DN-ZLB-024 Beta SP
PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS
Asian Woman relaxing at Sofa
Relaxation,Women,Sofa,One Woman Only,Tranquility,Living Room,Resting, Asian Woman relaxing at Sofa , Shoot format on 4K 4:2:2 10bit All-i
CELEBRITIES
Sound Bite: Derek Mears You know the hardest through in the scene it was cut down when we shot it was much longer uh Travis Van Winkle there’s a scene, not to go into details about it but I’m holding Travis uh Travis and I’m just muscling him and Travis is about, I’m 230 and he’s about 180 or so and I’m holding him the air and as were shooting Marcus is never yelling cut, shake him more, lift him higher into the air, no no no, find the lens and I’m sitting there and the whole time why this is happening its not like you just have a barbell that weighs that much that would be so easy as I’m doing this Travis is struggling the same time so everythings moving and I’m trying to balance and we’re like going so many minutes like I took five minutes another shot and were both like (breathing) and Travis is like mumbling “is he still rolling, are we still fighting?” “yeah we’re still fighting” “Ok keep fighting”. Uh and then after that you know cut ok lets do another take. Can I breath a little bit? Unbelievable.
BREATH - RITE (04/13/1995)
THE INVENTION OF A ST. PAUL MAN IS SKYROCKETING INTO THE BIG LEAGUES. THE COMPANY THAT MAKES "BREATHE RIGHT" NASAL STRIPS ESTIMATES SALES FOR THE FIRST QUARTER OF THISYEAR WILL TOP EIGHT MILLION DOLLARS. REPORTER ANGELA DAVIS TELLS US WHAT'S BOOSTING THIS BUSINESS.
A PEN AND INKLING - BOBBY BUMPS FIGHT
Animation featuring the cartoon character Bobby Bumps. A Bray Studio production. <br/> <br/>A heavy "bruiser" type walks into the picture. He wears a black cap and looks muscle bound. He sees a brick lying on the ground. He spits on it and it cracks in two. He then looks at a flower and it withers and dies. Bobby's dog Fido comes running along chasing a butterfly. He runs in between the baddy's legs. The baddy grabs him by the foot and lifts him into the air. The baddy then kicks him out of the picture. Fido goes flying then knocks Bobby Bumps over. Bobby gets annoyed and goes over to the bruiser and says: "What do you mean by kicking my dog?" The baddy blows smoke in Bobby's eyes. Bobby breathes out smoke. He throws down his cap and puts his dukes up. The bruiser picks him up and throws him. Bobby lands on top of Fido. <br/> <br/>"Fido - I'm going to start training for that bully." says Bobby. Fido does a cartwheel. "Training" Bobby hits a punch bag in a gym whilst Fido watches. Fido brings a mattress into the room so that Bobby has something soft to fall on. A cat comes along. Fido looks cross and says: "Private! Keep Out!" The cat socks the dog on the jaw. Fido says: "I'm gonna train for that cat!" <br/> <br/>Fido stands on the mattress and hits the punch ball. Fido hits the ball hard and it bounces back and hits him in the face. He punches the air. He jumps up on top of the punch ball stand and then kicks the ball with his back legs. He then sees Bobby who is lifting a large dumbbell. Fido puts his paws up and Bobby hands him the dumbbell. The sweat pours off Fido's head then suddenly he sinks through the floor, the dumbbell crashing through the floorboards. "The big fight." Bobby and Fido walk towards the bruiser. Bobby and the Bruiser have a fight. Bobby (of course) gets the better of him. It is pretty violent. After a few left hooks whilst he is flat on the ground the bruiser says "Enuff!" and Bobby stands victorious with his foot on top of the bruiser's head. Fido gets an idea - the cat! <br/> <br/>Fido runs off. He jumps through a window into a room where the cat lies sleeping. He lands on the cat and the cat's fur bristles and it arches its back. The two begin to fight (violent stuff). The cat seems to get the better of Fido, but when the cat goes into the gym and begins licking its paws, Fido grabs its tail and pulls it up through a hole in the board to which the punch ball was previously attached. Fido ties a knot in the cat's tail so that it can't get away then jumps down and begins hitting it like a replacement punch ball. The cat eventually says "Enuff!" <br/> <br/>A little mouse sitting on the mattress signs the name of the cartoonist "Earl Hurd". <br/> <br/>Safety print only.
THE HOLLIES PERFORM THE AIR THAT I BREATHE
9:18:58:20-9:23:10:08 maCOLOR w/STEREO AUDIO The Hollies give a romantic performance of their classic song, The Air That I Breathe in front of a live audience. Beautifully lit multicamera shoot from a network special on a colorful set designed to look like a jukebox.
US Reeve - New implant helps actor's breathing
TAPE: EF03/0231 IN_TIME: 04:32:56 DURATION: 1:44 SOURCES: ABC RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Cleveland, 13 March 2003 SHOTLIST: 1. Aerial of University Hospitals of Cleveland 2. STILL of surgery and doctors 3. STILL push in on doctor 4. Device that was implanted in Reeve 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Reeve, actor: "And we turned off the ventilator, and they were standing around in case I needed help. But we were totally quiet in the room and all you can hear was my breathing from my nose. Regular, rhythmic breathing from my nose, for the first time in nearly eight years. I hadn't heard that sound since May of 1995. It meant a tremendous amount." 6. STILL of Reeve's surgery 7. Doctor shows electrode used on Reeve 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Reeve, actor: "It was a very exciting moment. Also one that needs to be put in perspective, in terms of what rehabilitation really is, which is a process. It takes discipline and it takes time. And it also takes a tremendous support team." 9. ANIMATION showing how the device helps Reeve breathe. STORYLINE The actor Christopher Reeve, who's been paralysed and on a respirator since breaking his neck in a riding accident eight years ago, has undergone an experimental procedure which is allowing him to breathe on his own. Since his accident, Christopher Reeve, who is best know for his film role as Superman, has been dependant on a respirator funnelling air into his throat via a tube. Now doctors threaded tiny electrodes into Reeve's diaphragm connecting them to a battery powered pacemaker. Every few seconds, an electrical pulse contracts his diaphragm which inflates his lungs. For now, Reeve can only use the new device for about 15 minutes at a time, but doctors say he might be able to breath permanently on his own in two to three months. Reeve underwent the surgery at University Hospitals of Cleveland, where a team, led by surgeon Raymond Ungers and Dr. Anthony DeMarco implanted the device. It was developed in partnership with biomedical engineers at Case Western Reserve University.
LET'S GO BATHING
Full titles read: "'Let's go bathing! (A novel Parade organised to help the Middlesex Hospital re-building fund)'. (new title) '"Summer is acumen in", as the poet says - (and weather permitting.)'. <br/>Panning shots across an open-air lido / swimming pool and across a crowded beach - locations unknown. <br/> <br/>Intertitle reads: 'But, what are you going to wear when you go down to the briny? Cicely Courtneidge, Nelson Keys, Mercia Swinburne, Ruby Miller, & Evelyn Laye... (with other famous Stage Folk) give us their ideas on the matter.' <br/> <br/>Elstree, London. <br/> <br/>In a studio we see Cicely Courtneidge in old-fashioned bathing costume complete with bloomers and cap, knitting as she sits in a deck chair on the 'beach'. Nelson Keys sits in the sand beside her; she asks if he is going in the water? He looks at her bloomer-covered legs and he lights a match for his cigarette on the foot of another man on the beach. The man says "Oi!"; Nelson says "Oh, I'm sorry, cock!". <br/> <br/>C/U of a sign reading 'Screen & Stage Stars Beach Parade'. A small crowd of women is gathered at a tent on another part of the studio 'beach'; we see several beautiful women come out of the tent and show off their fashionable beachwear. Among them are Mercia Swinburne, Ruby Miller and Evelyn Laye. Cicely starts to feel a bit dowdy in her swim wear, tries to adjust her swimsuit to look more fashionable then walks off. Nelson makes eyes at some of the models, but is snubbed by all except Evelyn Laye, who gives him a come hither look. Nelson joins the girls on a sort of float, supposedly on the sea and jumps in with a brunette beauty. C/U of a water-soaked Cicely as she calls "George! I thought you weren't going in the water today!" <br/> <br/>Cut to blank screen; a voice off-camera introduces Evelyn Laye to say a few words to us. C/U of Evelyn, who, saying she has forgotten what she was going to say and then getting some of her words around the wrong way tells us that this little film has been designed to show us some of the smart beach suits being made this year, to help British Cotton goods and to help with the rebuilding of the Middlesex Hospital. She breathes a sigh of relief. Soundtrack cuts out but we see her mouth "Thank you". <br/> <br/>(Followed by Pathetone main titles - on tape sleeve as separate item 1026.7.)
CELEBRITIES
JOE: TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT PAPOOSE. DAVE: PAPOOSE WAS A NATURAL. GREAT GUITAR PLAYER. I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE THERE VERY YOUNG, GREAT IDEAS. JUST ONE OF THOSE THINGS. WELL WE'RE TALKING ABOUT PAPOOSE, WAS VERY VERY GREAT. THE GREAT SMOKEY JOHNSON, ANOTHER DRUMMER. KEEP ON TALKING ABOUT THE GREATNESS. ALMOST EVERYBODY FROM MY BAND, WE DON'T HAVE ENOUGH TAPE FOR ME TO TELL YOU ABOUT ALL THE GREAT MUSICIANS TOGETHER. NEW ORLEANS IS A BREATHING PLACE. ONCE THEY COME HERE, THEY FIND OUT WHAT ACTUALLY GOING ON IN THE WORLD. AND ONCE YOU START PLAYING THE MUSIC, THE NEW ORLEANS MUSICIANS, ITS SOMETHING NEW ORLEANS HAD THAT NOBODY ELSE HAD. TOGETHERNESS BECAUSE I THINK THAT LATTER ON LOUIE ARMSTRONG AND ALL OF THOSE PEOPLE GAVE US THE BLUES IN THE AIR SOMEWHERE AND THE AIR COMES DOWN ON NEW ORLEANS.
Battling - Bad - Breath (natsound version)
BATTLING BAD BREATH IS BIG BUSINESS, BUT WHAT REALLY WORKS?
Entertainment: US Reeve - New implant helps actor's breathing
TAPE: EF03/0232 IN_TIME: 06:55:44 DURATION: 1:44 SOURCES: ABC RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Cleveland, 13 March 2003 SHOTLIST: 1. Aerial of University Hospitals of Cleveland 2. STILL of surgery and doctors 3. STILL push in on doctor 4. Device that was implanted in Reeve 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Reeve: "And we turned off the ventilator, and they were standing around in case I needed help. But we were totally quiet in the room and all you can hear was my breathing from my nose. Regular, rhythmic breathing from my nose, for the first time in nearly eight years. I hadn't heard that sound since May of 1995. It meant a tremendous amount." 6. STILL of Reeve's surgery 7. Doctor shows electrode used on Reeve 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Reeve: "It was a very exciting moment. Also one that needs to be put in perspective, in terms of what rehabilitation really is, which is a process. It takes discipline and it takes time. And it also takes a tremendous support team." 9. ANIMATION showing how the device helps Reeve breathe. DOCTORS OPERATE ON REEVE'S DIAPHRAGM The actor Christopher Reeve, who's been paralysed and on a respirator since breaking his neck in a riding accident eight years ago, has undergone an experimental procedure which is allowing him to breathe on his own. Since his accident, Christopher Reeve, who is best know for his film role as 'Superman,' has been dependent on a respirator funnelling air into his throat via a tube. Now doctors threaded tiny electrodes into Reeve's diaphragm connecting them to a battery powered pacemaker. Every few seconds, an electrical pulse contracts his diaphragm which inflates his lungs. For now, Reeve can only use the new device for about 15 minutes at a time, but doctors say he might be able to breath permanently on his own in two to three months. Reeve underwent the surgery at University Hospitals of Cleveland, where a team, led by surgeon Raymond Ungers and Dr. Anthony DeMarco implanted the device. It was developed in partnership with biomedical engineers at Case Western Reserve University.
Thinking, night and woman at the beach in Brazil for travel feeling calm, peace and on an outdoor vacation. Dream, inspiration and young person at the sea or ocean for self love or healing in nature
Thinking, night and woman at the beach in Brazil for travel feeling calm, peace and on an outdoor vacation. Dream, inspiration and young person at the sea or ocean for self love or healing in nature
PA-0183 Beta SP
Angry Boy
US Diver - Diver sets record by holding breath underwater for 15 minutes
NAME: US DIVER 20070809I TAPE: EF07/0948 IN_TIME: 10:53:45:09 DURATION: 00:02:05:22 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: New York - 9 Aug 2007 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Zoom in Tom Sietas starting world record attempt for longest underwater breath hold 2. Pan from camera to Sietas inside tank with talk show US TV hosts Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa standing by 3. Pull out from stopwatch to member of Sietas' team 4. Zoom in to clock by Sietas in tank 5. Cutaway audience 6. Zoom in Sietas breaking record 7. Cutaway camera 8. Pull out Sietas standing up in tank, raising arms over his head 9. Pull out from world record certificate to Sietas and hosts getting covered with confetti 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tom Sietas, Guinness World Record holder: "It's always the beginning, when I'm a little bit worried because you never know how much air you get inside, how you feel about the blood pressure and all that, so after the first two minutes I felt quite confident." 11. Mid of Sietas being interviewed 12. SOUNDBITE: (German) Tom Sietas, Guinness World Record holder: "I was so happy that I was here, that the audience enjoyed the show and that I achieved such a great time." 13. Zoom in Sietas holding certificate, with Philbin congratulating him 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Regis Philbin, talk show host: "Well it was very exciting to tell you the truth and it was quite serious too. We had an ambulance parked right on our garage, we had a couple of doctors here, couple of divers watching every move he made and it was full of tension I thought, until we got near the end and then you could see he was going to make it okay." 15. Zoom into Guinness World Records representative and Sietas, holding certificate STORYLINE: A German diver broke his own Guinness world record for holding his breath underwater for over fifteen minutes. On the US morning talk show, 'Live with Regis and Kelly,' Tom Sietas of Hamburg, Germany set a new Guinness World Record for a breath held underwater. He lasted 15.02 minutes; the previous Guinness record, also held by Sietas, was 14.25 minutes. The 30-year-old free-diver has been practicing breath-holds for eight years, but this was his first attempt in the US. "It's always the beginning, when I'm a little bit worried because you never know how much air you get inside, how you feel about the blood pressure and that, so after the first two minutes I felt quite confident," said Sietas. Sietas received oxygen for about 15 minutes after entering the water tank, to help fill his lungs with as much oxygen as possible before the attempt. Talk show host Regis Philbin said he was a little nervous watching Sietas hold his breath for so long. "It was very exciting to tell you the truth and it was quite serious too. We had an ambulance parked right in our garage, we had a couple of doctors here, couple of divers watching every move he made and it was full of tension I thought, until we got near the end and then you could see he was going to make it okay," said Philbin. Sietas holds one other Guinness record, 130 metres (427 feet) for the longest free dive. Keyword-wacky Keyword-world records
Breathing fresh air in the forest
Breathing fresh air in the forest
MORNING ON MOUNT KENYA Reel 1 (on sleeve as MOURNING ON MOUNT KENYA )
Check copyright with Central Office of Information before using. <br/> <br/>Mombasa, Kenya. Camera pans to follow two couples who walk along a jetty towards some fishing boats. L/S of a beach with palm trees at the edge. M/S of people in swimsuits walking down a path towards the sea. There is a sign which reads: "Silversands Leave Centre." M/S of two couples sitting beside the beach. One of the men has been swimming and uses a towel to dry his hair. The girls joke that the men have it easy, sailing, swimming and lying around on the beach all day. The men, soldiers on leave presumably, begin to tell the girls what they have to do to deserve this break. <br/> <br/>Title: "Morning on Mount Kenya.". <br/> <br/>One of the men describes an exercise on Mount Kenya. Various shots of men packing up their camp. C/U and M/Ss of baboons. Narrator describes how the section Corporal was to be flown home as his mother had been taken ill. Corporal Woodley is told that he is now in command. Lieutenant Stanley shows Woodley a map and tells him the grid reference of the platoon rendezvous. Stanley climbs into a jeep and drives off. <br/> <br/>Some of the men sit down for a cigarette. An S.O.S. message is received on the radio from Nairobi. There has been a civil aircraft crash on Mount Kenya, the pilot is believed to be the only occupants. The men discuss whether they should go to the rescue. They debate whether they can reach the man before dark. It is a million to one against chance that anyone else will have picked up the message. <br/> <br/>The decision is made to attempt to reach the pilot by nightfall. Some men are sent off to make the rendezvous with Mr Stanley, the others will climb Mount Kenya led by Jeff - our hero. Voiceover continues to recount the story over shots of those men chosen to be in the rescue party. The narrator speaks fondly of the men he has chosen for the mission. The men are seen in M/S packing up their gear as the narrator describes them. <br/> <br/>Watches are synchronised and the rescue party are seen walking into the forest. Various shots of them making their way through the undergrowth. Jeff takes a compass reading. Jeff mulls over the responsibilities of leadership and the fact that he could be accused of acting without authority. L/S of the mountain, various shots of the rescue party climbing hills and making their way through forest. <br/> <br/>The men stop for a breather, they are all hot, tired and thirsty. Various shots of the men. One says: "Ice cold water, straight from the glaciers" and Jeff realises that the quickest way up would be to follow the river. Various shots of the men walking through and beside the river. They clamber over tree roots and rocks. <br/> <br/>The men stop for a break. One of the men identifies an elephant track. Some of the men are worried about an encounter with an elephant but Jeff decides to follow the track. <br/> <br/>Back at the rendezvous the rest of the men arrive. C/U of Lieutenant Stanley who asks: "Where the devil's Woodley and the others?" <br/> <br/>The search party breaks for some food. Jeff decides to have a scout around and the radio operator prepares to try and contact the rest of the platoon. Jeff suddenly spots two elephants and rushes back to tell the others to pack up and move. The radio operator had just got through to the signaller back at the rendezvous. The signaller says: "I can't understand it sir. They came over loud and clear then cut dead." <br/> <br/>Lieutenant Stanley tells the Signaller to get through to battalion and tell them that they are still trying to make contact. <br/> <br/>The elephants walk through the bush. Local tribesmen take aim with bows and arrows and shoot at the elephants. Our search party run towards the men and scare them away. The search party suddenly comes upon a pile of elephant tusks. "Look at this ivory." says one of the soldiers "Must have taken them weeks to poach all this." They discuss how much it might be worth. Jeff suggests that they should bury it so that the game warden can pick it up later. <br/> <br/>L/S of a plane taking off from a dusty airfield. Aerial shots of the forest. Pilot is in radio communication and is asked to report any sign of the search party back to base. <br/> <br/>The search party the radio operator reports: "Platoon say that they will stay on listening watch as radio link between us and battalion H.Q." Jeff tells him to report that they will be in touch again once they have cleared the bamboo. Men of the search party spot the Royal Air Force plane and wave. <br/> <br/>The search party make their way through a dense bamboo forest. "We've got to clear this bamboo before it gets dark" says Jeff. The men are tired and short of breath. Dramatic music marks their exit from the bamboo forest onto moorland. L/S of Mount Kenya. Jeff asks the men if they can see any sign of the crashed plane. The answer is no. Jeff thinks they are in the right area and tells the men to spread out and have a look around until it gets dark. End of reel 1. Reel 2 has been transferred on *PM1237* (film id 1237.01). See separate records for details. <br/> <br/>Print has bad colour fading.
PA-2325 Beta SP; PA-0686 Digibeta
Freedom Highway
1980s NEWS
Offset pre-recorded interview with "Ira", face is blacked out. INSERT INTERVIEW: Ira: Sure, there was an incredible amount of guilt and an incredible amount of less than human feeling. At that time, I felt I didn't have the right to occupy space or breathe air. People were telling me about blackouts that I had. "Do you know what you did last night?" That kind of thing. And I really would have no recollection of having done these things at night before. I once woke up in the morning, and I was with this woman whose name I didn't even know. There was glass all over the bed. And I said, "What happened? How did this glass get here?" and I looked up and there was this fixture on the ceiling. And it was broken. And I said "how this glass got here?" and she said "you don't remember what happened last night? You punched the fixture, and then announced to me that it was about to attack us." And I couldn't believe I did that. There were times that I would take a couple of drinks even knowing that I was on call and was supposed to behave in a responsible manner. An interesting thing, I had seen other surgeons, not often, but I had seen other surgeons were absolutely intoxicated while doing surgery. My wife would argue with me frequently about the amount I was drinking. And I would say to her, if you have the responsibilities, I had, the heavy, heavy load of medicine, you'd drink too, which is nonsense, because we know statistically that 10% of doctors as well as 10% of any population drank. 90%, the other 90% who are under just as much stress, who see terribly sick people who are who do get somewhat emotionally involved with their patients and feel for their pain or feel for the pain of the family who just lost somebody, but they don't drink. They handle it in healthy, normal ways. Stress has nothing to do with it. It just doesn't. I have a disease, and when I lost my license to practice medicine for a few months, it was brought to my attention quite, quite well, that you got a problem, and you better do something about it before it destroys not only your career, but your life and everything about it. How I stay off alcohol is I simply do it one day at a time in a 12 step self-help group that I find extremely useful and I believe is the best thing that's ever come down the pike for the treatment of alcoholism. It's kind of tragic that I have to be in silhouette to protect my identity, but I was advised by several people that this could prove injurious to my practice. Many of the public does not realize that the alcoholic can come back. Not just the alcoholic physician, the alcoholic pile of the alcoholic baseball player, the alcoholic baker, a carpenter, regardless, can come back and do extremely well. Robert Lipsyte in the studio with Dr. Millman and Dr. Primm: I wish I could be more sympathetic, but I keep thinking that I would hear that voice coming out of anesthesia or something. While we're more concerned in some ways about the alcoholic doctor and what he can do to us, society really doesn't care as much about Mitzi as they care about the middle class, particularly the middle class professional addict. Is that so?
Battling - Bad - Breath
BATTLING BAD BREATH IS BIG BUSINESS, BUT WHAT REALLY WORKS?
DN-LB-100 Beta SP
Report to the Nation
1970S TELEVISION SHOWS
INTERVIEW RESUMES: David Susskind Evidently, these men found it's such an unhappy lifestyle that they went about to changing, right? You weren't happy? Roy Harris no, I wasn't happy and I was a homosexual from the age of consciously anyway, from 14 to 22 when I met Aesthetic Realism. I was come from Alabama, and I graduated from the University of Alabama on the Phi Beta Kappa, by the way, but one thing I want to say David Susskind it must be very uncomfortable being a homosexual in Alabama. Roy Harris I guess not much more uncomfortable to be anywhere.They're gay bars in Alabama right. Now. Uh, one thing I want to say is that I mean, our purpose is not here tonight is not to convince the other four gentlemen that they should change. However, then there are people all over the country. I know who I know, I'm enough like people who would like to change it happens right now that Mr. Van Griethuysen, Mr. Kranz and myself are presently involved in consultations. We have various people come to us and talk. It's called consultation with three and then it's available. It's called the terrain gallery wa 94. David Susskind Roy, what was the specific miseries that led you Roy Harris I wouldn't describe it as misery because it makes it very, I would say simply, I didn't like myself being homosexual. And however, it why as a person because every time I had a homosexual experience from the time I was at least 18, consciously, I felt bad after I had sex. Oh, that's very, very bad. David Susskind bad as in guilty. Roy Harris Yes, guilty. I felt cheap. I felt I would feel simply not clean. The point is, that's how I felt about it. And I think there are other people who feel the same thing. And I'm not saying these people had to change at all. But I when I heard through Tom shields, who first told me about aesthetic realism, and he invited me to the terrain gallery for the first time, when I heard that he could change that I could change. There was a possibility I might have a real deep feeling, an honest feeling about a woman. I mean, that meant very much to me, and it happens. I have a son who's a year old Gabriel. And that meant very much to me. And the thing is, what happens in aesthetic realism and I wouldn't have listened to it for a second. David Susskind Did You try psychiatry? Roy Harris I did twice. And I even went to a therapist and the therapist for six months and there were no real changes after that. David Susskind Where did psychiatry fail you? Ted Van Griethuysen I would say it didn't see me as I was as a healer with Eli Siegel and my aesthetic realism lessons. He didn't see me as a homosexual. I wouldn't have sat there for five minutes through a lesson. He saw me as a whole person who was who did not see the world In a way that made me like myself David Susskind Did Psychiatry fail you, Roy, because they looked at you as a sickie. Is that what you resent it? Roy Harris Yeah. David Susskind But you went there because you fell sick Roy Harris Right. So I didn't know. Sheldon Kranz David, you know, what I think it is, I think the reason it failed is that they simply did not under do not understand. The deep cause of homosexuality, they see it much too much in terms of medical terms, something sick. You see, without seeing it as a cultural matter, they're right for shock, the way one sees the world is the big thing that affects the way you see a wife, the way you see your job, the way you see the world affects everything you do change that. And if you happen to be homosexual, it will change the way you see women. But you see, it happens that it's a cultural man, it's a matter of ethics, it's a matter of aesthetics. It's a matter of philosophy. Psychiatry simply does not see that these are crucial in understanding this. Roy Harris Also, when I went to a psychiatrist, I was never criticized, I got criticism from Eli Siegel, tough criticism. He told me the way I saw women wasn't good. The way I saw men wasn't particularly good. And he gave me an outline from which I could see things in a way I liked. And it was tough criticism. There was also kind because I wouldn't have sat around and just heard me and things about myself. I'm sorry, I'm, I'm out. I'm looking at the number one. David Susskind you have had no reaction to the inevitable scorn of society in general. In other words, it hasn't got you to where you say, No, I've got to do something about Well, are you an activist, for example, today George Caldwell To begin with, I've never played games, I, you know, I became a homosexual or admitted that I was homosexual to myself, when I was 19. I'm 38. Now, and I have a lover. Who's we've been together for nine years. And we have never played game games. We've always told we haven't run around telling everybody that we're homosexuals. We know, you respect. Well, that's a peculiar issue. And we can get into whole rap on that. I told my family when I was 19, they chose not to believe it. They treat my lover as though he were a son in law. But I see no particular reason, in my case to call long distance on the phone and say, you know, we disagree in politics, we disagree. And, and guess what else? But mean, since they didn't believe it the first time they David Susskind 19 years later, still don't? George Caldwell Well, I mean, I've told them that I'm not going to marry in their sense of the word. But I certainly have had no problem really in, in the business world. I'm in a fairly responsible position. And I knew or figured that my boss knew that I was homosexual, when he hired me, considering my age and my singleness in New York. And there was, you know, no real problem. And then when I got involved in the Gay Activist Alliance, I took him aside and said, you know, you know, I'm a homosexual? And he said, Yes. I said, I have no real complaints. But once in a while, I'm bothered by not told the story before. But once in a while, I'm bothered by little things. You will have a cocktail party and invite the female editor's husband and you don't invite my husband. Well, I'm happy to say my boss and my lover sitting out there together. So when I really got involved, you know, I first got involved in the Gay Activists Alliance, I joined David Susskind Let me ask you something about that. Is 19, very late age for the awareness George Caldwell the well, I explained that in a way, because I was so afraid to have at that time to have sex with anything or anyone or any, either sex, and because society, the kind of society religious society that I came from, had created such taboos, David Susskind Are you Catholic? George Caldwell No, no, David Susskind Was it a very strict religious upbringing George Caldwell But what I wanted to say was that what really got me angry. I mean, after all, I, my lover and I have had a way of coping with this kind of oppression. And I decided that when the militant movement started, that the people who have the least to lose economically and other in other ways, get involved first, but it behooves those of us who have a lot to lose economically to get involved. And then I discovered when I really got out into the open and did programs like this, or March, that it wasn't the big hassle that I thought it was going to be. There were some hassle in my own mind about oh, having to rethink the whole homosexual thing again, you know, 19 years later, or how many years but otherwise and everybody that really matters has been, you know, has nothing has changed. And they all know it now. And what else can I say David Susskind Furritiveness is no longer part of your attitude, you're open and George Caldwell the only furritiveness that I ever had was when I was nothing. When I was not sexual being. I, I you know, we keep talking about these utopian world David Susskind You went from nothingness to homosexual George Caldwell there was some heterosexual activity in between. But I really find that the saddest people are those people who have have no sex at all, or have repressed all sex. I think that is, that is really sad. Randolfe Hayden Wicker You know,David, you assume that society gets at the homosexual I decided 10 years ago, I was going to be myself, I was going to be a free person. And I was one of the first people I organized the first public homosexual demonstration put the first homosexuals on radio speaking for themselves, is the first person in New York to go on TV as a homosexual. And I expect it you know, to be stoned on street corners, I really thought there'd be a great hostile reaction. And instead, I really breathed free air for the first time. And I got a job in publishing when my boss knew I was homosexual. And instead of being condescending, there was a reverse publish of reverse prejudice because he thought I was a homosexual genius, because I did great jobs with his magazines. And I started a business where I was self employed, I didn't have to bow to anyone. So I really think that what homosexuals have to learn in this country is this is a free society. And we have free enterprise and free enterprise doesn't care what you're doing, but he cares. He cares about how you organize work, how you produce a product, how you compete in the system, and it rewards efficiency and it rewards productivity. A few years ago, I created this slogan button. Boom, did very well financially for several years now. I'm taking a couple years off to travel and write. I feel I found freedom through free enterprise and I'm a free man and I'm proud Sheldon Kranz Can I have a moment? David Susskind Yes, go ahead. Sheldon Kranz What's very interesting to me, it's the thing that I to mention Merle Miller again, because I think that article had a big effect on people David Susskind that article we go around the country. That article is a New York Times Sunday magazine article right Rob Miller what it means to be a homosexual. Sheldon Kranz But what I feel one of the things that I'm very aware of and it's one of the biggest things I had to learn. In my study with Eli Siegel. There's very little criticism of people who want to defend homosexuality. It's also happens to be a general thing with people. I wish Merle Miller had been able to say one thing self critical of himself. I would like to ask Merle Milla homosexuality aside, does he like the way he sees people? I would ask that of any human being Do you like holy the way you see other people? That to me is a beginning question that is necessary. I feel,instead of harping on how society is not this how society is not that? Even if you Let's assume you like being homosexual, some people seem to do they like the way they see people that seems to be much more important than one the second Marc Rubin The more important thing is, do you like the way you see yourself? If people are unhappy? Ted Van Griethuysen Especially the question, can you like yourself? Unless you like how yourself sees other people and deals with other people? That question doesn't mean anything. It may not a relationship think about it. Sheldon Kranz Every marriage has it. David Susskind We'll be back in a minute.
US Diver - Diver sets record by holding breath underwater for 15 minutes
NAME: US DIVER 20070809I TAPE: EF07/0948 IN_TIME: 10:53:45:09 DURATION: 00:02:05:22 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: New York - 9 Aug 2007 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Zoom in Tom Sietas starting world record attempt for longest underwater breath hold 2. Pan from camera to Sietas inside tank with talk show US TV hosts Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa standing by 3. Pull out from stopwatch to member of Sietas' team 4. Zoom in to clock by Sietas in tank 5. Cutaway audience 6. Zoom in Sietas breaking record 7. Cutaway camera 8. Pull out Sietas standing up in tank, raising arms over his head 9. Pull out from world record certificate to Sietas and hosts getting covered with confetti 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tom Sietas, Guinness World Record holder: "It's always the beginning, when I'm a little bit worried because you never know how much air you get inside, how you feel about the blood pressure and all that, so after the first two minutes I felt quite confident." 11. Mid of Sietas being interviewed 12. SOUNDBITE: (German) Tom Sietas, Guinness World Record holder: "I was so happy that I was here, that the audience enjoyed the show and that I achieved such a great time." 13. Zoom in Sietas holding certificate, with Philbin congratulating him 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Regis Philbin, talk show host: "Well it was very exciting to tell you the truth and it was quite serious too. We had an ambulance parked right on our garage, we had a couple of doctors here, couple of divers watching every move he made and it was full of tension I thought, until we got near the end and then you could see he was going to make it okay." 15. Zoom into Guinness World Records representative and Sietas, holding certificate STORYLINE: A German diver broke his own Guinness world record for holding his breath underwater for over fifteen minutes. On the US morning talk show, 'Live with Regis and Kelly,' Tom Sietas of Hamburg, Germany set a new Guinness World Record for a breath held underwater. He lasted 15.02 minutes; the previous Guinness record, also held by Sietas, was 14.25 minutes. The 30-year-old free-diver has been practicing breath-holds for eight years, but this was his first attempt in the US. "It's always the beginning, when I'm a little bit worried because you never know how much air you get inside, how you feel about the blood pressure and that, so after the first two minutes I felt quite confident," said Sietas. Sietas received oxygen for about 15 minutes after entering the water tank, to help fill his lungs with as much oxygen as possible before the attempt. Talk show host Regis Philbin said he was a little nervous watching Sietas hold his breath for so long. "It was very exciting to tell you the truth and it was quite serious too. We had an ambulance parked right in our garage, we had a couple of doctors here, couple of divers watching every move he made and it was full of tension I thought, until we got near the end and then you could see he was going to make it okay," said Philbin. Sietas holds one other Guinness record, 130 metres (427 feet) for the longest free dive. Keyword-wacky Keyword-world records