REVIEWS 1957 (aka REVIEW OF THE YEAR - 1957)
Full title reads: "Reviews 1957". <br/> <br/>GV From ship, ice flows on water. CU Bow of ship ploughing through ice. GV Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's ship in the Antarctic ploughing through ice. SV Duke with beard, looking over side of ship. Top View Seal moving along ice. CU Duke wearing duffle coat. <br/> <br/>SV Lion and Lioness laying under tree in South Africa. GV Ext. South African observatory. Angle shot Int. with telescope in observatory. SV Man looking through telescope. CU Moon in the sky. LV Int. Man at control panel operating huge radio telescope at Jodrell Bank. Angle shot Telescope. SV Machinery operating telescope on rails. Aerial shot Jodrell radio telescope. SV American Army doctor Major Simons with container lowered over him. GV Balloon ascending. He went 19 miles up. AS Balloon ascending. GV Ext. Moscow, Russia / Soviet Union. SV Sputnik dog - Laika - being put into container. CU Girl assistant. SV Sputnik II dog being put into container GV Ext. rocket being fired. CU Rocket ascending. CU Sputnik dog inside rocket. LV People in Moscow looking through small telescopes. GV Satellite going across sky. <br/> <br/>GV Rockets being raised for firing position (American). GV American rockets being raised. LV English rocket being prepared for firing by British troops. CU Sergeant giving instructions. CU Rocket. GV Bloodhound rocket being fired. LV Rocket ascending boosters come away. SV Sir William Penny arriving in South Australia. SV Valiant bomber carrying H bomb. SV Men standing with backs to explosion, terrific flash comes over screen - Christmas Island atomic test bomb. GV Hydrogen bomb exploding & mushroom effect. <br/> <br/>SV Deep freeze mother with her baby Stephen sitting beside her husband and elder child. CU Deep freeze mother holding baby. SV Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh arriving at Cheam School with Prince Charles stepping out of car & being greeted. SV Boys from Cheam school watching. CU Prince Charles standing by the Queen. <br/> <br/>LV Sir Anthony Eden walking to his ship for health trip to New Zealand (after his resignation) (A young Edward 'Ted' Heath is behind them). SV Eden and Lady Clarissa Eden walk to gangway. GV Port Said, Egypt. SV Evacuation of British troops from Suez Canal Zone. Troops marching on to tank carrier. CU United Nations flag flying from stern of ship. GV Night, leaving Port Said. Statute of De Lesseps. GV Duchess of Kent being escorted to platform during Gold Coast / Ghana Independence Celebrations. LV Locals watching. GV Night. Cheering. LV Premiere Kwame Nkruma dancing on platform. GV Riots in Paris, France over Algeria - cars burning. CU Car burning. Petrol burning in road. SV Police rioting with civilians. LV Late Aga Khan being weighed in diamonds. SV Son Aly talking to Indian. GV Mosque. GV Muslims at prayer. SV New Aga Khan - Karim, son of Aly Khan. GV Russian troops crossing Red Square, Moscow. SV Russian leaders 1. to r. Zhukov, Bulganin, Khruschev, Malenkov, Molotov and two others. SV Russian troops parading. SV Zhukov on Yugoslavian aerodrome. <br/> <br/>SV Queen presenting Althea Gibson with trophy at Wimbledon Tennis tournament. SV Spectators applauding. SV Althea Gibson being kissed by Darlene Hard. SV Danish girl Greta Anderson treading wearily out of water and almost falls over after swimming English Channel. CU She tries to climb out on her hands and knees. SV Half collapsing she is held up by a man. GV Derek Ibbotson taking the lead in his record-breaking mile. GV Crowd applauding. CU Ibbotson. <br/> <br/>SV Stanley Matthews surrounded by people being crowned King of Soccer in Africa. CU Stanley looking worried. CU Pan CBE smiling Stanley at Buckingham Palace after receiving award. GV Crowds surging forward on golf course at Lindrick watching Ryder Cup. SV Dai Rees making winning putt the strikes ball in hole and shakes hands with American. GV Start of Motor racing Grand Prix at Monza, Italy. LV Cars come round bend. GV Cars come down straight. LV Car No 20 being pursued by Stirling Moss No 18. SV Crowd looking on. LV No. 18 car coming in, Moss wins, crowds round car. CU Moss & Katie Molson, he has laurel wreath round neck and she holds helmet. SV Moss & Katie after wedding, he kisses her. <br/> <br/>GV Fire raging in shop in London's Oxford Street, upper floors alight. SV Injured woman being carried towards ambulance. GV Fire leaping out of first floor window. GV Bus crashed against wall of bank. SV Firemen jacking back of bus up to release trapped people. SV Body on stretcher being taken away. SV Bus on pavement. GV Int. Mass congregation for enthronement of Dr William Godfrey as Archbishop of Westminster. GV Sailing ship Pamir putting to sea. VS Boys working on deck. GV Sun going behind cloud. VS of ship in heavy storm. GV Collapsed house, large hole in road. SV Badly damaged house. <br/> <br/>GV New York GV Boat carrying Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh coming across to United States of America (USA). GV Queen on deck surrounded by officials, ship 'Mayflower II' in dock. CU Person in Pilgrim costume standing on board. CU Queen smiling, man points. SV Sign 'Welcome to the City of New York'. GV Procession down Broadway. AS Ticker tape being thrown out of window. GV Queen's car going along. AS Tape thrown out of windows with Union Jacks & Stars & stripes being flown from balcony. SV Queen on top of Empire State Building. AV New York. <br/> <br/>GV White House, Washington DC, United States of America (USA). CU President Dwight D Eisenhower sitting at desk. <br/> <br/>GV Prime Minister Harold Macmillan & Prime Minister Felix Gaillard in France. <br/> <br/>GV Oil field. SV King of Morocco walking with Mr Bourguiba. <br/> <br/>GV Street riots in France, police waving batons. GV Paris - River Seine & Eiffel tower. <br/> <br/>GV Queen Elizabeth II's boat pulls away from bank of River Seine SV. President Rene Coty & Queen with Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh sitting on board. GV Dancing by side of river. GV People in period costumes & bonfires alight. GV Mass of fireworks going up. SV Queen, Coty & Duke smiling & chatting. <br/> <br/>(Neg.)
Last quarter Moon against a blue sky, South Africa
Close-up of wispy clouds passing the half Moon against a blue sky. This is a last quarter Moon, visible in the morning sky. Filmed from South Africa.
Week - Ahead - NATS
IMAGINE GOING 500-MILLION MILES BEFORE GETTING A TUNE-UP... IT'S TIME FOR A SERVICE CALL IN SPACE. AND... A WOMAN WHO SOME HAVE CREDITED WITH BLOWING THE WHISTLE ON ENRON WILL TESTIFY. THOSE STORIES AND MORE WITH A LOOK A THE WEEK AHEAD...
ECLIPSE
CUT STORY: MS ROW OF TENT WHERE PEOPLE CAME TO SEE ECLIPSE ARE STAYING. MS MAN MAKING PREPARATIONS FOR ECLIPSE WITH SOPHISTICATED LOOKING EQUIPMENT. MS MAN LOOKING AT SUN THROUGH CAMER W / LARGE LENS. VS KENYAN NATIVES WATCHING ECLIPSE THROUGH FILTERS (PIECES OF EXPOSED FILM) VS VISITING SCIENTISTS & KENYANS MINGLING IN TENT VILLAGE. MS SUN 3 / 4 ECLIPSED. SU BRANNIGAN ABOUT ECLIPSE. MS SUN AT START OF ECLIPSE (ONLY A SMALL PART BLOCKED OUT), THEN ABOUT 3 / 4 ECLIPSED, THEN TOTALLY ECLIPSED (VERY GOOD SHOTS) MORE OF VILLAGERS & TOURISTS. VO BRANNIGAN ABOUT ECLIPSE, PREPARATIONS BEFORE HAND AND SATISFACTION OF VISITORS AFTERWARD. END C.S. VS ON THE SHORE OF LAKE RUDOLPH, SCIENTISTS CAMPS, PEOPLE SITTING W / EQUIPMENT TO VIEW & RECORD ECLIPSE. SU BRANNIGAN VS VILLAGE OF GRASS HUTS W / LOCAL TRIBESMEN GOING THROUGH THEIR BUSINESS & SOME LOOKING AT SUN THROUGH FILTERS. VS VISITERS WATCHING ECLIPSE MORE OF VILLAGERS INCL. ROOSTERS GRAZING IN SHADE. VS TRIBESMAN LOOKING AT SUN THROUGH FILTERS. MS INTVW. W / AMER. ANTHROPOLOGIST CAROLE SCHERRER, ABOUT NATIVES' REACTIONS TO ECLIPSE & LARGE INFLUX OF EUROPEANS. VS NATIVE VILLAGE DURING ECLIPSE, DESERTED BECAUSE VILL- GERS ARE HIDING INSIDE THEIR HUTS. MORE GEN. VIEWS OF AREA & PEOPLE PREPARING TO VIEW ECLIPSE. VS TENT VILLAGE & TOURISTS W / CAMERAS. MORE OF NATIVE VILLAGE W / NO PEOPLE, CATTLE GRAZING OUTISDE HUTS. VS NATIVES WALKING AROUND IN VILLAGE. SU & VO BRANNIGAN. VS ECLIPSE-BEGINNING SUN GRADUALLY DISAPPEARING & TOTALLY BLOCKED OUT, THEN REAPPEARING (GOOD SHOTS) MORE OF OBSERVERS WATCHING ECLIPSE. CI: GEOGRAPHIC: KENYA, NAIROBI. BUILDINGS: TENTS. MANKIND: NATIONALITIES: AFRICAN. GEOLOGY: SUN. TRAVELING: TOURISTS. SCIENCE: ASTRONOMY: (ECLIPSE). GEOLOGY: SHORELINE NAIROBI, KENYA. APPARATUS: MISC. BUILDINGS: HUTS. ANIMALS: BIRDS, CHICKENS. PERSONALITIES: SCHERRER, CAROLE. BUILDINGS: VILLAGES (TENT).
DN-S-044 1 inch; DN-S-053 1 inch; AFP-135AN 16mm
EXPLORING THE UNIVERSE
Indianizer: Our music explores the connections between body and mind
Télérama
Father and son with telescope looking at sky from home
Father and son with telescope looking at sky from home
Tuskegee-trained home demonstration agent helps African American people in different fields
Home demonstration agent at Tuskegee Institute trains women as part of a Tuskegee Institute "Movable Schools" education outreach program. Collins, a farmer, meets a preacher. Two men with a poster from State Agriculture College. The poster advertises the upcoming arrival of a "Movable School" in the Alabama town. People read the poste and move to attend the school. Knapp truck (A Ford truck called the Knapp Agricultural Truck, so named to honor Seaman A. Knapp, of the national Cooperative Extension System) arrives with a group of instructors. Rural agricultural community of African American people learn skills from the movable school as they work in garden, water plants, erect stairs, mend houses, sharpen tools and make baskets. People learn carpentry under the guidance of an African American instructor. A new poultry house replaces an old hen house. A man views through a transit device as they learn about creating terraced farming plots. Location: Alabama United States USA. Date: 1921.
US LA AL Boeing School (CR)
Boeing partners with historically black university
1970s Space
narrator on camera - solar system - sun - sunset - solar flare - Stonehenge - Egyptian relief of the Sun God Ra - montage of art works depicting sun - tractor / harvester in field - devastated African landscape with dead cattle - graphic of solar system - constellations - astronomy - science
Nightscapade festival of astro-photography, in connection with the wildlife photography festival
Grand Est
Girls doing a presentation about the Solar System in the classroom
Girls doing a presentation about the Solar System in the classroom
Last quarter Moon against a blue sky, South Africa
Close-up of wispy clouds passing the half Moon against a blue sky. This is a last quarter Moon, visible in the morning sky. Filmed from South Africa.
ECLIPSE ADVANCER
ORIG. COLOR 1050 SOF / MAG. CUT STORY: VO BRANNIGAN ABOUT CONGREGATION OF PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD IN KENYA TO VIEW SOLAR ECLIPSE. SU BRANNIGAN. VS LOCAL VILLAGES AROUND THEIR GRASS HUTS. VS TOURISTS AT SWIMMING POOL. LS TENT VILLAGE WHERE MANY OF THE TOURISTS ARE STAYING W / LAKE RUDOLPH. IN BACKGROUND. VS TOURISTS' VILLAGE, ARRIVALS, SCIENTIFIC EQUIPMENT, PEOPLE SETTING UP APPARATUS. MORE OF KENYAN VILLAGERS. MS SCRAWNY COWS GRAZING. MS WOMEN AT GRASS HUTS. END C.S. VS INTVW. W / DR. KENNETY FRANKLIN OF NEW YORK'S HAYDEN MANETARIUM. HE TALKS ABOUT ECLIPSE AND SURPRISINGLY LARGE GROUP OF PEOPLE COMING TO AFRICA FOR A BETTER VIEW OF IT. RE- VERSALS ON BRANNIGAN FOR INTVW. MORE VS IN VILLAGE, PEOPLE WORKING ON HUTS, WOMEN IN NATIVE GARB. VS TOURISTS AROUND SWIMMING POOL AND LODGE WHERE MANY OF THEM ARE STAYING. MS AIRFIELD W / SMALL PLANES. MORE VS IN TOURIST TENT VILLAGE, PEOPLE ARRIVING, KENYANS BRINGING IN WATER, SUPPLIES (LAMPS, CHAIRS, ETC) PILED UP FOR TENTERS & GEN. ACTIVITIES. LS TENT VILLAGE W / LAKE RUDOLPH IN DISTANCE. VS SCIENTIFIC EQUIP. & PEOPLE SETTING UP TO STUDY ECLIPSE. MS LABELS OR EQUIP. UNIV. OF MASS. MS SMALL BIRD WALKING ALONG SHORE OF LAKE. PAN UP TO MS LAKE. SU BRANNIGAN. MORE IN GRASS HUT VILLAGE OF KENYAN TRIBESMAN INCL. LIVESTOCK GRAZING. VO BRANNIGAN. CI: GEOGRAPHIC: KENYA, NAIROBI. TRAVELING: TOURIST. ANIMALS: COWS. PERSONALITIES: FRANKLIN, KENNETH. MANKIND: NATIONALITIES: AFRICANS. SCIENCE: ASTRONOMY (ECLIPSE). BUILDINGS: VILLAGES (TENT). BUILDINGS: HUTS. BUILDINGS: TENTS. APPARATUS: MISC. ANIMALS: BIRD. GEOLOGY: SHORELINE NAIROBI, KENYA. BUILDINGS: POOLS. AVIATION: PLANES, MISC.
Africa At Night - Planet Earth Seen From Space (Highlighted)
Africa seen from space. High quality 3D rendered image, made from ultra high res 20k textures by NASA:
BARACK OBAMA REMARKS ON ASTRONOMY NIGHT AT THE WHITE HOUSE STIX
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA delivers remarks at the White House Astronomy Night. South Lawn. ABC UNI / STIX Remarks by President Barack Obama at the second White House Astronomy Night Subject: Space-Related Educational Activities to Help Promote the Importance of STEM Education Location: South Lawn, the White House, Washington, D.C. OBAMA: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Yay! (Applause.) Everybody, have a seat. Welcome to the White House. I love Astronomy Night. (Applause.) And we've got a very clear night to enjoy Astronomy Night. This is some of the most fun that I have on this job. They never let me tinker with the telescopes. They don't let me hold the moon rocks when you guys aren't around. Michelle is dying to know how they grow lettuce on the International Space Station. (Laughter.) But when you guys come, I get to have some fun. And we've got some space buffs here tonight. We have a number of members of Congress, including former astronaut, Senator Bill Nelson, from the great state of Florida. (Applause.) My science advisor, John Holdren, is here. Where is he? John -- there he is. (Applause.) See, John is a superstar in this crowd. (Laughter.) The head of NASA, Charlie Bolden -- (applause) -- along with 11 of his fellow astronauts. Mae Jameson, the first African-American woman in space is here. (Applause.) We've got Bill Nye the Science Guy. (Applause.) We've got the Mythbusters in the house. (Applause.) But the most important thing we have here, in addition to this guy, is the young people who are here. (Applause.) Young people from across the country who are already focused on some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. And I'm going to begin with a quick story. A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away-- (laughter) -- actually, it was in Brooklyn -- a 14-year-old asked his parents, "What are the stars?" His parents replied, "They're lights in the sky, kid." The answer did not satisfy that young man, so he set out to answer his endless questions about the stars and the planets and possibilities of extraterrestrial life. And Carl Sagan grew up to become an astronomer who enlarged this country's imagination and sense of wonder about the depths of outer space. We've got some young Americans here tonight with that same kind of adventurous spirit. When Pranav Sivakumar was six years old, he found an encyclopedia about famous scientists lying around the house. At least he thinks it was lying around there. Actually, his parents probably were setting it out -- (laughter) -- hoping he was going to run into it. And he's been fascinated with outer space ever since. For years, every Saturday morning, his parents drove him an hour to an astrophysics lab for "Ask-A-Scientist" class. And before long, he teamed up with researchers he met there to study the "gravitational lensing of quasars." That is not what I was thinking about at his age. Pranav was a global finalist in the Google Science Fair -- not once, but twice. So you know he's going to do some important things. Give him a big round of applause. (Applause.) With the help from their coaches, the RCS Rocketry Champions of Russellville, Alabama -- where are you? You're back there. There you go. Stand up, guys. (Applause.) They built a rocket that flies eggs -- well, at least one egg -- nearly one thousand feet into the air, and returns to the earth, unbroken, in under a minute. They beat hundreds of other teams to take first place in the America and International Rocketry Challenges. We are very proud of you gentlemen, and ladies. Great job. (Applause.) From the time she was young, Phoebe Kinzelman spent nights like tonight on her grandfather's driveway, staring at the stars through his telescope. She spent a summer at Space Camp at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and her dream is to become an astronaut. I think she speaks for many of us when she says that one of her favorite Instagram accounts is Scott Kelly's. "Space is this humbling thing," Phoebe says, "you can't get too eager to rule the entire universe." But Phoebe is on her way. Where's Phoebe? Stand up, Phoebe, so everybody can you give you a big round of applause. (Applause.) And where's Pranav? Because I was talking about him, and I didn't -- there you go. Give Pranav a big round of applause. (Applause.) So these are examples of the extraordinary young people that we have here today. Phoebe has given pretty wise advice for a 17-year-old. Young people like Phoebe should encourage all of us to help our young people set their sights as high as they want. We need teachers to light a spark of curiosity in young minds. And we've got some outstanding teachers here today. We need parents to leave encyclopedias of famous scientists lying around the house, or help turn a bedroom into an ideas laboratory. We need to inspire more young people to ask about the stars, and begin that lifetime quest to become the next great scientist, or inventor, or engineer, or astronaut. And we have to watch for, and cultivate, and encourage those glimmers of curiosity and possibility, and not suppress them, not squelch them -- because not only are the young people's futures at stake, but our own is at stake. That's one of the reasons that my administration has worked so hard to encourage kids to enter STEM fields, especially young women who are too often under-represented in these fields. (Applause.) We are halfway to my goal of training 100,000 new STEM teachers by the end of the decade. We're on track to connect 99 percent of our students to high-speed Internet before the end of the decade. And over the past six years, our "Educate to Innovate" campaign has raised $1 billion to support STEM programs nationwide, including 80 other Astronomy Nights happening right now, all across the country. So tonight, I'm proud to announce new commitments, by cities and organizations all over the country, to expose even more students and their parents to STEM education. Bayer is launching a national effort to help 100,000 American parents and children work on science and engineering projects together. More than 300 foundations, museums, libraries and schools across the country are partnering to bring hands-on science programming to students who don't have it. Eight observatories in Hawaii will offer all of the residents of that state free, guided tours. They didn't do that when I was in high school. (Laughter.) Wish we had thought that up earlier. But these are just a few examples of the work that's being done all across the country. And I hope that more are going to follow the leads of these outstanding organizations, because that's how we're going to make sure our next generation of explorers take us even farther than we're going today. A few hours ago, I got a chance to talk to the astronauts up on the International Space Station, where Scott Kelly is living for an entire year. Last month, NASA found water flowing on Mars. Earlier this year, we mapped Pluto in high-resolution. In recent years, we've discovered the first Earth-sized planet orbiting a star in a distant galaxy. And we've even slipped the outermost grasp of our solar system with Voyager 1 -- the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. In 2017, with the help of American space companies, our astronauts will once again launch to space directly from American soil. And today, NASA is developing the capabilities to send humans to Mars in the 2030s. (Applause.) That means that some of the young people who are here tonight might be working on that project. Some of you might be on your way to mars. America can do anything. We just got to keep on encouraging every new generation to explore, and invent, and create, and discover. We got to keep encouraging some young kid in Brooklyn, or a budding rocket scientist in Alabama, or that young girl who's dreaming to become an astronaut. Because as long as young people, like so many of you who are here tonight, keep seeking answers to the great questions, America can do anything. Which is why I'm so excited to have you all tonight. You make me feel hopeful about our future. Because I know that you're not satisfied with being home to the last great discovery -- you want to be home to the next great discovery. And when I look out in the faces of these young people, I am absolutely confident that there are new frontiers that we're going to be busting through in my lifetime and beyond. So thank you for that. You make me excited and you make me inspired. (Applause.) So enough talk. Let's have some fun with this telescope. It looks pretty big. My understanding is, is that we've got another young lady, Sofy. We need you to come up here and help me with this telescope, because I don't know what I'm doing. (Laughter.) Where are you? Where are you? Save me. Here we go. Okay. I don't want to break it. How are you? I'm very proud of you. Let's grab a mic here. All right, introduce yourself. MS. ALVAREZ: Hello, I'm Sofy Alvarez, and I'm a student at Brooklyn International High School, and I'm from Paraguay. OBAMA: Well, it's great to see you, Sofy. So what are we going to do with this big telescope here? MS. ALVAREZ: Well, we're going to see the moon. OBAMA: Well, let's do that. I see it there, but you think I'm going to get a better view through this big telescope? MS. ALVAREZ: Probably. OBAMA: You think so? MS. ALVAREZ: Yeah. OBAMA: Okay. So, is it already set up for me? MS. ALVAREZ: Oh, yeah. So I just wanted to tell you more about it and how it works. OBAMA: Please do. MS. ALVAREZ: So this is a reflecting telescope, so it has three parts. There are two mirrors, and one of them right now is capturing the light of the moon. And then the other mirror is just making it focus. And there is an eye-piece lens, which right now is making it -- magnifying the image of the moon. And that's how you're going to be able to see the moon, like it's right in front of you. So do you want to try? OBAMA: Should I just go ahead and try it? MS. ALVAREZ: Yes. OBAMA: Okay. Does it matter which eye? MS. ALVAREZ: The one you see the best with. OBAMA: I'm teasing. (Laughter.) All right. Wow. MS. ALVAREZ: So right now what you're seeing, they're the black smooth parts, the dark smooth parts. They're called "marias" -- "maria" or "seas." And they're lava flows, and they're on the craters. They're the result of heavy bombardments with other gigantic space stuff with the moon. OBAMA: Is "space stuff" a scientific term? (Laughter.) MS. ALVAREZ: Yes, I think so. (Laughter.) OBAMA: Can I just say -- this looks spectacular. MS. ALVAREZ: It does. OBAMA: You guys are going to get a chance to see through this. But as good as it looks out there, it sure looks better here. Now, the interesting thing is, the image is inverted. MS. ALVAREZ: It is? OBAMA: Yes, it is. (Laughter.) See, if you look up, the right side -- my right side -- is lit up. But if you look through the telescope, it's the left side that's lit up. MS. ALVAREZ: Well, it has a mirror. It's a reflecting lens. So is it that -- OBAMA: I was trying to make a point -- (laughter) -- MS. ALVAREZ: Yes, yes. OBAMA: -- about optics. (Laughter.) Well, this is spectacular. So, Sofy, what year are you in school? MS. ALVAREZ: I'm sorry? OBAMA: What year are you in school? What grade? MS. ALVAREZ: I'm a senior in high school. OBAMA: You're a senior? MS. ALVAREZ: Yeah. OBAMA: So what do you want to do next year? MS. ALVAREZ: Well, I want to follow photography. I'm also interested in Korean studies. And I also like astronomy, so I want to do something with those three, if possible. OBAMA: Wow. MS. ALVAREZ: If possible. OBAMA: Anything is possible with you. You're a spectacular young lady. Give Sofy a big round of applause. (Applause.) MS. ALVAREZ: Thank you. OBAMA: All right, everybody, we are setting you loose. We've got some incredible exhibits all over the place -- not just this telescope, but I know that we've got a mini planetarium and virtual reality, and real reality. (Laughter.) So there's all kinds of good stuff. I hope you guys have a wonderful time tonight. And I hope that all of you are inspired the way I am by science and by space. Thank you, everybody. (Applause.)
Last quarter Moon against a blue sky, South Africa
Close-up of wispy clouds passing the half Moon against a blue sky. This is a last quarter Moon, visible in the morning sky. Filmed from South Africa.
19 20 National edition: [issue of July 23, 2015]
FR3 / France 3
Chronicle An Eye on the Border with Valérie Odile
Grand Est
Clouds passing half Moon, South Africa
Clouds passing in front of a half Moon. Filmed from South Africa.
Earth from Space Night Realistic Blue Shining Country Brazil
Earth from Space Night Realistic Blue Shining Country Brazil
US Space Tourist - Private company prepares to launch another space tourist
NAME: US SPACE 290304N TAPE: EF04/0355 IN_TIME: 10:34:08:03 DURATION: 00:02:11:24 SOURCES: APTN/VNR DATELINE: New York - 29 March 2004 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: APTN 1. Wide shot press briefing room 2. Close up sign "Space Adventures" 3. Wide shot briefing 4. Medium shot Space Adventures CEO Eric Anderson introduces next space tourist, Gregory Olsen, Olsen to podium 5. Wide shot reporter asking question 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gregory Olsen, next space tourist: "The sheer thrill of going into space, the scientific, I mean I''ve spent all my life with science and engineering, all my adult life, and finally the educational part, which is very important to me." VNR - from Space Adventures, dates and locations unknown ??? 7. Mid shot Olsen in front of space capsule 8. Mid shot launch of Russian rocket APTN 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gregory Olsen, next space tourist: "Probably learning Russian is the biggest fear I have right now." 10. Wide shot briefing 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eric Anderson, CEO, Space Adventures: "I see what he''s doing and what others can do to follow him as an investment rather than a cost. And I think many people will see that. Certainly many of the people with whom we''ve been in contact see it that way as well, and I think for these next three seats, as we announce those people over the coming months, you''re going to see some very interesting projects." VNR - from Space Adventures, dates and locations unknown ??? 12. Still image of International Space Station 13. Wide shot people in zero gravity in airplane (not in space) STORYLINE: The next civilian to be rocketed into orbit at his own expense won''t just be enjoying the ride: Gregory Olsen, a scientist who made a fortune with optics inventions, plans to do some research during his 20 (m) million US dollar trip to the International Space Station. Olsen, the founder of Sensors Unlimited Inc. in Princeton, N.J., has hired the company that brokered the first space tourist trip, millionaire Dennis Tito''s flight aboard a Russian spacecraft in 2001. The 58-year-old Olsen told The Associated Press he plans to bring along infrared sensors, which detect varying levels of heat, to analyse pollution in the Earth''s atmosphere and the health of agricultural systems on the ground. At a news conference Monday, he also said he wants to take the camera and "turn it around to look at the heavens and do infrared astronomy." Olsen also hopes the weightlessness of space will help him grow better versions of special crystals used in infrared sensors and other high-tech applications, though he hasn''t finalised these plans. He plans to publish his findings in scientific journals. The entrepreneur said he has no worries for his safety, even with memories of the 2003 space shuttle Columbia disaster fresh in his mind. Olsen, who is divorced and single with a house in Princeton and a condo in the Time Warner Center in Manhattan, said his two grown daughters are supportive of the mission. He leaves for Star City, Russia, this week to begin six months of training for his flight aboard the Soyuz to the ISS. The eight-day voyage is scheduled for April 2005, but there''s a chance he could go this October. The trip''s 20 (m) million dollar price is what Tito paid in 2001 and South African Mark Shuttleworth paid in 2002 for strictly tourist trips. Eric Anderson, chief executive of Space Adventures, of Arlington, Va., would not elaborate on his company''s financial arrangement with the Russian government. Space Adventures hopes to eventually send two tourists aboard a Soyuz flight flown by a Russian cosmonaut. That would mean there would be no room to bring a cosmonaut or astronaut home from the ISS on the return flight, so someone''s ISS mission would be extended from six months to one year.
Girls doing a presentation about the Solar System in the classroom
Girls doing a presentation about the Solar System in the classroom
WHITE HOUSE MEDAL OF SCIENCE AWARDS - STIX
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA awards the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation East Room. stix Obama awards Nat'l Medals of Science, Tech, Innovation - WH East Room DC Slugs: 1430 WH OBAMA MEDAL CEREMONY STIX FS39 76 & 1430 WH OBAMA CEREMONY CUTS FS33 73 AR: 16x9 NYFS: WASH3 (4523/5593) / WASH4 (4524/5594) 14:45:20 OBAMA: Thank you so much. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you, everybody. Please have a seat. Welcome to the White House. Today, I have the privilege to present our nation's highest honor for scientific and technological achievement -- the National Medals of Science, and the National Medals of Technology and Innovation. The amount of brainpower in this room right now is astonishing. (Laughter.) But when you talk to these brilliant men and women, it's clear the honor has not yet gone to their heads. They still put their lab coats [on] one arm at a time. (Laughter.) Joining us to celebrate these achievements are members of Congress; Secretary of Energy Ernie Moniz -- a pretty good scientist himself -- my Science Advisor, John Holdren; the Director of the National Science Foundation, France Cordova; the Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Michelle Lee; and Jim Rathmann from the National Medals of Science and Technology Foundation. I want to thank them for all the work that they do each year to help us organize and honor the scientists and innovators in this great nation of ours. Now, we are engaging in a lot of science and tinkering here at the White House. We've got Astronomy Night. We got Hack-a-thons. We got Code-a-thons. We have Science Fairs, Maker Faires. It is fun. I love this stuff. I get to test out some of the cool stuff that ends up here in the White House. 14:47:05 At this year's Science Fair, one nine- year-old, named Jacob Leggette, turned the tables on me and suggested that we needed to start a kids' advisory group -- (laughter) -- so that young people can help us understand what's interesting to them when it comes to STEM education, which I thought was a pretty good idea. (Laughter.) So, today, I can announce that we are launching a "Kid Science Advisors" campaign for young scientists and innovators to send in their suggestions for what we should be doing to support science and technology, and inspire the next generation of scientists and innovators. So those young people out there who are listening, go to our website -- we're going to be looking for some advisors, some advice. (Laughter.) The real reason we do this, as I've said before, is to teach our young people that it's not just the winner of the Super Bowl or the NCAA tournament that deserves a celebration; that we want the winners of science fairs, we want those who have invented the products and lifesaving medicines and are engineering our future to be celebrated as well. 14:48:22 Because immersing young people in science, math, engineering -- that's what's going to carry the American spirit of innovation through the 21st century and beyond. That's what the honorees who are here today represent. Many of them came from humble or ordinary beginnings, but along the way, someone or something sparked their curiosity. Someone bought them their first computer. Someone introduced them to a lab. A child in their lives needed specialized medical help. And because they lived in an America that fosters curiosity, and invests in education, and values science as important to our progress, they were able to find their calling and do extraordinary things. So there are few better examples for our young people to follow than the Americans that we honor today. Just to take a couple of examples: Shirley Ann Jackson, who is part of my science advisory group, grew up right here in Washington, D.C. Hers was a quiet childhood. Her first homemade experiment involved, I understand, collecting and cataloging bumblebees in her backyard. (Laughter.) Two events happened that would not only change our country's course, but Shirley's. In Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court handed down a landmark decision that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal, and the Soviets launched Sputnik up in the sky, sparking a space race. As Shirley put it, "Those two events in history changed my life for good." She went on to become the first African American to earn a doctorate in physics from MIT, the second woman to do so anywhere in America. And over the years, Dr. Jackson has revolutionized the way science informs public policy from rethinking safety at our nuclear plants to training a new generation of scientists and engineers that looks more like the diverse and inclusive America she loves. Then you have Mark Humayan, who immigrated to the United States with his family when he was nine years old. When his diabetic grandmother lost her vision, he began studying to become an ophthalmologist, hoping he could save the sight of others. Mark helped create the "Argus II," a "bionic eye" that has restored vision to patients who've been blind for up to 50 years. He says the moment when he witnessed someone seeing light and shapes, someone experiencing the miracle of sight for the first time in decades -- those moments have been some of the happiest and most rewarding of his professional career. In his words -- and I think no pun is intended -- "There wasn't a dry eye in the operating room." (Laughter.) Growing up in Chicago, Mary-Claire King's dad would sit with her in front of the TV for Cubs and White Sox games -- (laughter) -- and make up story problems for her to solve about the players on the field. She just thought that's how everyone watched baseball -- which explains why, when a college advisor encouraged her to take a genetics course, she said, "I couldn't believe anything could be so fun." But every single American should be grateful for Mary-Claire King's path. We're glad that she thought it was fun because. at a time when most scientists believed that cancer was caused by viruses, she relentlessly pursued her hunch that certain cancers were linked to inherited genetic mutations. This self-described "stubborn" scientist kept going until she proved herself right. Seventeen years of work later, Mary-Claire discovered a single gene that predisposes women to breast cancer. And that discovery has empowered women and their doctors with science to better understand the choices that they make when it comes to their health and their future. 14:52:39 So these are just three examples of the remarkable stories that are represented here today. They illustrate why this is such an extraordinary moment to be a scientist in this country. America's progress in science and technology has countless revolutionary discoveries within our reach. New materials designed atom by atom. New forms of clean energy. New breakthroughs in treating cancer and ending the wait for organ transplants. Private space flights, a planned human mission to Mars, a NASA probe that broke free from the Solar System three years ago and just kept on going. That's some of what America can do. That's why we're constantly pushing Congress to fund the work of our scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs and dreamers to keep America on the cutting-edge. As President, I'm proud to honor each of you for your contributions to our nations. As an American, I'm proud of everything that you've done to contribute to that fearless spirit of innovation that's made us who we are, and that doesn't just benefit our citizens but benefits the world. We're very proud of what you've done. So congratulations to all of you. 14:53:59 With that, let's read the citations and present the awards. (Applause.) MILITARY AIDE: National Medals of Science. Armand Paul Alivisatos. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Armand Paul Alivisatos, University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, California. For his foundational contributions to the field of nanoscience, for the development of nanocrystals as a building block of nanotechnologies, and for his leadership in the nanoscience community. (Applause.) Michael Artin. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Michael Artin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Massachusetts. For his leadership in modern algebraic geometry, including three major bodies of work: Etale cohomology, algebraic approximation of formal solutions of equations, and non-commutative algebraic geometry. (Applause.) Albert Bandura. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Albert Bandura, Stanford University, California. For fundamental advances in the understanding of social learning mechanisms and self-referent thinking processes in motivation and behavior change, and for the development of social cognitive theory of human action and psychological development. (Applause.) Stanley Falkow. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Stanley Falkow, Stanford University School of Medicine, California. For his monumental contributions toward understanding how microbes cause disease and resist the effects of antibiotics, and for his inspiring mentorship that create the field of molecular microbial pathogenesis. (Applause.) Shirley Ann Jackson. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Shirley Ann Jackson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York. For her insightful work in condensed matter physics and particle physics, for her science-rooted public policy achievements, and for her inspiration to the next generation of professionals in the science, technology, engineering, and math fields. (Applause.) Rakesh K. Jain. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Rakesh K. Jain, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts. For pioneering research at the interface of engineering and oncology, including tumor microenvironment, drug delivery and imaging, and for groundbreaking discoveries of principles leading to the development and novel use of drugs for treatment of cancer and non-cancerous diseases. (Applause.) Mary-Claire King. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Mary-Claire King, University of Washington, Washington. For pioneering contributions to human genetics, including discovery of the BRCA1 susceptibility gene for breast cancer; and for development of genetic methods to match "disappeared" victims of human rights abuses with their families. (Applause.) Simon Asher Levin. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Simon Asher Levin, Princeton, New Jersey. For international leadership in environmental science, straddling ecology and applied mathematics, to promote conservation; for his impact on a generation of environmental scientists; and for his critical contributions to ecology, environmental economics, epidemiology, applied mathematics, and evolution. (Applause.) Geraldine Richmond. (Applause.) National Medal of Science to Geraldine Richmond, University of Oregon, Oregon. For her landmark discoveries of the molecular characteristics of water surfaces; for her creative demonstration of how her findings impact many key biological, environmental, chemical and technological processes; and for her extraordinary efforts in the United States and around the globe to promote women in science. (Applause.) National Medals of Technology and Innovation. Joseph N. DeSimone. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Joseph N. DeSimone, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Carbon 3D, California. For pioneering innovations in material science that led to the development of technologies in diverse fields from manufacturing to medicine, and for innovative and inclusive leadership in higher education and entrepreneurship. (Applause.) Robert E. Fischell. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland at College Park, Maryland. For invention of novel medical devices used in the treatment of many illnesses thereby improving the health and saving the lives of millions of patients around the world. (Applause.) Arthur Gossard. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Arthur Gossard, University of California, Santa Barbara, California. For innovation, development, and application of artificially structured quantum materials critical to ultrahigh performance semiconductor device technology used in today's digital infrastructure. (Applause.) Nancy Ho. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Nancy Ho, Green Tech America, Incorporated and Purdue University, Indiana. For the development of a yeast-based technology that is able to co-ferment sugars extracted from plants to produce ethanol, and for optimizing this technology for large-scale and cost- effective production of renewable biofuels and industrial chemicals. (Applause.) Chenming Hu. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Chenming Hu, University of California, Berkeley, California. For pioneering innovations in microelectronics including reliability technologies, the first industry-standard model for circuit design, and the first 3-dimensional transistors, which radically advanced semiconductor technology. (Applause.) Mark Humayun. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Mark Humayun, University of Southern California, California. For the invention, development, and application of bioelectronics in medicine, including a retinal prosthesis for restoring vision to the blind, thereby significantly improving patients' quality of life. (Applause.) Cato T. Laurencin. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Cato T. Laurencin, University of Connecticut, Connecticut. For seminal work in the engineering of musculoskeletal tissues, especially for revolutionizing achievements in the design of bone matrices and ligament regeneration; and for extraordinary work in promoting diversity and excellence in science. (Applause.) Jonathan Marc Rothberg. (Applause.) National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Jonathan Marc Rothberg, 4catalyzer Corporation and Yale School of Medicine, Connecticut. For pioneering inventions and commercialization of next generation DNA sequencing technologies, making access to genomic information easier, faster, and more cost-effective for researchers around the world. (Applause.) 15:08:25 OBAMA: Let's give another big round of applause to our honorees. (Applause.) Yay! Very proud of you. (Applause.) And let's give a big round of applause to my military aide, who had to read those citations -- (laughter) -- with a lot of pretty complicated phrases in them. (Applause.) You were practicing, weren't you? (Laughter.) Well, it just goes to show we can all learn science. (Laughter.) 15:09:09 Science rocks. (Applause.) Thank you very much, everybody. Please enjoy the reception. Congratulations to our honorees. Have a wonderful afternoon. Thank you very much, everybody. (Applause.) END