PASADENA CRUISER CRASH 2006
Kenneth Ray Pool, 58, is charged with attempted capital murder and aggravated robbery. Police said the Pool fired several shots during the wild chase through Harris and Brazoria counties but no one was hit. Four minutes after the chase began, the Pasadena officer crashed, cut off by a truck turning into a driveway. Law enforcement officers from Pasadena, Houston, Harris County and Brazoria County continued chasing Pool through southeast Harris County and Brazoria County. He crashed into several vehicles along the way, drove through muddy fields and even sped across a golf course. Pool eventually drove into the water and held officers at bay for another 90 minutes before finally surrendering.
PANTS OF A CHANCE ESCAPE (8-23-1999)
DURING A ROUTINE TRAFFIC STOP, DRIVER DEMORIA CANADY REFUSES DEPUTY CHAD PAYNE'S REQUEST TO EMPTY HIS POCKET AND CANADY TAKES OFF RUNNING INTO THE ROAD. PAYNE AND ANOTHER OFFICER, SGT. STOKES, GO AFTER HIM. STOKES AND PAYNE STRUGGLE WITH CANADY AND THE SUSPECT'S PANTS ARE PULLED OFF. SUSPECT GETS AWAY BUT HE IS LATER CAUGHT.
RURAL ROUGH RIDER CHASE (2008)
A Georgia man is facing multiple felony charges after leading police from three states on a high-speed chase that ended in Seminole County, Ga. Seminole County Sheriff Dale Swanner said Joe William Holden, 46, of Poulan, Ga., began fleeing Houston County Sheriff’s deputies Thursday afternoon. The chase continued into Jackson County, Fla., at speeds in excess of 100 mph. Holden continued from there into Seminole County where sheriff’s deputies followed Holden off of State Highway 91 into an open field. Deputies fired several shots at the tires of Holden’s vehicle in order to disable it, but Holden continued driving his 1999 Buick Century into the thick woods at the end of the field. He eventually got out of the vehicle and ran into the woods. ‘The suspect was driving in a manner which caused danger to the public,’ Swanner said. ‘Our deputies did what they had to do to terminate the chase and make sure the public was no longer in danger.’ A female passenger was taken into custody after Holden fled the vehicle. Swanner said Thursday night it is unclear whether she will face any charges. Holden eluded law enforcement personnel from three states for almost two hours until he attempted to stop a passerby on Georgia Highway 91. The motorist called police, tracking dogs were taken to the scene and they immediately tracked Holden to a wooded area near the Chattahoochee River. Holden is facing two counts of aggravated assault on a peace office for striking two separate Seminole county police cars, Swanner said. He is also charged with felony obstruction of justice and numerous traffic violations. He could be facing other charges in Houston and Jackson counties. Holden had no outstanding warrants and it is unclear why he began fleeing. He was on probation for un unknown violation in Daughtry County, Ga.
A WOMAN SCORNED...IS CRAZY 2009
A Byron woman faces aggravated assault, drunken driving and several other charges after she allegedly tried to run over her ex-boyfriend early Friday. Authorities said Angela Gail Pollock, 41, ended up crashing into the vehicle of a Houston County deputy who was responding to the 911 call. Pollock was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle, aggravated assault against a police officer, terroristic threats for allegedly threatening to kill law enforcement officers, criminal damage to property, leaving the scene of an accident and other charges, said Houston County sheriff’s Sgt. Al Elvins. She faces charges of drunken driving, reckless driving, disorderly conduct and other traffic-related charges in relation to the crash, said Georgia State Patrol Sgt. Leamon Hughes. Pollock was examined at the Houston Medical Center and was released. She was being held late Friday in the Houston County jail without bond, Elvins said. Houston County sheriff’s deputy William Mitchelson, 30, was treated and released from the Houston Medical Center for minor injuries, said Houston County sheriff’s Chief Deputy Billy Rape. Here’s what happened, according to an incident report: Mitchelson was responding to the domestic call about 3:42 a.m. on Ticonderoga Drive near Byron when he was struck by a 1996 Honda Civic driven by Pollock. Her ex-boyfriend, Donald Mullis, 55, told authorities that while he was trying to load two suitcases of Pollock’s belongings into her car, she tried to back up and run over him. Pollock then chased Mullis through the backyard of his home with her car. When Pollock drove back around to the front yard, she stuck a transformer, a neighbor’s home and her ex-boyfriend’s mailbox. She then tried a second time to run over Mullis, who retreated to a back porch for safety. Pollock then drove her car through a 3-foot-tall, inflatable pool in the backyard. She crashed into the deputy’s police car on Liberty Lane as she was trying to flee the scene. As the deputy turned onto Liberty Lane from U.S. 41, he saw the Honda Civic driving toward him on the wrong side of the road. The deputy pulled over and Pollock struck the patrol car, which had its lights and sirens activated, nearly head-on, Hughes said. The police car camera, which is automatically activated anytime an officer turns on lights and sirens, captured the approaching Honda Civic and the video indicated that the car accelerated toward the deputy, Elvins said. Damage to both vehicles was extensive, Hughes said. The incident report indicated that neighbors witnessed a vehicle trying to run over a man. Next-door neighbor Beth Bramlett said she was awakened about 3:30 a.m. when the Honda Civic stuck her house, knocking pictures off the wall. She found a woman, who was later identified as Pollock, inside the car outside her house. As she tried to talk to the woman, Pollock started the car again and took off. She said the woman chased Mullis, who’d moved in about a week ago, as he was trying to call 911 on his cell phone. Pollock would stop the car, start it, rev up the engine and take off again. Bramlett said she also saw Pollock take out the pool with her car. “It was crazy,” Bramlett said.
OLD MAN HITS TROOPER 1992
AN OLD MAN AND HIS WIFE GRAZE A TROOPER WHO IS IN THE BREAKDOWN LANE DURING A TRAFFIC STOP. THE TROOPER ISN'T REALLY HURT, HE JUST HAS SOME TORN PANTS. THE MAN'S WIFE SAID THAT SHE THOUGH THAT THE NOISE THEY HEARD ON IMPACT WAS SOMEBODY SHOOTING AT THEM.
WOMAN HAS NO LICENSE AND NO TAGS (1994)
A WOMAN IS PULLED OVER AND HAS NO LICENSE AND NO REGISTRATION OR TAGS FOR HER VEHICLE. IT TURNS OUT SHE IS TRAVELING WITH A HITCHHIKER WHOM SHE SAYS IS HER BOYFRIEND. THEY BOTH ENDED UP GOING TO JAIL.
BRIDE AND GROOM’S DASHCAM MOMENT
A bride on her wedding night was put in handcuffs and taken to the county jail, right along with her new husband. For the first time, we're seeing dash cam video of newlyweds caught in a drunk driving crackdown. The arrests, followed by the newlyweds' time in jail, led to a complaint being filed against local law enforcement. The couple felt they were unfairly held up as an example. The couple has taken responsibility for their arrests. They have pleaded out their cases, but the video shows much more about what happened the night they were arrested, including a part where the bride almost had her chance to go free. It is the traffic stop that has people across the area talking. "You're fixing to talk yourself into the county jail," a deputy could be heard saying on the dashboard camera. "(Inaudible) put me in the county jail. I don't care," said Jade Puckett, who had just gotten married. The new bride in her wedding gown was arrested and placed in handcuffs. Her new husband, faced with the same fate, was taken down to the county jail. The arrest on March 15 was part of a DWI crackdown conducted by Precinct 8 constable's office. The deputy shown on the dash cam video pulled over the car after allegedly witnessing the bride attempt to leave the moving vehicle. Billy Puckett, the groom still in his tuxedo, explains what happened. "It's our wedding night and she's freaking out," he said. "We're trying to find the hotel (inaudible)." "So she's jumping out of a moving car?" asked the officer. "Yeah," said Puckett. The video goes on to show the groom go through at least three different sobriety tests. "Do I keep (inaudible)?" Puckett asked the deputy. "Do you remember the instructions?" asked the deputy in response. He's then handcuffed charged with drinking and driving. At one point, you can hear the groom admit being drunk. "Maybe you had too much to drink?" asked the deputy. "Yeah," he responded. "You had too much to drink?" asked the deputy. "Yeah," answered Puckett. "Do you think you had too much to drink to be driving tonight?" "Not to be driving, but just like (inaudible), I don't know," said Puckett. After talking to the bride and determining she too was too drunk to drive, you can hear on tape the deputies offer to call someone to pick her up. But when that doesn't go as planned, she, too, found herself in trouble. They asked, "Where's your phone?" "Probably in my purse," she answered. "You're fixing to talk yourself into county jail," the deputy cautioned. Puckett responded, "(Inaudible) put me in county jail." It was certainly a wedding night to remember. We made several attempts to the reach the couple today, as well as their attorney, but, as of right now, we have not heard from any one of them. The Precinct 8 constable's office is also refusing to comment on the case. The couple has filed a complaint with Precinct 8 over how they claim they were treated after their arrests. Jade Puckett says her cell was filthy and overcrowded. She also claims deputies repeatedly opened the cell door to point her out to other jailers. They said officers made them the poster child for their campaign against drunk driving. Our legal analyst Joel Androphy watched the video of the arrest. "Are they a poster child? Possibly so," he said. "But they put themselves in that position and the only people at fault at the end of day are them for drinking and driving." Puckett wrote in the complaint "We are not now complaining about the stop. I am complaining about the lack of professionalism of our law enforcement community and the fact that they chose to hype this arrest by embarrassing me and my family."
3 ANGLE SHOOTOUT! - 2004
A PERRY POLICE OFFICER AND THREE MEN WERE WOUNDED MONDAY AFTER A HIGH-SPEED CHASE ENDED IN A SHOOTOUT IN A SPARSELY POPULATED AERA OF PERRY, AUTHORITIES SAID. PERRY POLIC SGT. CHRIS SUTCLIFF, A SEVEN-YEAR VETERAN, WAS SHOT IN THE FOREARM BY A MAN WHEN SUTCLIFF HELPED HOUSTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPUTIES AS THEY WERE ATTEMPTING TO APPREHEND FOUR PEOPLE IN A PICKUP TRUCK. THREE SUSPECTS WERE SHOT AS LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS RETURNED FIRE. ALL WERE TAKEN TO AREA HOSPITALS AND THEIR INJURIES WERE NOT EXPECTED TO BE LIFE-THREATENING. THE CHASE BEGAN AFTER 2PM WHEN HOUSTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPUTY CHAD PAYNE ATTEMPTED TO PULL OVER A PICKUP TRUCK FOR SPEEDING ON INTERSTATE 75. THE PICKUP WOULD NOT STOP SO PAYNE GAVE CHASE. THE PICKUP DRIVER LOST CONTROL IN A 60 DEGREE CURB, CRASHING INTO A TELEPHONE POLE. TWO SUSPECTS EXITED THE LEFT SIDE OF THE TRUCK AND STARTED FIRING WITH A .45 CALIBER PISTOL, SHOOTING SUTCLIFF AS HE WAS ABOUT 10 TO 15 FEET FROM THE PICKUP. THE INJURY CAUSED SUTCLIFF TO DROP HIS GUN. HE ROLLED OUT OF THE LINE OF FIRE AND ANOTHER SUSPECT PICKED UP THE GUN AND BEGAN SHOOTING AT THE OFFICERS. AFTER THE SHOOTING HAD ENDED, ONE DEPUTY’S CAR WAS LEFT WITH FOUR OR FIVE BULLET HOLES.
DEADLY SHOOTOUT AND CHASE - PART 1 - 2007
A Wharton County jury convicted an unemployed welder of capital murder Monday, ensuring he will face the death penalty or spend the rest of his life in prison for killing a state game warden. James Garrett Freeman, 27, of Lissie, showed no emotion as the jury's verdict was announced after nearly three hours of deliberations. He will return to court today as the punishment phase of his case begins. Jurors concluded Freeman intentionally killed Texas Parks and Wildlife game warden Justin Hurst, 34, after a lengthy police chase in Wharton and Colorado counties last year. Hurst, one of seven officers who closed in on Freeman after a 90-minute pursuit, was the first game warden shot to death in the line of duty since 1973. Prosecutors contended Freeman deliberately executed Hurst on March 17, 2007, knowing he was a peace officer. Defense attorneys alleged Freeman acted recklessly without thinking of the consequences when he fired nearly 40 shots from two guns as officers tried to capture him. The slain game warden's family remained calm, but wept after the verdict was announced. "Nobody wins in these situations," said his widow, Amanda Hurst of El Campo, after numerous other game wardens lined up to hug her. Hurst's father expressed sorrow for the convicted killer's family, who also cried at the verdict. "You feel sorry for his family, too, because he's got a good family. And his brother is good," said Allen Hurst of El Campo. During closing arguments Monday, Houston defense attorney Stanley Schneider suggested Freeman was guilty only of the lesser charge of manslaughter because he acted recklessly, with no intent to hurt anyone. Prosecutors scoffed at that, however, arguing Freeman fired all the rounds from a Glock pistol before opening fire with an AK-47 rifle, striking Hurst twice and hitting numerous police vehicles with a barrage of 29 bullets. Schneider suggested depression and an alcohol problem drove Freeman to attempt "suicide by cop" — trying to provoke officers to shoot him — when he bailed from his car with a gun on a dark, rural road after his tires were punctured, ending the chase. Hurst, on duty and in uniform, had joined in the pursuit to help other officers and was taking aim at Freeman when he was hit. He died at a Houston hospital minutes after arriving by medical helicopter. "Garrett Freeman disregarded a known risk — that if he fired a gun, someone could get hurt," Schneider told the jury. "Did he want to kill Justin Hurst? No. Is there any evidence that he aimed at Justin Hurst? No. Is there any evidence he even saw Justin Hurst? No." Wharton County District Attorney Josh McCown and special prosecutor Kelly Siegler dismissed the "suicide by cop" theory as an insult to the jury's intelligence. "While he's firing, he makes himself a moving target that's harder to hit," McCown said. "He retreated and grabbed an AK-47. ... This wasn't luck. This was cold, calculated capital murder." Prosecutors said they could not explain why Freeman reacted so erratically just because another game warden had tried to stop him and ticket him for shooting at an animal on a dark country road. They argued Freeman steadily took aim at Hurst and the other officers, including one who ducked beneath his dashboard before his windshield was shot out. Much of the shooting was captured on video by police cars' dashboard cameras — footage viewed in court by the jury. "To take an AK-47 and sight a human being with it — a father, husband and friend — that ain't reckless," said Siegler, a former Harris County prosecutor who resigned after losing the Republican nomination for Harris County district attorney earlier this year. Freeman, already in trouble for not complying with the terms of his probation for a drunken-driving conviction, resisted because he knew he would go to jail if stopped by police, prosecutors said. He tried to run after shooting Hurst, but collapsed when officers shot him. A capital murder conviction has only two possible punishments — the death penalty or life in prison. The trial is the first potential death-penalty case considered by a Wharton County jury in nearly 30 years.
DEADLY SHOOTOUT AND CHASE - PART 2 - 2007
A Wharton County jury convicted an unemployed welder of capital murder Monday, ensuring he will face the death penalty or spend the rest of his life in prison for killing a state game warden. James Garrett Freeman, 27, of Lissie, showed no emotion as the jury's verdict was announced after nearly three hours of deliberations. He will return to court today as the punishment phase of his case begins. Jurors concluded Freeman intentionally killed Texas Parks and Wildlife game warden Justin Hurst, 34, after a lengthy police chase in Wharton and Colorado counties last year. Hurst, one of seven officers who closed in on Freeman after a 90-minute pursuit, was the first game warden shot to death in the line of duty since 1973. Prosecutors contended Freeman deliberately executed Hurst on March 17, 2007, knowing he was a peace officer. Defense attorneys alleged Freeman acted recklessly without thinking of the consequences when he fired nearly 40 shots from two guns as officers tried to capture him. The slain game warden's family remained calm, but wept after the verdict was announced. "Nobody wins in these situations," said his widow, Amanda Hurst of El Campo, after numerous other game wardens lined up to hug her. Hurst's father expressed sorrow for the convicted killer's family, who also cried at the verdict. "You feel sorry for his family, too, because he's got a good family. And his brother is good," said Allen Hurst of El Campo. During closing arguments Monday, Houston defense attorney Stanley Schneider suggested Freeman was guilty only of the lesser charge of manslaughter because he acted recklessly, with no intent to hurt anyone. Prosecutors scoffed at that, however, arguing Freeman fired all the rounds from a Glock pistol before opening fire with an AK-47 rifle, striking Hurst twice and hitting numerous police vehicles with a barrage of 29 bullets. Schneider suggested depression and an alcohol problem drove Freeman to attempt "suicide by cop" — trying to provoke officers to shoot him — when he bailed from his car with a gun on a dark, rural road after his tires were punctured, ending the chase. Hurst, on duty and in uniform, had joined in the pursuit to help other officers and was taking aim at Freeman when he was hit. He died at a Houston hospital minutes after arriving by medical helicopter. "Garrett Freeman disregarded a known risk — that if he fired a gun, someone could get hurt," Schneider told the jury. "Did he want to kill Justin Hurst? No. Is there any evidence that he aimed at Justin Hurst? No. Is there any evidence he even saw Justin Hurst? No." Wharton County District Attorney Josh McCown and special prosecutor Kelly Siegler dismissed the "suicide by cop" theory as an insult to the jury's intelligence. "While he's firing, he makes himself a moving target that's harder to hit," McCown said. "He retreated and grabbed an AK-47. ... This wasn't luck. This was cold, calculated capital murder." Prosecutors said they could not explain why Freeman reacted so erratically just because another game warden had tried to stop him and ticket him for shooting at an animal on a dark country road. They argued Freeman steadily took aim at Hurst and the other officers, including one who ducked beneath his dashboard before his windshield was shot out. Much of the shooting was captured on video by police cars' dashboard cameras — footage viewed in court by the jury. "To take an AK-47 and sight a human being with it — a father, husband and friend — that ain't reckless," said Siegler, a former Harris County prosecutor who resigned after losing the Republican nomination for Harris County district attorney earlier this year. Freeman, already in trouble for not complying with the terms of his probation for a drunken-driving conviction, resisted because he knew he would go to jail if stopped by police, prosecutors said. He tried to run after shooting Hurst, but collapsed when officers shot him. A capital murder conviction has only two possible punishments — the death penalty or life in prison. The trial is the first potential death-penalty case considered by a Wharton County jury in nearly 30 years.
GUARDIAN ANGELS RUSH IN AND VANISH! 2009
The Conroe Police Department wants to honor three men who, like guardian angels, helped an officer rescue a man from a burning car Saturday night – and then just disappeared. The man pulled from the car is in the intensive care unit at Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston’s Texas Medical Center, a friend of his said Tuesday. Officer Allan Bell, 33, who joined the department 14 months ago, was on patrol in the 5200 block of West Davis Street around 11:45 p.m. Saturday and saw a red Pontiac four-door sedan driving ahead of him in the same direction. Bell watched as the vehicle drifted off the road, struck a concrete culvert, flipped in the air and burst into flames. Bell stopped his car and ran to the burning Pontiac to check on anyone in the car. “At first, I thought I had a drunk driver,” Bell said. “When I saw it flip, it just went to something completely different.” Trapped inside the Pontiac was Aaron Puffer, 38, of Katy, owner of Major League Beginnings, a company that introduces college baseball coaches to talented high school players. Puffer, according to a July 7 story in The Courier, played in the College World Series with Creighton University in 1991 and was a pitcher for the California Angels’ minor league team. Bell was joined by three men who stopped to help, and who can be seen on the dashboard camera video from Bell’s patrol car running toward the burning vehicle. Here is a link to that video. “He was a big boy,” Bell said about Puffer, who was listed at 6 feet 2 inches and 230 pounds when drafted in 1993. “I definitely appreciated their help. Without their assistance, I wouldn’t have been able to get him out of the car.” It took less than a minute for all four to get Puffer out of the car, Bell said. They stabilized Puffer as best they could before EMS and the Conroe Fire Department arrived. The next thing Bell knew, the three men had disappeared. “They sort of snuck out without saying anything,” Bell said. EMS transported Puffer to Conroe Regional Medical Center by EMS ambulance but was transferred Sunday to Memorial Hermann, said Cody Smith, a friend who worked with Puffer for the Katy Sting Sports Academy. Puffer, who’s gone through several surgeries since the wreck, Smith said, suffered fractures and burns. He will have to go through rehabilitation, Smith said. No citations were issued for the wreck, Conroe Police Sgt. Bob Berry said. “He (Puffer) did not appear to be speeding,” Berry said. “It appears he went to sleep.” Bell, who worked for the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office for six years before joining the CPD, is also with the Army Reserves and worked in Iraq for 19 months with a private contractor, he said. Every bit of that training played into his response Saturday night. “Everything you do prepares you for something like that,” he said. “In Iraq, you were trained and you just react.” Bell already has received a sergeant’s coin – minted to give to officers for good work – and will be honored in the future by the department, Berry said. The hope is that the three men who helped Bell save Puffer’s life also will step forward. “We would like to get a hold of them,” Berry said, “and honor them as well.” Anyone with information about the identity of the three men who helped Conroe Police Officer Allan Bell pull Aaron Puffer out of the burning car Saturday night can call the Conroe Police Criminal Investigations Division at (936) 522-3231.
FIERO CURVY BACKROADS CHASE AND CRASH
OFFICER TRIES TO PULL OVER A SPEEDER IN RURAL FLORIDA BUT THE DRIVER INSTEAD CHOOSES TO START A HIGH SPEED CHASE! the little sports car ends up in a ditch and the driver takes off on foot. the cops nab him shortly and turns out he was driving with a suspended license and was a wanted man by the houston county sheriff's dept. SUSPECT IS RONNIE RICHARDS, JR. UPON SEARCHING THE CAR, POLICE FIND A DOUBLE BARREL SHOTGUN AND A BLACK LEATHER CASE CONTAINING METH. GUESS I WOULD RUN TOO!
GUY GETS TURNED IN BY CB'ER 1993
TWO MEN CLAIMING TO BE ON A FISHING TRIP, GET PULLED OVER BECAUSE A CB'ER CALLED THE STATE PATROL AND REPORTED THAT A CAR WAS DRIVING ALL OVER THE ROAD. THE TROOPER THEN GETS CONSENT TO SEARCH THE CAR AND HE FINDS 4 LARGE BAGS OF MARIJUANA.
NO SEAT BELT GUY MAKES A RUN FOR IT (1997)
A MAN GETS PULLED OVER FOR NOT WEARING HIS SEAT BELT. HE GETS A WRITTEN WARNING AND IS ABOUT TO BE SENT ON HIS WAY. THEN THE OFFICER TELLS THE GUY HE WANTS TO SEARCH HIM AND HIS CAR. THE GUY MAKES A RUN FOR IT WHILE BEING SEARCHED.
GUY ARRESTED FOR DUI AFTER NOT BLOWING CORRECTLY INTO BREATHALYZER (1994)
A man gets stopped for taking a pee on the side of the road. Then the trooper decides to make him take a breathalyzer test. he keeps screaming at him because he's not blowing hard enough. the guy refuses to do the tests and gets all pissed off when he gets arrested. His girlfriend and child are left in the car. the man starts crying in the back seat in the end. he later says he has a bladder problem and high blood pressure.