots were fired, no cannons roared, but a battlefield nonetheless, a battlefield of ideas, the ideas that define us as a nation. As it was once said of Churchill, Martin Luther King on that day mobilized the English language and marched it into war, and, in the process, caught the conscience of a nation. And here today on these steps, 50 years on, indeed, something abides and the power of the vision has surely passed into our souls. 11:41:57 The Honorable Johnny L. DuPree, Mayor of Hattiesburg, Mississippi and Secretary, National Council of Black Mayors 11:42:15 decades and decades ago, blood sweat and tears all culminated in a march 11:42:31 if someone would have told me this country boy would become a mayor, I'd say they fell off a truck 11:42:52 some of y'all never had the opportunity to take a bath in a #3 tin tub, I did that 11:43:19 we've been entrusted with making the lives better of people that we serve 11:43:39 at one point, struggle was to gain citizenship, then vote, for brief period, African Americans held elected office during reconstruction 11:44:00 now one of the challenges is the freedom to govern. We must to locally what obama did nationally 11:44:15 we must go back to individuals who helped get us here and encourage them to make their voices heard 11:44:34 we did not quiver or retreat in face of injustice 11:44:55 it is because of those who marched on, even though wearied and bloodied, until they did what people said couldn't be done 11:45:40 Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey with Trayvon Martin's parents and Newtown victim father Mark Barden 11:50:17 INTRO CHARLES STEELE JR and MELANIE CAMPBELL (Soledad O'Brien) 11:50:46 Charles Steele, president emeritus & CEO, Southern Christian Leadership Council 11:53:27 Melanie Campbell, president & CEO, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation 11:56:45 U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro, Texas (20th District) 11:56:55 CASTRO: It's an honor to be here with you today. I come as a son of the great state of Texas, the home to the president who signed the most sweeping and important civil rights legislation in our nation's history. I am 38 years old. I also speak to you as someone of a grateful generation, grateful for the struggles and the movements and the blood and tears and all of the work of the civil rights pioneers who stood here 50 years ago today, and those who marched in the streets of Selma, those who organized people in factories and farms, those who took their battles to the courts, like Thurgood Marshall and Gus Garcia, those who organized people to vote and exercise our rights, those like Willie Velasquez. My own parents in the 1960s were very involved in a movement inspired by Martin Luther King and the men and women who stood here. They were active in the Chicano movement, or the Latino civil rights movement. 11:58:08 And I want to say thank you to them, and thank you to all of you. And I also want to make a promise to you. As somebody of a younger generation of Americans, I want to promise you that all of the struggles and all of the fights and all of the work and all of the years that you put in to making our country a better place, to helping our leaders understand that freedom and democracy are prerequisites to opportunity, I want you to know that this generation of Americans will not let that dream go. That we will carry on, and make sure that this country lives up to the values and principles for which you fought so hard. Thank you very much. 11:58:53 The Right Honorable Perry Christie, Prime Minister of the Bahamas CHRISTIE: Greetings from the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, your closest neighbor to the south. Martin Luther King, Jr., holds a very special place in the hearts and minds of Bahamians, not least because he spent time amongst us, both in Nassau and in the tiny island of Bimini, where in 1964, while on a brief vacation, he composed his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. On a clear night, the lights of metropolitan Miami are, in fact, visible from the shores of Bimini, dramatizing the closeness between our two nations. We are, after all, less than 50 miles apart. But however close that may be in the literal sense, we are in the geography of the soul even closer than that. The common ties of history, of ethnicity and culture, of migration, of a common heritage of struggle bind us together not just as neighbors, not even only as friends, but as true brothers and sisters. The message I bring to you today can be briefly stated, and it is this. As momentous as this occasion is, we do a grave injustice to ourselves and to all humanity if we leave here unresolved to carry on the greater noble struggle for which Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his life. The blood of this good man shed in Memphis still cries out across the years, cries out to each and every one of us, wherever we may be, all across the world, to stand up for freedom, to stand up for human dignity, to stand up for equality, to stand up for social justice, to stand up for right and not for wrong, for peace and not for war, for love and not for hate. It is the timelessness and universality of the message that he proclaimed and the heroic majesty of his personal example that explains why Martin Luther King, Jr., is as relevant today, as compelling today, as inspirational today as he was 50 years ago, when from the very precincts he delivered the oration that rocked the conscience of America and the world. When he spoke as he did that day, we somehow knew, we somehow felt that his message was coming from a place that was not only deeper than himself, but deep within us all. He had awakened to the call of that place and was rousing us from our slumber so that we could take our own inner soundings and hear it, too. In so doing, he gave language to our deepest yearning for a better life. Martin Luther King's work remains unfinished. This then must be for all of us a time not only for renewal, but above all, a profoundly personal level and the most authentic way possible, a time for rededication to the dream that Martin Luther King championed throughout his life. May the light of the flame continue to guide us as we go forward, each in his own way, each in his own nation to continue the work of Martin Luther King. In that way, and in no other way, we keep his dream alive and make it our own. 12:00 -1:00 p.m. 12:02:42 Junkaroo performance 12:07:08 Myrlie Evers Williams 12:07:19 50 years ago we gathered in this very same spot. We felt in the words of another Mississippian, fannie lou hamer, I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. And I do believe that's what the crowd was saying to all of our leaders. Dr king took the helm, and under his leadership, said enough is enough America. This is our country. All of us, we belong here, and here we are, some 50 years later, assessing what has happened. Where we are 12:08:39 for a brief period of time I think we fell asleep and said everything is ok, but we know today everything is not ok, there has been a retrenchment in this country as far as equal rights is concerned. 12:09:09 the triumphs and defeats belong to us all. Dr king told us he might not get to mountaintop with us but there is a promised land. America is that land for all of us. 12:09:45 today's world, there's emphasis on individuality. How can I reach my top? No matter how strong any 1 person may be, they may be strengthened with support from each other 12:10:11 the movement can no longer afford an individual approach to justice 12:10:34 at times it is necessary that we let those who represent us know that we are a force to be reckoned with. Many of our messages today target youth and elders. I look at those in middle, they are young enough to relate but established enough in our community, I ask you what are our next steps 12:11:25 this country in the area of civil rights has taken a turn backward. I am energized to move forward and to be sure to see the gains we have encountered are not lost. So I do ask you what are our next steps. 12:11:58 many of our civil rights leaders like my husband and dr martin luther king 12:12:12 I challenge you to get back to community building, these are our children. You are the parents. The victory will be a collective one. It is with clear conscience that we will reach that mountaintop and we will overcome 12:12:46 it will take each and every one of us, letting those who say they manage America it's the voice and actions of people who say we must overcome and will eventually say we have overcome because of the involvement of each and every one 12:14:01 Kristin Stoneking, executive director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation 12:16:29 Mee Moua, president and executive director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice 12:18:40 The Honorable Martin O'Malley, Governor of Maryland 12:18:42 O'MALLEY: The work of justice is urgent. It is real, and it is needed. Let there be no comfort in our country for the bigotry of cold indifference. For there are still too many lives in America taken from us by violence, still too many children in America who go to bed hungry, who go to school hungry. Still too much apathy when the lives of people of color are too often valued less than the lives of white people. 12:19:09 And so, the responsibility we consecrate today is not rooted in nostalgia or memory. It is rooted in something far deeper. It is rooted in the calling of conscious to action, actions that protect every individual's right to vote; action that safeguards and keeps guns out of the hands of violent offenders; action makes quality education and the opportunity of college a reality for more families; action that protects the dignity of every child's home with civil marriage equality; action that strengthens our country with the hopes and dreams and hard work of our newest generation of new American immigrants; action that abolishes the death penalty and improves public safety in every neighborhood regardless of income or color; actions that create jobs and raises the minimum wage for every mom and dad that's willing to work hard and play by the rules. 12:20:25 Yes, thanks to Dr. King, America's best days are still ahead of us. Love remains the strongest power in our country. Forward we shall walk, hand in hand. And in this great work, we are not afraid. Thank you. 12:21:00 Natalie Grant 12:24:39 Fred Maahs, chair of the American Association of People with Disabilities 12:29:19 Reverend Roslyn Brock, chairman of the NAACP 12:29:24 the march on Washington was for equality and opportunity. We of NAACP acknowledge our organizing days are beginning anew 12:29:52 the power and depth of their witness is magnified by the fact that they returned home and organized 12:30:08 in a 1966 speech to medical committee for human rights, dr king said injustice in healthcare is most inhumane inequality. One of the most pressing issues for this generation 12:30:38 supreme court and people have spoken. Affordable Care Act is the law of the land. 12:30:58 we must ensure all Americans are aware we can change the face of health in this nation. We are determined and clear to the world, when it comes to healthj equity, courage will not skip this generation. 12:31:37 Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP BENJAMIN JEALOUS: Fired up! (Cheers.) Come on. Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Ladies and gentlemen, as we stand here 50 years after the March on Washington, let us remember that Dr. King's last march was never finished. The Poor People's Campaign was never finished. Some 50 years after the March on Washington, while fewer people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. And while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off every day. 12:32:00 Indeed, one could say that the distance between a child's aspiration represented by the top of that ladder and a family's situation at the bottom of that ladder is the exact measurement of that parent's level of frustration. 12:32:44 And so as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. And as we turn on our TVs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they're being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom, because as the top of that ladder has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. Let us not just be dreamers this day; let us recommit to be doers. Thank you, and God bless. (Cheers, applause.) 12:33:52 Maori Dancers performance 12:38:41 Reverend Joseph Lowery 12:42:26 Laura Turner Seydel, aka "Captain Planet" 12:45:42 Dr. Eliza Byard, executive director, Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network 12:48:19 Bill Russell 12:48:29 good afternoon, it's nice to be here. 12:48:39 it's nice to be anywhere after 50 years. 12:49:41 from my point of view, you only register progress by how far you have to go 12:50:46 progress can only be measured by how far we have to go 12:51:07 as we used to say in the projects, keep on keeping on 12:51:58 Clayola Brown, president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute 12:53:47 Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO 12:53:50 good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent 1.6 tril members 12:54:16 and 5 years later, dr king stood with sanitation workers of local 1733 12:54:38 new momentum on these steps 50 years ago, advances whenever disenfranchised stand up 12:54:52 because our struggle continues12:55:08 we come to commemorate past and shape future 12:55:10 we must also have the courage in the name of dr king, a phillip ranolph, rep john lewis, we must recommit to struggle as stewards of nation that belongs to rich and poor, those with and those without 12:55:44 we have to build on legacy left to us all, protect fundamental rights, ensure workers voices never silenced, fight for good jobs and decent pay. Above all, we must uphold principle that everyone who contributes to prosperity of nation should share in prosperity 12:56:31 U.S. Congresswoman Donna Edwards, Maryland (4th District) 12:56:43 REPRESENTATIVE DONNA EDWARDS (D-MD): On behalf of the members of Congress, I represent Maryland's 4th Congressional District. As the first African-American woman to represent Maryland in the House of Representatives, and on behalf of my sisters in Congress, I'm proud to stand here with you today on the shoulders of women, courageous women like Fannie Lou Hamer and Dorothy Height and Vivian Malone and Rosa Parks and so many others. I'm proud to stand on the shoulders of our domestic workers and to be wrapped in the arms of three, four little girls in a Birmingham church and a Chicago teenager on vacation in Mississippi. 12:57:05 It's a new day 50 years later and a better day. But the day is not over. Today's struggle for civil rights, social justice and economic opportunity demand our engagement and our voice. To realize fully the dream we must both raise our voices and take action. We must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and our neighbors to be better. We must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations and for a just justice system. We must lift our voice for the value of our vote and have our votes counted without interference. As we stand here today, Dr. King would know and my dear colleague John Lewis certainly does know that today is not just a commemoration or a celebration; it's a call to action for the work that remains undone and the communities that remain unchanged. Our foremothers and forefathers, 50 years ago they closed a book on the last century. Well, when the book closes on the 21st century and civil rights, which chapter will you have written? What fight will you have fought in the halls of Congress or in the town halls of your community? For men and women, black and white, Latino and Asian, Muslim, Christian and Jew, gay and straight, I hope this book includes you. We need you to act. The final chapter must include your voice to achieve Dr. King's dream. They cannot be written without you. 12:58:50 Alan van Capelle - CEO Bend the Arc 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. 13:02:43 Ingrid Saunders Jones, chair of the National Council of Negro Women SAUNDERS: Good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent the 1.6 million members of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, AFSCME, public service workers whose labor touches communities throughout this nation. You know, AFSCME stood with Dr. King in 1963 when he called on America to be true to its principles. And five years later Dr. King stood with AFSCME when the sanitation workers of Local 1733 demanded justice, dignity, and respect. The journey for civil rights, workers' rights and economic rights began almost from the moment America was born. It gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. And it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned stand up, fight back and march forward. Because our struggle continues, we come to this memorial not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. We have the power to carry the determination, the hope and passion of the March on Washington forward. We must also have had the courage. We must also have the courage. SAUNDERS: In the name of Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Ella Baker and Congressman John Lewis, on behalf of those whose names will never be known, we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor, to the CEO and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. We have the responsibility to build on the legacy that has been left -- left to us all. We must protect the most fundamental rights we have -- the right to vote. We must be sure that workers' voices will never be silenced. We must fight for good jobs and decent pay. And we must become the just and fair society of our ideals. Above all -- above all -- we must uphold the principle that everyone who contributes to the prosperity of this nation should share in the prosperity of our nation. Thank you. 13:05:19 Mark Tillman, president of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 13:07:57 Delores Huerta DOLORES HUERTA: We're being blessed with the rain. Yes, we are. 13:08:14 You know, we're here to celebrate all of the wonderful benefits that we all received from the civil rights movement and the Chicano movement. We honor the sacrifices and the lives of those that gave their lives so that we could have these benefits. We want to honor Coretta Scott King -- (cheers) -- for all of the work that she did to get that Martin Luther King holiday, the national holiday. We want to honor Yolanda King for all that she did on behalf of women and children to stop abuses of both. 13:08:45 But you know, Dr. King said, on this very stage, go back to your communities, go back to the South, go back to the North. And I'm saying also to the West, because we've got to continue to organize to fulfill that dream, because you know what? If we don't do it, it's not going to happen. The only way that discrimination is going to end against women of -- people of color, against women, against our LGBT community is if we do it, which means that we've got to outreach to those that are not with us. We've got to educate them. We've got to mobilize them. We've got to motivate them. That's the only way it can happen. So I'm going to ask all of you, who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We do! MS. HUERTA: Let's hear it loud and clear. We've got the power. I'm going to say, who's got the power? I want you to say, we've got the power. Who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We've got the power! MS. HUERTA: And I'm going to say, what kind of power? I want you to say, people power. What kind of power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: People power! MS. HUERTA: All right! So we can do it. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Let's all say this all together. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Put your hands up, everybody, like this. We're going to all clap together and in Spanish we're going to say, "Si, se puede," which means, "Yes, we can." Let's do it. (Chanting.) "Si, se puede." AUDIENCE MEMBERS: (Chanting and clapping.) "Si, se puede! Si, se puede! Si, se puede!" 13:10:09 CUT OFF for LeAnn Rimes 13:10:34 LeAnn Rimes performs "Amazing Grace" 13:13:19 Marc Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League MARC MORIAL: Good afternoon, fellow Americans. I stand today on the shoulders of Martin Luther King, Whitney Young, John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph and the many great leaders of 1963 who sacrificed, who marched, who demonstrated courage and bravery in the face of attack so that we can be here today. 13:14:05 I stand as a representative of the next generation that has had the opportunity to walk into corporate boardrooms, walk into city halls and county halls, into halls of justice, into the Justice Department and, yes, into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue solely because of the sacrifices and the bravery of those whose names we remember and those we don't. 13:14:39 I stand here today to call on this great and mighty nation to wake up, wake up to unfair legality parading as morality; wake up to insensitivity to the poor masked as fiscal austerity; wake up to politics without a positive purpose. It is time, America, to wake up. 13:15:06 Fifty years ago, that sleeping giant was awakened. But somewhere along the way, we've dozed. We've been quelled by the lullaby of false prosperity and the mirage of economic equality. We fell into a slumber. Somewhere along the way, white sheets were traded for buttoned down white shirts. Attack dogs and water hoses were traded for tasers and widespread implementation of stop-and-frisk policies. Nooses were traded for handcuffs. Somewhere along the way, we gained new enemies, cynicism and complacency. Murders from urban America to suburban America. The pursuit of power for power's sake. We stand here today to say it is time to wake up. 13:16:01 So here in 2013, we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. We look toward the statue of the great liberator. We say we have come to wake up a new civil rights movement for economic justice, a new civil rights movement for freedom in these days, a new civil rights movement for jobs, a new civil rights movement for men, for women, for children of all backgrounds, all races, all dispositions, all orientations, all cities, all counties, all towns all across America. 13:16:43 America, it is time for us to wake up. The 21st-century agenda for jobs and freedom comes alive today. We stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of yesterday, and we affirm this new commitment for today and tomorrow. God bless you, God thank you, and God bless this great nation. (Cheers, applause.) 13:17:15 U.S. Congresswoman Marcia Fudge, Ohio (11th District) and chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus FUDGE: Good afternoon. I am Marcia Fudge, the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. 13:17:19 And I am the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus because Dr. Martin Luther King acted upon his dream. Dr. King was not just a dreamer, but the voice of a movement. In 1963, there were five members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Today, there are 44 African-American members in Congress. 13:17:44 Dr. King dreamed of an America where every individual -- no matter their race, nationality, or socioeconomic background -- would have the opportunity to achieve dreams of their own. His dream was a call to action. Dr. King advocated for an America where everyone would be afforded their inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, a nation where there would be equal protection under the law and a country where every person's right to vote is protected. He dreamed of an America where every child has access to quality schools and an education that prepares them for their future. And he dreamed that we as a nation would walk together on the swift path towards justice. 13:18:31 Now it is up to us, the Congress of the United States of America, to work together to pass a jobs bill that ensures decent jobs for all of our citizens. Now it is up to us to ensure that we have a criminal justice system that does not value one life more than another. Now it is up to us to make sure that no child goes hungry to school or to bed. 13:19:10 In Dr. King's words, we cannot and we must not be satisfied with anything less. It is our time to make Dr. King's dream our reality. Dr. King said that 1963 was not an end, but a new beginning. Let us make today the start of a new chapter in the history of this country, and let us march forward towards justice together. Thank you. 13:19:39 Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union HENRY: Brothers and sisters, the members of the Service Employees International Union are proud to join the freedom fighters across this country in insisting on the three freedoms that are on the back of your program. And in the spirit of the civil rights economic leadership whose shoulders we stand, I want you to join me in repeating the pledges of the freedoms we are committing ourselves here today: The freedom to participate in government, the freedom to prosper in life, the freedom to peacefully coexist. Our members are proud to join with working people, faith leaders, community leaders all across this country in joining our hands in a renewed commitment to bending the arc toward justice and continuing the struggle to achieve racial equality and economic equality for all by delivering on the promise of the Affordable Care Act, by insisting that we prevail in winning common sense immigration reform now, and by joining together to create good jobs by supporting workers all across this country who have the guts to stand up, join together, and demand a living wage from their employers. The fight continues. We want to work for a just society where all work is valued, every human being is respected, where every family and community can thrive, and where we, brothers and sisters, join together in pursuing the freedom to have a better and more equal society for the next generation. Thank you. 13:21:43 Jamie Foxx 13:21:44 FOXX: How we doing? Make some noise for 50 years. Right now let's make some noise. Listen, I don't have much time. I'm here to celebrate what Dr. King did 50 years -- I'm not even probably going to read from the teleprompter because I'm just going to speak from my heart. I'm going to tell you right now that everybody my age and all the entertainers, it's time for us to stand up now and renew this dream. That's what we got to do. I was affected by -- I was affected by the Trayvon Martin situation. I was affected by -- by Newtown. I was affected by Sandy Hook. I'm affected by those things. So it's time for us now to pick up. Harry Belafonte saw me at the Image Awards and he asked me what am I willing to do. He took it a step further and we went to dinner. And my daughter, who's 19 years old, I said listen, if you want to get inspired, come listen to this man speak. When I sat with Mr. Belafonte, he asked my daughter, how old are you? And my daughter said 19. 13:22:48 And I said, Mr. Belafonte, what were you doing at 19? He said, I was coming home from World War II. And when I got back to America, I wasn't allowed to vote. So I love my country. I love America. But I realized that I had more work to do. So myself, Al, Jesse and Martin, we marched. And I said, wait a minute, man. You sound like you're naming a boy band group. What do you mean? Who are these guys' names? And he looked at my daughter and he said, Martin Luther King. Have you heard of him? And we sat there and we cried. What we need to do now is the young folks pick it up now so that when we're 87 years old talking to the other young folks we can say it was me, Will Smith, Jay Z, Kanye, Alicia Keys, Kerry Washington. The list goes on and on. Don't make me start preaching up here. 13:23:38 Last but not least, I have to recognize Mr. Berry Gordy. And not only -- not only did Harry Belafonte bail Martin Luther King out of jail so that he could march, he also paid for all of Coretta Scott King's bills as long as she was on this planet. Young folks, let's have some respect to our elders. That's the first thing. Last thing is this and I'm out. I know they're telling me to get out of here. We have to salute Mr. Berry Gordy because Mr. Berry Gordy put Dr. King's speech on an album and put it out on Motown Records. And then after he did that, he turned around gave those -- those reels and those -- those tapes back to the King family. Thank you so much. Do not forget 50 years. I'm out. 13:24:59 Reverend Al Sharpton, founder and president of the National Action Network 13:25:05 REVEREND AL SHARPTON: Fifty years ago, when they came to Washington, it was not for an event. It was in the middle of struggles. It was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in America. And Dr. King and those that fought with him, they fought and they beat Jim Crow. We come today to not only celebrate and commemorate, but we come as the children of Dr. King to say that we are going to face Jim Crow's children, because Jim Crow had a son called James Crow Jr. Esquire. (Laughter.) He writes voting suppression laws and puts it in language that looks different, but the results are the same. They come with laws that tell people to stand their ground, they come with laws to tell people to stop and frisk, but I've come to tell you, just like our mothers and fathers beat Jim Crow, we will beat James Crow Jr., Esq. (Cheers, applause.) 13:26:24 They called the generation of Dr. King the Moses generation, and those out here are now Joshua. But if Joshua does not fight the fights of Moses, they're not really Joshua. We saw Dr. King and the dream cross the Red Sea of apartheid and segregation, but we have to cross the Jordan of unequal economic (parity ?). We have to cross the Jordan of continued discrimination and mass incarceration. We've got to keep on fighting, and we've got to vindicate and stand up and substantiate that the dream was not for one generation, the dream goes on until the dream is achieved. 13:27:17 Lastly, we made it this far not because of what we had in our pockets but we had in our hearts, not because of what we owned but because who owned us. And we thank a mighty God for giving us a Martin Luther King. We thank a mighty God that brought us a long way. He brought us from disgrace to amazing grace. He brought us from the butler to the president. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us from Beulah to Oprah. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us a mighty long way, and we thank God for the dream, and we're going to keep on fighting until the dream is a reality. Thank you, and God bless you. 13:28:10 Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers 13:28:18 RANDI WEINGARTEN: Ladies and gentlemen, sisters and brothers, I am the president of the 1.5 million-member American Federation of Teachers. (Cheers, applause.) We have come so far -- King, Rustin, Evers, Parks, Chavez and so many others who have summoned our nation to confront the malignancy of prejudice and discrimination. And many of our afflictions have been healed, but we have far to go. Because the Supreme Court has turned its back on voter suppression, many will once again be denied the right to vote. Children born today poor will stay poor. Millions of Americans work hard every day but can't earn a living wage or exercise their right to collectively bargain. Public schools where kids need the most often get the least. And discrimination based on the color of your skin or the person you love may not be legal in many arenas, but it is still lethal in many times. 13:29:18 Leaders this day 50 years ago understood that the struggle for civil right and racial equality is a struggle for good jobs and decent wages. They understood, as we do today, that public education is an economic necessity, an anchor of democracy and a fundamental right. So we celebrate today that we have become a country that believes in equality, and we recommit ourselves to be a country that acts on that belief. And that start with reclaiming the promise of public education, not as it is today or was in the past, but what we need it to be to fulfill our collective responsibility to all of God's children. 13:30:06 A great nation ensures that every neighborhood public school is a good school. It takes great pains to make the working poor and child hunger conditions of the past. It honors the rights of workers. It takes its immigrants out of its shadows. And it makes the franchise sacrosanct. A great nation is one that acts to lifting us towards opportunity and justice. 13:30:32 The King family has brought us together these five days, not simply to reflect but to act. And we at the AFT will act to keep the dream alive. Thank you. 13:31:06 Julian Bond JULIAN BOND: This is a special day and a special place for all of us. Not only do we pay homage to those who gathered here 50 years ago to tell the nation that they too were Americans, we also celebrate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation. This is personal for me. Like many of you, I was privileged to be here 50 years ago. And like many of you, I am the grandson of a slave. My grandfather and his mother were property, like a horse or a chair. As a young girl, she'd been given away as a wedding present to a new bride. And when that bride became pregnant, her husband -- that's my great-grandmother's owner and master -- exercised his right to take his wife's slave as his mistress. That union produced two children, one of them my grandfather. At age 15, barely able to read or write, he hitched his tuition to a steer and walked across Kentucky to Berea College, and the college let him in. He belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans, a generation born in slavery, freed by the Civil War, determined to make their way as free women and men. Martin Luther King belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans too, a generation born in segregation, determined to make their way as free women and men. When my grandfather graduated from Berea, the college asked him to deliver the commencement address. He said then: The pessimist, from his corner, looks out on a world of wickedness and sin, and, blinded by all that is good or hopeful in the condition and the progress of the human race, bewails the present state of affairs and predicts woeful things for the future. In every cloud, he beholds a destructive storm; in every flash of lightning, an omen of evil; in every shadow that falls across his path, a lurking foe. But he forgets that the clouds also bring life and hope, that the lightning purifies the atmosphere, that shadow and darkness prepare for sunshine and growth, and that hardships and adversity nerve the race, as the individuals, for greater efforts and grander victories. We're still being tested by hardships and adversity, from the elevation of "stand your ground" laws to the evisceration of the Voting Rights Act. But today we commit ourselves, as we did 50 years ago, to greater efforts and grander victories. Thank you. 13:33:43 Reverend Shirley Caesar performs "How I Got Over" 13:39:12 Lynda Bird Johnson Robb JOHNSON ROBB: (OFF-MIKE) my father, Lyndon Johnson, a passionate believer in equality, spoke these words: "One hundred years ago, the slaved was freed. One hundred years later, the Negro remained in bondage to the color of his skin. "The Negro today asks justice. We do not answer him -- we do not answer those who lie beneath this soil -- when we reply to the Negro by asking, 'Patience.'" 13:39:39 The Place was Gettysburg, and I was there with him when he spoke on Memorial Day, 1963, at the 100th Anniversary of the Civil War. He was vice president at that time, and it was three months before the historical march on Washington that we commemorate today. 13:40:03 At a superficial glance, my father, the grandson of a Confederate soldier, may not have seen the most obvious ally to the movement, a white Southerner from (inaudible), he was no young idealist fresh out of college, nor was racial equality a pressing goal of the majority of his Texas constituents; rather, the opposite. But as a teacher, he had seen the plight of his Mexican-American students. And Dr. King's powerful dream found a kindred spirit in my father, who cared deeply about fairness and equality. 13:40:40 When the tragedy of President Kennedy's assassination propelled him to the presidency, he used every power at his disposal, including this considerable legislative muscle, to push through the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. In Daddy's last year in the White House, signing the third Civil Rights bill, he wrote, "I do not exaggerate when I say that the proudest moments of my presidency have been times such as this, when I have signed into law the promises of a century." Recently, the Supreme Court struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, which did so much to combat voting inequality in our country. Now, 50 years later, there are still many examples from current events on how much farther we have yet to go to achieve that promise of a colorblind America. 13:41:56 But remember, too, that fairness and equality are powerful ideas that resonate with all Americans. And with a message as inspiring and timeless as the dream of Dr. King, there will be unexpected allies, if only we look for them. And you know what his wife said? Coretta Scott King said, "Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation." And she was right. So let's go forth, like Jimmie Foxx (ph) said. Thank you. 13:42:50 Ambassador Caroline Kennedy KENNEDY: Good afternoon. Fifty years ago, my father watched from the White House as Dr. King and thousands of others recommitted America to our highest ideals. Over the preceding months, President Kennedy has put the full force of the federal government on the side of the movement, calling on all Americans to recognize that we faced a moral crisis, as old as the Scriptures and as clear as the American Constitution. 13:43:24 His brothers, my Uncle Bobby and Teddy, my Aunt Eunice, continued his committed, working to expand the promises made here to others suffering from discrimination and exclusion. A few months ago, after the Trayvon Martin verdict was handed down, and the Supreme Court eviscerated the Voting Rights Act, President Obama did the same, reminding us all that despite our remarkable progress, each generation must rededicate itself to the unfinished work of building a free and just America. 13:44:03 Fifty years ago, our parents and grandparents marched for jobs and freedom. We have suffered and sacrificed too much to let their dream become a memory. 13:44:13 The children in our failing schools are all of our children. The victims of hate crimes and gun violence are our brothers and sisters. 13:44:23 In the words of an old Japanese proverb, "the water flows on, but the river remains." Now is our turn to live up to our parents' dream, to draw renewed strength from what happened here 50 years ago, and work together for a better world. Thank you. 13:44:52 Forest Whitaker 13:44:59 it's a great honor to be here on 50th anniversary 13:45:10 each of you came here with individual goals but we all share common bond. Your presence says you care and want to bring more peace love and harmony. Together we must embrace this moment. I've observed revolutions, social change firsthand 13:45:53 I am often reminded of the marches and sit ins we've experienced here. Hate is too great a burden 13:46:15 we've all see images of those days. Pictures of segregated water fountains. 13:46:33 many remain nameless but their heroic faces captured in portraits of the past. They risked their lives to bring about change 13:47:00 I want you to recognize the hero that exist inside yourselves. Every step you take around an unknown corner marks your bravery. 13:47:27 and if I were to take a picture of this crowd right now, people would see some of your faces in the movements of today. Individuals who stood in the very spot you stand today, you have responsibility to carry the torch 13:48:04 let's be the generation to make a true difference in the world. 13:48:43 so as the bell rings today, my dream is something will resonate inside you and me that will remind us each of our common bond. 13:49:42 BeBe, Marvin and Carvin Winans perform "God Before Us" 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. 14:05:35 Oprah Winfrey 14:05:45 OPRAH WINFREY: Hello everybody. I am absolutely thrilled to be here. I remember when I was 9 years old and the march was occurring and I asked my mama, can I go to the march? It took me 50 years, but I'm here. On this date in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Took me 50 years, but I'm here. 14:06:05 On this date, in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Dr. King was the passionate voice that awakened the (conscience ?) of a nation and inspired people all over the world. The power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. "Let Freedom Ring" was Dr. King's closing call for a better and more just America. 14:06:47 So today, people from all walks of life will gather at 3 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we re-affirm our commitment to Dr. King's ideals. Dr. King believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. He challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. 14:07:29 So as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made -- and we've made a lot -- but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. It's an opportunity today to recall where we once were in this nation and to think about that young man, who, at 34 years old, stood up here and was able to force an entire country to wake up, to look at itself and to eventually change. 14:08:04 And as we, the people continue to honor the dream of a man and a movement, a man who in his short life saw suffering and injustice and refused to look the other way, we can be inspired and we too can be courageous by continuing to walk in the footsteps in the path that he forged. He is the one who reminded us that we will never walk alone. He was, after all, a drum major for justice. So as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom, who stood up for us, whose shoulders we now stand on. And as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves: How will the dream live in me, in you, in all of us? As the bells toll, let us remind ourselves: "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." As the bells toll, we commit to a life of service because Dr. King, one of my favorite quotes from him is, "Not everybody can be famous, but everybody can be great because greatness is determined by service." 14:09:36 So we ask ourselves, what are we doing for others to lift others up? And as the bells toll, we must recommit to let the love that abides and connects each of us to shine through and let freedom ring. 14:11:47 President Barack Obama walking out with First Lady Michelle Obama, Former President Bill Clinton, and Former President Jimmy Carter 14:12:52 Identity4Pop performs "The Star Spangled Banner" 14:10:28 U.S. Congressman John Lewis, Georgia (5th District) 14:15:01 LEWIS: President and Mrs. Obama, President Clinton, President Carter. I want to thank Bernice King, the King family, and the National Park Service for inviting me here to speak today. 14:15:30 When I look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, it seems to realize what Otis Redding was singing about and what Martin Luther King Jr. preached about, this moment in our history has been a long time coming, but a change has come. We are standing here in the shadow of Abraham Lincoln 150 years after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and only 50 years after the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. 14:16:07 We have come a great distance in this country in the 50 years, but we still have a great distance to go before we fulfill the dream of Martin Luther King. Sometimes I hear people saying, nothing has changed, but for someone to grow up the way I grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama to now be serving in the United States Congress, makes me want to tell them, come and walk in my shoes. 14:17:00 Come walk in the shoes of those who were attacked by police dogs, fire hoses, and nightsticks, arrested and taken to jail. I first came to Washington in the same year that President Barack Obama was born to participate in a Freedom Ride. In 1961, black and white people could not be seated together on a Greyhound bus. So we decided to take an integrated-fashion ride from here to New Orleans. But we never made it there. Over 400 of us were arrested and jailed in Mississippi during the Freedom Rides. A bus was set on fire in Anderson, Alabama. We were beaten, and arrested, and jailed. But we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. I came back here again in June of 1963 (inaudible) as the new chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. We met with President Kennedy, who said the fires of frustration were burning throughout America. 14:18:16 In 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. We had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, count the number of bubbles in a bar of soap, or the number of jelly beans in a jar. Hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the South for trying to participate in the democratic process. Medgar Evers had been killed in Mississippi. And that is why we told President Kennedy we intended to March on Washington, to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in America. 14:18:53 On August 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. Thousands of troops surrounded the city. Workers were told to stay home that day. Liquor stores were closed. But the march was so orderly, so peaceful, it was filled with dignity and self- respect. Because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. People came that day to that march dressed like they were on their way to a religious service. As Mahalia Jackson sang, "How We Got Over." "How We Got Over." She drew thousands of us together in a strange sense, it seemed like the whole place started rocking. 14:19:58 We truly believe that in every human being, even those who were violent toward us, there was a spark of the divine. And no person had the right to scar or destroy that spark. Martin Luther King Jr. taught us the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. 14:20:22 He taught us to have the power to forgive, the capacity to be reconciled. He taught us to stand up, to speak up, to speak out, to find a way to get in the way. 14:20:43 People were advised by their vision of justice and equality, and they were willing to put their bodies on the line for a greater cause, greater than themselves. Not one incident of violence was reported that day. A spirit had engulfed the leadership of the movement and all of its participants. The spirit of Dr. King's words captured the hearts of people not just around America but around the world. 14:21:28 On that day, Martin Luther King Jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. He transformed these marble steps of the Lincoln Memorial into a modern-day pulpit. He changed us forever. After the ceremony was over, President Kennedy invited us back down to the White House. He met us standing in the door of the Oval Office. And he was beaming like a proud father, As he shook the hand of each one of us, he said, "You did a good job. You did a good job." And he said to Dr. King, "And you have a dream." 14:22:13 Fifty years later, we can ride anywhere we want to ride. We can stay where we want to stay. Those signs that said "white" and "colored" are gone. And you won't see them any more... ... except in a museum, in a book, or on a video. 14:22:35 But there are still invisible signs, barriers in the heart of humankind that form a gulf between us. Too many of us still believe our differences define us instead of the divine spark that runs through all of human creation. 14:22:55 The scars and stains of racism still remain deeply embedded in American society, whether it is stop-and-frisk in New York or injustice in Trayvon Martin's case in Florida. The mass incarceration of millions of Americans. Immigrants hiding in fear in the shadow of our society. Unemployment. Homelessness. Poverty. Hunger. Or the renewed struggle for voting rights. So I say to each one of us today, we must never, ever give up. We must never ever give in. We must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. 14:23:46 We did go to jail. But we got the Civil Rights Act. We got a Voting Rights Act. We got a Fair Housing Act. But we must continue to push. We must continue to work. As the late A. Philip Randolph (ph) said, the organizer for the march in 1963, and the dean of the civil rights movement once said, we may have come here on different ships, but we all are in the same boat now. 14:24:27 So, it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, Latino, Asian American or Native American, whether we are gay or straight. We're one people. We are one family. We all live in the same house, not just the American house but the world's house. 14:24:46 And when we finally accept these truths, then we will be able to fulfill Dr. King's dreams to build a beloved community, a nation and a world at peace with itself. Thank you very much. 14:25:20 President Jimmy Carter PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER: Well, I'm greatly honored to be here. And I realize that most people know that it's highly unlikely that any of us three over on my right would have served in the White House or be on this platform had it not been for Martin Luther King Jr. and his movement and his crusade for civil rights. So we are grateful to him for us being here. (Applause.) 14:25:57 I'm also proud that I came from the same part of the South as he did. He never lost contact with the folks back home. He was helping Tennessee garbage workers, as you know, when he gave his life to a racist bullet. 14:26:14 I remember how it was, back in those days. I left Georgia in 1943 for college and the Navy. And when I came home from submarine duty, I was put on the Board of Education. I suggested to the other members that we visit all the schools in the county. They had never done this before, and they were reluctant to go with me. 14:26:40 But we finally did it, and we found that white children had three nice brick buildings, but the African-American children had 26 different elementary schools in the county. They were in churches, in front living rooms and a few in barns. They had so many because there were no school buses for African-American children, and they had to be within walking distance of where they went to class. Their schoolbooks were outdated and worn out, and every one of them had a white child's name in the front of the book. We finally obtained some buses. And then the state legislature ordained that the front fenders be painted black. Not even the school buses could be equal to each other. One of the finest moments of my life was 10 months after Dr. King's famous speech right here, when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. I was really grateful when the King family adopted me as their presidential candidate in 1976. (Cheers.) Every handshake from Dr. King, from Daddy King, every hug from Coretta got me a million Yankee votes. (Laughter.) Daddy King prayed at the Democratic Convention -- for quite a while, I might say -- (laughter) -- and Coretta was in the hotel room with me and Rosalyn when I was elected president. My Presidential Medal of Freedom citation to Coretta for Dr. King said, and I quote, "He gazed at the great wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. He made our nation stronger because he made it better." 14:28:47 We were able to create a national historic site where Dr. King lived, worked and worshipped. It's next door to the Carter Center, linked together just by a walking path. And at the Carter Center, we try to make the (principles ?) that we follow the same as his, emphasizing peace and human rights. I remember that Daddy King said, too many people think Martin freed only black people; in truth, he helped to free all people. (Applause.) And Daddy King added, it's not enough to have a right to sit at a lunch counter if you can't afford to buy a meal. And he also said, the ghetto still looks the same even from the front seat of a bus. Perhaps the most challenging statement of Martin Luther King Jr. was, and I quote: "The crucial question of our time is how to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence." In the Nobel Prize ceremony of 2002, I said that my fellow Georgian was, and I quote again, "the greatest leader that my native state, and perhaps my native country, has ever produced." And I was not excluding presidents and even the Founding Fathers when I said this. I believe we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the new ID requirements to exclude certain voters, especially African- Americans. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the Supreme Court striking down a crucial part of the Voters' Rights Act just recently passed overwhelmingly by Congress. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to unemployment among African- Americans being almost twice the rate of white people and for teenagers at 42 percent. I think we would all know how Dr. King would have reacted to our country being awash in guns and for more and more states passing "stand your ground" laws. I think we know how Dr. King would have reacted for people of District of Columbia still not having full citizenship rights. (Cheers, applause.) And I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to have more than 835,000 African-American men in prison, five times as many as when I left office, and with one-third of all African-American males being destined to be in prison in their lifetimes. 14:31:44 Well, there's a tremendous agenda ahead of us, and I'm thankful to Martin Luther King Jr. that his dream is still alive. Thank you. 14:32:00 President Bill Clinton 14:32:11 CLINTON: Thank you, Mr. President, Mrs. Obama, President Carter, Vice President Biden (inaudible) Biden. I want to thank my great friend, Reverend Bernice King, and the King family for inviting me to be part of this 50th observation of one of the most important days in American history. Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph, John Lewis and Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Myrlie Evers, Daisy Bates (ph), and all the others who led there massive march knew what they were doing on this hallowed ground, in the shadow of Lincoln's statue the burning memory of the fact that he gave his life to preserve the Union and end slavery. 14:33:27 Martin Luther King urged his crowd not to drink from the cup of bitterness, but to reach across the racial divide, because, he said, we cannot walk alone. Their destiny is tied up with our destiny. Their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. He urged the victims of racial violence to meet white Americans with an outstretched hand, not a clenched fist, and in so doing to prove the redeeming power of unearned suffering. 14:33:52 And then he dreamed of an America where all citizens would sit together at a table of brotherhood where little white boys and girls and little black boys and girls would hold hands across the color lines, where his own children would be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. 14:34:29 This march and that speech changed America. They opened minds, they melted hearts, and they moved millions, including a 17-year-old boy watching alone in his home in Arkansas. 14:34:43 It was an empowering moment but also an empowered moment. As the great chronicler of those years Taylor Branch wrote, the movement here gained a force to open, quote, "the stubborn gates of freedom." And out flowed the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, immigration reform, Medicare, Medicaid, open housing. 14:35:09 It is well to remember that the leaders and foot soldiers here were both idealists and tough realists. They had to be. It was a violent time. Just three months later we lost President Kennedy. And we thank God that President Johnson came in and fought for all those issues I just mentioned. Just five years later, we lost Senator Kennedy. And in between, there was the carnage of the fights for jobs, freedom and equality. Just 18 days after this march, four little children were killed in the Birmingham church bombing. Then there were the Ku Klux Klan murders, the Mississippi lynching and a dozen others until in 1968, Dr. King was martyred, still marching for jobs and freedom. What a debt we owe to those people who came here 50 years ago. The martyrs paid it all for a dream, a dream as John Lewis said that millions have now actually lived. So how are we gonna repay the debt? Dr. King's dream of interdependence, his prescription of whole- hearted cooperation across racial lines, they ring as true today as they did 50 years ago. Oh, yes, we face terrible political gridlock now. Read a little history. It's nothing new. Yes, there remain racial inequalities in employment, income, health, wealth, incarceration and in the victims and perpetrators of violent crime. But we don't face beatings, lynchings and shootings for our political beliefs anymore. And I would respectfully suggest that Martin Luther King did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political gridlock. It is time to stop complaining and put our shoulders against the stubborn gates... ... holding the American people back. We cannot be disheartened by the forces of resistance to building a modern economy of good jobs and rising incomes or to rebuilding our education system to give all our children a common core of knowledge necessary to ensure success, or to give Americans of all ages access to affordable college and training programs. And we thank the president for his efforts in those regards. 14:38:13 We cannot relax in our efforts to implement health care reform in a way that ends discrimination against those with preexisting conditions, one of which is inadequate income to pay for rising health care. A health care reform that will lower costs and lengthen lives. Nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses and our climate. We must push open those stubborn gates. We cannot be discouraged by a Supreme Court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the Voting Rights Act because -- look at the states (ph). It made it harder for African-Americans and Hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. What do you know? They showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. So obviously, we don't need any kind of law. 14:39:27 But a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. We must open those stubborn gates. And let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole American landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. And the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. It has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gates and if we do it together. 14:40:20 The choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago. Cooperate and thrive, or fight with each other and fall behind. We should all thank God for Dr. King and John Lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide it -- a dream they paid for, like our founders, with their lives, their fortune, their sacred honor. And we thank them for reminding us that America is always becoming, always on a journey. And we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. God bless them and God bless America. 14:41:22 Martin L. King III 14:41:26 MARTIN LUTHER KING III: Mr. President, Madam First Lady, President Carter, President Clinton, Congressman Lewis, and to all program participants, this is an unusual moment in our world history as we observe this 50th anniversary. And I'm so thankful for the opportunity to really thank America for helping to realize the dream, although I must say it is not yet realized. And so we must redouble and quadruple our efforts. So much has been said today, and I was 5 years old in 1963, when dad delivered his message. And so I'm blessed that we were able to bring our daughter, who's hopefully paying attention, 5 -- 3 years -- 5 years old, so that she can appreciate this history and continue to participate. There are two quick other things that I want to say. I've been speaking all week, as many of us have. But I'm reminded that Dad challenged us. That's what he did, challenged our nation to be a better nation for all God's children. I'm reminded that he taught us the power of love, agape love, the love that is totally unselfish; you love someone if you're old or young, rich or poor, black or white, Native America or Hispanic- American or Latino. It does not matter. You love them because God calls us to do that. Love and forgiveness is what we need more of, not just in our nation but really throughout the world. And so I want to rush to tell you Dad said the ultimate measure of a human being is where one stands not in times of comfort and convenience, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy. He went on to say that on some questions, cowardice asks, is a position safe; expediency asks, is a position politic; vanity asks, is a position popular, but that something deep inside called conscience asks, is a position right. So he often talked about sometimes we must take positions that are neither safe nor popular nor politic, but we must take those position because our conscience tells us they are right. (Applause.) I'd finally say this afternoon, we've got a lot of work to do. But none of us should be (in any ways tired ?). Why? Because we've come much too far from where we started. You see, no one ever told any of us that our roads would be easy. But I know our God -- our God -- our God did not bring any of us this far to leave us. Thank you. God bless you. 14:44:57 Christine King Farris 14:45:05 CHRISTINE KING FARRIS: Thank you. President Obama and Mrs. Obama, former Presidents Clinton and Carter, other distinguished program participants, I am honored to be among you today and to address this historic gathering. I don't know if I am the most senior speaker to address this assemblage today, but I am certainly and surely the only person alive who knew Martin Luther King Jr. when he was a baby. (Laughter, applause.) It has been my great privilege to watch my little brother grow and thrive and develop into a fine man and then a great leader whose legacy continues to inspire countless millions around the world. Unfortunately, a bout with a flu virus 50 years ago prevented me from attending the original march. But I was able to watch it on television, and I was as awestruck as everyone else. I knew Martin was an excellent preacher, because I had seen him deliver, on many occasions. But on that day, Martin achieved greatness because he melded the hope and dreams of millions into a grand vision of healing, reconciliation and brotherhood. The dream my brother shared with our nation and world on that sweltering day of days 50 years ago continues to nurture and sustain nonviolent activists worldwide in their struggle for freedom and human rights. Indeed, this gathering provides a powerful testament of hope and proof positive that Martin's great dream will live on in the hearts of humanity for generations to come. Our challenge, then, as followers of Martin Luther King, Jr. is to now honor his life, leadership and legacy by living our lives in a way that carries forward the unfinished work. There is no better way to honor his sacrifices and contributions than by becoming champions of nonviolence in our homes and communities, in our places of work, worship and learning. Everywhere, every day, the dream Martin shared on that day a half century ago remains a definitive statement of the American dream, the beautiful vision of a diverse freedom-loving people united in our love for justice, brotherhood and sisterhood. Yes, they can slay the dreamer, but no, they cannot destroy his immortal dream. 14:49:18 But Martin's dream is a vision not yet to be realized, a dream yet unfilled, and we have much to do before we can celebrate the dream as reality, as the suppression of voting rights and horrific violence that has taken the lives of Trayvon Martin and young people all across America has so painfully demonstrated. But despite the influences and challenges we face, we are here today to affirm the dream. We are not going to be discouraged, we are not going to be distracted, we are not going to be defeated. Instead, we are going forward into this uncertain future, with courage and determination, to make the dream a vibrant reality. And so the work to fulfill the dream goes on, and despite the daunting challenges we face on the road to the beloved community, I feel that the dream is sinking deep and nourishing roots all across America and around the world. May it continue to thrive and spread and help bring justice, peace and liberation to all humanity. Thank you, and God bless you all. 14:51:40 Rev. Dr. Bernice King, CEO of The King Center for Non-Violent Social Change 14:51:30 REVEREND BERNICE KING: President Obama, Mrs. Obama, Presidents Carter and Clinton, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, my brother Martin III, Dexter Scott King, to my entire family, I was five months old when my father delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech, and I probably was somewhere crawling on the floor or taking a nap after having a meal. But today is a glorious day because on this program today we have witnessed a manifestation of the beloved community. And we thank everyone for their presence here today. 14:52:21 Today we have been honored to have three presidents of the United States. Fifty years ago, the president did not attend. Today we are honored to have many women in the planning and mobilization of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. (Cheers, applause.) And 50 years ago, there was not a single woman on the program. Today we are honored to have not just one young person, but several young people on the program today. It is certainly a tribute to the work and the legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. Fifty years ago today, in the symbolic shadow of this great emancipator Abraham Lincoln, my father the great liberator stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring for all people who were being manacled by a system of segregation and discrimination. Fifty years ago, he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. The reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963, through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world and has summoned us once again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. Since that time, as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act in 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for all, regardless of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, disability, class or sexual orientation. 14:54:15 Fifty years later, in this year of jubilee, we're standing once again in the shadow of that "Great Emancipator," having been summoned to these hallowed grounds to reverberate the message of that great liberator, for there's a remnant from 1963, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, that still remains, who has come to bequeath that message of freedom to a new generation of people who must now carry that message -- (cheers) -- in their time, in their community, amongst their tribes and amongst their nations of the world. We must keep the sound and the message of freedom and justice going. It was my mother, as has been said previously, Coretta Scott King, who in fact 30 years ago assembled a Coalition of Conscience that started us on this whole path of remembering the anniversary of the March on Washington. She reminded that struggle is a never-ending process; freedom is never really won. You earn it and win it in every generation. And so we come once again to let freedom ring, because if freedom stops ringing, then the sound will disappear, and the atmosphere will be charged with something else. Fifty years later, we come once again to this special landing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to reflect, to renew and to rejuvenate for the continued struggle of freedom and justice. 14:56:06 For today, 50 years later, my friends, we are still crippled by practices and policies steeped in racial pride, hatred and hostility, some of which have us standing our ground rather than finding common ground. We are still chained by economic disparities, income and class inequalities and conditions of poverty for many of God's children around this nation and the world. We're still bound by a cycle of civil unrest and inherent social biases in our nations and worlds that oftentimes degenerate into violence and destruction, especially against women and children. We're at this landing, and now we must break the cycle. The Prophet King spoke the vision. He made it plain, and we must run with it in this generation. His prophetic vision and magnificent dream described the yearning of people all over the world to have the freedom to prosper in life, which is the right to pursue one's aspirations, purpose, dreams, well- being without oppressive, depressive, repressive practices, behaviors, laws and conditions that diminish one's dignity and that denies one life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- the freedom to participate in government, which is the right to have a voice and a say in how you are represented, regulated and governed without threats of tyranny, disenfranchisement, exclusionary tactics and behaviors, and to have freedom to peacefully coexist, which is the right to be respected in one's selfhood, individuality and uniqueness without fear of attack, assault or abuse. In 1967 my father asked a poignant and critical question: Where do we go from here, chaos or community? And we say, with a resounding voice, no to chaos and yes to community. If we're going to rid ourselves of the chaos, then we must make a necessary shift. Nothing is more tragic than for us to fail to achieve new attitudes and new mental outlooks. We have a tremendous and unprecedented opportunity to reset the very means by which we live, work and enjoy our lives. If we're going to continue the struggle of freedom and create true community, then we will have to be relentless in exposing, confronting and ridding ourselves of the mindset of pride and greed and selfishness and hate and lust and fear and idleness and lack of purpose and lack of love, as my brother said, for our neighbor. We must seize this moment, the dawning of a new day, the emergence of a new generation who is postured to change the world through collaborative power, facilitated by unconditional love. And as I close, I call upon my brother by the name of Nehemiah, who was also in the midst of rebuilding a community. And in the midst of rebuilding a community, he brought the leaders and the rulers and the rest of the people together, and he told them that the work is great and large, and we are widely separated one from another on the wall, but when you hear the sound of the trumpet, and might I say -- (cheers, applause) -- when you hear the sound of the bells today, come to that spot, and our God will fight with us. And so today we're going to let freedom ring all across this nation. We're going to let freedom ring everywhere we go. If freedom is going to ring in Libya, in Syria, in Egypt, in Florida, then we must reach across the table, feed each other and let freedom ring. 15:00:36 Participants gathering around bell 15:01:19 ringing bell 15:02:03 performance by Heather Headley 15:05:31 President Barack Obama takes podium 15:05:54 PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: To the King family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to President Clinton, President Carter, Vice President Biden, Jill, fellow Americans, five decades ago today, Americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 15:07:06 In 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. And so they came by the thousands, from every corner of our country -- men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. Across the land, congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. In the middle of the night, entire blocks of Harlem came out to wish them well. With the few dollars they scrimped from their labor, some bought tickets and boarded buses, even if they couldn't always sit where they wanted to sit. Those with less money hitchhiked, or walked. They were seamstresses, and steelworkers, and students, and teachers, maids and pullman porters. They shared simple meals and bunked together on floors. And then, on a hot summer day, they assembled here, in our nation's capital, under the shadow of the great emancipator, to offer testimony of injustice, to petition their government for redress and to awaken America's long-slumbering conscience. 15:09:17 We rightly and best remember Dr. King's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. His words belong to the ages, possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. 15:09:51 But we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose names never appeared in the history books, never got on TV. Many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters, had lived in towns where they couldn't vote, in cities where their votes didn't matter. There were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. They had seen loved ones beaten and children fire- hosed. And they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. 15:10:54 And yet they chose a different path. In the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormentors. In the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonviolence. Willingly, they went to jail to protest unjust laws, their cells swelling with the sound of freedom songs. A lifetime of indignities had taught them that no man can take away the dignity and grace that God grants us. They had learned through hard experience what Frederick Douglas once taught: that freedom is not given; it must be won through struggle and discipline, persistence and faith. That was the spirit they brought here that day. 15:11:55 That was the spirit young people like John Lewis brought that day. That was the spirit that they carried with them like a torch back to their cities and their neighborhoods, that steady flame of conscience and courage that would sustain them through the campaigns to come, through boycotts and voter registration drives and smaller marches, far from the spotlight, through the loss of four little girls in Birmingham, the carnage of Edmund Pettus Bridge and the agony of Dallas, California, Memphis. Through setbacks and heartbreaks and gnawing doubt, that flame of justice flickered and never died. And because they kept marching, America changed. Because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. Because they marched, the voting rights law was signed. Because they marched, doors of opportunity and education swung open so their daughters and sons could finally imagine a life for themselves beyond washing somebody else's laundry or shining somebody else's shoes. (Applause.) Because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and Congress changed and, yes, eventually the White House changed. (Cheers, applause.) 15:13:58 Because they marched, America became more free and more fair, not just for African-Americans but for women and Latinos, Asians and Native Americans, for Catholics, Jews and Muslims, for gays, for Americans with disabilities. America changed for you and for me. And the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an Iron Curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside South Africa who would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. (Applause.) Those are the victories they won, with iron wills and hope in their hearts. That is the transformation that they wrought with each step of their well-worn shoes. That's the depth that I and millions of Americans owe those maids, those laborers, those porters, those secretaries -- folks who could have run a company, maybe, if they had ever had a chance; those white students who put themselves in harm's way even though they didn't have to -- (applause) -- those Japanese- Americans who recalled their own interment, those Jewish Americans who had survived the Holocaust, people who could have given up and given in but kept on keeping on, knowing that weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning -- (cheers, applause) -- on the battlefield of justice, men and women without rank or wealth or title or fame would liberate us all, in ways that our children now take for granted as people of all colors and creeds live together and learn together and walk together, and fight alongside one another and love one another, and judge one another by the content of our character in this greatest nation on Earth. 15:16:32 To dismiss the magnitude of this progress, to suggest, as some sometimes do, that little has changed -- that dishonors the courage and the sacrifice of those who paid the price to march in those years. (Applause.) Medgar Evers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, Martin Luther King Jr., they did not die in vain. (Applause.) Their victory was great. But we would dishonor those heroes as well to suggest that the work of this nation is somehow complete. The arc of the moral universe may bend towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. To secure the gains this country has made requires constant vigilance, not complacency. Whether it's by challenging those who erect new barriers to the vote or ensuring that the scales of justice work equally for all in the criminal justice system and not simply a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails -- (applause) -- it requires vigilance. 15:18:12 And we'll suffer the occasional setback. But we will win these fights. This country has changed too much. (Applause.) People of good will, regardless of party, are too plentiful for those with ill will to change history's currents. (Applause.) In some ways, though, the securing of civil rights, voting rights, the eradication of legalized discrimination -- the very significance of these victories may have obscured a second goal of the march, for the men and women who gathered 50 years ago were not there in search of some abstract idea. They were there seeking jobs as well as justice -- (applause) -- not just the absence of oppression but the presence of economic opportunity. For what does it profit a man, Dr. King would ask, to sit at an integrated lunch counter if he can't afford the meal? This idea that -- that one's liberty is linked to one's livelihood, that the pursuit of happiness requires the dignity of work, the skills to find work, decent pay, some measure of material security -- this idea was not new. 15:20:06 Lincoln himself understood the Declaration of Independence in such terms, as a promise that in due time, the weights should be lifted from the shoulders of all men and that all should have an equal chance. Dr. King explained that the goals of African-Americans were identical to working people of all races: decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing, old age security, health and welfare measures -- conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community. 15:20:54 What King was describing has been the dream of every American. It's what's lured for centuries new arrivals to our shores. And it's along this second dimension of economic opportunity, the chance through honest toil to advance one's station in life, that the goals of 50 years ago have fallen most short. Yes, there have been examples of success within black America that would have been unimaginable a half-century ago. But as has already been noted, black unemployment has remained almost twice as high as white employment (sic), Latino unemployment close behind. The gap in wealth between races has not lessened, it's grown. 15:21:52 As President Clinton indicated, the position of all working Americans, regardless of color, has eroded, making the dream Dr. King described even more elusive. For over a decade, working Americans of all races have seen their wages and incomes stagnate. Even as corporate profits soar, even as the pay of a fortunate few explodes, inequality has steadily risen over the decades. Upward mobility has become harder. In too many communities across this country in cities and suburbs and rural hamlets, the shadow of poverty casts a pall over our youth, their lives a fortress of substandard schools and diminished prospects, inadequate health care and perennial violence. 15:22:50 And so as we mark this anniversary, we must remind ourselves that the measure of progress for those who marched 50 years ago was not merely how many blacks had joined the ranks of millionaires; it was whether this country would admit all people who were willing to work hard, regardless of race, into the ranks of a middle-class life. (Applause.) The test was not and never has been whether the doors of opportunity are cracked a bit wider for a few. It was whether our economic system provides a fair shot for the many, for the black custodian and the white steelworker, the immigrant dishwasher and the Native American veteran. To win that battle, to answer that call -- this remains our great unfinished business. 15:23:54 We shouldn't fool ourselves. The task will not be easy. Since 1963 the economy's changed. The twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class, reduced the bargaining power of American workers. And our politics has suffered. Entrenched interests -- those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it just to fund crumbling schools -- that all these things violated sound economic principles. 15:24:53 We'd be told that growing inequality was the price for a growing economy, a measure of the free market -- that greed was good and compassion ineffective, and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. And then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle-class Americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity -- that distant bureaucrats were taking their hard-earned dollars to benefit the welfare cheat or the illegal immigrant. 15:25:46 And then, if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us, claiming to push for change, lost our way. The anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. Legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse- making for criminal behavior. Racial politics could cut both ways as the transformative message of unity and brotherhood was drowned out by the language of recrimination. And what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all Americans to work hard and get ahead was too often framed as a mere desire for government support, as if we had no agency in our own liberation, as if poverty was an excuse for not raising your child and the bigotry of others was reason to give up on yourself. All of that history is how progress stalled. That's how hope was diverted. It's how our country remained divided. But the good news is, just as was true in 1963, we now have a choice. We can continue down our current path in which the gears of this great democracy grind to a halt and our children accept a life of lower expectations, where politics is a zero-sum game, where a few do very well while struggling families of every race fight over a shrinking economic pie. That's one path. Or we can have the courage to change. 15:27:52 The March on Washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history, that we are masters of our fate. But it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. We'll have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. 15:28:26 And I believe that spirit is there, that true force inside each of us. I see it when a white mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. I see it when the black youth thinks of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. It's there when the native born recognizing that striving spirit of a new immigrant, when the interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple who were discriminated against and understands it as their own. That's where courage comes from, when we turn not from each other or on each other but towards one another, and we find that we do not walk alone. That's where courage comes from. (Applause.) And with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. With that courage, we can stand together for the right to health care in the richest nation on earth for every person. (Applause.) With that courage, we can stand together for the right of every child, from the corners of Anacostia to the hills of Appalachia, to get an education that stirs the mind and captures the spirit and prepares them for the world that awaits them. (Applause.) With that courage, we can feed the hungry and house the homeless and transform bleak wastelands of poverty into fields of commerce and promise. America, I know the road will be long, but I know we can get there. Yes, we will stumble, but I know we'll get back up. That's how a movement happens. That's how history bends. That's how, when somebody is faint of heart, somebody else brings them along and says, come on, we're marching. (Cheers, applause.) There's a reason why so many who marched that day and in the days to come were young, for the young are unconstrained by habits of fear, unconstrained by the conventions of what is. They dared to dream different and to imagine something better. And I am convinced that same imagination, the same hunger of purpose serves in this generation. 15:31:11 We might not face the same dangers as 1963, but the fierce urgency of now remains. We may never duplicate the swelling crowds and dazzling processions of that day so long ago, no one can match King's brilliance, but the same flames that lit the heart of all who are willing to take a first step for justice, I know that flame remains. (Applause.) That tireless teacher who gets to class early and stays late and dips into her own pocket to buy supplies because she believes that every child is her charge -- she's marching. (Applause.) That successful businessman who doesn't have to, but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, maybe an ex-con, who's down on his luck -- he's marching. 15:32:12 (Cheers, applause.) The mother who pours her love into her daughter so that she grows up with the confidence to walk through the same doors as anybody's son -- she's marching. (Cheers, applause.) The father who realizes the most important job he'll ever have is raising his boy right, even if he didn't have a father, especially if he didn't have a father at home -- he's marching. (Applause.) The battle-scarred veterans who devote themselves not only to helping their fellow warriors stand again and walk again and run again, but to keep serving their country when they come home -- they are marching. (Applause.) Everyone who realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day, that change does not come from Washington but to Washington, that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship -- you are marching. (Applause.) 15:33:16 And that's the lesson of our past, that's the promise of tomorrow, that in the face of impossible odds, people who love their country can change it. And when millions of Americans of every race and every region, every faith and every station can join together in a spirit of brotherhood, then those mountains will be made low, and those rough places will be made plain, and those crooked places, they straighten out towards grace, and we will vindicate the faith of those who sacrificed so much and live up to the true meaning of our creed as one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. (Cheers, applause.) 15:33:56 Obama waving, walking from podium 15:34:59 Barack and Michelle hugging and gladhanding with King family onstage 15:36:12 Obama hugging Oprah 15:37:19 Barack and Michelle walking up steps away from event 15:37:29 Barack and Michelle Obama waving 15:37:50 Obamas with Clinton and Carter waving, walking away from event Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech. The final refrain of Martin Luther King Jr.'s most famous speech will echo around the world as bells from churches, schools and historical monuments "let freedom ring" in celebration of a powerful moment in civil rights history. Organizers said sites in nearly every state will ring their bells at 3pm today, the hour when King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington. President Obama, and former Presidents Clinton and Carter will deliver speeches at the Lincoln Memorial to commemorate the anniversary.
MLK MARCH ANNIVERSARY CEREMONY ABC POOL CUTS CAM P2
EXT BROLL ABC POOL CUTS CAM POSITION LOW SHOT DURING 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MARCH CEREMONY Wednesday, August 28, 2013 LOG: March on Washington 50th Anniversary "Let Freedom Ring" at Lincoln Memorial SLUG: 0930 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 74 1530 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 71 AR: 16X9 DISC# NYRS: WASH HD 4 11:00 am - 12:00 pm 11:09:25 Geraldo Marshall (Trumpet Call) 11:11:28 REMARKS/ INTRO INVOCATION (Soledad O'Brien, Hill Harper) 11:14:49 Pastor A.R. Bernard (Invocation) 11:20:17 INTRO AMB. YOUNG (Hill Harper) 11:20:39 Ambassador Andrew Young YOUNG: I don't know about you, but I "Woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind" -- come on, help me -- "stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu" -- come on (inaudible) -- "Hallelujah." Well, "I'm walking and talking with my mind -- my mind, it was, stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelujah." Now, 50 years ago when we came here, we came from a battle. We came from a battle in Birmingham. But that was just a few months before -- before Martin Luther King came through to speak of his dream. 11:22:11 He had been through bombings, jailings, beatings. He had been snatched from his jailhouse cell in DeKalb County, and put in chains, and taken down to Reidsville Penitentiary in the middle of the night, and thought it was going to be his last night on earth. 11:22:31 He went through the battles of Albany and Birmingham, and came out victorious. But we knew that the fight was just beginning. And we knew that we had a long, long way to go, and this was just the start. Now, he came here representing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, saying that we were going to redeem the soul of America from the triple evils of racism, war and poverty. He came, not talking so much about racism nor war. His speech was about poverty. And he said that the Constitution was a promissory note, to which all of us would fall heir, but that when men and women of color presented their check at the bank of justice, it came back marked, "insufficient funds." But then he said he knew that wasn't the end. But 50 years later, we're still here trying (ph) to cash that bad check. Fifty years later, we're still dealing with all kinds of problems. And so we're not here to claim any victory. We're here to simply say that the struggle continues. But a long time ago, when Ralph Abernathy would stand with him, and things would get difficult, Ralph would say, "Well, I don't know what the future may hold, but I know who holds the future." 11:24:02 And Martin would say that, "The moral arch of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice." And then he would say, "Truth forever on the scaffold; wrong forever on the throne. But the scaffold sways the future, for behind the dim unknown, standeth God beneath the shadows keeping watch above His own." 11:24:22 So I want to say to you this morning, I want to say, "I've got a feeling everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right, be all right, be all right, be all right." Pray on, and stay on, and fight on. 11:25:34 Robby Novak, Kid President remarks 11:25:59 Jonathan B. Jarvis, 18th Director of the National Park Service remarks 11:26:08 there are countless photographs of that historic day, one with a pair of rangers with Dr King. Image captures small moment in great event, but captures role of nat'l parks service. 11:26:49 each monument you find a familiar parks service arrowhead. We are there to welcome visitors and preserve American stories they represent. Places civil rights was organized are now preserved as nat'l parks. The power of these places is to inspire each generation to have a dream. 11:28:11 we are very proud of the 2 rangers who stood here 50 years ago. My promise to you is that we will protect all the places entrusted to us with the highest standard of stewardship 11:28:48 Vincent C. Gray, Mayor of Washington 11:28:52 on behalf of 632,000 residents of DC, allow me to welcome you 11:29:08 dr king borrowed a lyric from one of our favorite patriotic songs: let freedom ring. 11:29:33 there was one place DR king didn't mention in that speech but later spoke forcefully: DC. That's because full freedom and democracy are still denied to those who live within sight of capitol dome. We have no voting representative in our own congress. We pay 3.5 billion dollars in taxes but don't get final say. We send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy but don't get to practice here at home 11:30:47 I implore, I hope all of you will stand with me when we say let freedom ring from mt st Albans, the bridges of Anacostia, from Capitol Hill itself, until all of the residents are truly free. 11:31:25 please join hands with us and make every American free 11:31:45 Reverend Wintley Phipps, Sr. 11:36:00 U.S. Senator Angus King, Maine 11:36:10 KING: Fifty years ago, Americans marched to this place. They came from the Northeast, from the West, from the Midwest, and they came from the South. They came by rail; they came by bus; they came by car. One even roller-skated here from Chicago. They slept the night before in buses, in cars, on friends' floors, and in churches. 11:36:42 Fifty years ago this morning, we started in small rivulets of people on the side streets of this great city. We joined together in larger streams, moving toward the main arteries of Washington. Then we came together in a mighty river of people down to this place, old, young, black, white, Protestant, Catholic, and Jew. We stopped at the Washington Monument and heard Peter, Paul and Mary sing of the hammer of justice and the bell of freedom. 11:37:26 Fifty years ago, Americans came to this place around a radical idea, an idea at the heart of the American experience, an idea new to the world in 1776, tested in 1865, renewed in 1963, and an idea still new and radical today: all men and women are created equal. All men and women are created equal. 11:38:08 Fifty years ago, at this place, at this sacred place, Americans sent a message to their leaders and around the world that the promise of equality of opportunity, equality before the law, equality in the right to freely participate in the benefits and responsibilities of citizenship applied to everyone in this country, not just the lucky few of the right color or the accident of birth. This is what Martin Luther King meant when he said that his dream was deeply rooted in the American dream. 11:39:03 And 150 years ago -- 150 years ago this summer -- a mighty battle was fought not far from this place. And this idea, the idea of equality, the idea of America hung in the balance. One of the soldiers on those hot July days was a young college professor from Maine named Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. And returning to the battlefield at Gettysburg many years later, he expressed the power of the place where such momentous deeds were done. Here is what he said. Here is what Joshua Chamberlain said. 11:39:44 "In great deeds, something abides. On great fields, something stays. Forms change and pass, bodies disappear, but spirits linger to consecrate the ground for the vision-place of souls. Generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field, to this deathless place, to ponder and dream. And, lo, the shadow of a mighty presence will wrap them in its bosom and the power of the vision shall pass into their souls." 11:40:53 Fifty years ago today, this place was a battlefield. No shots were fired, no cannons roared, but a battlefield nonetheless, a battlefield of ideas, the ideas that define us as a nation. As it was once said of Churchill, Martin Luther King on that day mobilized the English language and marched it into war, and, in the process, caught the conscience of a nation. And here today on these steps, 50 years on, indeed, something abides and the power of the vision has surely passed into our souls. 11:41:57 The Honorable Johnny L. DuPree, Mayor of Hattiesburg, Mississippi and Secretary, National Council of Black Mayors 11:42:15 decades and decades ago, blood sweat and tears all culminated in a march 11:42:31 if someone would have told me this country boy would become a mayor, I'd say they fell off a truck 11:42:52 some of y'all never had the opportunity to take a bath in a #3 tin tub, I did that 11:43:19 we've been entrusted with making the lives better of people that we serve 11:43:39 at one point, struggle was to gain citizenship, then vote, for brief period, African Americans held elected office during reconstruction 11:44:00 now one of the challenges is the freedom to govern. We must to locally what obama did nationally 11:44:15 we must go back to individuals who helped get us here and encourage them to make their voices heard 11:44:34 we did not quiver or retreat in face of injustice 11:44:55 it is because of those who marched on, even though wearied and bloodied, until they did what people said couldn't be done 11:45:40 Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey with Trayvon Martin's parents and Newtown victim father Mark Barden 11:50:17 INTRO CHARLES STEELE JR and MELANIE CAMPBELL (Soledad O'Brien) 11:50:46 Charles Steele, president emeritus & CEO, Southern Christian Leadership Council 11:53:27 Melanie Campbell, president & CEO, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation 11:56:45 U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro, Texas (20th District) 11:56:55 CASTRO: It's an honor to be here with you today. I come as a son of the great state of Texas, the home to the president who signed the most sweeping and important civil rights legislation in our nation's history. I am 38 years old. I also speak to you as someone of a grateful generation, grateful for the struggles and the movements and the blood and tears and all of the work of the civil rights pioneers who stood here 50 years ago today, and those who marched in the streets of Selma, those who organized people in factories and farms, those who took their battles to the courts, like Thurgood Marshall and Gus Garcia, those who organized people to vote and exercise our rights, those like Willie Velasquez. My own parents in the 1960s were very involved in a movement inspired by Martin Luther King and the men and women who stood here. They were active in the Chicano movement, or the Latino civil rights movement. 11:58:08 And I want to say thank you to them, and thank you to all of you. And I also want to make a promise to you. As somebody of a younger generation of Americans, I want to promise you that all of the struggles and all of the fights and all of the work and all of the years that you put in to making our country a better place, to helping our leaders understand that freedom and democracy are prerequisites to opportunity, I want you to know that this generation of Americans will not let that dream go. That we will carry on, and make sure that this country lives up to the values and principles for which you fought so hard. Thank you very much. 11:58:53 The Right Honorable Perry Christie, Prime Minister of the Bahamas CHRISTIE: Greetings from the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, your closest neighbor to the south. Martin Luther King, Jr., holds a very special place in the hearts and minds of Bahamians, not least because he spent time amongst us, both in Nassau and in the tiny island of Bimini, where in 1964, while on a brief vacation, he composed his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. On a clear night, the lights of metropolitan Miami are, in fact, visible from the shores of Bimini, dramatizing the closeness between our two nations. We are, after all, less than 50 miles apart. But however close that may be in the literal sense, we are in the geography of the soul even closer than that. The common ties of history, of ethnicity and culture, of migration, of a common heritage of struggle bind us together not just as neighbors, not even only as friends, but as true brothers and sisters. The message I bring to you today can be briefly stated, and it is this. As momentous as this occasion is, we do a grave injustice to ourselves and to all humanity if we leave here unresolved to carry on the greater noble struggle for which Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his life. The blood of this good man shed in Memphis still cries out across the years, cries out to each and every one of us, wherever we may be, all across the world, to stand up for freedom, to stand up for human dignity, to stand up for equality, to stand up for social justice, to stand up for right and not for wrong, for peace and not for war, for love and not for hate. It is the timelessness and universality of the message that he proclaimed and the heroic majesty of his personal example that explains why Martin Luther King, Jr., is as relevant today, as compelling today, as inspirational today as he was 50 years ago, when from the very precincts he delivered the oration that rocked the conscience of America and the world. When he spoke as he did that day, we somehow knew, we somehow felt that his message was coming from a place that was not only deeper than himself, but deep within us all. He had awakened to the call of that place and was rousing us from our slumber so that we could take our own inner soundings and hear it, too. In so doing, he gave language to our deepest yearning for a better life. Martin Luther King's work remains unfinished. This then must be for all of us a time not only for renewal, but above all, a profoundly personal level and the most authentic way possible, a time for rededication to the dream that Martin Luther King championed throughout his life. May the light of the flame continue to guide us as we go forward, each in his own way, each in his own nation to continue the work of Martin Luther King. In that way, and in no other way, we keep his dream alive and make it our own. 12:00 -1:00 p.m. 12:02:42 Junkaroo performance 12:07:08 Myrlie Evers Williams 12:07:19 50 years ago we gathered in this very same spot. We felt in the words of another Mississippian, fannie lou hamer, I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. And I do believe that's what the crowd was saying to all of our leaders. Dr king took the helm, and under his leadership, said enough is enough America. This is our country. All of us, we belong here, and here we are, some 50 years later, assessing what has happened. Where we are 12:08:39 for a brief period of time I think we fell asleep and said everything is ok, but we know today everything is not ok, there has been a retrenchment in this country as far as equal rights is concerned. 12:09:09 the triumphs and defeats belong to us all. Dr king told us he might not get to mountaintop with us but there is a promised land. America is that land for all of us. 12:09:45 today's world, there's emphasis on individuality. How can I reach my top? No matter how strong any 1 person may be, they may be strengthened with support from each other 12:10:11 the movement can no longer afford an individual approach to justice 12:10:34 at times it is necessary that we let those who represent us know that we are a force to be reckoned with. Many of our messages today target youth and elders. I look at those in middle, they are young enough to relate but established enough in our community, I ask you what are our next steps 12:11:25 this country in the area of civil rights has taken a turn backward. I am energized to move forward and to be sure to see the gains we have encountered are not lost. So I do ask you what are our next steps. 12:11:58 many of our civil rights leaders like my husband and dr martin luther king 12:12:12 I challenge you to get back to community building, these are our children. You are the parents. The victory will be a collective one. It is with clear conscience that we will reach that mountaintop and we will overcome 12:12:46 it will take each and every one of us, letting those who say they manage America it's the voice and actions of people who say we must overcome and will eventually say we have overcome because of the involvement of each and every one 12:14:01 Kristin Stoneking, executive director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation 12:16:29 Mee Moua, president and executive director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice 12:18:40 The Honorable Martin O'Malley, Governor of Maryland 12:18:42 O'MALLEY: The work of justice is urgent. It is real, and it is needed. Let there be no comfort in our country for the bigotry of cold indifference. For there are still too many lives in America taken from us by violence, still too many children in America who go to bed hungry, who go to school hungry. Still too much apathy when the lives of people of color are too often valued less than the lives of white people. 12:19:09 And so, the responsibility we consecrate today is not rooted in nostalgia or memory. It is rooted in something far deeper. It is rooted in the calling of conscious to action, actions that protect every individual's right to vote; action that safeguards and keeps guns out of the hands of violent offenders; action makes quality education and the opportunity of college a reality for more families; action that protects the dignity of every child's home with civil marriage equality; action that strengthens our country with the hopes and dreams and hard work of our newest generation of new American immigrants; action that abolishes the death penalty and improves public safety in every neighborhood regardless of income or color; actions that create jobs and raises the minimum wage for every mom and dad that's willing to work hard and play by the rules. 12:20:25 Yes, thanks to Dr. King, America's best days are still ahead of us. Love remains the strongest power in our country. Forward we shall walk, hand in hand. And in this great work, we are not afraid. Thank you. 12:21:00 Natalie Grant 12:24:39 Fred Maahs, chair of the American Association of People with Disabilities 12:29:19 Reverend Roslyn Brock, chairman of the NAACP 12:29:24 the march on Washington was for equality and opportunity. We of NAACP acknowledge our organizing days are beginning anew 12:29:52 the power and depth of their witness is magnified by the fact that they returned home and organized 12:30:08 in a 1966 speech to medical committee for human rights, dr king said injustice in healthcare is most inhumane inequality. One of the most pressing issues for this generation 12:30:38 supreme court and people have spoken. Affordable Care Act is the law of the land. 12:30:58 we must ensure all Americans are aware we can change the face of health in this nation. We are determined and clear to the world, when it comes to healthj equity, courage will not skip this generation. 12:31:37 Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP BENJAMIN JEALOUS: Fired up! (Cheers.) Come on. Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Ladies and gentlemen, as we stand here 50 years after the March on Washington, let us remember that Dr. King's last march was never finished. The Poor People's Campaign was never finished. Some 50 years after the March on Washington, while fewer people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. And while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off every day. 12:32:00 Indeed, one could say that the distance between a child's aspiration represented by the top of that ladder and a family's situation at the bottom of that ladder is the exact measurement of that parent's level of frustration. 12:32:44 And so as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. And as we turn on our TVs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they're being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom, because as the top of that ladder has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. Let us not just be dreamers this day; let us recommit to be doers. Thank you, and God bless. (Cheers, applause.) 12:33:52 Maori Dancers performance 12:38:41 Reverend Joseph Lowery 12:42:26 Laura Turner Seydel, aka "Captain Planet" 12:45:42 Dr. Eliza Byard, executive director, Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network 12:48:19 Bill Russell 12:48:29 good afternoon, it's nice to be here. 12:48:39 it's nice to be anywhere after 50 years. 12:49:41 from my point of view, you only register progress by how far you have to go 12:50:46 progress can only be measured by how far we have to go 12:51:07 as we used to say in the projects, keep on keeping on 12:51:58 Clayola Brown, president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute 12:53:47 Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO 12:53:50 good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent 1.6 tril members 12:54:16 and 5 years later, dr king stood with sanitation workers of local 1733 12:54:38 new momentum on these steps 50 years ago, advances whenever disenfranchised stand up 12:54:52 because our struggle continues12:55:08 we come to commemorate past and shape future 12:55:10 we must also have the courage in the name of dr king, a phillip ranolph, rep john lewis, we must recommit to struggle as stewards of nation that belongs to rich and poor, those with and those without 12:55:44 we have to build on legacy left to us all, protect fundamental rights, ensure workers voices never silenced, fight for good jobs and decent pay. Above all, we must uphold principle that everyone who contributes to prosperity of nation should share in prosperity 12:56:31 U.S. Congresswoman Donna Edwards, Maryland (4th District) 12:56:43 REPRESENTATIVE DONNA EDWARDS (D-MD): On behalf of the members of Congress, I represent Maryland's 4th Congressional District. As the first African-American woman to represent Maryland in the House of Representatives, and on behalf of my sisters in Congress, I'm proud to stand here with you today on the shoulders of women, courageous women like Fannie Lou Hamer and Dorothy Height and Vivian Malone and Rosa Parks and so many others. I'm proud to stand on the shoulders of our domestic workers and to be wrapped in the arms of three, four little girls in a Birmingham church and a Chicago teenager on vacation in Mississippi. 12:57:05 It's a new day 50 years later and a better day. But the day is not over. Today's struggle for civil rights, social justice and economic opportunity demand our engagement and our voice. To realize fully the dream we must both raise our voices and take action. We must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and our neighbors to be better. We must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations and for a just justice system. We must lift our voice for the value of our vote and have our votes counted without interference. As we stand here today, Dr. King would know and my dear colleague John Lewis certainly does know that today is not just a commemoration or a celebration; it's a call to action for the work that remains undone and the communities that remain unchanged. Our foremothers and forefathers, 50 years ago they closed a book on the last century. Well, when the book closes on the 21st century and civil rights, which chapter will you have written? What fight will you have fought in the halls of Congress or in the town halls of your community? For men and women, black and white, Latino and Asian, Muslim, Christian and Jew, gay and straight, I hope this book includes you. We need you to act. The final chapter must include your voice to achieve Dr. King's dream. They cannot be written without you. 12:58:50 Alan van Capelle - CEO Bend the Arc 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. 13:02:43 Ingrid Saunders Jones, chair of the National Council of Negro Women SAUNDERS: Good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent the 1.6 million members of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, AFSCME, public service workers whose labor touches communities throughout this nation. You know, AFSCME stood with Dr. King in 1963 when he called on America to be true to its principles. And five years later Dr. King stood with AFSCME when the sanitation workers of Local 1733 demanded justice, dignity, and respect. The journey for civil rights, workers' rights and economic rights began almost from the moment America was born. It gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. And it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned stand up, fight back and march forward. Because our struggle continues, we come to this memorial not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. We have the power to carry the determination, the hope and passion of the March on Washington forward. We must also have had the courage. We must also have the courage. SAUNDERS: In the name of Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Ella Baker and Congressman John Lewis, on behalf of those whose names will never be known, we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor, to the CEO and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. We have the responsibility to build on the legacy that has been left -- left to us all. We must protect the most fundamental rights we have -- the right to vote. We must be sure that workers' voices will never be silenced. We must fight for good jobs and decent pay. And we must become the just and fair society of our ideals. Above all -- above all -- we must uphold the principle that everyone who contributes to the prosperity of this nation should share in the prosperity of our nation. Thank you. 13:05:19 Mark Tillman, president of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 13:07:57 Delores Huerta DOLORES HUERTA: We're being blessed with the rain. Yes, we are. 13:08:14 You know, we're here to celebrate all of the wonderful benefits that we all received from the civil rights movement and the Chicano movement. We honor the sacrifices and the lives of those that gave their lives so that we could have these benefits. We want to honor Coretta Scott King -- (cheers) -- for all of the work that she did to get that Martin Luther King holiday, the national holiday. We want to honor Yolanda King for all that she did on behalf of women and children to stop abuses of both. 13:08:45 But you know, Dr. King said, on this very stage, go back to your communities, go back to the South, go back to the North. And I'm saying also to the West, because we've got to continue to organize to fulfill that dream, because you know what? If we don't do it, it's not going to happen. The only way that discrimination is going to end against women of -- people of color, against women, against our LGBT community is if we do it, which means that we've got to outreach to those that are not with us. We've got to educate them. We've got to mobilize them. We've got to motivate them. That's the only way it can happen. So I'm going to ask all of you, who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We do! MS. HUERTA: Let's hear it loud and clear. We've got the power. I'm going to say, who's got the power? I want you to say, we've got the power. Who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We've got the power! MS. HUERTA: And I'm going to say, what kind of power? I want you to say, people power. What kind of power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: People power! MS. HUERTA: All right! So we can do it. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Let's all say this all together. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Put your hands up, everybody, like this. We're going to all clap together and in Spanish we're going to say, "Si, se puede," which means, "Yes, we can." Let's do it. (Chanting.) "Si, se puede." AUDIENCE MEMBERS: (Chanting and clapping.) "Si, se puede! Si, se puede! Si, se puede!" 13:10:09 CUT OFF for LeAnn Rimes 13:10:34 LeAnn Rimes performs "Amazing Grace" 13:13:19 Marc Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League MARC MORIAL: Good afternoon, fellow Americans. I stand today on the shoulders of Martin Luther King, Whitney Young, John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph and the many great leaders of 1963 who sacrificed, who marched, who demonstrated courage and bravery in the face of attack so that we can be here today. 13:14:05 I stand as a representative of the next generation that has had the opportunity to walk into corporate boardrooms, walk into city halls and county halls, into halls of justice, into the Justice Department and, yes, into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue solely because of the sacrifices and the bravery of those whose names we remember and those we don't. 13:14:39 I stand here today to call on this great and mighty nation to wake up, wake up to unfair legality parading as morality; wake up to insensitivity to the poor masked as fiscal austerity; wake up to politics without a positive purpose. It is time, America, to wake up. 13:15:06 Fifty years ago, that sleeping giant was awakened. But somewhere along the way, we've dozed. We've been quelled by the lullaby of false prosperity and the mirage of economic equality. We fell into a slumber. Somewhere along the way, white sheets were traded for buttoned down white shirts. Attack dogs and water hoses were traded for tasers and widespread implementation of stop-and-frisk policies. Nooses were traded for handcuffs. Somewhere along the way, we gained new enemies, cynicism and complacency. Murders from urban America to suburban America. The pursuit of power for power's sake. We stand here today to say it is time to wake up. 13:16:01 So here in 2013, we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. We look toward the statue of the great liberator. We say we have come to wake up a new civil rights movement for economic justice, a new civil rights movement for freedom in these days, a new civil rights movement for jobs, a new civil rights movement for men, for women, for children of all backgrounds, all races, all dispositions, all orientations, all cities, all counties, all towns all across America. 13:16:43 America, it is time for us to wake up. The 21st-century agenda for jobs and freedom comes alive today. We stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of yesterday, and we affirm this new commitment for today and tomorrow. God bless you, God thank you, and God bless this great nation. (Cheers, applause.) 13:17:15 U.S. Congresswoman Marcia Fudge, Ohio (11th District) and chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus FUDGE: Good afternoon. I am Marcia Fudge, the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. 13:17:19 And I am the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus because Dr. Martin Luther King acted upon his dream. Dr. King was not just a dreamer, but the voice of a movement. In 1963, there were five members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Today, there are 44 African-American members in Congress. 13:17:44 Dr. King dreamed of an America where every individual -- no matter their race, nationality, or socioeconomic background -- would have the opportunity to achieve dreams of their own. His dream was a call to action. Dr. King advocated for an America where everyone would be afforded their inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, a nation where there would be equal protection under the law and a country where every person's right to vote is protected. He dreamed of an America where every child has access to quality schools and an education that prepares them for their future. And he dreamed that we as a nation would walk together on the swift path towards justice. 13:18:31 Now it is up to us, the Congress of the United States of America, to work together to pass a jobs bill that ensures decent jobs for all of our citizens. Now it is up to us to ensure that we have a criminal justice system that does not value one life more than another. Now it is up to us to make sure that no child goes hungry to school or to bed. 13:19:10 In Dr. King's words, we cannot and we must not be satisfied with anything less. It is our time to make Dr. King's dream our reality. Dr. King said that 1963 was not an end, but a new beginning. Let us make today the start of a new chapter in the history of this country, and let us march forward towards justice together. Thank you. 13:19:39 Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union HENRY: Brothers and sisters, the members of the Service Employees International Union are proud to join the freedom fighters across this country in insisting on the three freedoms that are on the back of your program. And in the spirit of the civil rights economic leadership whose shoulders we stand, I want you to join me in repeating the pledges of the freedoms we are committing ourselves here today: The freedom to participate in government, the freedom to prosper in life, the freedom to peacefully coexist. Our members are proud to join with working people, faith leaders, community leaders all across this country in joining our hands in a renewed commitment to bending the arc toward justice and continuing the struggle to achieve racial equality and economic equality for all by delivering on the promise of the Affordable Care Act, by insisting that we prevail in winning common sense immigration reform now, and by joining together to create good jobs by supporting workers all across this country who have the guts to stand up, join together, and demand a living wage from their employers. The fight continues. We want to work for a just society where all work is valued, every human being is respected, where every family and community can thrive, and where we, brothers and sisters, join together in pursuing the freedom to have a better and more equal society for the next generation. Thank you. 13:21:43 Jamie Foxx 13:21:44 FOXX: How we doing? Make some noise for 50 years. Right now let's make some noise. Listen, I don't have much time. I'm here to celebrate what Dr. King did 50 years -- I'm not even probably going to read from the teleprompter because I'm just going to speak from my heart. I'm going to tell you right now that everybody my age and all the entertainers, it's time for us to stand up now and renew this dream. That's what we got to do. I was affected by -- I was affected by the Trayvon Martin situation. I was affected by -- by Newtown. I was affected by Sandy Hook. I'm affected by those things. So it's time for us now to pick up. Harry Belafonte saw me at the Image Awards and he asked me what am I willing to do. He took it a step further and we went to dinner. And my daughter, who's 19 years old, I said listen, if you want to get inspired, come listen to this man speak. When I sat with Mr. Belafonte, he asked my daughter, how old are you? And my daughter said 19. 13:22:48 And I said, Mr. Belafonte, what were you doing at 19? He said, I was coming home from World War II. And when I got back to America, I wasn't allowed to vote. So I love my country. I love America. But I realized that I had more work to do. So myself, Al, Jesse and Martin, we marched. And I said, wait a minute, man. You sound like you're naming a boy band group. What do you mean? Who are these guys' names? And he looked at my daughter and he said, Martin Luther King. Have you heard of him? And we sat there and we cried. What we need to do now is the young folks pick it up now so that when we're 87 years old talking to the other young folks we can say it was me, Will Smith, Jay Z, Kanye, Alicia Keys, Kerry Washington. The list goes on and on. Don't make me start preaching up here. 13:23:38 Last but not least, I have to recognize Mr. Berry Gordy. And not only -- not only did Harry Belafonte bail Martin Luther King out of jail so that he could march, he also paid for all of Coretta Scott King's bills as long as she was on this planet. Young folks, let's have some respect to our elders. That's the first thing. Last thing is this and I'm out. I know they're telling me to get out of here. We have to salute Mr. Berry Gordy because Mr. Berry Gordy put Dr. King's speech on an album and put it out on Motown Records. And then after he did that, he turned around gave those -- those reels and those -- those tapes back to the King family. Thank you so much. Do not forget 50 years. I'm out. 13:24:59 Reverend Al Sharpton, founder and president of the National Action Network 13:25:05 REVEREND AL SHARPTON: Fifty years ago, when they came to Washington, it was not for an event. It was in the middle of struggles. It was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in America. And Dr. King and those that fought with him, they fought and they beat Jim Crow. We come today to not only celebrate and commemorate, but we come as the children of Dr. King to say that we are going to face Jim Crow's children, because Jim Crow had a son called James Crow Jr. Esquire. (Laughter.) He writes voting suppression laws and puts it in language that looks different, but the results are the same. They come with laws that tell people to stand their ground, they come with laws to tell people to stop and frisk, but I've come to tell you, just like our mothers and fathers beat Jim Crow, we will beat James Crow Jr., Esq. (Cheers, applause.) 13:26:24 They called the generation of Dr. King the Moses generation, and those out here are now Joshua. But if Joshua does not fight the fights of Moses, they're not really Joshua. We saw Dr. King and the dream cross the Red Sea of apartheid and segregation, but we have to cross the Jordan of unequal economic (parity ?). We have to cross the Jordan of continued discrimination and mass incarceration. We've got to keep on fighting, and we've got to vindicate and stand up and substantiate that the dream was not for one generation, the dream goes on until the dream is achieved. 13:27:17 Lastly, we made it this far not because of what we had in our pockets but we had in our hearts, not because of what we owned but because who owned us. And we thank a mighty God for giving us a Martin Luther King. We thank a mighty God that brought us a long way. He brought us from disgrace to amazing grace. He brought us from the butler to the president. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us from Beulah to Oprah. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us a mighty long way, and we thank God for the dream, and we're going to keep on fighting until the dream is a reality. Thank you, and God bless you. 13:28:10 Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers 13:28:18 RANDI WEINGARTEN: Ladies and gentlemen, sisters and brothers, I am the president of the 1.5 million-member American Federation of Teachers. (Cheers, applause.) We have come so far -- King, Rustin, Evers, Parks, Chavez and so many others who have summoned our nation to confront the malignancy of prejudice and discrimination. And many of our afflictions have been healed, but we have far to go. Because the Supreme Court has turned its back on voter suppression, many will once again be denied the right to vote. Children born today poor will stay poor. Millions of Americans work hard every day but can't earn a living wage or exercise their right to collectively bargain. Public schools where kids need the most often get the least. And discrimination based on the color of your skin or the person you love may not be legal in many arenas, but it is still lethal in many times. 13:29:18 Leaders this day 50 years ago understood that the struggle for civil right and racial equality is a struggle for good jobs and decent wages. They understood, as we do today, that public education is an economic necessity, an anchor of democracy and a fundamental right. So we celebrate today that we have become a country that believes in equality, and we recommit ourselves to be a country that acts on that belief. And that start with reclaiming the promise of public education, not as it is today or was in the past, but what we need it to be to fulfill our collective responsibility to all of God's children. 13:30:06 A great nation ensures that every neighborhood public school is a good school. It takes great pains to make the working poor and child hunger conditions of the past. It honors the rights of workers. It takes its immigrants out of its shadows. And it makes the franchise sacrosanct. A great nation is one that acts to lifting us towards opportunity and justice. 13:30:32 The King family has brought us together these five days, not simply to reflect but to act. And we at the AFT will act to keep the dream alive. Thank you. 13:31:06 Julian Bond JULIAN BOND: This is a special day and a special place for all of us. Not only do we pay homage to those who gathered here 50 years ago to tell the nation that they too were Americans, we also celebrate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation. This is personal for me. Like many of you, I was privileged to be here 50 years ago. And like many of you, I am the grandson of a slave. My grandfather and his mother were property, like a horse or a chair. As a young girl, she'd been given away as a wedding present to a new bride. And when that bride became pregnant, her husband -- that's my great-grandmother's owner and master -- exercised his right to take his wife's slave as his mistress. That union produced two children, one of them my grandfather. At age 15, barely able to read or write, he hitched his tuition to a steer and walked across Kentucky to Berea College, and the college let him in. He belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans, a generation born in slavery, freed by the Civil War, determined to make their way as free women and men. Martin Luther King belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans too, a generation born in segregation, determined to make their way as free women and men. When my grandfather graduated from Berea, the college asked him to deliver the commencement address. He said then: The pessimist, from his corner, looks out on a world of wickedness and sin, and, blinded by all that is good or hopeful in the condition and the progress of the human race, bewails the present state of affairs and predicts woeful things for the future. In every cloud, he beholds a destructive storm; in every flash of lightning, an omen of evil; in every shadow that falls across his path, a lurking foe. But he forgets that the clouds also bring life and hope, that the lightning purifies the atmosphere, that shadow and darkness prepare for sunshine and growth, and that hardships and adversity nerve the race, as the individuals, for greater efforts and grander victories. We're still being tested by hardships and adversity, from the elevation of "stand your ground" laws to the evisceration of the Voting Rights Act. But today we commit ourselves, as we did 50 years ago, to greater efforts and grander victories. Thank you. 13:33:43 Reverend Shirley Caesar performs "How I Got Over" 13:39:12 Lynda Bird Johnson Robb JOHNSON ROBB: (OFF-MIKE) my father, Lyndon Johnson, a passionate believer in equality, spoke these words: "One hundred years ago, the slaved was freed. One hundred years later, the Negro remained in bondage to the color of his skin. "The Negro today asks justice. We do not answer him -- we do not answer those who lie beneath this soil -- when we reply to the Negro by asking, 'Patience.'" 13:39:39 The Place was Gettysburg, and I was there with him when he spoke on Memorial Day, 1963, at the 100th Anniversary of the Civil War. He was vice president at that time, and it was three months before the historical march on Washington that we commemorate today. 13:40:03 At a superficial glance, my father, the grandson of a Confederate soldier, may not have seen the most obvious ally to the movement, a white Southerner from (inaudible), he was no young idealist fresh out of college, nor was racial equality a pressing goal of the majority of his Texas constituents; rather, the opposite. But as a teacher, he had seen the plight of his Mexican-American students. And Dr. King's powerful dream found a kindred spirit in my father, who cared deeply about fairness and equality. 13:40:40 When the tragedy of President Kennedy's assassination propelled him to the presidency, he used every power at his disposal, including this considerable legislative muscle, to push through the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. In Daddy's last year in the White House, signing the third Civil Rights bill, he wrote, "I do not exaggerate when I say that the proudest moments of my presidency have been times such as this, when I have signed into law the promises of a century." Recently, the Supreme Court struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, which did so much to combat voting inequality in our country. Now, 50 years later, there are still many examples from current events on how much farther we have yet to go to achieve that promise of a colorblind America. 13:41:56 But remember, too, that fairness and equality are powerful ideas that resonate with all Americans. And with a message as inspiring and timeless as the dream of Dr. King, there will be unexpected allies, if only we look for them. And you know what his wife said? Coretta Scott King said, "Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation." And she was right. So let's go forth, like Jimmie Foxx (ph) said. Thank you. 13:42:50 Ambassador Caroline Kennedy KENNEDY: Good afternoon. Fifty years ago, my father watched from the White House as Dr. King and thousands of others recommitted America to our highest ideals. Over the preceding months, President Kennedy has put the full force of the federal government on the side of the movement, calling on all Americans to recognize that we faced a moral crisis, as old as the Scriptures and as clear as the American Constitution. 13:43:24 His brothers, my Uncle Bobby and Teddy, my Aunt Eunice, continued his committed, working to expand the promises made here to others suffering from discrimination and exclusion. A few months ago, after the Trayvon Martin verdict was handed down, and the Supreme Court eviscerated the Voting Rights Act, President Obama did the same, reminding us all that despite our remarkable progress, each generation must rededicate itself to the unfinished work of building a free and just America. 13:44:03 Fifty years ago, our parents and grandparents marched for jobs and freedom. We have suffered and sacrificed too much to let their dream become a memory. 13:44:13 The children in our failing schools are all of our children. The victims of hate crimes and gun violence are our brothers and sisters. 13:44:23 In the words of an old Japanese proverb, "the water flows on, but the river remains." Now is our turn to live up to our parents' dream, to draw renewed strength from what happened here 50 years ago, and work together for a better world. Thank you. 13:44:52 Forest Whitaker 13:44:59 it's a great honor to be here on 50th anniversary 13:45:10 each of you came here with individual goals but we all share common bond. Your presence says you care and want to bring more peace love and harmony. Together we must embrace this moment. I've observed revolutions, social change firsthand 13:45:53 I am often reminded of the marches and sit ins we've experienced here. Hate is too great a burden 13:46:15 we've all see images of those days. Pictures of segregated water fountains. 13:46:33 many remain nameless but their heroic faces captured in portraits of the past. They risked their lives to bring about change 13:47:00 I want you to recognize the hero that exist inside yourselves. Every step you take around an unknown corner marks your bravery. 13:47:27 and if I were to take a picture of this crowd right now, people would see some of your faces in the movements of today. Individuals who stood in the very spot you stand today, you have responsibility to carry the torch 13:48:04 let's be the generation to make a true difference in the world. 13:48:43 so as the bell rings today, my dream is something will resonate inside you and me that will remind us each of our common bond. 13:49:42 BeBe, Marvin and Carvin Winans perform "God Before Us" 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. 14:05:35 Oprah Winfrey 14:05:45 OPRAH WINFREY: Hello everybody. I am absolutely thrilled to be here. I remember when I was 9 years old and the march was occurring and I asked my mama, can I go to the march? It took me 50 years, but I'm here. On this date in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Took me 50 years, but I'm here. 14:06:05 On this date, in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Dr. King was the passionate voice that awakened the (conscience ?) of a nation and inspired people all over the world. The power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. "Let Freedom Ring" was Dr. King's closing call for a better and more just America. 14:06:47 So today, people from all walks of life will gather at 3 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we re-affirm our commitment to Dr. King's ideals. Dr. King believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. He challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. 14:07:29 So as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made -- and we've made a lot -- but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. It's an opportunity today to recall where we once were in this nation and to think about that young man, who, at 34 years old, stood up here and was able to force an entire country to wake up, to look at itself and to eventually change. 14:08:04 And as we, the people continue to honor the dream of a man and a movement, a man who in his short life saw suffering and injustice and refused to look the other way, we can be inspired and we too can be courageous by continuing to walk in the footsteps in the path that he forged. He is the one who reminded us that we will never walk alone. He was, after all, a drum major for justice. So as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom, who stood up for us, whose shoulders we now stand on. And as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves: How will the dream live in me, in you, in all of us? As the bells toll, let us remind ourselves: "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." As the bells toll, we commit to a life of service because Dr. King, one of my favorite quotes from him is, "Not everybody can be famous, but everybody can be great because greatness is determined by service." 14:09:36 So we ask ourselves, what are we doing for others to lift others up? And as the bells toll, we must recommit to let the love that abides and connects each of us to shine through and let freedom ring. 14:11:47 President Barack Obama walking out with First Lady Michelle Obama, Former President Bill Clinton, and Former President Jimmy Carter 14:12:52 Identity4Pop performs "The Star Spangled Banner" 14:10:28 U.S. Congressman John Lewis, Georgia (5th District) 14:15:01 LEWIS: President and Mrs. Obama, President Clinton, President Carter. I want to thank Bernice King, the King family, and the National Park Service for inviting me here to speak today. 14:15:30 When I look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, it seems to realize what Otis Redding was singing about and what Martin Luther King Jr. preached about, this moment in our history has been a long time coming, but a change has come. We are standing here in the shadow of Abraham Lincoln 150 years after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and only 50 years after the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. 14:16:07 We have come a great distance in this country in the 50 years, but we still have a great distance to go before we fulfill the dream of Martin Luther King. Sometimes I hear people saying, nothing has changed, but for someone to grow up the way I grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama to now be serving in the United States Congress, makes me want to tell them, come and walk in my shoes. 14:17:00 Come walk in the shoes of those who were attacked by police dogs, fire hoses, and nightsticks, arrested and taken to jail. I first came to Washington in the same year that President Barack Obama was born to participate in a Freedom Ride. In 1961, black and white people could not be seated together on a Greyhound bus. So we decided to take an integrated-fashion ride from here to New Orleans. But we never made it there. Over 400 of us were arrested and jailed in Mississippi during the Freedom Rides. A bus was set on fire in Anderson, Alabama. We were beaten, and arrested, and jailed. But we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. I came back here again in June of 1963 (inaudible) as the new chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. We met with President Kennedy, who said the fires of frustration were burning throughout America. 14:18:16 In 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. We had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, count the number of bubbles in a bar of soap, or the number of jelly beans in a jar. Hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the South for trying to participate in the democratic process. Medgar Evers had been killed in Mississippi. And that is why we told President Kennedy we intended to March on Washington, to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in America. 14:18:53 On August 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. Thousands of troops surrounded the city. Workers were told to stay home that day. Liquor stores were closed. But the march was so orderly, so peaceful, it was filled with dignity and self- respect. Because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. People came that day to that march dressed like they were on their way to a religious service. As Mahalia Jackson sang, "How We Got Over." "How We Got Over." She drew thousands of us together in a strange sense, it seemed like the whole place started rocking. 14:19:58 We truly believe that in every human being, even those who were violent toward us, there was a spark of the divine. And no person had the right to scar or destroy that spark. Martin Luther King Jr. taught us the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. 14:20:22 He taught us to have the power to forgive, the capacity to be reconciled. He taught us to stand up, to speak up, to speak out, to find a way to get in the way. 14:20:43 People were advised by their vision of justice and equality, and they were willing to put their bodies on the line for a greater cause, greater than themselves. Not one incident of violence was reported that day. A spirit had engulfed the leadership of the movement and all of its participants. The spirit of Dr. King's words captured the hearts of people not just around America but around the world. 14:21:28 On that day, Martin Luther King Jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. He transformed these marble steps of the Lincoln Memorial into a modern-day pulpit. He changed us forever. After the ceremony was over, President Kennedy invited us back down to the White House. He met us standing in the door of the Oval Office. And he was beaming like a proud father, As he shook the hand of each one of us, he said, "You did a good job. You did a good job." And he said to Dr. King, "And you have a dream." 14:22:13 Fifty years later, we can ride anywhere we want to ride. We can stay where we want to stay. Those signs that said "white" and "colored" are gone. And you won't see them any more... ... except in a museum, in a book, or on a video. 14:22:35 But there are still invisible signs, barriers in the heart of humankind that form a gulf between us. Too many of us still believe our differences define us instead of the divine spark that runs through all of human creation. 14:22:55 The scars and stains of racism still remain deeply embedded in American society, whether it is stop-and-frisk in New York or injustice in Trayvon Martin's case in Florida. The mass incarceration of millions of Americans. Immigrants hiding in fear in the shadow of our society. Unemployment. Homelessness. Poverty. Hunger. Or the renewed struggle for voting rights. So I say to each one of us today, we must never, ever give up. We must never ever give in. We must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. 14:23:46 We did go to jail. But we got the Civil Rights Act. We got a Voting Rights Act. We got a Fair Housing Act. But we must continue to push. We must continue to work. As the late A. Philip Randolph (ph) said, the organizer for the march in 1963, and the dean of the civil rights movement once said, we may have come here on different ships, but we all are in the same boat now. 14:24:27 So, it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, Latino, Asian American or Native American, whether we are gay or straight. We're one people. We are one family. We all live in the same house, not just the American house but the world's house. 14:24:46 And when we finally accept these truths, then we will be able to fulfill Dr. King's dreams to build a beloved community, a nation and a world at peace with itself. Thank you very much. 14:25:20 President Jimmy Carter PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER: Well, I'm greatly honored to be here. And I realize that most people know that it's highly unlikely that any of us three over on my right would have served in the White House or be on this platform had it not been for Martin Luther King Jr. and his movement and his crusade for civil rights. So we are grateful to him for us being here. (Applause.) 14:25:57 I'm also proud that I came from the same part of the South as he did. He never lost contact with the folks back home. He was helping Tennessee garbage workers, as you know, when he gave his life to a racist bullet. 14:26:14 I remember how it was, back in those days. I left Georgia in 1943 for college and the Navy. And when I came home from submarine duty, I was put on the Board of Education. I suggested to the other members that we visit all the schools in the county. They had never done this before, and they were reluctant to go with me. 14:26:40 But we finally did it, and we found that white children had three nice brick buildings, but the African-American children had 26 different elementary schools in the county. They were in churches, in front living rooms and a few in barns. They had so many because there were no school buses for African-American children, and they had to be within walking distance of where they went to class. Their schoolbooks were outdated and worn out, and every one of them had a white child's name in the front of the book. We finally obtained some buses. And then the state legislature ordained that the front fenders be painted black. Not even the school buses could be equal to each other. One of the finest moments of my life was 10 months after Dr. King's famous speech right here, when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. I was really grateful when the King family adopted me as their presidential candidate in 1976. (Cheers.) Every handshake from Dr. King, from Daddy King, every hug from Coretta got me a million Yankee votes. (Laughter.) Daddy King prayed at the Democratic Convention -- for quite a while, I might say -- (laughter) -- and Coretta was in the hotel room with me and Rosalyn when I was elected president. My Presidential Medal of Freedom citation to Coretta for Dr. King said, and I quote, "He gazed at the great wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. He made our nation stronger because he made it better." 14:28:47 We were able to create a national historic site where Dr. King lived, worked and worshipped. It's next door to the Carter Center, linked together just by a walking path. And at the Carter Center, we try to make the (principles ?) that we follow the same as his, emphasizing peace and human rights. I remember that Daddy King said, too many people think Martin freed only black people; in truth, he helped to free all people. (Applause.) And Daddy King added, it's not enough to have a right to sit at a lunch counter if you can't afford to buy a meal. And he also said, the ghetto still looks the same even from the front seat of a bus. Perhaps the most challenging statement of Martin Luther King Jr. was, and I quote: "The crucial question of our time is how to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence." In the Nobel Prize ceremony of 2002, I said that my fellow Georgian was, and I quote again, "the greatest leader that my native state, and perhaps my native country, has ever produced." And I was not excluding presidents and even the Founding Fathers when I said this. I believe we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the new ID requirements to exclude certain voters, especially African- Americans. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the Supreme Court striking down a crucial part of the Voters' Rights Act just recently passed overwhelmingly by Congress. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to unemployment among African- Americans being almost twice the rate of white people and for teenagers at 42 percent. I think we would all know how Dr. King would have reacted to our country being awash in guns and for more and more states passing "stand your ground" laws. I think we know how Dr. King would have reacted for people of District of Columbia still not having full citizenship rights. (Cheers, applause.) And I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to have more than 835,000 African-American men in prison, five times as many as when I left office, and with one-third of all African-American males being destined to be in prison in their lifetimes. 14:31:44 Well, there's a tremendous agenda ahead of us, and I'm thankful to Martin Luther King Jr. that his dream is still alive. Thank you. 14:32:00 President Bill Clinton 14:32:11 CLINTON: Thank you, Mr. President, Mrs. Obama, President Carter, Vice President Biden (inaudible) Biden. I want to thank my great friend, Reverend Bernice King, and the King family for inviting me to be part of this 50th observation of one of the most important days in American history. Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph, John Lewis and Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Myrlie Evers, Daisy Bates (ph), and all the others who led there massive march knew what they were doing on this hallowed ground, in the shadow of Lincoln's statue the burning memory of the fact that he gave his life to preserve the Union and end slavery. 14:33:27 Martin Luther King urged his crowd not to drink from the cup of bitterness, but to reach across the racial divide, because, he said, we cannot walk alone. Their destiny is tied up with our destiny. Their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. He urged the victims of racial violence to meet white Americans with an outstretched hand, not a clenched fist, and in so doing to prove the redeeming power of unearned suffering. 14:33:52 And then he dreamed of an America where all citizens would sit together at a table of brotherhood where little white boys and girls and little black boys and girls would hold hands across the color lines, where his own children would be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. 14:34:29 This march and that speech changed America. They opened minds, they melted hearts, and they moved millions, including a 17-year-old boy watching alone in his home in Arkansas. 14:34:43 It was an empowering moment but also an empowered moment. As the great chronicler of those years Taylor Branch wrote, the movement here gained a force to open, quote, "the stubborn gates of freedom." And out flowed the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, immigration reform, Medicare, Medicaid, open housing. 14:35:09 It is well to remember that the leaders and foot soldiers here were both idealists and tough realists. They had to be. It was a violent time. Just three months later we lost President Kennedy. And we thank God that President Johnson came in and fought for all those issues I just mentioned. Just five years later, we lost Senator Kennedy. And in between, there was the carnage of the fights for jobs, freedom and equality. Just 18 days after this march, four little children were killed in the Birmingham church bombing. Then there were the Ku Klux Klan murders, the Mississippi lynching and a dozen others until in 1968, Dr. King was martyred, still marching for jobs and freedom. What a debt we owe to those people who came here 50 years ago. The martyrs paid it all for a dream, a dream as John Lewis said that millions have now actually lived. So how are we gonna repay the debt? Dr. King's dream of interdependence, his prescription of whole- hearted cooperation across racial lines, they ring as true today as they did 50 years ago. Oh, yes, we face terrible political gridlock now. Read a little history. It's nothing new. Yes, there remain racial inequalities in employment, income, health, wealth, incarceration and in the victims and perpetrators of violent crime. But we don't face beatings, lynchings and shootings for our political beliefs anymore. And I would respectfully suggest that Martin Luther King did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political gridlock. It is time to stop complaining and put our shoulders against the stubborn gates... ... holding the American people back. We cannot be disheartened by the forces of resistance to building a modern economy of good jobs and rising incomes or to rebuilding our education system to give all our children a common core of knowledge necessary to ensure success, or to give Americans of all ages access to affordable college and training programs. And we thank the president for his efforts in those regards. 14:38:13 We cannot relax in our efforts to implement health care reform in a way that ends discrimination against those with preexisting conditions, one of which is inadequate income to pay for rising health care. A health care reform that will lower costs and lengthen lives. Nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses and our climate. We must push open those stubborn gates. We cannot be discouraged by a Supreme Court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the Voting Rights Act because -- look at the states (ph). It made it harder for African-Americans and Hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. What do you know? They showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. So obviously, we don't need any kind of law. 14:39:27 But a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. We must open those stubborn gates. And let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole American landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. And the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. It has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gates and if we do it together. 14:40:20 The choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago. Cooperate and thrive, or fight with each other and fall behind. We should all thank God for Dr. King and John Lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide it -- a dream they paid for, like our founders, with their lives, their fortune, their sacred honor. And we thank them for reminding us that America is always becoming, always on a journey. And we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. God bless them and God bless America. 14:41:22 Martin L. King III 14:41:26 MARTIN LUTHER KING III: Mr. President, Madam First Lady, President Carter, President Clinton, Congressman Lewis, and to all program participants, this is an unusual moment in our world history as we observe this 50th anniversary. And I'm so thankful for the opportunity to really thank America for helping to realize the dream, although I must say it is not yet realized. And so we must redouble and quadruple our efforts. So much has been said today, and I was 5 years old in 1963, when dad delivered his message. And so I'm blessed that we were able to bring our daughter, who's hopefully paying attention, 5 -- 3 years -- 5 years old, so that she can appreciate this history and continue to participate. There are two quick other things that I want to say. I've been speaking all week, as many of us have. But I'm reminded that Dad challenged us. That's what he did, challenged our nation to be a better nation for all God's children. I'm reminded that he taught us the power of love, agape love, the love that is totally unselfish; you love someone if you're old or young, rich or poor, black or white, Native America or Hispanic- American or Latino. It does not matter. You love them because God calls us to do that. Love and forgiveness is what we need more of, not just in our nation but really throughout the world. And so I want to rush to tell you Dad said the ultimate measure of a human being is where one stands not in times of comfort and convenience, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy. He went on to say that on some questions, cowardice asks, is a position safe; expediency asks, is a position politic; vanity asks, is a position popular, but that something deep inside called conscience asks, is a position right. So he often talked about sometimes we must take positions that are neither safe nor popular nor politic, but we must take those position because our conscience tells us they are right. (Applause.) I'd finally say this afternoon, we've got a lot of work to do. But none of us should be (in any ways tired ?). Why? Because we've come much too far from where we started. You see, no one ever told any of us that our roads would be easy. But I know our God -- our God -- our God did not bring any of us this far to leave us. Thank you. God bless you. 14:44:57 Christine King Farris 14:45:05 CHRISTINE KING FARRIS: Thank you. President Obama and Mrs. Obama, former Presidents Clinton and Carter, other distinguished program participants, I am honored to be among you today and to address this historic gathering. I don't know if I am the most senior speaker to address this assemblage today, but I am certainly and surely the only person alive who knew Martin Luther King Jr. when he was a baby. (Laughter, applause.) It has been my great privilege to watch my little brother grow and thrive and develop into a fine man and then a great leader whose legacy continues to inspire countless millions around the world. Unfortunately, a bout with a flu virus 50 years ago prevented me from attending the original march. But I was able to watch it on television, and I was as awestruck as everyone else. I knew Martin was an excellent preacher, because I had seen him deliver, on many occasions. But on that day, Martin achieved greatness because he melded the hope and dreams of millions into a grand vision of healing, reconciliation and brotherhood. The dream my brother shared with our nation and world on that sweltering day of days 50 years ago continues to nurture and sustain nonviolent activists worldwide in their struggle for freedom and human rights. Indeed, this gathering provides a powerful testament of hope and proof positive that Martin's great dream will live on in the hearts of humanity for generations to come. Our challenge, then, as followers of Martin Luther King, Jr. is to now honor his life, leadership and legacy by living our lives in a way that carries forward the unfinished work. There is no better way to honor his sacrifices and contributions than by becoming champions of nonviolence in our homes and communities, in our places of work, worship and learning. Everywhere, every day, the dream Martin shared on that day a half century ago remains a definitive statement of the American dream, the beautiful vision of a diverse freedom-loving people united in our love for justice, brotherhood and sisterhood. Yes, they can slay the dreamer, but no, they cannot destroy his immortal dream. 14:49:18 But Martin's dream is a vision not yet to be realized, a dream yet unfilled, and we have much to do before we can celebrate the dream as reality, as the suppression of voting rights and horrific violence that has taken the lives of Trayvon Martin and young people all across America has so painfully demonstrated. But despite the influences and challenges we face, we are here today to affirm the dream. We are not going to be discouraged, we are not going to be distracted, we are not going to be defeated. Instead, we are going forward into this uncertain future, with courage and determination, to make the dream a vibrant reality. And so the work to fulfill the dream goes on, and despite the daunting challenges we face on the road to the beloved community, I feel that the dream is sinking deep and nourishing roots all across America and around the world. May it continue to thrive and spread and help bring justice, peace and liberation to all humanity. Thank you, and God bless you all. 14:51:40 Rev. Dr. Bernice King, CEO of The King Center for Non-Violent Social Change 14:51:30 REVEREND BERNICE KING: President Obama, Mrs. Obama, Presidents Carter and Clinton, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, my brother Martin III, Dexter Scott King, to my entire family, I was five months old when my father delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech, and I probably was somewhere crawling on the floor or taking a nap after having a meal. But today is a glorious day because on this program today we have witnessed a manifestation of the beloved community. And we thank everyone for their presence here today. 14:52:21 Today we have been honored to have three presidents of the United States. Fifty years ago, the president did not attend. Today we are honored to have many women in the planning and mobilization of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. (Cheers, applause.) And 50 years ago, there was not a single woman on the program. Today we are honored to have not just one young person, but several young people on the program today. It is certainly a tribute to the work and the legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. Fifty years ago today, in the symbolic shadow of this great emancipator Abraham Lincoln, my father the great liberator stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring for all people who were being manacled by a system of segregation and discrimination. Fifty years ago, he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. The reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963, through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world and has summoned us once again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. Since that time, as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act in 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for all, regardless of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, disability, class or sexual orientation. 14:54:15 Fifty years later, in this year of jubilee, we're standing once again in the shadow of that "Great Emancipator," having been summoned to these hallowed grounds to reverberate the message of that great liberator, for there's a remnant from 1963, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, that still remains, who has come to bequeath that message of freedom to a new generation of people who must now carry that message -- (cheers) -- in their time, in their community, amongst their tribes and amongst their nations of the world. We must keep the sound and the message of freedom and justice going. It was my mother, as has been said previously, Coretta Scott King, who in fact 30 years ago assembled a Coalition of Conscience that started us on this whole path of remembering the anniversary of the March on Washington. She reminded that struggle is a never-ending process; freedom is never really won. You earn it and win it in every generation. And so we come once again to let freedom ring, because if freedom stops ringing, then the sound will disappear, and the atmosphere will be charged with something else. Fifty years later, we come once again to this special landing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to reflect, to renew and to rejuvenate for the continued struggle of freedom and justice. 14:56:06 For today, 50 years later, my friends, we are still crippled by practices and policies steeped in racial pride, hatred and hostility, some of which have us standing our ground rather than finding common ground. We are still chained by economic disparities, income and class inequalities and conditions of poverty for many of God's children around this nation and the world. We're still bound by a cycle of civil unrest and inherent social biases in our nations and worlds that oftentimes degenerate into violence and destruction, especially against women and children. We're at this landing, and now we must break the cycle. The Prophet King spoke the vision. He made it plain, and we must run with it in this generation. His prophetic vision and magnificent dream described the yearning of people all over the world to have the freedom to prosper in life, which is the right to pursue one's aspirations, purpose, dreams, well- being without oppressive, depressive, repressive practices, behaviors, laws and conditions that diminish one's dignity and that denies one life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- the freedom to participate in government, which is the right to have a voice and a say in how you are represented, regulated and governed without threats of tyranny, disenfranchisement, exclusionary tactics and behaviors, and to have freedom to peacefully coexist, which is the right to be respected in one's selfhood, individuality and uniqueness without fear of attack, assault or abuse. In 1967 my father asked a poignant and critical question: Where do we go from here, chaos or community? And we say, with a resounding voice, no to chaos and yes to community. If we're going to rid ourselves of the chaos, then we must make a necessary shift. Nothing is more tragic than for us to fail to achieve new attitudes and new mental outlooks. We have a tremendous and unprecedented opportunity to reset the very means by which we live, work and enjoy our lives. If we're going to continue the struggle of freedom and create true community, then we will have to be relentless in exposing, confronting and ridding ourselves of the mindset of pride and greed and selfishness and hate and lust and fear and idleness and lack of purpose and lack of love, as my brother said, for our neighbor. We must seize this moment, the dawning of a new day, the emergence of a new generation who is postured to change the world through collaborative power, facilitated by unconditional love. And as I close, I call upon my brother by the name of Nehemiah, who was also in the midst of rebuilding a community. And in the midst of rebuilding a community, he brought the leaders and the rulers and the rest of the people together, and he told them that the work is great and large, and we are widely separated one from another on the wall, but when you hear the sound of the trumpet, and might I say -- (cheers, applause) -- when you hear the sound of the bells today, come to that spot, and our God will fight with us. And so today we're going to let freedom ring all across this nation. We're going to let freedom ring everywhere we go. If freedom is going to ring in Libya, in Syria, in Egypt, in Florida, then we must reach across the table, feed each other and let freedom ring. 15:00:36 Participants gathering around bell 15:01:19 ringing bell 15:02:03 performance by Heather Headley 15:05:31 President Barack Obama takes podium 15:05:54 PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: To the King family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to President Clinton, President Carter, Vice President Biden, Jill, fellow Americans, five decades ago today, Americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 15:07:06 In 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. And so they came by the thousands, from every corner of our country -- men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. Across the land, congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. In the middle of the night, entire blocks of Harlem came out to wish them well. With the few dollars they scrimped from their labor, some bought tickets and boarded buses, even if they couldn't always sit where they wanted to sit. Those with less money hitchhiked, or walked. They were seamstresses, and steelworkers, and students, and teachers, maids and pullman porters. They shared simple meals and bunked together on floors. And then, on a hot summer day, they assembled here, in our nation's capital, under the shadow of the great emancipator, to offer testimony of injustice, to petition their government for redress and to awaken America's long-slumbering conscience. 15:09:17 We rightly and best remember Dr. King's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. His words belong to the ages, possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. 15:09:51 But we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose names never appeared in the history books, never got on TV. Many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters, had lived in towns where they couldn't vote, in cities where their votes didn't matter. There were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. They had seen loved ones beaten and children fire- hosed. And they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. 15:10:54 And yet they chose a different path. In the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormentors. In the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonviolence. Willingly, they went to jail to protest unjust laws, their cells swelling with the sound of freedom songs. A lifetime of indignities had taught them that no man can take away the dignity and grace that God grants us. They had learned through hard experience what Frederick Douglas once taught: that freedom is not given; it must be won through struggle and discipline, persistence and faith. That was the spirit they brought here that day. 15:11:55 That was the spirit young people like John Lewis brought that day. That was the spirit that they carried with them like a torch back to their cities and their neighborhoods, that steady flame of conscience and courage that would sustain them through the campaigns to come, through boycotts and voter registration drives and smaller marches, far from the spotlight, through the loss of four little girls in Birmingham, the carnage of Edmund Pettus Bridge and the agony of Dallas, California, Memphis. Through setbacks and heartbreaks and gnawing doubt, that flame of justice flickered and never died. And because they kept marching, America changed. Because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. Because they marched, the voting rights law was signed. Because they marched, doors of opportunity and education swung open so their daughters and sons could finally imagine a life for themselves beyond washing somebody else's laundry or shining somebody else's shoes. (Applause.) Because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and Congress changed and, yes, eventually the White House changed. (Cheers, applause.) 15:13:58 Because they marched, America became more free and more fair, not just for African-Americans but for women and Latinos, Asians and Native Americans, for Catholics, Jews and Muslims, for gays, for Americans with disabilities. America changed for you and for me. And the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an Iron Curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside South Africa who would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. (Applause.) Those are the victories they won, with iron wills and hope in their hearts. That is the transformation that they wrought with each step of their well-worn shoes. That's the depth that I and millions of Americans owe those maids, those laborers, those porters, those secretaries -- folks who could have run a company, maybe, if they had ever had a chance; those white students who put themselves in harm's way even though they didn't have to -- (applause) -- those Japanese- Americans who recalled their own interment, those Jewish Americans who had survived the Holocaust, people who could have given up and given in but kept on keeping on, knowing that weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning -- (cheers, applause) -- on the battlefield of justice, men and women without rank or wealth or title or fame would liberate us all, in ways that our children now take for granted as people of all colors and creeds live together and learn together and walk together, and fight alongside one another and love one another, and judge one another by the content of our character in this greatest nation on Earth. 15:16:32 To dismiss the magnitude of this progress, to suggest, as some sometimes do, that little has changed -- that dishonors the courage and the sacrifice of those who paid the price to march in those years. (Applause.) Medgar Evers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, Martin Luther King Jr., they did not die in vain. (Applause.) Their victory was great. But we would dishonor those heroes as well to suggest that the work of this nation is somehow complete. The arc of the moral universe may bend towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. To secure the gains this country has made requires constant vigilance, not complacency. Whether it's by challenging those who erect new barriers to the vote or ensuring that the scales of justice work equally for all in the criminal justice system and not simply a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails -- (applause) -- it requires vigilance. 15:18:12 And we'll suffer the occasional setback. But we will win these fights. This country has changed too much. (Applause.) People of good will, regardless of party, are too plentiful for those with ill will to change history's currents. (Applause.) In some ways, though, the securing of civil rights, voting rights, the eradication of legalized discrimination -- the very significance of these victories may have obscured a second goal of the march, for the men and women who gathered 50 years ago were not there in search of some abstract idea. They were there seeking jobs as well as justice -- (applause) -- not just the absence of oppression but the presence of economic opportunity. For what does it profit a man, Dr. King would ask, to sit at an integrated lunch counter if he can't afford the meal? This idea that -- that one's liberty is linked to one's livelihood, that the pursuit of happiness requires the dignity of work, the skills to find work, decent pay, some measure of material security -- this idea was not new. 15:20:06 Lincoln himself understood the Declaration of Independence in such terms, as a promise that in due time, the weights should be lifted from the shoulders of all men and that all should have an equal chance. Dr. King explained that the goals of African-Americans were identical to working people of all races: decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing, old age security, health and welfare measures -- conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community. 15:20:54 What King was describing has been the dream of every American. It's what's lured for centuries new arrivals to our shores. And it's along this second dimension of economic opportunity, the chance through honest toil to advance one's station in life, that the goals of 50 years ago have fallen most short. Yes, there have been examples of success within black America that would have been unimaginable a half-century ago. But as has already been noted, black unemployment has remained almost twice as high as white employment (sic), Latino unemployment close behind. The gap in wealth between races has not lessened, it's grown. 15:21:52 As President Clinton indicated, the position of all working Americans, regardless of color, has eroded, making the dream Dr. King described even more elusive. For over a decade, working Americans of all races have seen their wages and incomes stagnate. Even as corporate profits soar, even as the pay of a fortunate few explodes, inequality has steadily risen over the decades. Upward mobility has become harder. In too many communities across this country in cities and suburbs and rural hamlets, the shadow of poverty casts a pall over our youth, their lives a fortress of substandard schools and diminished prospects, inadequate health care and perennial violence. 15:22:50 And so as we mark this anniversary, we must remind ourselves that the measure of progress for those who marched 50 years ago was not merely how many blacks had joined the ranks of millionaires; it was whether this country would admit all people who were willing to work hard, regardless of race, into the ranks of a middle-class life. (Applause.) The test was not and never has been whether the doors of opportunity are cracked a bit wider for a few. It was whether our economic system provides a fair shot for the many, for the black custodian and the white steelworker, the immigrant dishwasher and the Native American veteran. To win that battle, to answer that call -- this remains our great unfinished business. 15:23:54 We shouldn't fool ourselves. The task will not be easy. Since 1963 the economy's changed. The twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class, reduced the bargaining power of American workers. And our politics has suffered. Entrenched interests -- those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it just to fund crumbling schools -- that all these things violated sound economic principles. 15:24:53 We'd be told that growing inequality was the price for a growing economy, a measure of the free market -- that greed was good and compassion ineffective, and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. And then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle-class Americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity -- that distant bureaucrats were taking their hard-earned dollars to benefit the welfare cheat or the illegal immigrant. 15:25:46 And then, if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us, claiming to push for change, lost our way. The anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. Legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse- making for criminal behavior. Racial politics could cut both ways as the transformative message of unity and brotherhood was drowned out by the language of recrimination. And what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all Americans to work hard and get ahead was too often framed as a mere desire for government support, as if we had no agency in our own liberation, as if poverty was an excuse for not raising your child and the bigotry of others was reason to give up on yourself. All of that history is how progress stalled. That's how hope was diverted. It's how our country remained divided. But the good news is, just as was true in 1963, we now have a choice. We can continue down our current path in which the gears of this great democracy grind to a halt and our children accept a life of lower expectations, where politics is a zero-sum game, where a few do very well while struggling families of every race fight over a shrinking economic pie. That's one path. Or we can have the courage to change. 15:27:52 The March on Washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history, that we are masters of our fate. But it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. We'll have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. 15:28:26 And I believe that spirit is there, that true force inside each of us. I see it when a white mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. I see it when the black youth thinks of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. It's there when the native born recognizing that striving spirit of a new immigrant, when the interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple who were discriminated against and understands it as their own. That's where courage comes from, when we turn not from each other or on each other but towards one another, and we find that we do not walk alone. That's where courage comes from. (Applause.) And with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. With that courage, we can stand together for the right to health care in the richest nation on earth for every person. (Applause.) With that courage, we can stand together for the right of every child, from the corners of Anacostia to the hills of Appalachia, to get an education that stirs the mind and captures the spirit and prepares them for the world that awaits them. (Applause.) With that courage, we can feed the hungry and house the homeless and transform bleak wastelands of poverty into fields of commerce and promise. America, I know the road will be long, but I know we can get there. Yes, we will stumble, but I know we'll get back up. That's how a movement happens. That's how history bends. That's how, when somebody is faint of heart, somebody else brings them along and says, come on, we're marching. (Cheers, applause.) There's a reason why so many who marched that day and in the days to come were young, for the young are unconstrained by habits of fear, unconstrained by the conventions of what is. They dared to dream different and to imagine something better. And I am convinced that same imagination, the same hunger of purpose serves in this generation. 15:31:11 We might not face the same dangers as 1963, but the fierce urgency of now remains. We may never duplicate the swelling crowds and dazzling processions of that day so long ago, no one can match King's brilliance, but the same flames that lit the heart of all who are willing to take a first step for justice, I know that flame remains. (Applause.) That tireless teacher who gets to class early and stays late and dips into her own pocket to buy supplies because she believes that every child is her charge -- she's marching. (Applause.) That successful businessman who doesn't have to, but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, maybe an ex-con, who's down on his luck -- he's marching. 15:32:12 (Cheers, applause.) The mother who pours her love into her daughter so that she grows up with the confidence to walk through the same doors as anybody's son -- she's marching. (Cheers, applause.) The father who realizes the most important job he'll ever have is raising his boy right, even if he didn't have a father, especially if he didn't have a father at home -- he's marching. (Applause.) The battle-scarred veterans who devote themselves not only to helping their fellow warriors stand again and walk again and run again, but to keep serving their country when they come home -- they are marching. (Applause.) Everyone who realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day, that change does not come from Washington but to Washington, that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship -- you are marching. (Applause.) 15:33:16 And that's the lesson of our past, that's the promise of tomorrow, that in the face of impossible odds, people who love their country can change it. And when millions of Americans of every race and every region, every faith and every station can join together in a spirit of brotherhood, then those mountains will be made low, and those rough places will be made plain, and those crooked places, they straighten out towards grace, and we will vindicate the faith of those who sacrificed so much and live up to the true meaning of our creed as one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. (Cheers, applause.) 15:33:56 Obama waving, walking from podium 15:34:59 Barack and Michelle hugging and gladhanding with King family onstage 15:36:12 Obama hugging Oprah 15:37:19 Barack and Michelle walking up steps away from event 15:37:29 Barack and Michelle Obama waving 15:37:50 Obamas with Clinton and Carter waving, walking away from event Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech. The final refrain of Martin Luther King Jr.'s most famous speech will echo around the world as bells from churches, schools and historical monuments "let freedom ring" in celebration of a powerful moment in civil rights history. Organizers said sites in nearly every state will ring their bells at 3pm today, the hour when King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington. President Obama, and former Presidents Clinton and Carter will deliver speeches at the Lincoln Memorial to commemorate the anniversary.
FOLK MUSIC
ROOFTOP SINGERS - WALK RIGHT IN 1960'S FOLK REVIVAL VOCAL GROUP THE ROOFTOP SINGERS PERFORM THEIR POP HIT " WALK RIGHT IN " WHICH IS A RE-ARRANGEMENT OF MEMPHIS BLUES JUG BAND MUSICIAN GUS CANNONS 1930 ORIGINAL - THEY PERFORM IT ON TWO TWELVE STRING GUITARS AND BASS
NEWSREELS
FLORIDA GOVERNOR REUBIN ASKEW STAN BRANTLEY AL CAHILL JUSTICE CALDWELL SENATOR HARRY CAIN NICK CAIRIS FLOYD THOMAS CALDWELL (JOSEPH DEKLE) ADMIRAL HENRY CALDWELL (ADM. GOLDTHWAITE, REAR ADM. ROBERT STROH) MILLARD CALDWELL BILL CALHOUN DR. FRANK CALHOUN ORVILLE CALHOUN (DR. JOSEPH CRESINBENI) MIKE CALLAHAN (CAROL SCOTT) REPRESENTATIVE HOWARD CALLAWAY LT. WILLIAM CALLEY (DR. GERHARD BECK) LUIS CARLOS CALVO JAMES CAMERO (ROY CECIL FLOYD) LARRY CAMP CALVIN CARLOS CAMPBELL (MORRIS FISH) CHARLES CAMPELL DR. DOAK CAMPBELL HAROLD CAMPBELL (ROBERT VARN) PHIL CAMPBEL DR. ROY CAMPBELL THOMAS CAMPBELL WALTER CAMPBELL CONDUCTOR CANARINA JIM CANADAY JIM CLYDE CANADY C. LAMARR CANNON CLYDE CANNON FINLEY CANNON BENNY CANTY LARRY CAPUNE BRITISH UN AMBASSADOR LORD CARADON LOUISE CARDIL SENATOR FRANK CARLSON DR. ROY CARLSON (LAWRENCE LEWIS) DOYLE CARLTON CHARLES CARLTON MABRY CARLTON JOE CARLUCCI JAS V. CARMICHAEL CHARLES CARNEY HERMAN CAROL KATHRYN CAROLYN (LEM TURNER) WARRENT OFFICER CARPENTER DR. THOMAS CARPENTER DENNIS CARR JAMES CARR MIKE CARR JOHN CARRADINE CARRAWAY HENRY CARRERE BILL CARRIN GEORGE CARRISON BISHOP CARROLL ELLSWORTH CARROLL JOE CARROLL WILSON CARROWAY (JUDGE KELLY) ADMIRAL CARSON SHERIFF DALE CARSON DR. DORIS CARSON KEN CARSON JUDGE HARROLD CARSWELL WILLIAM CARSWELL AUDREY CARTER CHARLES CARTER EYTHLE CARTER JACK CARTER JAMES CARTER JAMES LEWIS CARTER JAMES RUBIN CARTER JERRY CARTER LT. (JG) GW CARTER JIM CARTER GOVERNOR JIMMY CARTER LOUIS CARTER (LEWIS CARTER) ROBERT CARTER STANLEY CARTER (MARY HIGGINBOTHAM) WILLIAM CARTER WILLIAM E. CARTER HORRACE CARTWRIGHT CRAIG CARVER DR. JOAN CARVER JOSEPH CASCELLA JESSIE CASEY NORMAN CASH WILLIAM CASH CONSTANCE CASON PERCY CASON EDNA CASON MRS. CASSERLY A.B. CASTLEBERRY RICKY CASTELMAN ANA CASTRO FIDEL CASTRO JUANITA CASTRO VIVIAN CAULEY RAY CAVERT CHARLES WILLIAM CLAYTON (PAUL WOODHAM, JULIAN CLIFFORD ANDREU) RALPH CELLON (HENRY BECK) MILDRED CENTERS (JUDGE DRAKE) EUGENE CERNAN (THOMAS STAFFORD) JOHN CHAFFEE ROGER CHAFFEE CAROL CHAFFIN HAL CHAIRES JUDD CHALMERS DR. LAWRENCE CHALMERS N.L. CHALMERS JACK CHAMBERS JOHN CHAMBERS DR. CHAMPION BOBBY LEE CHAMPION JOHN CHAMPION JOE CHANDLER D.J. CHANEY DR. VERNE CHENEY CAROL CHANNING TED CHAPEAU JAMES CHAPLIN (LEROY WILLIAMS, JAMES RAWLS, JEWELL HAYES, JAMES RUFUS MARTIN) A.B. CHAPMAN CLARENCE CHAPMAN GLORIA JEAN CHAPMAN HENRY CHAPELL BILL CHAPPEL WILLIAM CHAPPELL JOHNNY CHAPPELLE (JAMES SIMON) ROY CHARLES (PHILIP HOCHE) ANTHONY CHASE ROBERT CHASTAIN RUPERT CHASTAIN E.S. CHATHAM CMDR. GLEN CHEEK (CHARLES HILL) VA CHENEY CHERRON MRS. CHERRY WESLEY CHESSNUT CHARLES CHESTNUT RAOUL CHIBAS CAPT. K.C. CHILDERS (ON POLARIS) DR. WILLIAM CHILDERS SENATOR LAWTON CHILES LOUIS CHIQUET REP. SHIRLEY CHISHOLM (SENATOR HENRY JACKSON) MRS. BENJAMIN CHITKO DR. AUBURN CHITTY FLOYD CHRISTIAN (TERRELL SESSUMS) GEORGE CHURCHILL WINSTON CHURCHILL JAMES CIVILS IVAN CLARE VICE ADM. B.A. CLAREY AMANDA CLARK ARTHUR CLARK DAVE CLARK FIVE EARNEST CLARK LOLA MAE CLARK (WALTER LEE) PAT CLARK PETER CLARK S. GEORGE CLARK TOM CLARK CAPT. WALTER CLARK JOHN CLARKSON EDNA MARIE CLAY RUBY CLAYMAN RICK CLAYTON KAREN CLEAR WOODROW CLEMENS FRANK CLEMENT WILLIE CLEMENTS MARTHA CLEVELAND HENRIETTA CLIFFORD M.R. & J.R. CLIFTON PATROL COL. REID CLIFTON CHIEF CLOONEY BARNEY COBB JAMES COATES EVERETT JAMES COBB JAMES ALBERT COBB TYE COBB (CLAUDE KELLY) IMOGENE COCA DON COCHRAN H.G. COCHRAN JACQUELINE COCHRAN C.L. CODY H.A. COFFEE EDWIN PATTON COFFER CHARLES COGEN BEN COHEN BERNARD COHEN E.E. COHRAN CAPT. LEON COHRAN RICHARD COHRAN ROBERT COHRAN REAR ADM. RICHARD COLBERT FRED CARRINGTON COLE M.M. COLE NORVELL COLE RAZZIE COLE JR HAROLD COLEE (WILLIAM HUNT) DON COLEMAN HENRY COLEMAN JACK COLEMAN JAMES COLEMAN NORMAN COLEMAN (JAMES GRADEN) P.N. COLEMAN RICHARD COLEMAN ROBERT COLEMAN ROGER COLEMAN ROUSE COLEMAN (JAMES DAVIS, LOUIS JOURDAN) STEPHEN COLEMAN T.N. COLEMAN DR. A.B. COLEMAN DR. FRANK COLEMAN COURTLAND COLLIER BRIAN COLLINS CORTLAND COLLINS HORACE COLLINS LEROY COLLINS EDWARD COLSON DIANE COLSTON ADM. T.S. COMBS JOHN COMER JUANITA CONE VIRGIE CONE ROYCE CONEY (FREDDIE SIMPKINS) JOHN CONNALLY STEVEN O'CONELL JOHN CONNER DOYLE CONNER (DOYLE CONNOR) NICK CONNER CHARLES CONRAD HANS CONREID FRANICS PAT CONROY DR. PHIL CONSTANS KATHLEEN CONVERSE GERALDINE CONWAY REP. CONWAY WILLIAM CARDINAL CONWAY AL COOK BILLY COOK (JOYCE MILLER) CHARLES COOK CLYDE COOK C.W. COOK HAROLD COOK (WILLIAMS SELLERS) DR. JAMES COOK DAVID COOLEY WILLIAM COON (PAUL LUDQUIST) GORDON COOPER JOHNNY LEE COOPER (IDA MAE GILCREST) RALPH COOPER BRIG. GENERAL RALPH COOPER ROBERT COOPER ROGAR COPELAND WILLOU COPELAND DEAN WAYNE CORBIN MONIQUE CORDEAUX SEBRA COREY LOU CORKIN JANET CORLEY DR. ROBERT CORRIGAN WYNN COSSWELL HUGH COTNEY GARY COTTINGAME C.H. COULTER CHARLES COUNCIL BEATRICE COURSON WILLIE COURSON (DONALD DAVIS) JAMES COUSAR GENERAL FREDERICK COUTTS WALLACE COVINGTON ROBERT COWAN CHESTER COWART ED COWART JOHNNY COWART PAT COWART DR. PAT COWDRY (PAT COWDERY) CARL WILSON COX DONALD COX ERIC COX IRBY COX J.D. COX (J.E. DIXON) JIMMY DEAN COX KENNETH COX REV. M.E. COX ROBERT COX ANN COYLE (ANN COYLDE) BILLY JOE CRABB FRANK CRABTREE GEORGE CRADY REP. A.H. CRAIG A.J. CRAIG GUS CRAIG GUY CRAIG TOMMY CRAIG CHARLES CRAIG ROBERT CRAIG ANNE CRAMER CHAUNCEY CRAWFORD (CHAUNCY CRAWFORD) L.E. CRAWFORD ROLAND CRAYGER ANDER CRENSHAW WAYNE CRENSHAW (THOMAS RAFUSE, CHARLES ARMSTRONG) DR. JOSEPH CRESINBENI REP. WILIAM CRAMER ALACHUA SHERIFF JOE CREVASSE FRED CREWS JOHN CREWS PRICE CRIBBS JOHN CRIDER JESSE CRIPE MARSHALL CRISER DAN CRISP (BOB HARRIS) PAUL CRISP JUDGE GEORGE CROCKETT BRIG. GENERAL FRANK CROFT MAYOR RALPH CROFT ELIZABETH CROKE JONI CROKE WARREN CROKE LONNIE CROMBY BOB CROSBY DARRIS CROSBY DR. HAROLD CROSBY JOHN CROSBY ARMORD CROSS EMORY CROSS SENATOR J.E. "RED" CROSS LONNIE CROSS JAMES CROUCH ROBERT CROWLEY LUCILLE CRYSELL LT. FRANCIS CRUMPTON INMAN CRUTCHFIELD CLYATT CUATHEN DR. TONY CUNHA ROBERT CULBERTSON LT. DAVID CULLEN FLOYD CULLEN JAMES CULLEN JOSEPH CULLENS HOWARD CULPEPPER DR. J. BROWARD CULPEPPER RICHARD CUMBEY J.P. CUMMINGS THOMAS CUMMINGS WAYNE CUMMINGS DR. CUNNINGHAM GEORGE CURLIN DON CURREN JOSEPH CURRAN AMY CURRIE BRUCE CURRY ERNEST CURRY JOE CURRY (LORO HARTLEY) AL CURTSY FRANK CUSMANO NANCY CUTHERN DANNY CUTHERN GEORGE DABBS ARTHUR DE COSTA DR. EDWIN DAHLBERG ROBERT DAHNE SGT. MAJOR JOSEPH DAILEY SHELBY DALE LEE DANIELS REP. SANDY DELEMBERTE REP. TALBOT D'ALEMBERTE DEL DALLAS DR. DAME FIRE CHIEF JOHN DAMPIER ADM. J.C. DANIEL J.J. DANIELS (J.J. DANIEL) WILBURN DANIEL (WELBORN DANIEL) BILLY DANIELS J.D. DANIELS RUDOLPH DANIELS RUTH DANIELS SAMMY DANIELS BILL DANSBY JOHN DANSON RITA DAR DAVID LEE DARBY WOODROW DARDEN L.S. DASHER ADMIRAL DASPIT DR. MANNING DAUER HOWARD DAUFOLD JOEL DAVES RAY DAVID TED DAVID TOM DAVID DON DAVIDSON A.D. DAVIS ARTHUR JAMES DAVIS CARL DAVIS CHESLEY DAVIS CHUCK DAVIS CLINTON DAVIS DAVE DAVIS DON DAVIS DONALD DAVIS DR. GEORGE DAVIS CAPTAIN GEORGE DAVIS HELEN DAVIS J.E. DAVIS JAMES DAVIS JEFF DAVIS JOHN L. DAVIS MAJOR GENERAL LEIGHTON DAVIS MCKENNY DAVIS MARVIN DAVIES MOSES DAVIS NATHANIEL DAVIS PAUL DAVIS RALPH DAVIS RENNE DAVIS ROBERT DAVIS ROY DAVIS DR. W.C. DAVIS WESLEY DAVIS (CLYDE WILLIAMS, WILL MORRIS) FLOYD DAWDRY WILLIAM DAWSON (CHARLES GRIFFIN) AL DAY CAROLYN DAY DR. SAM DAY SIBYLE THOMPSON DAYMON (BILL ARFLIN) ARTHUR DAYMUDE ER DAYO JIMMY DEAN C. LAMAR DEAN JIM DEAN JOHN DEAN RHONDA MAE DEAN BRITISH AMBASSADOR SIR PATRICK DEAN OTTO DEBATE CARL DEBOIS A. GIB DEBUSK MRS. DECKEL SENATOR RICHARD DEEB DON DEFORE GLORIA DE HAVEN JUDGE HAL DEKLE JOSEPH DEKLE MICHAEL DELANEY STEVE DELANEY SENATOR LOUIS DE LA PARTE (DELAPARTE) JAMES OSCAR DELCHER DELIUS SAM T. DELL DR. DAVID DELO DELOACH SAMUEL DEMPS EDWARD DEMPSEY CLYDE DENMARK JOHN DENNARD JACK DENNIS SELENA DENNIS CHARLES DENNISON FRED DENT HARRY DENT DE PEDRAZA ROBERT DEPUGH GENERAL DE SHAZO JOHN DE SAUSSURE WALTER DEVINE BILL DIAMOND ERLINE DICKERSON FRED DICKENSON BUD DICKINSON FRED DICKINSON DR. J.C. DICKINSON WALTER DICKINSON JIM DICKSON GRANVILLE DIFFY REP. CHARLES DIGGES DEBBIE DIMLEY BARBARA DINGLE CLARENCE DINGLE PAUL DINKINS (EARL JOHNSON) CHARLES DINSDALE JOHN DIPPLE EDWARD DIRKSEN EVERETT DIRKSEN VIOLA DISHINGER ROY DISNEY EUNICE MAUDE DISNEY WALT DISNEY CHARLES DIXON EARL DIXON J.E. DIXON LARRY DIXON MARY DIXON ERNEST JOHN DOBBERT ARNOLD DOBEY GEOFFREY DOBSON JACK DODD MRS. GREGG SHERWOOD DODGE JOSEPH DODGE GEORGE DOERN FRANK DOGGETT U.S. SENATOR ROBERT DOLE (BOB DOLE) JOHN DOLL EARL DONALDSON SAM DONALDSON JERALD DONAWAY THOMAS DONNELLY H.W. DONOVAN PAUL DONOVAN COAST GUARD CAPTAIN DORR ADM. J.S. DORSEY COY LEE DOTY (GERALD ROYCE WILLIAMS, FRANK GRESSETT) LOUISE DORSEY WARD DOUGHERTY MARJORIE DOUGLAS DEPUTY W.C. DOUGLAS WILLIAM O. DOUGLAS DR. J.E. DOVELL VERNON DOWELL W.B. DOWELL DR. HEYWOOD DOWLING DR. JAMES DOWLING FIRE CHIEF JIM DOWLING JIM DOWLING SR MORRIS DOWNEY SUE ANN DOWNEY RICHARD DOWNING JR SGT. JAMES DOXEY DICK DOYLE JAMES DOYLE PAUL DOYLE BEVERLY DOZIER FRED DOZIER JUDGE DORCAS DRAKE MEL DRANE REX DRANE IRMA DRAYER COUNCILMAN DREW MARCUS DREWA LEWIS DROHAN REV. RICK DRUMMOND JAMES DRURY MURRAY DUBIN REP. MURRAY DUBBIN (MURRY DUBBIN) DR. RENE DUBOS JOHN DUBOSE JOHN DUCKER SHARON DUDLEY (JUDGE LAMAR WINEGEART, DOROTHY PATE) CLINTON T. DUFFY GERALD DUGGAN LAWRENCE DUGGER CHARLES DUGGINS JOHN DUGUID REC. HARVEY DUKE (FATHER JOHN LENIHAN) JAMES DULA ALLEN DULLES JOHN FOSTER DULLES EMMETT DUNAWAY OFFICER L.H. DUNAWAY PETE DUNBAR WALT DUNBAR MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE DUNCAN GORDON DUNCAN JR LEWIS DUNCAN REV. NORMAN DUNCAN RAY DUNCAN RAYMOND DUNCAN TED DUNCAN EDGAR DUNN DR. LLOYD DUNN JESSIE DUNNAWAY DON DUNNINGTON ROBERT DUNWOODY MICHAEL DUPES SGT. N.R. DUPONT LT. EMMETT LEE DUPREE SAMUEL DURBIN JIM DURDEN WILLIAM DURDEN KENNETH DURR MARGARET LEE DUTTON ED DWYER C.J. EADIE WALTER EADY DONALD LEE EAGLE FREDDIE LEE EAGLETON BARBARA EAKINS LEON HANSEN EARL LEWIS EARLE ERVIN EARLY REP. EASLEY CATHERINE EAST REV. CECIL EAVES LEONIE SEABROOK ECCLES JACK ECKERD (JOHN ECKERD) LARRY EDDY CAPTAIN E.F. EDENFIELD ANDREW EDGE WILLIE EDGE WILLIAM EDMISTON OLLIE EDMONDS J. HOWARD EDMONDSON (JIMMY EDMONDSON) JUANITA EDMONDSON MAYOR ROBERT EVANS BUDDY EDWARD BOB EDWARDS ERIC EDWARDS HENRY CLEVELAND EDWARDS HOLLY EDWARDS ISADORE EDWARDS JAKE EDWARDS JAMES EDWARDS MRS. JOHN EDWARDS KENNETH GILBERT EDWARDS L.K. EDWARDS MARVIN EDWARDS DR. RAY EDWARDS THOMAS EDWARDS TRUMAN EGGINK EGGLESTOM DON EGNER RICHARD EHLIS DOROTHY ANN EHMAN ULYSSES EICHELBERGER JOHN EILAND DR. MAURICE EISENDRATH BARBARA EISENHOWER DAVID EISENHOWER JULIE NIXON EISENHOWER JULIE EISENHOWER IKE JOSEPH ELBERS REPRESENTATIVE ELDRIDGE ROGER ELDRIDGE WALTER ELEASER HILDA ELIAN RICHARD ELIAN MICHAEL ELIZUR JOHN ELKINS RABBI PERETZ ELKINS DUKE ELLINGTON MELVIN ELLIOT CAPTAIN DON ELLIOTT CHARLES ELLIOT RALPH ELLIOTT ROBERT ELLIOTT RONALD ELLIOTT CLYDE ELLIS CRAWLY ELLIS DON ELLIS GLADYS ELLIS H.L. ELLIS JAMES ELLIS JEFF ELLIS (CHARLES ELLIS) LEVIN ELLIS MARVIN ELLIS HAROLD ELLIS MRS. RALPH ELLIS STEVE ELLIS WAYNE ELLIS GENE ELLISON REV. ELLISON CAPTAIN S.R. ELLISON ROBERT ELROD JOHANNA ELWELL GENERAL ELWOOD PIERRE EMANUELLI HUGH EMERSON EMMANUEL FRANK EMSHOFF DOUGLAS ENDSLEY DR. ANTHONY ENGLAND ARTHUR ENGLAND PAUL ENGLE JAMES ENGLISH DAVID ENTIN LT. COL. EPPERT HAROLD EPPINGER DR. BENJAMIN EPSTEIN LUDWIG ERHARD PAUL ERHARDT ERIAU JOHN ERKEY RICHARD ERVIN SENATOR SAM ERVIN DR. LUIS MARIA ESANDI VIRGINIA ESSEX WILLIAM ESTEP WALTER ESTER E.M. ESTES JACK ETHERIDGE MAYOR BOB EVANS LT. EVANS CLARENCE EVANS MAYOR ROBERT EVANS MRS. ROBERT EVANS GRANT EVANS (SHERMAN EVANS) OLLIE EVANS WILLIAM EVANS CLAYTON EVERETT PRESTON EVERETT LES EVERHARDT CHARLES EVERS EPHRAIM EVRON THOMAS EWART DONALD EWIG VINCE EXLEY MARY GRACE EZELL ALLEN FACEMIRE OSEE FAGAN JIM FAIR DAVID WILLIAM FAIRBANKS EARL FAIRCLOTH FALANEY HICKORY FANT JULIAN FANT CAPTAIN ROBERT FARKAS HAROLD FARMER JAMES FARMER JOHN FARMER DR. GLENN FARRIS ORVAL FAUBUS CMDR. J.J. FAY PAUL FAY ROBERT FEAGIN RICHARD FEATHERINGILL HAROLD FEATHERSTON DR. MEADE FEILD CARL FEIT FELDSHAW DR. ROBERT FELIX LINDSEY FELTON PATRICK FERGENSON CHESTER FERGUSON LT. COL. JOHN FERNSLER JULIAN FERRAS JULIE JEANETTE FERRELL CAPT. JIM FERRIS DR. JOHN FEY LEILA FIELD JOSEPH FIELDS GEORGE FIRESTONE S.H. FIFIELD THOMAS FIGGS FIGUERES DEAN O.R. FINCH SENATOR DICK FINCHER ELI FINKLESTEIN PATRICIA ANN FINLEY LEROY FINNEY CLYDE FISH MORRIS FISH GORDON FISHER MORRIS FISH ISABEL FISHER DR. JOHN FISHER SENATOR JOHN FISHER MORTON FISHER PRIM FISHER WILLIAM FITCH THOMAS FITZGIBBON REP. WILLIAM FLEECE RALPH FLEMING RICHARD FLEMMING TOM FLEMMING ARTHUR FLETCHER ED FLETCHER JERRY FLETCHER LYMAN FLETCHER THOMAS EDWIN FLETCHER TUCKER FLETCHER FRANK FLOOK WALTER FLOWERS WOODROW FLOWERS ROY CECIL FLOYD SIDNEY FLOYD WALTER FLOYD WALTER FLY EVERETT FLYNN LEON FLYNN BRIGADER GENERAL JAMES FOGLE DR. JACK LEE FOLEY KATHRYN FOLGER JACK FOLEY KEN FOLKS WARREN FOLKS SAM FOOR JOHN FORBES LEON FORBES DAN FORD GERALD FORD JANE FONDA DR. MALCOLM FORD MORRIS FORD WILBERT FORD DR. JOSEPH FORDYCE (JOSEPH FORDICE) AUBURN FORREST M.L. FORRESTER JOE FORSHEE A.J. FORSYTH ADM. MALCOLM FORTSON EDMOND FORTUEN DR. JAMES FOSHEE ELIZABETH JANE FOSTER JAMES FOSTER MARIE FOSTER FRANK FOURAKER PETE FOUNTAIN R.W. FOWLER REAR ADM. RICHARD FOWLER DAVE FOX VERNON FOX HARRY FOZZARD POLICE CHIEF C.H. FRANKS CELIA FRANCA PAT FRANK WILLIAM FRANKE POLICE CHIEF CHARLES FRANKS MEL FRANKS CHARLES FRANSON ROCCO FRANZESE ED FRASER JOHN FRATUS JOHN FRAZIER VIRGINIA FRAZIER WILLIE FRAZIER JOHN FREDERICK PAULINE FREDERICK MACK FREEMAN NOLAN FREEMAN ORVILLE FREEMAN ROBERT LEE FREEMAN TOMMY FREEMAN WALTER FREEMAN JACK FRENCH DR. HERMAN FRICK ELMER FRIDAY DANNY FRIEDMAN ROBERT FROEMKE CMDR. ROBERT FROSIO LOUIS FROST CONGRESSMAN LOUIS FRY DR. EARLE FRYE ED FRYE HENRY THEODORE FRYE KEVIN FRYE PATRICIA FUDGE FULBRIGHT REP. BILL FULFORD WARREN FULLER ROBERT FULLER COL. A.S. FULLERTON G.H. FULTON RUFUS FULTON ANTON FUNJEK KEITH FUNSTON DON FUQUA JOHN FUTCH THOMAS FURMAN JOSEPH WILLIAM FREELOW DAVID FREEMAN JOHNNY FREEMAN JUDSON FREEMAN BYRON FULLER }Y
MLK MARCH ANNIVERSARY CEREMONY ABC POOL CUTS CAM P3
EXT BROLL ABC POOL CUTS CAM POSITION LOW SHOT DURING 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MARCH CEREMONY Wednesday, August 28, 2013 LOG: March on Washington 50th Anniversary "Let Freedom Ring" at Lincoln Memorial SLUG: 0930 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 74 1530 LINCOLN MEM STIX RS34 71 AR: 16X9 DISC# NYRS: WASH HD 4 11:00 am - 12:00 pm 11:09:25 Geraldo Marshall (Trumpet Call) 11:11:28 REMARKS/ INTRO INVOCATION (Soledad O'Brien, Hill Harper) 11:14:49 Pastor A.R. Bernard (Invocation) 11:20:17 INTRO AMB. YOUNG (Hill Harper) 11:20:39 Ambassador Andrew Young YOUNG: I don't know about you, but I "Woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind" -- come on, help me -- "stayed on freedom. I woke up this morning with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu" -- come on (inaudible) -- "Hallelujah." Well, "I'm walking and talking with my mind -- my mind, it was, stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Walking and talking with my mind stayed on freedom. Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelujah." Now, 50 years ago when we came here, we came from a battle. We came from a battle in Birmingham. But that was just a few months before -- before Martin Luther King came through to speak of his dream. 11:22:11 He had been through bombings, jailings, beatings. He had been snatched from his jailhouse cell in DeKalb County, and put in chains, and taken down to Reidsville Penitentiary in the middle of the night, and thought it was going to be his last night on earth. 11:22:31 He went through the battles of Albany and Birmingham, and came out victorious. But we knew that the fight was just beginning. And we knew that we had a long, long way to go, and this was just the start. Now, he came here representing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, saying that we were going to redeem the soul of America from the triple evils of racism, war and poverty. He came, not talking so much about racism nor war. His speech was about poverty. And he said that the Constitution was a promissory note, to which all of us would fall heir, but that when men and women of color presented their check at the bank of justice, it came back marked, "insufficient funds." But then he said he knew that wasn't the end. But 50 years later, we're still here trying (ph) to cash that bad check. Fifty years later, we're still dealing with all kinds of problems. And so we're not here to claim any victory. We're here to simply say that the struggle continues. But a long time ago, when Ralph Abernathy would stand with him, and things would get difficult, Ralph would say, "Well, I don't know what the future may hold, but I know who holds the future." 11:24:02 And Martin would say that, "The moral arch of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice." And then he would say, "Truth forever on the scaffold; wrong forever on the throne. But the scaffold sways the future, for behind the dim unknown, standeth God beneath the shadows keeping watch above His own." 11:24:22 So I want to say to you this morning, I want to say, "I've got a feeling everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right. I've got a feeling, everything's going to be all right, be all right, be all right, be all right." Pray on, and stay on, and fight on. 11:25:34 Robby Novak, Kid President remarks 11:25:59 Jonathan B. Jarvis, 18th Director of the National Park Service remarks 11:26:08 there are countless photographs of that historic day, one with a pair of rangers with Dr King. Image captures small moment in great event, but captures role of nat'l parks service. 11:26:49 each monument you find a familiar parks service arrowhead. We are there to welcome visitors and preserve American stories they represent. Places civil rights was organized are now preserved as nat'l parks. The power of these places is to inspire each generation to have a dream. 11:28:11 we are very proud of the 2 rangers who stood here 50 years ago. My promise to you is that we will protect all the places entrusted to us with the highest standard of stewardship 11:28:48 Vincent C. Gray, Mayor of Washington 11:28:52 on behalf of 632,000 residents of DC, allow me to welcome you 11:29:08 dr king borrowed a lyric from one of our favorite patriotic songs: let freedom ring. 11:29:33 there was one place DR king didn't mention in that speech but later spoke forcefully: DC. That's because full freedom and democracy are still denied to those who live within sight of capitol dome. We have no voting representative in our own congress. We pay 3.5 billion dollars in taxes but don't get final say. We send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy but don't get to practice here at home 11:30:47 I implore, I hope all of you will stand with me when we say let freedom ring from mt st Albans, the bridges of Anacostia, from Capitol Hill itself, until all of the residents are truly free. 11:31:25 please join hands with us and make every American free 11:31:45 Reverend Wintley Phipps, Sr. 11:36:00 U.S. Senator Angus King, Maine 11:36:10 KING: Fifty years ago, Americans marched to this place. They came from the Northeast, from the West, from the Midwest, and they came from the South. They came by rail; they came by bus; they came by car. One even roller-skated here from Chicago. They slept the night before in buses, in cars, on friends' floors, and in churches. 11:36:42 Fifty years ago this morning, we started in small rivulets of people on the side streets of this great city. We joined together in larger streams, moving toward the main arteries of Washington. Then we came together in a mighty river of people down to this place, old, young, black, white, Protestant, Catholic, and Jew. We stopped at the Washington Monument and heard Peter, Paul and Mary sing of the hammer of justice and the bell of freedom. 11:37:26 Fifty years ago, Americans came to this place around a radical idea, an idea at the heart of the American experience, an idea new to the world in 1776, tested in 1865, renewed in 1963, and an idea still new and radical today: all men and women are created equal. All men and women are created equal. 11:38:08 Fifty years ago, at this place, at this sacred place, Americans sent a message to their leaders and around the world that the promise of equality of opportunity, equality before the law, equality in the right to freely participate in the benefits and responsibilities of citizenship applied to everyone in this country, not just the lucky few of the right color or the accident of birth. This is what Martin Luther King meant when he said that his dream was deeply rooted in the American dream. 11:39:03 And 150 years ago -- 150 years ago this summer -- a mighty battle was fought not far from this place. And this idea, the idea of equality, the idea of America hung in the balance. One of the soldiers on those hot July days was a young college professor from Maine named Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. And returning to the battlefield at Gettysburg many years later, he expressed the power of the place where such momentous deeds were done. Here is what he said. Here is what Joshua Chamberlain said. 11:39:44 "In great deeds, something abides. On great fields, something stays. Forms change and pass, bodies disappear, but spirits linger to consecrate the ground for the vision-place of souls. Generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field, to this deathless place, to ponder and dream. And, lo, the shadow of a mighty presence will wrap them in its bosom and the power of the vision shall pass into their souls." 11:40:53 Fifty years ago today, this place was a battlefield. No shots were fired, no cannons roared, but a battlefield nonetheless, a battlefield of ideas, the ideas that define us as a nation. As it was once said of Churchill, Martin Luther King on that day mobilized the English language and marched it into war, and, in the process, caught the conscience of a nation. And here today on these steps, 50 years on, indeed, something abides and the power of the vision has surely passed into our souls. 11:41:57 The Honorable Johnny L. DuPree, Mayor of Hattiesburg, Mississippi and Secretary, National Council of Black Mayors 11:42:15 decades and decades ago, blood sweat and tears all culminated in a march 11:42:31 if someone would have told me this country boy would become a mayor, I'd say they fell off a truck 11:42:52 some of y'all never had the opportunity to take a bath in a #3 tin tub, I did that 11:43:19 we've been entrusted with making the lives better of people that we serve 11:43:39 at one point, struggle was to gain citizenship, then vote, for brief period, African Americans held elected office during reconstruction 11:44:00 now one of the challenges is the freedom to govern. We must to locally what obama did nationally 11:44:15 we must go back to individuals who helped get us here and encourage them to make their voices heard 11:44:34 we did not quiver or retreat in face of injustice 11:44:55 it is because of those who marched on, even though wearied and bloodied, until they did what people said couldn't be done 11:45:40 Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey with Trayvon Martin's parents and Newtown victim father Mark Barden 11:50:17 INTRO CHARLES STEELE JR and MELANIE CAMPBELL (Soledad O'Brien) 11:50:46 Charles Steele, president emeritus & CEO, Southern Christian Leadership Council 11:53:27 Melanie Campbell, president & CEO, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation 11:56:45 U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro, Texas (20th District) 11:56:55 CASTRO: It's an honor to be here with you today. I come as a son of the great state of Texas, the home to the president who signed the most sweeping and important civil rights legislation in our nation's history. I am 38 years old. I also speak to you as someone of a grateful generation, grateful for the struggles and the movements and the blood and tears and all of the work of the civil rights pioneers who stood here 50 years ago today, and those who marched in the streets of Selma, those who organized people in factories and farms, those who took their battles to the courts, like Thurgood Marshall and Gus Garcia, those who organized people to vote and exercise our rights, those like Willie Velasquez. My own parents in the 1960s were very involved in a movement inspired by Martin Luther King and the men and women who stood here. They were active in the Chicano movement, or the Latino civil rights movement. 11:58:08 And I want to say thank you to them, and thank you to all of you. And I also want to make a promise to you. As somebody of a younger generation of Americans, I want to promise you that all of the struggles and all of the fights and all of the work and all of the years that you put in to making our country a better place, to helping our leaders understand that freedom and democracy are prerequisites to opportunity, I want you to know that this generation of Americans will not let that dream go. That we will carry on, and make sure that this country lives up to the values and principles for which you fought so hard. Thank you very much. 11:58:53 The Right Honorable Perry Christie, Prime Minister of the Bahamas CHRISTIE: Greetings from the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, your closest neighbor to the south. Martin Luther King, Jr., holds a very special place in the hearts and minds of Bahamians, not least because he spent time amongst us, both in Nassau and in the tiny island of Bimini, where in 1964, while on a brief vacation, he composed his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. On a clear night, the lights of metropolitan Miami are, in fact, visible from the shores of Bimini, dramatizing the closeness between our two nations. We are, after all, less than 50 miles apart. But however close that may be in the literal sense, we are in the geography of the soul even closer than that. The common ties of history, of ethnicity and culture, of migration, of a common heritage of struggle bind us together not just as neighbors, not even only as friends, but as true brothers and sisters. The message I bring to you today can be briefly stated, and it is this. As momentous as this occasion is, we do a grave injustice to ourselves and to all humanity if we leave here unresolved to carry on the greater noble struggle for which Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his life. The blood of this good man shed in Memphis still cries out across the years, cries out to each and every one of us, wherever we may be, all across the world, to stand up for freedom, to stand up for human dignity, to stand up for equality, to stand up for social justice, to stand up for right and not for wrong, for peace and not for war, for love and not for hate. It is the timelessness and universality of the message that he proclaimed and the heroic majesty of his personal example that explains why Martin Luther King, Jr., is as relevant today, as compelling today, as inspirational today as he was 50 years ago, when from the very precincts he delivered the oration that rocked the conscience of America and the world. When he spoke as he did that day, we somehow knew, we somehow felt that his message was coming from a place that was not only deeper than himself, but deep within us all. He had awakened to the call of that place and was rousing us from our slumber so that we could take our own inner soundings and hear it, too. In so doing, he gave language to our deepest yearning for a better life. Martin Luther King's work remains unfinished. This then must be for all of us a time not only for renewal, but above all, a profoundly personal level and the most authentic way possible, a time for rededication to the dream that Martin Luther King championed throughout his life. May the light of the flame continue to guide us as we go forward, each in his own way, each in his own nation to continue the work of Martin Luther King. In that way, and in no other way, we keep his dream alive and make it our own. 12:00 -1:00 p.m. 12:02:42 Junkaroo performance 12:07:08 Myrlie Evers Williams 12:07:19 50 years ago we gathered in this very same spot. We felt in the words of another Mississippian, fannie lou hamer, I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. And I do believe that's what the crowd was saying to all of our leaders. Dr king took the helm, and under his leadership, said enough is enough America. This is our country. All of us, we belong here, and here we are, some 50 years later, assessing what has happened. Where we are 12:08:39 for a brief period of time I think we fell asleep and said everything is ok, but we know today everything is not ok, there has been a retrenchment in this country as far as equal rights is concerned. 12:09:09 the triumphs and defeats belong to us all. Dr king told us he might not get to mountaintop with us but there is a promised land. America is that land for all of us. 12:09:45 today's world, there's emphasis on individuality. How can I reach my top? No matter how strong any 1 person may be, they may be strengthened with support from each other 12:10:11 the movement can no longer afford an individual approach to justice 12:10:34 at times it is necessary that we let those who represent us know that we are a force to be reckoned with. Many of our messages today target youth and elders. I look at those in middle, they are young enough to relate but established enough in our community, I ask you what are our next steps 12:11:25 this country in the area of civil rights has taken a turn backward. I am energized to move forward and to be sure to see the gains we have encountered are not lost. So I do ask you what are our next steps. 12:11:58 many of our civil rights leaders like my husband and dr martin luther king 12:12:12 I challenge you to get back to community building, these are our children. You are the parents. The victory will be a collective one. It is with clear conscience that we will reach that mountaintop and we will overcome 12:12:46 it will take each and every one of us, letting those who say they manage America it's the voice and actions of people who say we must overcome and will eventually say we have overcome because of the involvement of each and every one 12:14:01 Kristin Stoneking, executive director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation 12:16:29 Mee Moua, president and executive director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice 12:18:40 The Honorable Martin O'Malley, Governor of Maryland 12:18:42 O'MALLEY: The work of justice is urgent. It is real, and it is needed. Let there be no comfort in our country for the bigotry of cold indifference. For there are still too many lives in America taken from us by violence, still too many children in America who go to bed hungry, who go to school hungry. Still too much apathy when the lives of people of color are too often valued less than the lives of white people. 12:19:09 And so, the responsibility we consecrate today is not rooted in nostalgia or memory. It is rooted in something far deeper. It is rooted in the calling of conscious to action, actions that protect every individual's right to vote; action that safeguards and keeps guns out of the hands of violent offenders; action makes quality education and the opportunity of college a reality for more families; action that protects the dignity of every child's home with civil marriage equality; action that strengthens our country with the hopes and dreams and hard work of our newest generation of new American immigrants; action that abolishes the death penalty and improves public safety in every neighborhood regardless of income or color; actions that create jobs and raises the minimum wage for every mom and dad that's willing to work hard and play by the rules. 12:20:25 Yes, thanks to Dr. King, America's best days are still ahead of us. Love remains the strongest power in our country. Forward we shall walk, hand in hand. And in this great work, we are not afraid. Thank you. 12:21:00 Natalie Grant 12:24:39 Fred Maahs, chair of the American Association of People with Disabilities 12:29:19 Reverend Roslyn Brock, chairman of the NAACP 12:29:24 the march on Washington was for equality and opportunity. We of NAACP acknowledge our organizing days are beginning anew 12:29:52 the power and depth of their witness is magnified by the fact that they returned home and organized 12:30:08 in a 1966 speech to medical committee for human rights, dr king said injustice in healthcare is most inhumane inequality. One of the most pressing issues for this generation 12:30:38 supreme court and people have spoken. Affordable Care Act is the law of the land. 12:30:58 we must ensure all Americans are aware we can change the face of health in this nation. We are determined and clear to the world, when it comes to healthj equity, courage will not skip this generation. 12:31:37 Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP BENJAMIN JEALOUS: Fired up! (Cheers.) Come on. Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Fired up! AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ready to go! MR. JEALOUS: Ladies and gentlemen, as we stand here 50 years after the March on Washington, let us remember that Dr. King's last march was never finished. The Poor People's Campaign was never finished. Some 50 years after the March on Washington, while fewer people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. And while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off every day. 12:32:00 Indeed, one could say that the distance between a child's aspiration represented by the top of that ladder and a family's situation at the bottom of that ladder is the exact measurement of that parent's level of frustration. 12:32:44 And so as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. And as we turn on our TVs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they're being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom, because as the top of that ladder has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. Let us not just be dreamers this day; let us recommit to be doers. Thank you, and God bless. (Cheers, applause.) 12:33:52 Maori Dancers performance 12:38:41 Reverend Joseph Lowery 12:42:26 Laura Turner Seydel, aka "Captain Planet" 12:45:42 Dr. Eliza Byard, executive director, Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network 12:48:19 Bill Russell 12:48:29 good afternoon, it's nice to be here. 12:48:39 it's nice to be anywhere after 50 years. 12:49:41 from my point of view, you only register progress by how far you have to go 12:50:46 progress can only be measured by how far we have to go 12:51:07 as we used to say in the projects, keep on keeping on 12:51:58 Clayola Brown, president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute 12:53:47 Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO 12:53:50 good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent 1.6 tril members 12:54:16 and 5 years later, dr king stood with sanitation workers of local 1733 12:54:38 new momentum on these steps 50 years ago, advances whenever disenfranchised stand up 12:54:52 because our struggle continues12:55:08 we come to commemorate past and shape future 12:55:10 we must also have the courage in the name of dr king, a phillip ranolph, rep john lewis, we must recommit to struggle as stewards of nation that belongs to rich and poor, those with and those without 12:55:44 we have to build on legacy left to us all, protect fundamental rights, ensure workers voices never silenced, fight for good jobs and decent pay. Above all, we must uphold principle that everyone who contributes to prosperity of nation should share in prosperity 12:56:31 U.S. Congresswoman Donna Edwards, Maryland (4th District) 12:56:43 REPRESENTATIVE DONNA EDWARDS (D-MD): On behalf of the members of Congress, I represent Maryland's 4th Congressional District. As the first African-American woman to represent Maryland in the House of Representatives, and on behalf of my sisters in Congress, I'm proud to stand here with you today on the shoulders of women, courageous women like Fannie Lou Hamer and Dorothy Height and Vivian Malone and Rosa Parks and so many others. I'm proud to stand on the shoulders of our domestic workers and to be wrapped in the arms of three, four little girls in a Birmingham church and a Chicago teenager on vacation in Mississippi. 12:57:05 It's a new day 50 years later and a better day. But the day is not over. Today's struggle for civil rights, social justice and economic opportunity demand our engagement and our voice. To realize fully the dream we must both raise our voices and take action. We must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and our neighbors to be better. We must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations and for a just justice system. We must lift our voice for the value of our vote and have our votes counted without interference. As we stand here today, Dr. King would know and my dear colleague John Lewis certainly does know that today is not just a commemoration or a celebration; it's a call to action for the work that remains undone and the communities that remain unchanged. Our foremothers and forefathers, 50 years ago they closed a book on the last century. Well, when the book closes on the 21st century and civil rights, which chapter will you have written? What fight will you have fought in the halls of Congress or in the town halls of your community? For men and women, black and white, Latino and Asian, Muslim, Christian and Jew, gay and straight, I hope this book includes you. We need you to act. The final chapter must include your voice to achieve Dr. King's dream. They cannot be written without you. 12:58:50 Alan van Capelle - CEO Bend the Arc 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. 13:02:43 Ingrid Saunders Jones, chair of the National Council of Negro Women SAUNDERS: Good afternoon. I'm so proud to represent the 1.6 million members of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, AFSCME, public service workers whose labor touches communities throughout this nation. You know, AFSCME stood with Dr. King in 1963 when he called on America to be true to its principles. And five years later Dr. King stood with AFSCME when the sanitation workers of Local 1733 demanded justice, dignity, and respect. The journey for civil rights, workers' rights and economic rights began almost from the moment America was born. It gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. And it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned stand up, fight back and march forward. Because our struggle continues, we come to this memorial not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. We have the power to carry the determination, the hope and passion of the March on Washington forward. We must also have had the courage. We must also have the courage. SAUNDERS: In the name of Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Ella Baker and Congressman John Lewis, on behalf of those whose names will never be known, we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor, to the CEO and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. We have the responsibility to build on the legacy that has been left -- left to us all. We must protect the most fundamental rights we have -- the right to vote. We must be sure that workers' voices will never be silenced. We must fight for good jobs and decent pay. And we must become the just and fair society of our ideals. Above all -- above all -- we must uphold the principle that everyone who contributes to the prosperity of this nation should share in the prosperity of our nation. Thank you. 13:05:19 Mark Tillman, president of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 13:07:57 Delores Huerta DOLORES HUERTA: We're being blessed with the rain. Yes, we are. 13:08:14 You know, we're here to celebrate all of the wonderful benefits that we all received from the civil rights movement and the Chicano movement. We honor the sacrifices and the lives of those that gave their lives so that we could have these benefits. We want to honor Coretta Scott King -- (cheers) -- for all of the work that she did to get that Martin Luther King holiday, the national holiday. We want to honor Yolanda King for all that she did on behalf of women and children to stop abuses of both. 13:08:45 But you know, Dr. King said, on this very stage, go back to your communities, go back to the South, go back to the North. And I'm saying also to the West, because we've got to continue to organize to fulfill that dream, because you know what? If we don't do it, it's not going to happen. The only way that discrimination is going to end against women of -- people of color, against women, against our LGBT community is if we do it, which means that we've got to outreach to those that are not with us. We've got to educate them. We've got to mobilize them. We've got to motivate them. That's the only way it can happen. So I'm going to ask all of you, who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We do! MS. HUERTA: Let's hear it loud and clear. We've got the power. I'm going to say, who's got the power? I want you to say, we've got the power. Who's got the power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: We've got the power! MS. HUERTA: And I'm going to say, what kind of power? I want you to say, people power. What kind of power? AUDIENCE MEMBERS: People power! MS. HUERTA: All right! So we can do it. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Let's all say this all together. Yes, we can. "Si, se puede." Put your hands up, everybody, like this. We're going to all clap together and in Spanish we're going to say, "Si, se puede," which means, "Yes, we can." Let's do it. (Chanting.) "Si, se puede." AUDIENCE MEMBERS: (Chanting and clapping.) "Si, se puede! Si, se puede! Si, se puede!" 13:10:09 CUT OFF for LeAnn Rimes 13:10:34 LeAnn Rimes performs "Amazing Grace" 13:13:19 Marc Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League MARC MORIAL: Good afternoon, fellow Americans. I stand today on the shoulders of Martin Luther King, Whitney Young, John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph and the many great leaders of 1963 who sacrificed, who marched, who demonstrated courage and bravery in the face of attack so that we can be here today. 13:14:05 I stand as a representative of the next generation that has had the opportunity to walk into corporate boardrooms, walk into city halls and county halls, into halls of justice, into the Justice Department and, yes, into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue solely because of the sacrifices and the bravery of those whose names we remember and those we don't. 13:14:39 I stand here today to call on this great and mighty nation to wake up, wake up to unfair legality parading as morality; wake up to insensitivity to the poor masked as fiscal austerity; wake up to politics without a positive purpose. It is time, America, to wake up. 13:15:06 Fifty years ago, that sleeping giant was awakened. But somewhere along the way, we've dozed. We've been quelled by the lullaby of false prosperity and the mirage of economic equality. We fell into a slumber. Somewhere along the way, white sheets were traded for buttoned down white shirts. Attack dogs and water hoses were traded for tasers and widespread implementation of stop-and-frisk policies. Nooses were traded for handcuffs. Somewhere along the way, we gained new enemies, cynicism and complacency. Murders from urban America to suburban America. The pursuit of power for power's sake. We stand here today to say it is time to wake up. 13:16:01 So here in 2013, we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. We look toward the statue of the great liberator. We say we have come to wake up a new civil rights movement for economic justice, a new civil rights movement for freedom in these days, a new civil rights movement for jobs, a new civil rights movement for men, for women, for children of all backgrounds, all races, all dispositions, all orientations, all cities, all counties, all towns all across America. 13:16:43 America, it is time for us to wake up. The 21st-century agenda for jobs and freedom comes alive today. We stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of yesterday, and we affirm this new commitment for today and tomorrow. God bless you, God thank you, and God bless this great nation. (Cheers, applause.) 13:17:15 U.S. Congresswoman Marcia Fudge, Ohio (11th District) and chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus FUDGE: Good afternoon. I am Marcia Fudge, the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. 13:17:19 And I am the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus because Dr. Martin Luther King acted upon his dream. Dr. King was not just a dreamer, but the voice of a movement. In 1963, there were five members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Today, there are 44 African-American members in Congress. 13:17:44 Dr. King dreamed of an America where every individual -- no matter their race, nationality, or socioeconomic background -- would have the opportunity to achieve dreams of their own. His dream was a call to action. Dr. King advocated for an America where everyone would be afforded their inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, a nation where there would be equal protection under the law and a country where every person's right to vote is protected. He dreamed of an America where every child has access to quality schools and an education that prepares them for their future. And he dreamed that we as a nation would walk together on the swift path towards justice. 13:18:31 Now it is up to us, the Congress of the United States of America, to work together to pass a jobs bill that ensures decent jobs for all of our citizens. Now it is up to us to ensure that we have a criminal justice system that does not value one life more than another. Now it is up to us to make sure that no child goes hungry to school or to bed. 13:19:10 In Dr. King's words, we cannot and we must not be satisfied with anything less. It is our time to make Dr. King's dream our reality. Dr. King said that 1963 was not an end, but a new beginning. Let us make today the start of a new chapter in the history of this country, and let us march forward towards justice together. Thank you. 13:19:39 Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union HENRY: Brothers and sisters, the members of the Service Employees International Union are proud to join the freedom fighters across this country in insisting on the three freedoms that are on the back of your program. And in the spirit of the civil rights economic leadership whose shoulders we stand, I want you to join me in repeating the pledges of the freedoms we are committing ourselves here today: The freedom to participate in government, the freedom to prosper in life, the freedom to peacefully coexist. Our members are proud to join with working people, faith leaders, community leaders all across this country in joining our hands in a renewed commitment to bending the arc toward justice and continuing the struggle to achieve racial equality and economic equality for all by delivering on the promise of the Affordable Care Act, by insisting that we prevail in winning common sense immigration reform now, and by joining together to create good jobs by supporting workers all across this country who have the guts to stand up, join together, and demand a living wage from their employers. The fight continues. We want to work for a just society where all work is valued, every human being is respected, where every family and community can thrive, and where we, brothers and sisters, join together in pursuing the freedom to have a better and more equal society for the next generation. Thank you. 13:21:43 Jamie Foxx 13:21:44 FOXX: How we doing? Make some noise for 50 years. Right now let's make some noise. Listen, I don't have much time. I'm here to celebrate what Dr. King did 50 years -- I'm not even probably going to read from the teleprompter because I'm just going to speak from my heart. I'm going to tell you right now that everybody my age and all the entertainers, it's time for us to stand up now and renew this dream. That's what we got to do. I was affected by -- I was affected by the Trayvon Martin situation. I was affected by -- by Newtown. I was affected by Sandy Hook. I'm affected by those things. So it's time for us now to pick up. Harry Belafonte saw me at the Image Awards and he asked me what am I willing to do. He took it a step further and we went to dinner. And my daughter, who's 19 years old, I said listen, if you want to get inspired, come listen to this man speak. When I sat with Mr. Belafonte, he asked my daughter, how old are you? And my daughter said 19. 13:22:48 And I said, Mr. Belafonte, what were you doing at 19? He said, I was coming home from World War II. And when I got back to America, I wasn't allowed to vote. So I love my country. I love America. But I realized that I had more work to do. So myself, Al, Jesse and Martin, we marched. And I said, wait a minute, man. You sound like you're naming a boy band group. What do you mean? Who are these guys' names? And he looked at my daughter and he said, Martin Luther King. Have you heard of him? And we sat there and we cried. What we need to do now is the young folks pick it up now so that when we're 87 years old talking to the other young folks we can say it was me, Will Smith, Jay Z, Kanye, Alicia Keys, Kerry Washington. The list goes on and on. Don't make me start preaching up here. 13:23:38 Last but not least, I have to recognize Mr. Berry Gordy. And not only -- not only did Harry Belafonte bail Martin Luther King out of jail so that he could march, he also paid for all of Coretta Scott King's bills as long as she was on this planet. Young folks, let's have some respect to our elders. That's the first thing. Last thing is this and I'm out. I know they're telling me to get out of here. We have to salute Mr. Berry Gordy because Mr. Berry Gordy put Dr. King's speech on an album and put it out on Motown Records. And then after he did that, he turned around gave those -- those reels and those -- those tapes back to the King family. Thank you so much. Do not forget 50 years. I'm out. 13:24:59 Reverend Al Sharpton, founder and president of the National Action Network 13:25:05 REVEREND AL SHARPTON: Fifty years ago, when they came to Washington, it was not for an event. It was in the middle of struggles. It was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in America. And Dr. King and those that fought with him, they fought and they beat Jim Crow. We come today to not only celebrate and commemorate, but we come as the children of Dr. King to say that we are going to face Jim Crow's children, because Jim Crow had a son called James Crow Jr. Esquire. (Laughter.) He writes voting suppression laws and puts it in language that looks different, but the results are the same. They come with laws that tell people to stand their ground, they come with laws to tell people to stop and frisk, but I've come to tell you, just like our mothers and fathers beat Jim Crow, we will beat James Crow Jr., Esq. (Cheers, applause.) 13:26:24 They called the generation of Dr. King the Moses generation, and those out here are now Joshua. But if Joshua does not fight the fights of Moses, they're not really Joshua. We saw Dr. King and the dream cross the Red Sea of apartheid and segregation, but we have to cross the Jordan of unequal economic (parity ?). We have to cross the Jordan of continued discrimination and mass incarceration. We've got to keep on fighting, and we've got to vindicate and stand up and substantiate that the dream was not for one generation, the dream goes on until the dream is achieved. 13:27:17 Lastly, we made it this far not because of what we had in our pockets but we had in our hearts, not because of what we owned but because who owned us. And we thank a mighty God for giving us a Martin Luther King. We thank a mighty God that brought us a long way. He brought us from disgrace to amazing grace. He brought us from the butler to the president. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us from Beulah to Oprah. (Cheers, applause.) He brought us a mighty long way, and we thank God for the dream, and we're going to keep on fighting until the dream is a reality. Thank you, and God bless you. 13:28:10 Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers 13:28:18 RANDI WEINGARTEN: Ladies and gentlemen, sisters and brothers, I am the president of the 1.5 million-member American Federation of Teachers. (Cheers, applause.) We have come so far -- King, Rustin, Evers, Parks, Chavez and so many others who have summoned our nation to confront the malignancy of prejudice and discrimination. And many of our afflictions have been healed, but we have far to go. Because the Supreme Court has turned its back on voter suppression, many will once again be denied the right to vote. Children born today poor will stay poor. Millions of Americans work hard every day but can't earn a living wage or exercise their right to collectively bargain. Public schools where kids need the most often get the least. And discrimination based on the color of your skin or the person you love may not be legal in many arenas, but it is still lethal in many times. 13:29:18 Leaders this day 50 years ago understood that the struggle for civil right and racial equality is a struggle for good jobs and decent wages. They understood, as we do today, that public education is an economic necessity, an anchor of democracy and a fundamental right. So we celebrate today that we have become a country that believes in equality, and we recommit ourselves to be a country that acts on that belief. And that start with reclaiming the promise of public education, not as it is today or was in the past, but what we need it to be to fulfill our collective responsibility to all of God's children. 13:30:06 A great nation ensures that every neighborhood public school is a good school. It takes great pains to make the working poor and child hunger conditions of the past. It honors the rights of workers. It takes its immigrants out of its shadows. And it makes the franchise sacrosanct. A great nation is one that acts to lifting us towards opportunity and justice. 13:30:32 The King family has brought us together these five days, not simply to reflect but to act. And we at the AFT will act to keep the dream alive. Thank you. 13:31:06 Julian Bond JULIAN BOND: This is a special day and a special place for all of us. Not only do we pay homage to those who gathered here 50 years ago to tell the nation that they too were Americans, we also celebrate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation. This is personal for me. Like many of you, I was privileged to be here 50 years ago. And like many of you, I am the grandson of a slave. My grandfather and his mother were property, like a horse or a chair. As a young girl, she'd been given away as a wedding present to a new bride. And when that bride became pregnant, her husband -- that's my great-grandmother's owner and master -- exercised his right to take his wife's slave as his mistress. That union produced two children, one of them my grandfather. At age 15, barely able to read or write, he hitched his tuition to a steer and walked across Kentucky to Berea College, and the college let him in. He belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans, a generation born in slavery, freed by the Civil War, determined to make their way as free women and men. Martin Luther King belonged to a transcendent generation of black Americans too, a generation born in segregation, determined to make their way as free women and men. When my grandfather graduated from Berea, the college asked him to deliver the commencement address. He said then: The pessimist, from his corner, looks out on a world of wickedness and sin, and, blinded by all that is good or hopeful in the condition and the progress of the human race, bewails the present state of affairs and predicts woeful things for the future. In every cloud, he beholds a destructive storm; in every flash of lightning, an omen of evil; in every shadow that falls across his path, a lurking foe. But he forgets that the clouds also bring life and hope, that the lightning purifies the atmosphere, that shadow and darkness prepare for sunshine and growth, and that hardships and adversity nerve the race, as the individuals, for greater efforts and grander victories. We're still being tested by hardships and adversity, from the elevation of "stand your ground" laws to the evisceration of the Voting Rights Act. But today we commit ourselves, as we did 50 years ago, to greater efforts and grander victories. Thank you. 13:33:43 Reverend Shirley Caesar performs "How I Got Over" 13:39:12 Lynda Bird Johnson Robb JOHNSON ROBB: (OFF-MIKE) my father, Lyndon Johnson, a passionate believer in equality, spoke these words: "One hundred years ago, the slaved was freed. One hundred years later, the Negro remained in bondage to the color of his skin. "The Negro today asks justice. We do not answer him -- we do not answer those who lie beneath this soil -- when we reply to the Negro by asking, 'Patience.'" 13:39:39 The Place was Gettysburg, and I was there with him when he spoke on Memorial Day, 1963, at the 100th Anniversary of the Civil War. He was vice president at that time, and it was three months before the historical march on Washington that we commemorate today. 13:40:03 At a superficial glance, my father, the grandson of a Confederate soldier, may not have seen the most obvious ally to the movement, a white Southerner from (inaudible), he was no young idealist fresh out of college, nor was racial equality a pressing goal of the majority of his Texas constituents; rather, the opposite. But as a teacher, he had seen the plight of his Mexican-American students. And Dr. King's powerful dream found a kindred spirit in my father, who cared deeply about fairness and equality. 13:40:40 When the tragedy of President Kennedy's assassination propelled him to the presidency, he used every power at his disposal, including this considerable legislative muscle, to push through the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. In Daddy's last year in the White House, signing the third Civil Rights bill, he wrote, "I do not exaggerate when I say that the proudest moments of my presidency have been times such as this, when I have signed into law the promises of a century." Recently, the Supreme Court struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, which did so much to combat voting inequality in our country. Now, 50 years later, there are still many examples from current events on how much farther we have yet to go to achieve that promise of a colorblind America. 13:41:56 But remember, too, that fairness and equality are powerful ideas that resonate with all Americans. And with a message as inspiring and timeless as the dream of Dr. King, there will be unexpected allies, if only we look for them. And you know what his wife said? Coretta Scott King said, "Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation." And she was right. So let's go forth, like Jimmie Foxx (ph) said. Thank you. 13:42:50 Ambassador Caroline Kennedy KENNEDY: Good afternoon. Fifty years ago, my father watched from the White House as Dr. King and thousands of others recommitted America to our highest ideals. Over the preceding months, President Kennedy has put the full force of the federal government on the side of the movement, calling on all Americans to recognize that we faced a moral crisis, as old as the Scriptures and as clear as the American Constitution. 13:43:24 His brothers, my Uncle Bobby and Teddy, my Aunt Eunice, continued his committed, working to expand the promises made here to others suffering from discrimination and exclusion. A few months ago, after the Trayvon Martin verdict was handed down, and the Supreme Court eviscerated the Voting Rights Act, President Obama did the same, reminding us all that despite our remarkable progress, each generation must rededicate itself to the unfinished work of building a free and just America. 13:44:03 Fifty years ago, our parents and grandparents marched for jobs and freedom. We have suffered and sacrificed too much to let their dream become a memory. 13:44:13 The children in our failing schools are all of our children. The victims of hate crimes and gun violence are our brothers and sisters. 13:44:23 In the words of an old Japanese proverb, "the water flows on, but the river remains." Now is our turn to live up to our parents' dream, to draw renewed strength from what happened here 50 years ago, and work together for a better world. Thank you. 13:44:52 Forest Whitaker 13:44:59 it's a great honor to be here on 50th anniversary 13:45:10 each of you came here with individual goals but we all share common bond. Your presence says you care and want to bring more peace love and harmony. Together we must embrace this moment. I've observed revolutions, social change firsthand 13:45:53 I am often reminded of the marches and sit ins we've experienced here. Hate is too great a burden 13:46:15 we've all see images of those days. Pictures of segregated water fountains. 13:46:33 many remain nameless but their heroic faces captured in portraits of the past. They risked their lives to bring about change 13:47:00 I want you to recognize the hero that exist inside yourselves. Every step you take around an unknown corner marks your bravery. 13:47:27 and if I were to take a picture of this crowd right now, people would see some of your faces in the movements of today. Individuals who stood in the very spot you stand today, you have responsibility to carry the torch 13:48:04 let's be the generation to make a true difference in the world. 13:48:43 so as the bell rings today, my dream is something will resonate inside you and me that will remind us each of our common bond. 13:49:42 BeBe, Marvin and Carvin Winans perform "God Before Us" 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. 14:05:35 Oprah Winfrey 14:05:45 OPRAH WINFREY: Hello everybody. I am absolutely thrilled to be here. I remember when I was 9 years old and the march was occurring and I asked my mama, can I go to the march? It took me 50 years, but I'm here. On this date in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Took me 50 years, but I'm here. 14:06:05 On this date, in this place at this time, 50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King shared his dream for America with America. Dr. King was the passionate voice that awakened the (conscience ?) of a nation and inspired people all over the world. The power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. "Let Freedom Ring" was Dr. King's closing call for a better and more just America. 14:06:47 So today, people from all walks of life will gather at 3 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we re-affirm our commitment to Dr. King's ideals. Dr. King believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. He challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. 14:07:29 So as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made -- and we've made a lot -- but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. It's an opportunity today to recall where we once were in this nation and to think about that young man, who, at 34 years old, stood up here and was able to force an entire country to wake up, to look at itself and to eventually change. 14:08:04 And as we, the people continue to honor the dream of a man and a movement, a man who in his short life saw suffering and injustice and refused to look the other way, we can be inspired and we too can be courageous by continuing to walk in the footsteps in the path that he forged. He is the one who reminded us that we will never walk alone. He was, after all, a drum major for justice. So as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom, who stood up for us, whose shoulders we now stand on. And as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves: How will the dream live in me, in you, in all of us? As the bells toll, let us remind ourselves: "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." As the bells toll, we commit to a life of service because Dr. King, one of my favorite quotes from him is, "Not everybody can be famous, but everybody can be great because greatness is determined by service." 14:09:36 So we ask ourselves, what are we doing for others to lift others up? And as the bells toll, we must recommit to let the love that abides and connects each of us to shine through and let freedom ring. 14:11:47 President Barack Obama walking out with First Lady Michelle Obama, Former President Bill Clinton, and Former President Jimmy Carter 14:12:52 Identity4Pop performs "The Star Spangled Banner" 14:10:28 U.S. Congressman John Lewis, Georgia (5th District) 14:15:01 LEWIS: President and Mrs. Obama, President Clinton, President Carter. I want to thank Bernice King, the King family, and the National Park Service for inviting me here to speak today. 14:15:30 When I look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, it seems to realize what Otis Redding was singing about and what Martin Luther King Jr. preached about, this moment in our history has been a long time coming, but a change has come. We are standing here in the shadow of Abraham Lincoln 150 years after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and only 50 years after the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. 14:16:07 We have come a great distance in this country in the 50 years, but we still have a great distance to go before we fulfill the dream of Martin Luther King. Sometimes I hear people saying, nothing has changed, but for someone to grow up the way I grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama to now be serving in the United States Congress, makes me want to tell them, come and walk in my shoes. 14:17:00 Come walk in the shoes of those who were attacked by police dogs, fire hoses, and nightsticks, arrested and taken to jail. I first came to Washington in the same year that President Barack Obama was born to participate in a Freedom Ride. In 1961, black and white people could not be seated together on a Greyhound bus. So we decided to take an integrated-fashion ride from here to New Orleans. But we never made it there. Over 400 of us were arrested and jailed in Mississippi during the Freedom Rides. A bus was set on fire in Anderson, Alabama. We were beaten, and arrested, and jailed. But we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. I came back here again in June of 1963 (inaudible) as the new chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. We met with President Kennedy, who said the fires of frustration were burning throughout America. 14:18:16 In 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. We had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, count the number of bubbles in a bar of soap, or the number of jelly beans in a jar. Hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the South for trying to participate in the democratic process. Medgar Evers had been killed in Mississippi. And that is why we told President Kennedy we intended to March on Washington, to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in America. 14:18:53 On August 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. Thousands of troops surrounded the city. Workers were told to stay home that day. Liquor stores were closed. But the march was so orderly, so peaceful, it was filled with dignity and self- respect. Because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. People came that day to that march dressed like they were on their way to a religious service. As Mahalia Jackson sang, "How We Got Over." "How We Got Over." She drew thousands of us together in a strange sense, it seemed like the whole place started rocking. 14:19:58 We truly believe that in every human being, even those who were violent toward us, there was a spark of the divine. And no person had the right to scar or destroy that spark. Martin Luther King Jr. taught us the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. 14:20:22 He taught us to have the power to forgive, the capacity to be reconciled. He taught us to stand up, to speak up, to speak out, to find a way to get in the way. 14:20:43 People were advised by their vision of justice and equality, and they were willing to put their bodies on the line for a greater cause, greater than themselves. Not one incident of violence was reported that day. A spirit had engulfed the leadership of the movement and all of its participants. The spirit of Dr. King's words captured the hearts of people not just around America but around the world. 14:21:28 On that day, Martin Luther King Jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. He transformed these marble steps of the Lincoln Memorial into a modern-day pulpit. He changed us forever. After the ceremony was over, President Kennedy invited us back down to the White House. He met us standing in the door of the Oval Office. And he was beaming like a proud father, As he shook the hand of each one of us, he said, "You did a good job. You did a good job." And he said to Dr. King, "And you have a dream." 14:22:13 Fifty years later, we can ride anywhere we want to ride. We can stay where we want to stay. Those signs that said "white" and "colored" are gone. And you won't see them any more... ... except in a museum, in a book, or on a video. 14:22:35 But there are still invisible signs, barriers in the heart of humankind that form a gulf between us. Too many of us still believe our differences define us instead of the divine spark that runs through all of human creation. 14:22:55 The scars and stains of racism still remain deeply embedded in American society, whether it is stop-and-frisk in New York or injustice in Trayvon Martin's case in Florida. The mass incarceration of millions of Americans. Immigrants hiding in fear in the shadow of our society. Unemployment. Homelessness. Poverty. Hunger. Or the renewed struggle for voting rights. So I say to each one of us today, we must never, ever give up. We must never ever give in. We must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. 14:23:46 We did go to jail. But we got the Civil Rights Act. We got a Voting Rights Act. We got a Fair Housing Act. But we must continue to push. We must continue to work. As the late A. Philip Randolph (ph) said, the organizer for the march in 1963, and the dean of the civil rights movement once said, we may have come here on different ships, but we all are in the same boat now. 14:24:27 So, it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, Latino, Asian American or Native American, whether we are gay or straight. We're one people. We are one family. We all live in the same house, not just the American house but the world's house. 14:24:46 And when we finally accept these truths, then we will be able to fulfill Dr. King's dreams to build a beloved community, a nation and a world at peace with itself. Thank you very much. 14:25:20 President Jimmy Carter PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER: Well, I'm greatly honored to be here. And I realize that most people know that it's highly unlikely that any of us three over on my right would have served in the White House or be on this platform had it not been for Martin Luther King Jr. and his movement and his crusade for civil rights. So we are grateful to him for us being here. (Applause.) 14:25:57 I'm also proud that I came from the same part of the South as he did. He never lost contact with the folks back home. He was helping Tennessee garbage workers, as you know, when he gave his life to a racist bullet. 14:26:14 I remember how it was, back in those days. I left Georgia in 1943 for college and the Navy. And when I came home from submarine duty, I was put on the Board of Education. I suggested to the other members that we visit all the schools in the county. They had never done this before, and they were reluctant to go with me. 14:26:40 But we finally did it, and we found that white children had three nice brick buildings, but the African-American children had 26 different elementary schools in the county. They were in churches, in front living rooms and a few in barns. They had so many because there were no school buses for African-American children, and they had to be within walking distance of where they went to class. Their schoolbooks were outdated and worn out, and every one of them had a white child's name in the front of the book. We finally obtained some buses. And then the state legislature ordained that the front fenders be painted black. Not even the school buses could be equal to each other. One of the finest moments of my life was 10 months after Dr. King's famous speech right here, when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. I was really grateful when the King family adopted me as their presidential candidate in 1976. (Cheers.) Every handshake from Dr. King, from Daddy King, every hug from Coretta got me a million Yankee votes. (Laughter.) Daddy King prayed at the Democratic Convention -- for quite a while, I might say -- (laughter) -- and Coretta was in the hotel room with me and Rosalyn when I was elected president. My Presidential Medal of Freedom citation to Coretta for Dr. King said, and I quote, "He gazed at the great wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. He made our nation stronger because he made it better." 14:28:47 We were able to create a national historic site where Dr. King lived, worked and worshipped. It's next door to the Carter Center, linked together just by a walking path. And at the Carter Center, we try to make the (principles ?) that we follow the same as his, emphasizing peace and human rights. I remember that Daddy King said, too many people think Martin freed only black people; in truth, he helped to free all people. (Applause.) And Daddy King added, it's not enough to have a right to sit at a lunch counter if you can't afford to buy a meal. And he also said, the ghetto still looks the same even from the front seat of a bus. Perhaps the most challenging statement of Martin Luther King Jr. was, and I quote: "The crucial question of our time is how to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence." In the Nobel Prize ceremony of 2002, I said that my fellow Georgian was, and I quote again, "the greatest leader that my native state, and perhaps my native country, has ever produced." And I was not excluding presidents and even the Founding Fathers when I said this. I believe we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the new ID requirements to exclude certain voters, especially African- Americans. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to the Supreme Court striking down a crucial part of the Voters' Rights Act just recently passed overwhelmingly by Congress. I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to unemployment among African- Americans being almost twice the rate of white people and for teenagers at 42 percent. I think we would all know how Dr. King would have reacted to our country being awash in guns and for more and more states passing "stand your ground" laws. I think we know how Dr. King would have reacted for people of District of Columbia still not having full citizenship rights. (Cheers, applause.) And I think we all know how Dr. King would have reacted to have more than 835,000 African-American men in prison, five times as many as when I left office, and with one-third of all African-American males being destined to be in prison in their lifetimes. 14:31:44 Well, there's a tremendous agenda ahead of us, and I'm thankful to Martin Luther King Jr. that his dream is still alive. Thank you. 14:32:00 President Bill Clinton 14:32:11 CLINTON: Thank you, Mr. President, Mrs. Obama, President Carter, Vice President Biden (inaudible) Biden. I want to thank my great friend, Reverend Bernice King, and the King family for inviting me to be part of this 50th observation of one of the most important days in American history. Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph, John Lewis and Bayard Rustin, Dorothy Height, Myrlie Evers, Daisy Bates (ph), and all the others who led there massive march knew what they were doing on this hallowed ground, in the shadow of Lincoln's statue the burning memory of the fact that he gave his life to preserve the Union and end slavery. 14:33:27 Martin Luther King urged his crowd not to drink from the cup of bitterness, but to reach across the racial divide, because, he said, we cannot walk alone. Their destiny is tied up with our destiny. Their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. He urged the victims of racial violence to meet white Americans with an outstretched hand, not a clenched fist, and in so doing to prove the redeeming power of unearned suffering. 14:33:52 And then he dreamed of an America where all citizens would sit together at a table of brotherhood where little white boys and girls and little black boys and girls would hold hands across the color lines, where his own children would be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. 14:34:29 This march and that speech changed America. They opened minds, they melted hearts, and they moved millions, including a 17-year-old boy watching alone in his home in Arkansas. 14:34:43 It was an empowering moment but also an empowered moment. As the great chronicler of those years Taylor Branch wrote, the movement here gained a force to open, quote, "the stubborn gates of freedom." And out flowed the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, immigration reform, Medicare, Medicaid, open housing. 14:35:09 It is well to remember that the leaders and foot soldiers here were both idealists and tough realists. They had to be. It was a violent time. Just three months later we lost President Kennedy. And we thank God that President Johnson came in and fought for all those issues I just mentioned. Just five years later, we lost Senator Kennedy. And in between, there was the carnage of the fights for jobs, freedom and equality. Just 18 days after this march, four little children were killed in the Birmingham church bombing. Then there were the Ku Klux Klan murders, the Mississippi lynching and a dozen others until in 1968, Dr. King was martyred, still marching for jobs and freedom. What a debt we owe to those people who came here 50 years ago. The martyrs paid it all for a dream, a dream as John Lewis said that millions have now actually lived. So how are we gonna repay the debt? Dr. King's dream of interdependence, his prescription of whole- hearted cooperation across racial lines, they ring as true today as they did 50 years ago. Oh, yes, we face terrible political gridlock now. Read a little history. It's nothing new. Yes, there remain racial inequalities in employment, income, health, wealth, incarceration and in the victims and perpetrators of violent crime. But we don't face beatings, lynchings and shootings for our political beliefs anymore. And I would respectfully suggest that Martin Luther King did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political gridlock. It is time to stop complaining and put our shoulders against the stubborn gates... ... holding the American people back. We cannot be disheartened by the forces of resistance to building a modern economy of good jobs and rising incomes or to rebuilding our education system to give all our children a common core of knowledge necessary to ensure success, or to give Americans of all ages access to affordable college and training programs. And we thank the president for his efforts in those regards. 14:38:13 We cannot relax in our efforts to implement health care reform in a way that ends discrimination against those with preexisting conditions, one of which is inadequate income to pay for rising health care. A health care reform that will lower costs and lengthen lives. Nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses and our climate. We must push open those stubborn gates. We cannot be discouraged by a Supreme Court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the Voting Rights Act because -- look at the states (ph). It made it harder for African-Americans and Hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. What do you know? They showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. So obviously, we don't need any kind of law. 14:39:27 But a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. We must open those stubborn gates. And let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole American landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. And the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. It has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gates and if we do it together. 14:40:20 The choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago. Cooperate and thrive, or fight with each other and fall behind. We should all thank God for Dr. King and John Lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide it -- a dream they paid for, like our founders, with their lives, their fortune, their sacred honor. And we thank them for reminding us that America is always becoming, always on a journey. And we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. God bless them and God bless America. 14:41:22 Martin L. King III 14:41:26 MARTIN LUTHER KING III: Mr. President, Madam First Lady, President Carter, President Clinton, Congressman Lewis, and to all program participants, this is an unusual moment in our world history as we observe this 50th anniversary. And I'm so thankful for the opportunity to really thank America for helping to realize the dream, although I must say it is not yet realized. And so we must redouble and quadruple our efforts. So much has been said today, and I was 5 years old in 1963, when dad delivered his message. And so I'm blessed that we were able to bring our daughter, who's hopefully paying attention, 5 -- 3 years -- 5 years old, so that she can appreciate this history and continue to participate. There are two quick other things that I want to say. I've been speaking all week, as many of us have. But I'm reminded that Dad challenged us. That's what he did, challenged our nation to be a better nation for all God's children. I'm reminded that he taught us the power of love, agape love, the love that is totally unselfish; you love someone if you're old or young, rich or poor, black or white, Native America or Hispanic- American or Latino. It does not matter. You love them because God calls us to do that. Love and forgiveness is what we need more of, not just in our nation but really throughout the world. And so I want to rush to tell you Dad said the ultimate measure of a human being is where one stands not in times of comfort and convenience, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy. He went on to say that on some questions, cowardice asks, is a position safe; expediency asks, is a position politic; vanity asks, is a position popular, but that something deep inside called conscience asks, is a position right. So he often talked about sometimes we must take positions that are neither safe nor popular nor politic, but we must take those position because our conscience tells us they are right. (Applause.) I'd finally say this afternoon, we've got a lot of work to do. But none of us should be (in any ways tired ?). Why? Because we've come much too far from where we started. You see, no one ever told any of us that our roads would be easy. But I know our God -- our God -- our God did not bring any of us this far to leave us. Thank you. God bless you. 14:44:57 Christine King Farris 14:45:05 CHRISTINE KING FARRIS: Thank you. President Obama and Mrs. Obama, former Presidents Clinton and Carter, other distinguished program participants, I am honored to be among you today and to address this historic gathering. I don't know if I am the most senior speaker to address this assemblage today, but I am certainly and surely the only person alive who knew Martin Luther King Jr. when he was a baby. (Laughter, applause.) It has been my great privilege to watch my little brother grow and thrive and develop into a fine man and then a great leader whose legacy continues to inspire countless millions around the world. Unfortunately, a bout with a flu virus 50 years ago prevented me from attending the original march. But I was able to watch it on television, and I was as awestruck as everyone else. I knew Martin was an excellent preacher, because I had seen him deliver, on many occasions. But on that day, Martin achieved greatness because he melded the hope and dreams of millions into a grand vision of healing, reconciliation and brotherhood. The dream my brother shared with our nation and world on that sweltering day of days 50 years ago continues to nurture and sustain nonviolent activists worldwide in their struggle for freedom and human rights. Indeed, this gathering provides a powerful testament of hope and proof positive that Martin's great dream will live on in the hearts of humanity for generations to come. Our challenge, then, as followers of Martin Luther King, Jr. is to now honor his life, leadership and legacy by living our lives in a way that carries forward the unfinished work. There is no better way to honor his sacrifices and contributions than by becoming champions of nonviolence in our homes and communities, in our places of work, worship and learning. Everywhere, every day, the dream Martin shared on that day a half century ago remains a definitive statement of the American dream, the beautiful vision of a diverse freedom-loving people united in our love for justice, brotherhood and sisterhood. Yes, they can slay the dreamer, but no, they cannot destroy his immortal dream. 14:49:18 But Martin's dream is a vision not yet to be realized, a dream yet unfilled, and we have much to do before we can celebrate the dream as reality, as the suppression of voting rights and horrific violence that has taken the lives of Trayvon Martin and young people all across America has so painfully demonstrated. But despite the influences and challenges we face, we are here today to affirm the dream. We are not going to be discouraged, we are not going to be distracted, we are not going to be defeated. Instead, we are going forward into this uncertain future, with courage and determination, to make the dream a vibrant reality. And so the work to fulfill the dream goes on, and despite the daunting challenges we face on the road to the beloved community, I feel that the dream is sinking deep and nourishing roots all across America and around the world. May it continue to thrive and spread and help bring justice, peace and liberation to all humanity. Thank you, and God bless you all. 14:51:40 Rev. Dr. Bernice King, CEO of The King Center for Non-Violent Social Change 14:51:30 REVEREND BERNICE KING: President Obama, Mrs. Obama, Presidents Carter and Clinton, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, my brother Martin III, Dexter Scott King, to my entire family, I was five months old when my father delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech, and I probably was somewhere crawling on the floor or taking a nap after having a meal. But today is a glorious day because on this program today we have witnessed a manifestation of the beloved community. And we thank everyone for their presence here today. 14:52:21 Today we have been honored to have three presidents of the United States. Fifty years ago, the president did not attend. Today we are honored to have many women in the planning and mobilization of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. (Cheers, applause.) And 50 years ago, there was not a single woman on the program. Today we are honored to have not just one young person, but several young people on the program today. It is certainly a tribute to the work and the legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. Fifty years ago today, in the symbolic shadow of this great emancipator Abraham Lincoln, my father the great liberator stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring for all people who were being manacled by a system of segregation and discrimination. Fifty years ago, he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. The reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963, through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world and has summoned us once again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. Since that time, as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act in 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for all, regardless of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, disability, class or sexual orientation. 14:54:15 Fifty years later, in this year of jubilee, we're standing once again in the shadow of that "Great Emancipator," having been summoned to these hallowed grounds to reverberate the message of that great liberator, for there's a remnant from 1963, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, that still remains, who has come to bequeath that message of freedom to a new generation of people who must now carry that message -- (cheers) -- in their time, in their community, amongst their tribes and amongst their nations of the world. We must keep the sound and the message of freedom and justice going. It was my mother, as has been said previously, Coretta Scott King, who in fact 30 years ago assembled a Coalition of Conscience that started us on this whole path of remembering the anniversary of the March on Washington. She reminded that struggle is a never-ending process; freedom is never really won. You earn it and win it in every generation. And so we come once again to let freedom ring, because if freedom stops ringing, then the sound will disappear, and the atmosphere will be charged with something else. Fifty years later, we come once again to this special landing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to reflect, to renew and to rejuvenate for the continued struggle of freedom and justice. 14:56:06 For today, 50 years later, my friends, we are still crippled by practices and policies steeped in racial pride, hatred and hostility, some of which have us standing our ground rather than finding common ground. We are still chained by economic disparities, income and class inequalities and conditions of poverty for many of God's children around this nation and the world. We're still bound by a cycle of civil unrest and inherent social biases in our nations and worlds that oftentimes degenerate into violence and destruction, especially against women and children. We're at this landing, and now we must break the cycle. The Prophet King spoke the vision. He made it plain, and we must run with it in this generation. His prophetic vision and magnificent dream described the yearning of people all over the world to have the freedom to prosper in life, which is the right to pursue one's aspirations, purpose, dreams, well- being without oppressive, depressive, repressive practices, behaviors, laws and conditions that diminish one's dignity and that denies one life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- the freedom to participate in government, which is the right to have a voice and a say in how you are represented, regulated and governed without threats of tyranny, disenfranchisement, exclusionary tactics and behaviors, and to have freedom to peacefully coexist, which is the right to be respected in one's selfhood, individuality and uniqueness without fear of attack, assault or abuse. In 1967 my father asked a poignant and critical question: Where do we go from here, chaos or community? And we say, with a resounding voice, no to chaos and yes to community. If we're going to rid ourselves of the chaos, then we must make a necessary shift. Nothing is more tragic than for us to fail to achieve new attitudes and new mental outlooks. We have a tremendous and unprecedented opportunity to reset the very means by which we live, work and enjoy our lives. If we're going to continue the struggle of freedom and create true community, then we will have to be relentless in exposing, confronting and ridding ourselves of the mindset of pride and greed and selfishness and hate and lust and fear and idleness and lack of purpose and lack of love, as my brother said, for our neighbor. We must seize this moment, the dawning of a new day, the emergence of a new generation who is postured to change the world through collaborative power, facilitated by unconditional love. And as I close, I call upon my brother by the name of Nehemiah, who was also in the midst of rebuilding a community. And in the midst of rebuilding a community, he brought the leaders and the rulers and the rest of the people together, and he told them that the work is great and large, and we are widely separated one from another on the wall, but when you hear the sound of the trumpet, and might I say -- (cheers, applause) -- when you hear the sound of the bells today, come to that spot, and our God will fight with us. And so today we're going to let freedom ring all across this nation. We're going to let freedom ring everywhere we go. If freedom is going to ring in Libya, in Syria, in Egypt, in Florida, then we must reach across the table, feed each other and let freedom ring. 15:00:36 Participants gathering around bell 15:01:19 ringing bell 15:02:03 performance by Heather Headley 15:05:31 President Barack Obama takes podium 15:05:54 PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: To the King family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to President Clinton, President Carter, Vice President Biden, Jill, fellow Americans, five decades ago today, Americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 15:07:06 In 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. And so they came by the thousands, from every corner of our country -- men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. Across the land, congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. In the middle of the night, entire blocks of Harlem came out to wish them well. With the few dollars they scrimped from their labor, some bought tickets and boarded buses, even if they couldn't always sit where they wanted to sit. Those with less money hitchhiked, or walked. They were seamstresses, and steelworkers, and students, and teachers, maids and pullman porters. They shared simple meals and bunked together on floors. And then, on a hot summer day, they assembled here, in our nation's capital, under the shadow of the great emancipator, to offer testimony of injustice, to petition their government for redress and to awaken America's long-slumbering conscience. 15:09:17 We rightly and best remember Dr. King's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. His words belong to the ages, possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. 15:09:51 But we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose names never appeared in the history books, never got on TV. Many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters, had lived in towns where they couldn't vote, in cities where their votes didn't matter. There were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. They had seen loved ones beaten and children fire- hosed. And they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. 15:10:54 And yet they chose a different path. In the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormentors. In the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonviolence. Willingly, they went to jail to protest unjust laws, their cells swelling with the sound of freedom songs. A lifetime of indignities had taught them that no man can take away the dignity and grace that God grants us. They had learned through hard experience what Frederick Douglas once taught: that freedom is not given; it must be won through struggle and discipline, persistence and faith. That was the spirit they brought here that day. 15:11:55 That was the spirit young people like John Lewis brought that day. That was the spirit that they carried with them like a torch back to their cities and their neighborhoods, that steady flame of conscience and courage that would sustain them through the campaigns to come, through boycotts and voter registration drives and smaller marches, far from the spotlight, through the loss of four little girls in Birmingham, the carnage of Edmund Pettus Bridge and the agony of Dallas, California, Memphis. Through setbacks and heartbreaks and gnawing doubt, that flame of justice flickered and never died. And because they kept marching, America changed. Because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. Because they marched, the voting rights law was signed. Because they marched, doors of opportunity and education swung open so their daughters and sons could finally imagine a life for themselves beyond washing somebody else's laundry or shining somebody else's shoes. (Applause.) Because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and Congress changed and, yes, eventually the White House changed. (Cheers, applause.) 15:13:58 Because they marched, America became more free and more fair, not just for African-Americans but for women and Latinos, Asians and Native Americans, for Catholics, Jews and Muslims, for gays, for Americans with disabilities. America changed for you and for me. And the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an Iron Curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside South Africa who would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. (Applause.) Those are the victories they won, with iron wills and hope in their hearts. That is the transformation that they wrought with each step of their well-worn shoes. That's the depth that I and millions of Americans owe those maids, those laborers, those porters, those secretaries -- folks who could have run a company, maybe, if they had ever had a chance; those white students who put themselves in harm's way even though they didn't have to -- (applause) -- those Japanese- Americans who recalled their own interment, those Jewish Americans who had survived the Holocaust, people who could have given up and given in but kept on keeping on, knowing that weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning -- (cheers, applause) -- on the battlefield of justice, men and women without rank or wealth or title or fame would liberate us all, in ways that our children now take for granted as people of all colors and creeds live together and learn together and walk together, and fight alongside one another and love one another, and judge one another by the content of our character in this greatest nation on Earth. 15:16:32 To dismiss the magnitude of this progress, to suggest, as some sometimes do, that little has changed -- that dishonors the courage and the sacrifice of those who paid the price to march in those years. (Applause.) Medgar Evers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, Martin Luther King Jr., they did not die in vain. (Applause.) Their victory was great. But we would dishonor those heroes as well to suggest that the work of this nation is somehow complete. The arc of the moral universe may bend towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. To secure the gains this country has made requires constant vigilance, not complacency. Whether it's by challenging those who erect new barriers to the vote or ensuring that the scales of justice work equally for all in the criminal justice system and not simply a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails -- (applause) -- it requires vigilance. 15:18:12 And we'll suffer the occasional setback. But we will win these fights. This country has changed too much. (Applause.) People of good will, regardless of party, are too plentiful for those with ill will to change history's currents. (Applause.) In some ways, though, the securing of civil rights, voting rights, the eradication of legalized discrimination -- the very significance of these victories may have obscured a second goal of the march, for the men and women who gathered 50 years ago were not there in search of some abstract idea. They were there seeking jobs as well as justice -- (applause) -- not just the absence of oppression but the presence of economic opportunity. For what does it profit a man, Dr. King would ask, to sit at an integrated lunch counter if he can't afford the meal? This idea that -- that one's liberty is linked to one's livelihood, that the pursuit of happiness requires the dignity of work, the skills to find work, decent pay, some measure of material security -- this idea was not new. 15:20:06 Lincoln himself understood the Declaration of Independence in such terms, as a promise that in due time, the weights should be lifted from the shoulders of all men and that all should have an equal chance. Dr. King explained that the goals of African-Americans were identical to working people of all races: decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing, old age security, health and welfare measures -- conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community. 15:20:54 What King was describing has been the dream of every American. It's what's lured for centuries new arrivals to our shores. And it's along this second dimension of economic opportunity, the chance through honest toil to advance one's station in life, that the goals of 50 years ago have fallen most short. Yes, there have been examples of success within black America that would have been unimaginable a half-century ago. But as has already been noted, black unemployment has remained almost twice as high as white employment (sic), Latino unemployment close behind. The gap in wealth between races has not lessened, it's grown. 15:21:52 As President Clinton indicated, the position of all working Americans, regardless of color, has eroded, making the dream Dr. King described even more elusive. For over a decade, working Americans of all races have seen their wages and incomes stagnate. Even as corporate profits soar, even as the pay of a fortunate few explodes, inequality has steadily risen over the decades. Upward mobility has become harder. In too many communities across this country in cities and suburbs and rural hamlets, the shadow of poverty casts a pall over our youth, their lives a fortress of substandard schools and diminished prospects, inadequate health care and perennial violence. 15:22:50 And so as we mark this anniversary, we must remind ourselves that the measure of progress for those who marched 50 years ago was not merely how many blacks had joined the ranks of millionaires; it was whether this country would admit all people who were willing to work hard, regardless of race, into the ranks of a middle-class life. (Applause.) The test was not and never has been whether the doors of opportunity are cracked a bit wider for a few. It was whether our economic system provides a fair shot for the many, for the black custodian and the white steelworker, the immigrant dishwasher and the Native American veteran. To win that battle, to answer that call -- this remains our great unfinished business. 15:23:54 We shouldn't fool ourselves. The task will not be easy. Since 1963 the economy's changed. The twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class, reduced the bargaining power of American workers. And our politics has suffered. Entrenched interests -- those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it just to fund crumbling schools -- that all these things violated sound economic principles. 15:24:53 We'd be told that growing inequality was the price for a growing economy, a measure of the free market -- that greed was good and compassion ineffective, and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. And then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle-class Americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity -- that distant bureaucrats were taking their hard-earned dollars to benefit the welfare cheat or the illegal immigrant. 15:25:46 And then, if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us, claiming to push for change, lost our way. The anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. Legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse- making for criminal behavior. Racial politics could cut both ways as the transformative message of unity and brotherhood was drowned out by the language of recrimination. And what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all Americans to work hard and get ahead was too often framed as a mere desire for government support, as if we had no agency in our own liberation, as if poverty was an excuse for not raising your child and the bigotry of others was reason to give up on yourself. All of that history is how progress stalled. That's how hope was diverted. It's how our country remained divided. But the good news is, just as was true in 1963, we now have a choice. We can continue down our current path in which the gears of this great democracy grind to a halt and our children accept a life of lower expectations, where politics is a zero-sum game, where a few do very well while struggling families of every race fight over a shrinking economic pie. That's one path. Or we can have the courage to change. 15:27:52 The March on Washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history, that we are masters of our fate. But it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. We'll have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. 15:28:26 And I believe that spirit is there, that true force inside each of us. I see it when a white mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. I see it when the black youth thinks of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. It's there when the native born recognizing that striving spirit of a new immigrant, when the interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple who were discriminated against and understands it as their own. That's where courage comes from, when we turn not from each other or on each other but towards one another, and we find that we do not walk alone. That's where courage comes from. (Applause.) And with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. With that courage, we can stand together for the right to health care in the richest nation on earth for every person. (Applause.) With that courage, we can stand together for the right of every child, from the corners of Anacostia to the hills of Appalachia, to get an education that stirs the mind and captures the spirit and prepares them for the world that awaits them. (Applause.) With that courage, we can feed the hungry and house the homeless and transform bleak wastelands of poverty into fields of commerce and promise. America, I know the road will be long, but I know we can get there. Yes, we will stumble, but I know we'll get back up. That's how a movement happens. That's how history bends. That's how, when somebody is faint of heart, somebody else brings them along and says, come on, we're marching. (Cheers, applause.) There's a reason why so many who marched that day and in the days to come were young, for the young are unconstrained by habits of fear, unconstrained by the conventions of what is. They dared to dream different and to imagine something better. And I am convinced that same imagination, the same hunger of purpose serves in this generation. 15:31:11 We might not face the same dangers as 1963, but the fierce urgency of now remains. We may never duplicate the swelling crowds and dazzling processions of that day so long ago, no one can match King's brilliance, but the same flames that lit the heart of all who are willing to take a first step for justice, I know that flame remains. (Applause.) That tireless teacher who gets to class early and stays late and dips into her own pocket to buy supplies because she believes that every child is her charge -- she's marching. (Applause.) That successful businessman who doesn't have to, but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, maybe an ex-con, who's down on his luck -- he's marching. 15:32:12 (Cheers, applause.) The mother who pours her love into her daughter so that she grows up with the confidence to walk through the same doors as anybody's son -- she's marching. (Cheers, applause.) The father who realizes the most important job he'll ever have is raising his boy right, even if he didn't have a father, especially if he didn't have a father at home -- he's marching. (Applause.) The battle-scarred veterans who devote themselves not only to helping their fellow warriors stand again and walk again and run again, but to keep serving their country when they come home -- they are marching. (Applause.) Everyone who realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day, that change does not come from Washington but to Washington, that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship -- you are marching. (Applause.) 15:33:16 And that's the lesson of our past, that's the promise of tomorrow, that in the face of impossible odds, people who love their country can change it. And when millions of Americans of every race and every region, every faith and every station can join together in a spirit of brotherhood, then those mountains will be made low, and those rough places will be made plain, and those crooked places, they straighten out towards grace, and we will vindicate the faith of those who sacrificed so much and live up to the true meaning of our creed as one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. (Cheers, applause.) 15:33:56 Obama waving, walking from podium 15:34:59 Barack and Michelle hugging and gladhanding with King family onstage 15:36:12 Obama hugging Oprah 15:37:19 Barack and Michelle walking up steps away from event 15:37:29 Barack and Michelle Obama waving 15:37:50 Obamas with Clinton and Carter waving, walking away from event Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech. The final refrain of Martin Luther King Jr.'s most famous speech will echo around the world as bells from churches, schools and historical monuments "let freedom ring" in celebration of a powerful moment in civil rights history. Organizers said sites in nearly every state will ring their bells at 3pm today, the hour when King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington. President Obama, and former Presidents Clinton and Carter will deliver speeches at the Lincoln Memorial to commemorate the anniversary.