APTN 1830 PRIME NEWS NORTH AMERICA
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Friday, 9 April 2010 North America Prime News US Church Abuse 04:17 AP Clients Only REPLAY AP EXCLUSIVE Letter signed by future pope shows he didn't defrock abusive US priest ++Iran Nuclear 02:07 NO ACCESS BBC PERSIAN/VOA PERSIAN NEW Ceremony to mark National Day of Nuclear Technology Mideast US 02:18 Pt No Israel REPLAY Political scientist on Netanyahu's decision to call off trip to US NKorea US Nuclear 01:12 Pt No Access NKorea/APTN Clients Only REPLAY NKorea denounces Obama's nuclear policy as "hostile" Russia US Adoption 01:32 No Access Russia REPLAY Adoption freeze urged after boy returned to Russia Kyrgyzstan Politics 2 03:17 AP CLients Only WRAP Otunbayeva says Putin has offered economic help ADDS bites SAfrica Funeral 2 01:19 AP Clients Only REPLAY Burial of white supremacist Eugene Terreblanche SAfrica World Cup 02:31 AP Clients Only REPLAY Terror threat, AWB murder causes security concerns ahead of World Cup ++Haiti Protest 01:40 AP Clients Only NEW Displaced protest against being moved from tent city Cuba Russia 01:56 AP Clients Only REPLAY Russia's oldest tall ship sails into Havana as part of 65th WW2 anniv B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 04-09-10 1456EDT -----------End of rundown----------- AP-APTN-1830: US Church Abuse Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:US Church Abuse- REPLAY AP EXCLUSIVE Letter signed by future pope shows he didn't defrock abusive US priest LENGTH: 04:17 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642510 DATELINE: Los Angeles - 9 April 2010/File LENGTH: 04:17 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY CTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY LAW ENFORCEMENT HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: CTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Rome, Italy - 4 April 2010 1. Pope Benedict emerging on balcony of St. Peter's Basilica on Easter Sunday and waving to pilgrims AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Los Angeles, California - 9 April 2010 2. 1985 letter written by then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger to the Diocese of Oakland, scroll down to see Ratzinger's signature 3. Close shot of Ratzinger's signature LAW ENFORCEMENT HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Date/Location Unknown 4. Still photo of defrocked priest Rev. Stephen Kiesle AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Union City, California - 8 April 2010 5. Exteriors of the Our Lady of the Rosary parish school, where Kiesle pleaded no contest to molesting two boys 6. Mid shot of cross on top of the school LAW ENFORCEMENT HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Location Unknown - May 2002 7. Still photo of defrocked priest Rev. Stephen Kiesle AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Rome, Italy - 4 April 2010 8. Pan left from Apostolic Palace to St. Peter's Basilica AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Los Angeles, California - 8 April 2010 9. Attorney Irwin Zalkin sitting at his desk, tilt down to book 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Irwin Zalkin, lawyer for Kiesle Victims: "The pattern and practice of Cardinal Ratzinger was to delay the process, because there was a concern that if all of the sudden you're laicising numbers of priests, somebody is going to start asking questions: 'What's going on? Why is this happening? Why are we losing these priests? What is the issue?' And so it would be in their best interest for this process to drag on, for there to be a sort of a serial way of letting these guys go over time, that it wouldn't be as apparent that something was wrong." CTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Vatican City - 2002 (Exact date unknown) 11. Ratzinger beside Pope John Paul II during Mass in final year's of his life CTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Castel Gandolfo, Italy - 9 September 1997 12. Ratzinger with Pope John Paul II AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Los Angeles, California - 9 April 2010 13. Graphic showing letter written by Ratzinger; words on side read 'grave significance' 14. Graphic of same letter; words read "good of the universal church" 15. Graphic of same letter; words read "detriment that granting the dispensation can provoke within" 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Irwin Zalkin, lawyer for Kiesle Victims: "Their biggest concern was how to protect the Universal Church from any scandal. Scandal was considered a sin and if evidence or information were to get out and become public about the depth and the breath and the insidious nature of the problem of priests and other religious committing these crimes, it would for sure provoke scandal." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY San Ramon, California - 9 April 2010 17. Cutaway Maurine Behrend, who worked with the Youth Ministry with Kiesle at St Joseph Church: 18. Cutaway Behrend pointing to letter written to church officials 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Maurine Behrend, worked with the Youth Ministry with Kiesle at St Joseph Church: "I had read obviously about the stuff going on in Europe at the moment and there's a way of being ignorant that isn't your fault and there's a way of being ignorant that is your fault and then there is denial. And I think most bishops and priests know that." 20. Cutaway of Behrend AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Oakland, California - 8 April 2010 21. SOUNDBITE: (English), John Cummins, Oakland Bishop: "I didn't care for him, I didn't know him, I'd been in Sacramento. He was trouble." 22. SOUNDBITE: (English), John Cummins, Oakland Bishop: "I wish I did write to Cardinal Ratzinger, I didn't think I was that smart." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Rome, Italy - 4 April 2010 23. Bells tolling CTV - AP CLIENTS ONLY Rome, Italy - 4 April 2010 24. High angle shot St. Peter's square filled with pilgrims STORYLINE: Church files obtained exclusively by the Associated Press show that before becoming pope, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger resisted defrocking a San Francisco Bay-area priest who molested children. A 1985 letter signed by Ratzinger cited concerns about the effect that removing the priest would have on "the good of the universal church." The correspondence is the strongest challenge yet to the Vatican's insistence that Benedict played no role in blocking the removal of paedophile priests during his years as head of the Catholic Church's doctrinal watchdog office. The letter, signed by then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, was typed in Latin and is part of years of correspondence between the Diocese of Oakland in California and the Vatican about the proposed defrocking of the Rev. Stephen Kiesle. The Vatican refused to comment on the contents of the letter on Friday, but a spokesman confirmed it bore Ratzinger's signature. The diocese recommended removing Kiesle from the priesthood in 1981, the year Ratzinger was appointed to head the Vatican office which shared responsibility for disciplining abusive priests. The case then languished for four years at the Vatican before Ratzinger finally wrote to Oakland Bishop John Cummins. It was still two more years before Kiesle was removed. In the November 1985 letter, Ratzinger says the arguments for removing Kiesle are of "grave significance" but added that such actions required very careful review and more time. He also urged the bishop to provide Kiesle with "as much paternal care as possible" while awaiting the decision. But the future pope also noted that any decision to defrock Kiesle must take into account the "good of the universal church" and the "detriment that granting the dispensation can provoke within the community of Christ's faithful, particularly considering the young age." Kiesle was 38 at the time. Kiesle had been sentenced in 1978 to three years' probation after pleading no contest to misdemeanour charges of lewd conduct for tying up and molesting two young boys in a San Francisco Bay area church rectory. As his probation ended in 1981, Kiesle asked to leave the priesthood and the diocese submitted papers to Rome to defrock him. In his earliest letter to Ratzinger, Bishop John Cummins warned that returning Kiesle to ministry would cause more of a scandal than stripping him of his priestly powers. California church officials wrote to Ratzinger at least three times to check on the status of Kiesle's case. At one point, a Vatican official wrote to say the file may have been lost and suggested resubmitting materials. Lawyer Irwin Zalkin, who sued the diocese on behalf of some of Kiesle's victims outlined his explanation for the delay. "The pattern and practice of Cardinal Ratzinger was to delay the process because there was a concern that if all of the sudden you're laicising numbers of priests, somebody is going to start asking questions... And so it would be in their best interest for this process to drag on, for there to be a sort of a serial way of letting these guys go over time, that it wouldn't be as apparent that something was wrong." As Kiesle's fate was being considered in Rome, the priest returned to suburban Pinole to volunteer as a youth minister at St. Joseph Church, where he had served as associate pastor from 1972 to 1975. Kiesle was ultimately stripped of his priestly powers in 1987, though the documents do not indicate when, how or why. They also don't indicate what role - if any - Ratzinger had in the decision. Kiesle continued to volunteer with children, according to Maurine Behrend, who worked in the Oakland diocese's youth ministry office in the 1980s. After learning of his history, Behrend complained to church officials. When nothing was done she wrote a letter, which she showed to the AP. "There's a way of being ignorant isn't your fault and there's a way of being ignorant that is your fault and then there is denial. And I think most bishops and priests know that," she said in an interview. Behrend said she eventually confronted Cummins, the now retired bishop, at a confirmation and Kiesle was gone a short time later. Cummins told the AP during an interview at his Oakland home that he "didn't really care for" Kiesle, but he didn't recall writing to Ratzinger concerning the case. "I wish I did write to Cardinal Ratzinger. I don't think I was that smart," he said. Kiesle was arrested and charged in 2002 with 13 counts of child molestation from the 1970s. All but two were thrown out after the US Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional a California law extending the statute of limitations. He pleaded no contest in 2004 to a felony for molesting a young girl in his Truckee home in 1995 and was sentenced to six years in state prison. Kiesle, now 63 and a registered sex offender, lives in a Walnut Creek gated community, according to his address listed on the Megan's Law sex registry. An AP reporter was turned away when attempting to reach him for comment. These latest documents follow similar documents released last week, which revealed instances of the Vatican stalling in cases involving two Arizona clergy. The Vatican has called the accusations "absolutely groundless" and said the facts were being misrepresented. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1510EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++Iran Nuclear Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:++Iran Nuclear- NEW Ceremony to mark National Day of Nuclear Technology LENGTH: 02:07 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: NO ACCESS BBC PERSIAN/VOA PERSIAN TYPE: Farsi/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642462 DATELINE: Tehran - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 02:07 NO ACCESS BBC PERSIAN / NO ACCESS VOA PERSIAN ++AP Television is adhering to Iranian law that stipulates all media are banned from providing BBC Persian or VOA Persian any coverage from Iran, and under this law if any media violate this ban the Iranian authorities can immediately shut down that organisation in Tehran.++ SHOTLIST: 1. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad walking on stage to unveil centrifuges 2. Wide of audience and stage/ UPSOUND: Applause 3. Ahmadinejad unveiling centrifuge 4. Ahmadinejad walking towards podium for speech 5. Wide interior of hall 6. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran's President: "By the instalment of this centrifuge, which is completely made by Iran, as a replacement for the first-generation centrifuges, we can supply fuel for six power plants by the instalment of 60-thousand of them." 7. Wide of conference hall 8. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran's President: "Today, Iranian scientists have mastered the entire nuclear technology domain. It does not mean that we are at the peak, but there is no obstacle ahead of our scientists when it comes to (nuclear) science." 9. Pan of audience 10. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran's President: "In fact, you (US and West) are encouraging nations to achieve this tool (nuclear weapon). So it is a big lie when you say that you are after preventing proliferation (of nuclear weapons)." 11. Wide of audience chanting slogans 12. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iranian President: "They (Iran's enemies) all know and are certain today that any hand from any point in the world will be cut before extending against the Iranian nation." 13. Wide interior of hall STORYLINE: Iran's president unveiled a third generation of domestically built centrifuges on Friday, declaring there was no way back from the country's nuclear programme despite opposition from the United States and its allies. Enrichment technology is of concern to the international community because it can be used to generate fuel for power stations or material for nuclear bombs. The new generation of centrifuges, which spin uranium gas at extremely high speeds to purify it, will allow Iran to produce fuel for as many as six nuclear power plants, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said. During a ceremony marking Iran's National Day of Nuclear Technology, Ahmadinejad pulled back a white curtain to reveal one of the tall, cylindrical machines to a crowd of assembled dignitaries. "Today, Iranian scientists have mastered the entire nuclear technology domain. It does not mean that we are at the peak, but there is no obstacle ahead of our scientists when it comes to (nuclear) science," Ahmadinejad said. The display capped months of announcements about the development of the new machines. Iranian officials praised the advancement as a step toward greater self-sufficiency in the face of international sanctions. US President Barack Obama's announcement on Tuesday of a new American nuclear policy enraged Iran's leaders because the guidelines classify Iran as a potential target for a nuclear attack. Obama's policy included pledges to reduce America's nuclear arsenal, refrain from nuclear tests and not use nuclear weapons against countries that do not have them. Iran and North Korea were not included in that pledge because they do not cooperate with other countries on non-proliferation standards. Ahmadinejad called the promised arsenal reduction "a big lie" aimed at allowing Washington to keep the bulk of its weapons. The policy would only encourage nations to seek a nuclear military option, he said. The head of the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran, Ali Akbar Salehi, said the new machines were 10 times more powerful than ones now in use and had passed all necessary mechanical tests. The machines are at the core of Iran's disputed nuclear programme. The United States and its allies suspect Iran's civilian work is a cover for developing a weapons capability. Iran argues that its nuclear programme is aimed at creating a peaceful nuclear energy network to serve its growing population. Iran's first nuclear power plant is to be inaugurated later this year in the southern port of Bushehr with the help of Russia. Iran says it plans to build some 20 nuclear power plants. The US and Israel have not ruled out a military option for stopping Iran's nuclear programme if diplomacy and sanctions fail. "They (Iran's enemies) all know and are certain today that any hand from any point in the world will be cut before extending against the Iranian nation," Ahmadinejad warned on Friday. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1547EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Mideast US Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:Mideast US- REPLAY Political scientist on Netanyahu's decision to call off trip to US LENGTH: 02:18 FIRST RUN: 1130 RESTRICTIONS: Pt No Israel TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/Channel 10 STORY NUMBER: 642470 DATELINE: Jerusalem - 7/9 April 2010/FILE LENGTH: 02:18 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY CHANNEL 10 - NO ACCESS ISRAEL SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Jerusalem, 9 April 2010 1. Set up shot of Avraham Diskin, political scientist at Jerusalem's Hebrew University 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Avraham Diskin, political scientist at Jerusalem's Hebrew University "What we had last time with his visit to AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee) and later on the meeting with the president and his staff, I think it was very unpleasant for both parties I think. And you know, it's really part of the games. If you cannot really promote your interests and you're going just to create a very unpleasant atmosphere for both sides, it's not going to help anyone, so I think that's the consideration. That's why he decided, probably, not to go." 3. Cutaway of Diskin 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Avraham Diskin, political scientist at Jerusalem's Hebrew University "We do know that some of the people who are going to attend that conference are not, at the present time, are not really very pro-Israeli. So instead of helping each other to face these problems, we are going to waste efforts on you know, really, not very important war of propaganda. War, really, of different sides. So that's the real problem. And I think that sending Meridor (Netanyahu's deputy) instead of him is a very smart move because Meridor is in charge of the issue in the present Israeli government." 5. End shot of Diskin AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Jerusalem, 7 April 2010 6. Wide of press conference 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel's Prime Minister: "I'm not concerned that anyone would think that Israel is a terrorist regime. Everybody knows a terrorist and rogue regime when they see one, and believe me, they see quite a few around Israel. Thank you" Channel 10 - No Access Israel FILE - Dimona, southern Israel, 8 August 2004 8. Various of Dimona nuclear centre STORYLINE: An Israeli political scientist said on Friday that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's decision not to attend the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference on nuclear proliferation in Washington was likely made because of the current tension between the US and Israel. Officials in Netanyahu's office said that he called off the trip because he feared Israel would be singled out over its own nuclear programme. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because no announcement has been made. President Barack Obama's national security adviser on Friday said that Israel would still have a "robust" delegation at the conference however. One political scientist, based at Jerusalem's Hebrew University, speculated that the decision lies more with current U.S.-Israel relations. "If you cannot really promote your interests and you're going just to create a very unpleasant atmosphere for both sides, it's not going to help anyone, so I think that's the consideration," Avraham Diskin said. That's why he decided, probably, not to go," he added. Netanyahu had said he would attend the conference to underline the dangers of "terrorists" acquiring nuclear weapons, but suddenly called off the trip less than two days after he announced he would take part. Netanyahu acknowledged this week that his government has yet to iron out its differences with the US over Israeli construction in east Jerusalem, a dispute that has stalled American efforts to restart Mideast peace talks. A visit by Netanyahu to Washington could also have served to bring additional attention to Israel's currently rocky ties with the Obama administration. The Israeli leader's trip to the US capital last month failed to iron out differences between the allies on Israeli construction in east Jerusalem, a spat disrupting US efforts to relaunch Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. The Israeli officials did not name the states thought to be planning to single out Israel, which has not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Israel has not admitted to possessing nuclear weapons, preferring a policy it calls "ambiguity." Based on evidence, international experts have estimated that Israel has dozens, possibly hundreds, of nuclear bombs. Beginning on Monday, government leaders from more than 40 countries will gather to discuss improving safeguards against insurgent groups acquiring nuclear weapons. 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APTN APEX 04-09-10 1501EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: NKorea US Nuclear Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:NKorea US Nuclear- REPLAY NKorea denounces Obama's nuclear policy as "hostile" LENGTH: 01:12 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: Pt No Access NKorea/APTN Clients Only TYPE: Korean/Nat SOURCE: APTN/KRT STORY NUMBER: 642500 DATELINE: Various - 9 April 2010/FILE LENGTH: 01:12 APTN - APTN CLIENTS ONLY KRT - NO ACCESS NORTH KOREA ++KRT AUDIO AS INCOMING++ SHOTLIST KRT - NO ACCESS NORTH KOREA Pyongyang, North Korea - 9 April 2010 1. KRT news bulletin opening titles 2. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) KRT Newsreader: "The review made public on April 6 proves that the present US administration still regards nuclear missiles as a mainstay in carrying out its strategy for world domination." APTN - APTN CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Yenbyun, North Korea - 13 June 1996 3. Wide of exterior of nuclear facility 4. Various of researcher in front of machines KRT - NO ACCESS NORTH KOREA Pyongyang, North Korea - 9 April 2010 5. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) KRT Newsreader: "As far as the NPT (non proliferation treaty) is concerned, it is not a treaty to last long because it is a transitional step to prevent nuclear proliferation until the world is denuclearised." APTN - APTN CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Yenbyun, North Korea - 13 June 1996 6. Various of interior of nuclear facility KRT - NO ACCESS NORTH KOREA Pyongyang, North Korea - 9 April 2010 7. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) KRT Newsreader: "As long as the US nuclear threat persists, the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) will increase and update various type of nuclear weapons as its deterrent in such a manner as it deems necessary in the days ahead. The DPRK is fully capable of doing so." APTN - APTN CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Beijing, China - February, 2007 8. Various of delegations in meeting room for six party talks on North Korea's nuclear programme STORYLINE North Korea denounced US President Barack Obama's new nuclear stance as "hostile" on Friday and vowed to continue expanding its atomic arsenal. The blistering criticism from North Korea's Foreign Ministry was announced by state broadcaster KRT in Pyongyang. Obama pledged on Tuesday to resist using nuclear weapons against nations that comply with international non-proliferation standards - exempting North Korea and Iran from the new policy. North Korea accused Obama's government of posing a nuclear threat and said "the present US administration still regards nuclear missiles as a mainstay in carrying out its strategy for world domination." North Korea said it would not give up its atomic weapons. "As long as the US nuclear threat persists, the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) will increase and update various types of nuclear weapons as its deterrent in such a manner as it deems necessary in the days ahead," KRT quoted an unidentified Foreign Ministry spokesman as saying on Friday. Washington and other regional powers have been trying to coax North Korea back to disarmament talks it walked out of last year. North Korea had shown a willingness in recent months to return to the negotiations, but the ministry said Obama's new policy "chilled the hard-won atmosphere for the resumption of the talks." North Korea cites a US threat as a main reason behind its drive to build nuclear weapons. The US has 28,500 troops in South Korea to guard against the North. The two Koreas remain locked in an official state of war because their three-year conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty, in 1953. 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APTN APEX 04-09-10 1501EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Russia US Adoption Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:Russia US Adoption- REPLAY Adoption freeze urged after boy returned to Russia LENGTH: 01:32 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Russia TYPE: Russian/Nat SOURCE: RU-RTR STORY NUMBER: 642505 DATELINE: Moscow/Partizansk - 8/9 April 2010 LENGTH: 01:32 RU-RTR - NO ACCESS RUSSIA ++CLIENTS PLEASE USE THIS VERSION OF THE STORY AND IGNORE THE PREVIOUS VERSION IN THE 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS BULLETIN++ SHOTLIST: Moscow, Russia - April 9, 2010 1. Wide of exterior Moscow children's hospital 2. Close up of nameplate 3. Mid of children hospital gates, people coming in and coming out 4. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Pavel Astakhov, Kremlin Children Rights Commissioner "I ask him did she hurt you? He says "No, she didn't beat me, but she did this all the time" (++ASTAKHOV SHOWS HOW WOMAN ALLEGEDLY PULLED BOY'S HAIR++). He showed me what she did. So, she pulled his hair all the time. I asked him "Did she do this often?" He said "Yes, she did this very often". And he immediately starts crying after telling me about this". Moscow, Russia - April 8, 2010 5. Close up of nameplate of Moscow police department 6. Mid pan of Artyom Savelyev being taken to van, pull out ++FACE HAS BEEN DELIBERATELY BLURRED AT SOURCE++ 7. Mid pan of officials and journalists near van 8. Artyom Savelyev inside van ++FACE HAS BEEN DELIBERATELY BLURRED AT SOURCE++ 9. Man getting out of van Moscow, Russia - April 9, 2010 10. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Sergey Lavrov, Russian Foreign Minister: "What has happened is far beyond the borders of good and evil. We have taken the decision, and Russian Foreign Ministry will stand for this firmly, to freeze, to suggest a freeze on any adoptions to American families until Russia and the USA sign an international agreement about the conditions of adoption and responsibilities of the families which take our children." Town of Partizansk, Primorsky region,Russia - April 9, 2010 11. Wide of exterior orphanage building where Artyom Savelyev lived before being adopted 12. Mid of orphanage building entrance 13. Close up of orphanage nameplate STORYLINE Russia should freeze all child adoptions with US families, the country's foreign minister urged on Friday after an 8-year-old adopted Russian boy was allegedly put on a one-way flight back to his homeland all alone. Artyom Savelyev arrived in Moscow unaccompanied on a United Airlines flight on Thursday from Washington, the Kremlin children's rights office said on Friday. The child's adoptive grandmother, Nancy Hansen, told The Associated Press from her home in Shelbyville, Tennessee, that she put the child on a plane to Russia with a note from her daughter. She said the family paid a man 200 US dollars to pick the boy up at the airport and take him to the Russian Education and Science Ministry. She said that boy had been violent toward his adoptive mother in the US. The children's office said the boy, whose adoptive name is Justin Hansen, was carrying a letter from his adoptive mother, Torry Hansen of Shelbyville, Tennessee, saying she was returning him due to severe psychological problems. "This child is mentally unstable. He is violent and has severe psychopathic issues", the letter said, according to Russian officials, who sent what they said was a copy of the letter to The Associated Press. The authenticity of the letter could not be independently verified. The US ambassador to Russia, John Beyrle, said he was "deeply shocked by the news" and "very angry that any family would act so callously toward a child that they had legally adopted." Bedford County Sheriff Randall Boyce said Torry Hansen is under investigation although no charges have been filed. Officers were expected to interview her on Friday afternoon. The boy is now in hospital in northern Moscow for a checkup, Anna Orlova, spokeswoman for Kremlin's Children Rights Commissioner Pavel Astakhov, told The Associated Press. Astakhov visited Savelyev on Friday, and said afterwards that the boy had demonstrated to him how his hair was pulled by his adoptive mother. Savelyev was adopted late September last year from the town of Partizansk in Russia's Far East. He turned up at the door of the Russian Education and Science Ministry on Thursday afternoon accompanied by a Russian man who had been hired by Savelyev's adopted grandmother to pick him up from the airport, according to the ministry. The chaperone handed over the boy and his documents, and then left, officials said. The education minister said later on Friday that it had decided to suspended the license of World Association for Children and Parents - a Renton, Washington-based agency that processed Savelyev's adoption - for the duration of the probe. Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said in televised remarks on Friday that the ministry would recommend that the US and Russia hammer out an agreement before any new adoptions are allowed. "We have taken the decision, and Russian Foreign Ministry will stand for this firmly, to freeze, to suggest a freeze on any adoptions to American families until Russia and the USA sign an international agreement about the conditions of adoption and responsibilities of the families which take our children", Lavrov said. Russian officials have long cast a wary eye on international adoptions. In 2006, Peggy Sue Hilt of Manassas, Virginia, was sentenced to 25 years in prison after being convicted of fatally beating a 2-year-old girl adopted from Siberia just months earlier. In 2008, Kimberly Emelyantsev of Tooele, Utah, was sentenced to 15 years after pleading guilty to killing a Russian infant in her care. These cases prompted outrage in Russia, where foreign ills are reported with gusto, and calls for tougher rules governing foreign adoptions. Last year, nearly 1,600 Russian children were adopted in the United States, according to Tatyana Yakovleva of the ruling United Russia party. Rob Johnson, a spokesman for the Tennessee Department of Children's Services, said the agency is looking into Friday's allegations, although they do not handle international adoptions. United Airlines allows unaccompanied children as young as 5 years old on direct flights. But the airline disavowed any responsibility for the international incident. The airline said it requires a parent or guardian dropping off a child for a flight to show an ID and to list who is picking the child up at the destination. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1501EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Kyrgyzstan Politics 2 Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:Kyrgyzstan Politics 2- WRAP Otunbayeva says Putin has offered economic help ADDS bites LENGTH: 03:17 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP CLients Only TYPE: Russian/English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642516 DATELINE: Bishkek - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 03:17 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++ALL CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES THIS EDIT DID NOT PLAY OUT IN ITS ENTIRETY. A FULL VERSION OF THIS ITEM WILL RUN IN THE 1830GMT AMERICAS PRIME NEWS BULLETIN++ SHOTLIST: (FIRST RUN 1430 ME EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 9 APRIL 2010) 1. Vehicles arriving at the National Hospital 2. Head of the Kyrgyzstan opposition's self-declared Interim Government, Rosa Otunbayeva, walking towards hospital 3. Cutaway of cameras 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Roza Otunbayeva, head of the Kyrgyzstan opposition's self-declared interim government: "He (Putin) asked me about the situation, about what needs we have, and I responded that yes, we have some economical and financial needs. And my deputy, who is in charge of economical issues, he's today in Moscow." 5. Cutaway of doctors watching 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Roza Otunbayeva, head of the Kyrgyzstan opposition's self-declared interim government: "We are not raising this issue (the US base), we are keeping our commitments, which we signed, those international agreements, some times ago, so continue to keep those commitments." 7. Hospital staff watching through window 8. Otunbayeva speaking to media (FIRST RUN 1730 NEW SUPDATE - 9 APRIL 2010) 9. Wide of news conference 10. Cutaway of media 11. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Keneshbek Dushebayev, new head of Kyrgyz National Security Service: "At the moment Bakiyev's supporters by his order, are handing out arms, money and liquor, and they are trying to start an armed conflict. Frankly speaking, a civil war in the country." 12. Exterior of defence ministry 13. Security outside defence ministry 14. Otunbayeva walks into defence ministry 15. Cutaway cameraman 16. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Rosa Otunbayeva, head of the Kyrgyzstan opposition's self-declared interim government: "Bakiyev has an opportunity to leave the country, if he wants to go to court we can consider it. We guarantee his security if he removes the mantle of power but we are not going to negotiate after the deaths of 75 people." 17. OSCE delegates Zhanybek Karibzhanov (in front) and Ambassador Herbert Salber (with beard) walk towards cameras 18. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Zhanybek Karibzhanov, OSCE Special Envoy to Kyrgyzstan: "First of all the two sides should make steps towards each other to express their will to negotiate, and then we will see how it goes." 19. Reporters taking notes 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Herbert Salber, director of OSCE's Conflict Prevention Centre: "Civil war would be the last (thing) we wish to see and I hope this will not be the case. I hope, with the slight stabilisation that we observe also here in Bishkek, that can be excluded." 21. Cutaway 22. OSCE delegates talking in corridor STORYLINE: The head of Krygyzstan's self-declared interim government said on Friday she had spoken to Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin by phone and discussed Russian economic assistance for the former Soviet nation. Roza Otunbayeva said Putin had asked her "about what needs we have, and I responded that yes, we have some economical and financial needs." She said the deputy head of the interim government, Almazbek Atambayev, had flown to Moscow on Friday to talk with Russian government officials. Any suggestion that Russia is backing the new leadership would add to the pressure on President Kurmanbek Bakiyev to step down. Bakiyev reportedly fled the capital earlier in the week to seek support in his clan's southern power base. Otunbayeva was speaking during a visit to a hospital where people wounded during two days of civil unrest in Bishkek were being treated. At least 76 people died in the violence and more than 1,400 were injured, the Health Ministry reported on Friday. Otunbayeva also said there was no immediate intention to discuss whether a US air base would be allowed to remain in the country, but said "we are keeping our commitments." The status of the base, which is key to supporting the international military campaign against the Taliban in Afghanistan, has been a significant strategic question since the uprising on Wednesday. Opposition figures in the past have said they wanted the US base, at the international airport serving the capital, to close. Otunbayeva also said the interim government would not negotiate with Bakiyev, whose regime the opposition has accused of corruption. The new head of the Kyrgyz security service said Bakiyev's supporters were distributing weapons, funds and alcohol in what he described as an attempt to foment "an armed conflict". "Frankly speaking, a civil war," Keneshbek Dushebayev said at a news conference. Meanwhile, diplomatic efforts to reduce tensions in the central Asian nation continued. After a meeting between Otunbayeva and a delegation from the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the organisation's special envoy to Kyrgyzstan urged both sides to come together, apparently calling for a negotiated settlement. Zhanybek Karibzhanov said: "First of all the two sides should make steps towards each other to express their will to negotiate." Another member of the OSCE, Herbert Salber, told reporters that a civil war "would be the last thing we wish to see". Otunbayeva reiterated an earlier demand that her ousted predecessor leave the country but she said negotiations were not on offer. "We guarantee his security if he removes the mantle of power but we are not going to negotiate after the deaths of 75 people," she said. The situation in Bishkek was much calmer on Friday with no fresh reports of civil unrest or looting. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1502EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: SAfrica Funeral 2 Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:SAfrica Funeral 2- REPLAY Burial of white supremacist Eugene Terreblanche LENGTH: 01:19 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642507 DATELINE: Ventersdorp - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 01:19 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Eugene Terreblanche's coffin being carried towards the grave on the Terreblanche family farm 2. Coffin bearers 3. Coffin being carried to grave 4. Wide shot, graveside, Eugene Terreblanche's widow (dressed in black with a cross around her neck) and Terreblanche's daughter (on screen left of mother, dressed in blue and holding hands with mother) standing 5. Close shot, Terreblanche's widow and daughter 6. Mourners throwing flowers onto the coffin 7. Old man with beard, pull out to old man walking past the camera, crying 8. Close shot, grave 9. AWB member standing graveside, performing an AWB salute 10. Close AWB 'soldiers' standing in silent contemplation 11. Wide shot, graveside, mourners passing by STORYLINE: A white supremacist killed in what has been described as a wage dispute with two young black farmworkers was buried on Friday as a divided South Africa contemplated the meaning of his brutal death. Murdered Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging movement (AWB) leader Eugene Terreblanche was laid to rest in a grave on his family farm, 12 kilometres (7.2 miles) outside Ventersdorp, South Africa. Terreblanche's widow and daughter were were visibly moved by the burial, as were AWB members who stood in silent contemplation. A few gave the bent-arm AWB salute. Earlier on Friday, Terreblanche, who was killed in what has been described as a wage dispute with two young black farmworkers, was remembered with nationalist anthems and flags and impassioned rhetoric at a church service. Terreblanche's death has not sparked wider violence. South African leaders acknowledged that racial tensions remain 16 years after apartheid ended, but have played down any threat to the World Cup that starts in June, the first time football's premier tournament will come to Africa. White militants who considered Terreblanche their leader say his death proves whites aren't safe under majority rule. Black leaders say controlling crime - whether its victims are white or black - is a priority in a country with one of the highest rates of violent crime in the world. The aftermath of Terreblanche's death has shown how far South Africa has come. White militants first vowed revenge, but later joined President Jacob Zuma in calling for calm. Terreblanche's AWB movement, seeks to create an all-white republic within mostly black South Africa. The group's insignia resembles a Nazi swastika, but with three prongs instead of four. The movement always has been on the fringes, estimated to have no more than 70-thousand members at its height in the early 1990s out of a population of nearly 50 (m) million. Terreblanche was sentenced to six years in jail in 2001 for the attempted murder of former security guard Paul Motshabi in March 1996 and was released in 2004. Motshabi suffered brain damage, and was left paralysed and unable to speak for months after the attack. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1502EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: SAfrica World Cup Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:SAfrica World Cup- REPLAY Terror threat, AWB murder causes security concerns ahead of World Cup LENGTH: 02:31 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642498 DATELINE: Ventersdorp/Johannesburg - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 02:31 SHOTLIST: Johannesburg, South Africa 1. Set up shot of Jerome Valcke, FIFA General Secretary (on left) holding replica World Cup Ticket 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jerome Valcke, FIFA General Secretary: "The first issue is Al-Qaida, or any threat we will receive from international terrorist groups. I mean it will happen, and is happening, and any time you have an international event which brings a lot of focus on, whatever - it's not only sporting events, it's political events, it's whatever - I mean, we know that it can happen. Where we have to be very clear is that it's not a threat which will stop FIFA in the South Africa to organise the World Cup here in South Africa." Ventersdorp, South Africa 3. Boy walking past vehicles with Afrikaaner flags and bumper stickers 4. Close up of vehicle's bumper sticker reading (English and Afrikaans) "My God. My People. My Fatherland." 5. Wide of media surrounding Andre Visagie, Secretary General of the AWB 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andre Visagie, Secretary General of the AWB (Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging movement) : "The government cannot assure the safety and the security of its citizens, and therefore we say the soccer people who come to South Africa should also make provisions for their own security because the government itself cannot secure the local population, let alone the visitors from abroad." 7. Coffin of Eugene Terreblanche being wheeled through the APK Church during the funeral UPSOUND: (music) 'Amazing Grace' 8. Wide of Peter Mulder, Deputy Agriculture Minister and Leader of the Freedom Front Party (an Afrikaans political party). 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Mulder, Deputy Agriculture Minister and Leader of the Freedom Front Party: "I really hope it will not put people off coming to the World Cup, because it was an incident that happened, it caused a lot of emotion and it will fade out now without any doubt. So in that sense, I hope it will not have any effect." 10. Cutaway of Mulder talking to a journalist 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Mulder, Deputy Agriculture Minister and Leader of the Freedom Front Party: "Well, I think two things, very simple. I think the government must be strongly against Mr. Malema, to say that we can't afford that kind of politics in South Africa. That's easy politics, whipping up people, everybody can do that. We need wise politics to get moderation, to get that on the one side. And then surely, show some sign from your side that you are going to address the problem of people being murdered on their farms, defencelessly. Surely you must be protected by the constitution and by the police and they must show the measures to do that." 12. Wide of police motorcyclists riding past the camera 13. AWB security guards STORYLINE: The murder of white supremacist leader Eugene Terreblanche and the threat of militant attacks have caused renewed security concerns in South Africa ahead of the FIFA World Cup football tournament. Jerome Valcke, General Secretary of FIFA, said on Friday that the first issue faced by organisers of the South African World Cup is "Al-Qaida, or any threat we will receive from international terrorist groups." He admitted "it will happen, and is happening" but went on to say that the threat of violence is not something that will stop the World Cup going ahead. Meanwhile, on the back of Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging movement (AWB's) former leader Terreblanche's murder, South African leaders acknowledged that racial tensions remain 16 years after apartheid ended, but have played down any threat to the World Cup that starts in June, the first time football's premier tournament will come to Africa. While Terreblanche's death has not sparked wider violence, Andre Visagie, Secretary General of the AWB said the government was not able to ensure the safety of its citizens, nor that of visitors to the country. "We say the soccer people who come to South Africa should also make provisions for their own security because the government itself cannot secure the local population, let alone the visitors from abroad," he told journalists on Friday. Camouflage-clad men carrying pistols and little girls in their Sunday best meanwhile gathered in the country's northwest to mourn Terreblanche, whose body was brought into the church in a closed coffin covered in red and white flowers. His coffin was draped with a flag - red, black and white, with a Nazi-like symbol in the centre - representing the white supremacist movement he led. The some 500 people in the church rose and sang Die Stem, an Afrikaans song that was the national anthem during the apartheid era. White militants who considered Terreblanche their leader say his death proves whites aren't safe under majority rule. Black leaders say controlling crime - whether its victims are white or black - is a priority in a country with one of the highest rates of violent crime in the world. The aftermath of Terreblanche's death has shown how far South Africa has come. White militants first vowed revenge, but later joined President Jacob Zuma in calling for calm. Earlier this week, whites and blacks faced off angrily in front of a courthouse where a teenager and another farm worker who allegedly confessed to killing Terreblanche were charged with murder. But white leaders then asked their followers to go home, and the day ended calmly. On Friday, the country's largest trade union called a meeting to coincide with the funeral in the part of Ventersdorp where most of the town's poor blacks live, ensuring there would be no racial confrontations. Provincial Premier Maureen Modiselle, who is black, was among the mourners on Friday, her presence underlining government statements that it is in solidarity with all crime victims. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1502EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: ++Haiti Protest Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:++Haiti Protest- NEW Displaced protest against being moved from tent city LENGTH: 01:40 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Creole/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642520 DATELINE: Port au Prince - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 01:40 SHOTLIST: 1. Various of tent camp inside the National Stadium 2. Various of protestors, who live in the tent camp, marching down the street 3. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Jean Saintfeor, displaced protester: "It is a very difficult situation to ask these people to go because they have lost mothers, children, members of their family, this is criminal." 4. Various of protesters singing slogans and dancing to the drums 5. Protesters singing, one holding his baby son STORYLINE: Hundreds of Haitians living in tents inside the capital's national stadium protested on Friday against a plan to relocate them to a different site. The stadium in downtown Port-au-Prince houses a tent camp home to more than 10 thousand Haitian people who lost their homes after January's earthquake. According to authorities the stadium lacks the minimum hygienic conditions to host such a large number of displaced people. But they haven't announced yet where will they relocate the Haitians currently living there. Most of those taking part in the protest demanded to know more details about the relocation before evacuating the camp. They added that they feel more secure living in central Port-au-Prince - closer to their wrecked homes and businesses - than in the capital's outskirts. With torrential rains expected at any time, authorities are not even close to providing the shelters they promised. Three months since the January 12 quake, the government has yet to relocate a single person, despite a pledge that people would be moving into resettlement areas by early February. Aid groups say they're ready to build but don't have the land. Government officials insist they are making progress on finding sites in closed-door negotiations with private landowners. But time is running out for 600,000 people living under tarpaulins, tents or simply bedsheets as the rainy season has the makings of a second major crisis. Heavy rains typically start around April 1, and there already have been deadly floods to the west of the earthquake zone. In 2008, nearly 800 people were killed as Haiti was wracked by four named storms in the space of a month. UN officials are still analysing 9.9 (b) billion dollars in pledges from a March 31 donors' conference for Haiti. It is not yet clear how much of that will go toward improving shelter. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1547EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Cuba Russia Friday, 9 April 2010 STORY:Cuba Russia- REPLAY Russia's oldest tall ship sails into Havana as part of 65th WW2 anniv LENGTH: 01:56 FIRST RUN: 1630 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Russian/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 642506 DATELINE: Havana - 9 April 2010 LENGTH: 01:56 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of Kruzershtern entering Havana harbour as it passes Morro Castle 2. Close up Kruzershtern passing 3. Zoom in over cityscape as Kruzershtern enters Havana harbour and passes Morro Castle 4. Close up Russian flag on ship 5. Wide of ship in Havana harbour 6. Tilt up from port workers mooring ship 7. Mid of Cuban Naval band playing as ship docks 8. Mid of Russian Ambassador to Cuba reviewing troops onboard 9. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Mijail Kamynin, Russian Ambassador to Cuba: "Today the Cuban people will be able to come onboard this marvellous ship and enjoy the photo exhibits." 10. Mid of photo exhibit on ship deck 11. Close up Fidel Castro photograph 12. Close up photo of a young Raul Castro 13. Close up photo of Fidel Castro on plane with Russian fighter planes outside his window 14. Close up photo of Fidel Castro cutting sugar cane 15. Mid of Kamynin looking at photos in exhibit STORYLINE: The Kruzershtern, Russia's oldest tall ship, sailed into Cuba's Havana harbour on Friday amidst a light haze to begin a week-long visit to the island nation. The visit is part of a transatlantic voyage commemorating the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II. In Cuba, the ship's crew and local officials will also be celebrating the 50th anniversary of Russian-Cuban relations with an exhibition of previously unpublished photos displayed onboard, depicting Fidel and Raul Castro and Revolutionary icon, Che Guevara. "Today the Cuban people will be able to come onboard this marvellous ship and enjoy the photo exhibits," said Mijail Kamynin, Russian Ambassador to Cuba. The Kruzershtern was built in Germany in 1926 and even though it will turn 84 this year, the ship continues to be the pride of the training sailing fleet of Russia. One hundred and twenty cadets from St. Petersburg, Kaliningrad, and Astrakhan, as well as 60 crew members, are calling the ship home for the next few months as it travels around the world. Most recently, the ship docked in the port of La Guaira in Venezuela. In the past several weeks, the ship has visited Belgium, Spain, Panama, Canada, Peru, and Mexico. The tall ship is 114 metres long with four masts towering 50 metres high. The total area of it's sails is an astounding 3,500 metres. It is one of the oldest and at the same time one of the biggest sailing vessels in the world. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 04-09-10 1502EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------
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