AFP-66R 16mm; VTM-66R Beta SP
MISCELLANEOUS SILENT TRAILERS #2
Animation of atomic bomb blast shows changes in pressure based on distance and angle of blast.
Animation of an atom bomb blast. Arrows pointing away and down show ground impact along with formation of shock wave. Chalk board drawing shows static over pressure versus dynamic pressure from blast. The overpressure shockwave pattern is shown. Chalk board animation shows a shock wave destroying a house and tree. Animation demonstrating the weight of burst versus the distance affecting shock wave. Animation showing angle of the blast changing and affecting pressure to target. Low angle blast is shown as only 5 psi. The complex shape of a shock wave shown in drawing. Location: Nevada United States USA. Date: 1947.
ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE
COVERAGE IN CLAIRFIELD, UTAH FOR A JUDY MULLER CS VO ABOUT ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE AND THE FORMULA FOR FEAR. 02:00:30 FTG AT ARROW DYNAMICS. CONTINUATION OF INTV W/ RON TOOMER, WHO HAS DESIGNED 87 ROLLER COASTERS AS HE SITS BEFORE COASTER MODEL, ABOUT THE SEAT FORCE IN GRAVITY. 02:10:59 CU MODEL OF COASTER AS TOOMER VO EXPLAINS HOW COASTER RIDES WORK. 02:13:05 CU TOOMER EXPLAINING WHY COASTERS RUN SO MUCH FASTER THAN THEY DO WHEN IT IS COLD. 02:14:04 CU MODEL OF COASTER AS TOOMER EXPLAINS NEGATIVE FORCE. 02:15:00 B ROLL FTG TECHNICIAN SITTING AT HIS DESKTOP PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC). WS DIAGRAM OF COASTER ON WALL. 02:15:07 HIGH ANGLE PAN ACROSS TO TECHNICIAN SITTING AT DESK. 02:15:18 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 02:15:40 PAN ACROSS COASTER DESIGNS. 02:15:57 MCU COASTER RIDE ON COMPUTER. 02:16:28 MS TECHNICIAN SITTING AT PC LOOKING OVER DATA. 02:16:32 MS TECHNICIAN. 02:16:46 CU MULTI ELEMENT COASTER ANIMATION FOR PARC DE LOISIR ON PC SCREEN. 02:18:25 PAN ACROSS ROOM COVERED IN COASTER DESIGNS AS TECHNICIAN SITS AT PC WATCHING COASTER ANIMATION. 02:18:49 HIGH ANGLE CU OVER TECHNICIAN WATCHING. 02:19:03 VS ELABORATE COASTER DESIGNS ON WALL. 02:19:35 VS ANOTHER TECHNICIANS SITTING AT ANOTHER PC INPUTTING DATA. 02:20:09 CU COASTER DIAGRAMS UNDER LIGHT. 02:20:16 LOW ANGLE CU UNDER COASTER DIAGRAMS HANGING ON WALL. 02:20:34 CU WALL COVERED W/ DESIGN NOTES. 02:20:50 PAN FROM COASTER DESIGN TO NOTES. 02:21:03 SIDE MS THIRD TECHNICIAN SITTING AT PC WORKING. 02:21:31 MCU OVER TECHNICIAN'S SHOULDER AS HE INPUTS DATA. 02:22:06 PAN ACROSS WIRE MODEL OF COASTER AGAINST BLACK BG. 02:22:42 VS COASTER AGAINST DARK BG TO END.
PA-2323 Beta SP; PA-0738 Digibeta; PA-0736 (b&w) Digibeta
In the Suburbs
ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE
COVERAGE IN CLAIRFIELD, UTAH FOR A JUDY MULLER CS VO ABOUT ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE AND THE FORMULA FOR FEAR. 02:00:30 FTG AT ARROW DYNAMICS. CONTINUATION OF INTV W/ RON TOOMER, WHO HAS DESIGNED 87 ROLLER COASTERS AS HE SITS BEFORE COASTER MODEL, ABOUT THE SEAT FORCE IN GRAVITY. 02:10:59 CU MODEL OF COASTER AS TOOMER VO EXPLAINS HOW COASTER RIDES WORK. 02:13:05 CU TOOMER EXPLAINING WHY COASTERS RUN SO MUCH FASTER THAN THEY DO WHEN IT IS COLD. 02:14:04 CU MODEL OF COASTER AS TOOMER EXPLAINS NEGATIVE FORCE. 02:15:00 B ROLL FTG TECHNICIAN SITTING AT HIS DESKTOP PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC). WS DIAGRAM OF COASTER ON WALL. 02:15:07 HIGH ANGLE PAN ACROSS TO TECHNICIAN SITTING AT DESK. 02:15:18 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 02:15:40 PAN ACROSS COASTER DESIGNS. 02:15:57 MCU COASTER RIDE ON COMPUTER. 02:16:28 MS TECHNICIAN SITTING AT PC LOOKING OVER DATA. 02:16:32 MS TECHNICIAN. 02:16:46 CU MULTI ELEMENT COASTER ANIMATION FOR PARC DE LOISIR ON PC SCREEN. 02:18:25 PAN ACROSS ROOM COVERED IN COASTER DESIGNS AS TECHNICIAN SITS AT PC WATCHING COASTER ANIMATION. 02:18:49 HIGH ANGLE CU OVER TECHNICIAN WATCHING. 02:19:03 VS ELABORATE COASTER DESIGNS ON WALL. 02:19:35 VS ANOTHER TECHNICIANS SITTING AT ANOTHER PC INPUTTING DATA. 02:20:09 CU COASTER DIAGRAMS UNDER LIGHT. 02:20:16 LOW ANGLE CU UNDER COASTER DIAGRAMS HANGING ON WALL. 02:20:34 CU WALL COVERED W/ DESIGN NOTES. 02:20:50 PAN FROM COASTER DESIGN TO NOTES. 02:21:03 SIDE MS THIRD TECHNICIAN SITTING AT PC WORKING. 02:21:31 MCU OVER TECHNICIAN'S SHOULDER AS HE INPUTS DATA. 02:22:06 PAN ACROSS WIRE MODEL OF COASTER AGAINST BLACK BG. 02:22:42 VS COASTER AGAINST DARK BG TO END.
ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE
COVERAGE IN CLAIRFIELD, UTAH FOR A JUDY MULLER CS VO ABOUT ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE AND THE FORMULA FOR FEAR. 01:00:29 TWO SHOT MULLER TALKING TO RON TOOMER, CONSULTANT DIRECTOR OF ARROW DYNAMICS, THE LARGEST CUSTOM ROLLER COASTER MAKER IN THE WORLD. 01:01:30 CU OVER COASTER DIAGRAM. 01:01:50 TWO SHOT TOOMER TALKING TO MULLER ABOUT BUILDING THE HIGHEST & FASTER COASTER IN THE WORLD. 01:02:33 CU TOOMER HOLDING WIRES HE USES TO DEVELOP NEW UPSIDE DOWN ELEMENTS. 01:02:56 SOT W/ TOOMER ABOUT CORKSCREW RIDES. 01:03:18 TWO SHOT 01:03:26 CU CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:03:47 CU OVER COASTER BLUEPRINT. 01:03:55 PAN FROM TOOMER TO PLANS ON DRAWING BOARD. 01:04:23 PUSH INTO CU CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:04:58 TWO SHOT TOOMER TALKING ABOUT THE LAST TIME HE RODE ONE OF HIS COASTERS SEVERAL YEARS AGO. 01:05:20 CU OVER VERTICAL PROFILE DIAGRAM FOR BIGGEST ROLLER COASTER EVER BUILT. 01:06:13 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING ABOUT RACE FOR BRAGGING RIGHTS. 01:08:28 PUSH INTO CU TOOMER POINTING AT THE BIG RADIUS CURVES ON DIAGRAM. 01:09:03 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:09:56 PUSH INTO CU TOOMER FIELDING QUESTION ABOUT WHY PEOPLE GET SUCH A THRILL OUT OF GETTING SCARED. 01:11:06 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:11:27 CU MODEL OF MAN TOOMER USES FOR NEW SEATING ON VEHICLE. 01:12:12 TWO SHOT MULLER AND TOOMER TALKING. 01:12:40 CU SECTION OF CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:13:36 SOT W/ TOOMER ABOUT ALWAYS BEING A MECHANIC. 01:13:55 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:14:29 CU WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:14:36 CU MULLER. 01:14:42 CU TOOMER BENDING WIRE AND EXPLAINING HOW IT GIVES HIM IDEAS ABOUT HOW THINGS WORK. 01:15:35 TWO SHOT MULLER AND TOOMER. 01:16:27 LOW ANGLE MCU TOOMER HOLDING FIGURE EIGHT SHAPED WIRE AND EXPLAINING WHY IT IS SUCH AN EXCITING LOOKING THING. 01:17:10 CU TOOMER TURNING ON TOY COASTER MODEL. 01:17:42 INTV W/ TOOMER, WHO HAS DESIGNED 87 ROLLER COASTERS AS HE SITS BEFORE COASTER MODEL, ABOUT THE PHYSICS INVOLVED IN ROLLER COASTER DESIGN.
ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE
COVERAGE IN CLAIRFIELD, UTAH FOR A JUDY MULLER CS VO ABOUT ROLLER COASTER SCIENCE AND THE FORMULA FOR FEAR. 01:00:29 TWO SHOT MULLER TALKING TO RON TOOMER, CONSULTANT DIRECTOR OF ARROW DYNAMICS, THE LARGEST CUSTOM ROLLER COASTER MAKER IN THE WORLD. 01:01:30 CU OVER COASTER DIAGRAM. 01:01:50 TWO SHOT TOOMER TALKING TO MULLER ABOUT BUILDING THE HIGHEST & FASTER COASTER IN THE WORLD. 01:02:33 CU TOOMER HOLDING WIRES HE USES TO DEVELOP NEW UPSIDE DOWN ELEMENTS. 01:02:56 SOT W/ TOOMER ABOUT CORKSCREW RIDES. 01:03:18 TWO SHOT 01:03:26 CU CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:03:47 CU OVER COASTER BLUEPRINT. 01:03:55 PAN FROM TOOMER TO PLANS ON DRAWING BOARD. 01:04:23 PUSH INTO CU CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:04:58 TWO SHOT TOOMER TALKING ABOUT THE LAST TIME HE RODE ONE OF HIS COASTERS SEVERAL YEARS AGO. 01:05:20 CU OVER VERTICAL PROFILE DIAGRAM FOR BIGGEST ROLLER COASTER EVER BUILT. 01:06:13 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING ABOUT RACE FOR BRAGGING RIGHTS. 01:08:28 PUSH INTO CU TOOMER POINTING AT THE BIG RADIUS CURVES ON DIAGRAM. 01:09:03 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:09:56 PUSH INTO CU TOOMER FIELDING QUESTION ABOUT WHY PEOPLE GET SUCH A THRILL OUT OF GETTING SCARED. 01:11:06 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:11:27 CU MODEL OF MAN TOOMER USES FOR NEW SEATING ON VEHICLE. 01:12:12 TWO SHOT MULLER AND TOOMER TALKING. 01:12:40 CU SECTION OF CURVED WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:13:36 SOT W/ TOOMER ABOUT ALWAYS BEING A MECHANIC. 01:13:55 TWO SHOT MULLER & TOOMER TALKING. 01:14:29 CU WIRE IN TOOMER'S HANDS. 01:14:36 CU MULLER. 01:14:42 CU TOOMER BENDING WIRE AND EXPLAINING HOW IT GIVES HIM IDEAS ABOUT HOW THINGS WORK. 01:15:35 TWO SHOT MULLER AND TOOMER. 01:16:27 LOW ANGLE MCU TOOMER HOLDING FIGURE EIGHT SHAPED WIRE AND EXPLAINING WHY IT IS SUCH AN EXCITING LOOKING THING. 01:17:10 CU TOOMER TURNING ON TOY COASTER MODEL. 01:17:42 INTV W/ TOOMER, WHO HAS DESIGNED 87 ROLLER COASTERS AS HE SITS BEFORE COASTER MODEL, ABOUT THE PHYSICS INVOLVED IN ROLLER COASTER DESIGN.
CENTCOM BRIEFING / WEDNESDAY / RS 112 / 7:00 - 7:45 AM / NOT COMPLETE
Centcom briefing with Gen. Vincent Brooks 07:06:08 brooks 07:06:16 we honor brave m en and women 07:06:27 coalition conducted simulatious attacks 07:06:46 regime command and control facility attack graphic 07:07:06 arrows 07:07:13 after attack...mosque is in good shape 07:07:35 split screen 07:07:41 baath party hq 07:07:50 split screen damage 07:08:03 concerned about religious... 07:08:28 heavy equippment in populated areas 07:08:51 video tank on transporters 07:09:02 tank on transporter 07:09:16 another cilp tank explodes**** 07:09:36 aerial surveilllance 07:10:05 another concerrn burning oil trenches.. 07:10:22 over 50 oil trenches on fire 07:10:29 graphic 07:10:46 brooks points to graphic burn points 07:10:58 coaliton had nothing to do with starting these fires 07:11:14 ansar islam 07:11:25 07:11:25 deny freedom on movenment in westeren desert 07:11:46 nightscope video 07:12:10 helicopter landing 07:12:35 take off 07:12:53 07:13:07 coaltion fores seize dam...can flood eupraates rives..two days ago preveented distruction 07:13:41 two core attack rg outskirts of baghddad near al kut has crossed tigris river..baghdad division had been destroyed 07:14:19 action continues near karbal 07:14:32 5th core...welocmed by citizens and gunfie ali mosque 07:15:01 chose not to return fire 07:15:08 use of mosque of detestable....religious sites in jeopardy 07:15:30 capture of missile at airport...can be fired inkuwaiti territory 07:15:52 uk forces remain control of 07:16:27 07:16:37 each day effectilve of pushing info to iraqi people 07:16:53 psycho ops very effective and have impact 07:17:11 iraqi forces were encouraged to surrender 66 rg did surrender 07:17:43 coalition continues to move forward 07:17:57 photos food distribution 07:18:25 4500 enem;y pow..geneva convetntion 07:18:39 photo red cross 07:18:50 construcion of new pow camp 07:19:16 07:19:32 coalition did stage operatiaon into al nasiriya saddam hospital 07:20:40 coaliton special ops operation...mariens..navy seal 07:20:57 classic operation...camera crew 07:21:16 video rescue 07:21:27 lynch on stretcher being carried into air craft 07:22:04 color photo jessica lynch 07:22:50 she is alive and in coaliiton control... 07:23:03 regime was holding her... 07:23:18 buildings outside where we received fire 07:23:29 remains of 11 ...not identified at this point 07:23:41 9 inside others outside in grave area 07:23:54 someone who was taken in custody ... 07:24:18 weapons in school? 07:24:25 two things pattern...weapons cache inside school...using hospitals...command and control 07:24:56 t55 tank outside hospital.. 07:25:07 pattern is very clear...how buildingd are being used...against law in this conflict... 07:25:48 status of republican guard?? 07:25:59 we have seen some repositioning...effective of air attack ..relocation to some positions... 07:26:29 they are in trouble ...under serious attack...we believe we will have intended effect and operation will continue 07:27:17 no torture devices so far... 07:27:42 market attacks 07:27:48 we are deliberate in out targets...particular case in Baghdad. we have examined out flights..imagery to determine size of craters...absolutely nothing that joins to coalition 07:28:47 no associatoan with coaliton forces 07:29:09 cluster munitions..use by commadrs for tactial effect 07:30:04 will not appropirate to describe front line 07:30:20 we will approach baghdad ...dagger is pointed at baghdad 07:30:43 the dynamics of battlefield...exploit... 07:32:34 dagger remaims pointed... 07:32:58 we can fire back ...we chose not to fire back...mosque was protected us ...all decisions made with discrimination...will protect our force 07:34:52 red zones or lines may be a trigger line...regime may use weapons of mass destruction. it is a conceptual line were decision may be made by reqime 07:36:54 we say unit is destroyed ...no longer effective ...leadership broken..equipment destroyed...killed or captured considerable force 07:37:53 they are in serious trouble 07:38:03 troops in mosque in naja 07:38:15 there is still some resistance... 07:38:33 changing tides in people...will reduce in time 07:38:53 as populatin had less tolerance ...we will see fewer and fewer...basrra example 07:39:14 military action by uk ...pressure on reqime in town...when regime has no longer safe place...flee and destroyed 07:40:21 the coaliton will destroy regime... 07:40:34 did find it surprising...why necesary to read statement 07:40:54 regime is not the run... will not stop 07:42:19 we are making tremendous progress...
CENTCOM BRIEFING / WEDNESDAY / RS 112 / 7:00 - 7:45 AM / NOT COMPLETE
Centcom briefing with Gen. Vincent Brooks 07:06:08 brooks 07:06:16 we honor brave m en and women 07:06:27 coalition conducted simulatious attacks 07:06:46 regime command and control facility attack graphic 07:07:06 arrows 07:07:13 after attack...mosque is in good shape 07:07:35 split screen 07:07:41 baath party hq 07:07:50 split screen damage 07:08:03 concerned about religious... 07:08:28 heavy equippment in populated areas 07:08:51 video tank on transporters 07:09:02 tank on transporter 07:09:16 another cilp tank explodes**** 07:09:36 aerial surveilllance 07:10:05 another concerrn burning oil trenches.. 07:10:22 over 50 oil trenches on fire 07:10:29 graphic 07:10:46 brooks points to graphic burn points 07:10:58 coaliton had nothing to do with starting these fires 07:11:14 ansar islam 07:11:25 07:11:25 deny freedom on movenment in westeren desert 07:11:46 nightscope video 07:12:10 helicopter landing 07:12:35 take off 07:12:53 07:13:07 coaltion fores seize dam...can flood eupraates rives..two days ago preveented distruction 07:13:41 two core attack rg outskirts of baghddad near al kut has crossed tigris river..baghdad division had been destroyed 07:14:19 action continues near karbal 07:14:32 5th core...welocmed by citizens and gunfie ali mosque 07:15:01 chose not to return fire 07:15:08 use of mosque of detestable....religious sites in jeopardy 07:15:30 capture of missile at airport...can be fired inkuwaiti territory 07:15:52 uk forces remain control of 07:16:27 07:16:37 each day effectilve of pushing info to iraqi people 07:16:53 psycho ops very effective and have impact 07:17:11 iraqi forces were encouraged to surrender 66 rg did surrender 07:17:43 coalition continues to move forward 07:17:57 photos food distribution 07:18:25 4500 enem;y pow..geneva convetntion 07:18:39 photo red cross 07:18:50 construcion of new pow camp 07:19:16 07:19:32 coalition did stage operatiaon into al nasiriya saddam hospital 07:20:40 coaliton special ops operation...mariens..navy seal 07:20:57 classic operation...camera crew 07:21:16 video rescue 07:21:27 lynch on stretcher being carried into air craft 07:22:04 color photo jessica lynch 07:22:50 she is alive and in coaliiton control... 07:23:03 regime was holding her... 07:23:18 buildings outside where we received fire 07:23:29 remains of 11 ...not identified at this point 07:23:41 9 inside others outside in grave area 07:23:54 someone who was taken in custody ... 07:24:18 weapons in school? 07:24:25 two things pattern...weapons cache inside school...using hospitals...command and control 07:24:56 t55 tank outside hospital.. 07:25:07 pattern is very clear...how buildingd are being used...against law in this conflict... 07:25:48 status of republican guard?? 07:25:59 we have seen some repositioning...effective of air attack ..relocation to some positions... 07:26:29 they are in trouble ...under serious attack...we believe we will have intended effect and operation will continue 07:27:17 no torture devices so far... 07:27:42 market attacks 07:27:48 we are deliberate in out targets...particular case in Baghdad. we have examined out flights..imagery to determine size of craters...absolutely nothing that joins to coalition 07:28:47 no associatoan with coaliton forces 07:29:09 cluster munitions..use by commadrs for tactial effect 07:30:04 will not appropirate to describe front line 07:30:20 we will approach baghdad ...dagger is pointed at baghdad 07:30:43 the dynamics of battlefield...exploit... 07:32:34 dagger remaims pointed... 07:32:58 we can fire back ...we chose not to fire back...mosque was protected us ...all decisions made with discrimination...will protect our force 07:34:52 red zones or lines may be a trigger line...regime may use weapons of mass destruction. it is a conceptual line were decision may be made by reqime 07:36:54 we say unit is destroyed ...no longer effective ...leadership broken..equipment destroyed...killed or captured considerable force 07:37:53 they are in serious trouble 07:38:03 troops in mosque in naja 07:38:15 there is still some resistance... 07:38:33 changing tides in people...will reduce in time 07:38:53 as populatin had less tolerance ...we will see fewer and fewer...basrra example 07:39:14 military action by uk ...pressure on reqime in town...when regime has no longer safe place...flee and destroyed 07:40:21 the coaliton will destroy regime... 07:40:34 did find it surprising...why necesary to read statement 07:40:54 regime is not the run... will not stop 07:42:19 we are making tremendous progress...
CENTCOM BRIEFING / WEDNESDAY / RS 112 / 7:00 - 7:45 AM / NOT COMPLETE
Centcom briefing with Gen. Vincent Brooks 07:06:08 brooks 07:06:16 we honor brave m en and women 07:06:27 coalition conducted simulatious attacks 07:06:46 regime command and control facility attack graphic 07:07:06 arrows 07:07:13 after attack...mosque is in good shape 07:07:35 split screen 07:07:41 baath party hq 07:07:50 split screen damage 07:08:03 concerned about religious... 07:08:28 heavy equippment in populated areas 07:08:51 video tank on transporters 07:09:02 tank on transporter 07:09:16 another cilp tank explodes**** 07:09:36 aerial surveilllance 07:10:05 another concerrn burning oil trenches.. 07:10:22 over 50 oil trenches on fire 07:10:29 graphic 07:10:46 brooks points to graphic burn points 07:10:58 coaliton had nothing to do with starting these fires 07:11:14 ansar islam 07:11:25 07:11:25 deny freedom on movenment in westeren desert 07:11:46 nightscope video 07:12:10 helicopter landing 07:12:35 take off 07:12:53 07:13:07 coaltion fores seize dam...can flood eupraates rives..two days ago preveented distruction 07:13:41 two core attack rg outskirts of baghddad near al kut has crossed tigris river..baghdad division had been destroyed 07:14:19 action continues near karbal 07:14:32 5th core...welocmed by citizens and gunfie ali mosque 07:15:01 chose not to return fire 07:15:08 use of mosque of detestable....religious sites in jeopardy 07:15:30 capture of missile at airport...can be fired inkuwaiti territory 07:15:52 uk forces remain control of 07:16:27 07:16:37 each day effectilve of pushing info to iraqi people 07:16:53 psycho ops very effective and have impact 07:17:11 iraqi forces were encouraged to surrender 66 rg did surrender 07:17:43 coalition continues to move forward 07:17:57 photos food distribution 07:18:25 4500 enem;y pow..geneva convetntion 07:18:39 photo red cross 07:18:50 construcion of new pow camp 07:19:16 07:19:32 coalition did stage operatiaon into al nasiriya saddam hospital 07:20:40 coaliton special ops operation...mariens..navy seal 07:20:57 classic operation...camera crew 07:21:16 video rescue 07:21:27 lynch on stretcher being carried into air craft 07:22:04 color photo jessica lynch 07:22:50 she is alive and in coaliiton control... 07:23:03 regime was holding her... 07:23:18 buildings outside where we received fire 07:23:29 remains of 11 ...not identified at this point 07:23:41 9 inside others outside in grave area 07:23:54 someone who was taken in custody ... 07:24:18 weapons in school? 07:24:25 two things pattern...weapons cache inside school...using hospitals...command and control 07:24:56 t55 tank outside hospital.. 07:25:07 pattern is very clear...how buildingd are being used...against law in this conflict... 07:25:48 status of republican guard?? 07:25:59 we have seen some repositioning...effective of air attack ..relocation to some positions... 07:26:29 they are in trouble ...under serious attack...we believe we will have intended effect and operation will continue 07:27:17 no torture devices so far... 07:27:42 market attacks 07:27:48 we are deliberate in out targets...particular case in Baghdad. we have examined out flights..imagery to determine size of craters...absolutely nothing that joins to coalition 07:28:47 no associatoan with coaliton forces 07:29:09 cluster munitions..use by commadrs for tactial effect 07:30:04 will not appropirate to describe front line 07:30:20 we will approach baghdad ...dagger is pointed at baghdad 07:30:43 the dynamics of battlefield...exploit... 07:32:34 dagger remaims pointed... 07:32:58 we can fire back ...we chose not to fire back...mosque was protected us ...all decisions made with discrimination...will protect our force 07:34:52 red zones or lines may be a trigger line...regime may use weapons of mass destruction. it is a conceptual line were decision may be made by reqime 07:36:54 we say unit is destroyed ...no longer effective ...leadership broken..equipment destroyed...killed or captured considerable force 07:37:53 they are in serious trouble 07:38:03 troops in mosque in naja 07:38:15 there is still some resistance... 07:38:33 changing tides in people...will reduce in time 07:38:53 as populatin had less tolerance ...we will see fewer and fewer...basrra example 07:39:14 military action by uk ...pressure on reqime in town...when regime has no longer safe place...flee and destroyed 07:40:21 the coaliton will destroy regime... 07:40:34 did find it surprising...why necesary to read statement 07:40:54 regime is not the run... will not stop 07:42:19 we are making tremendous progress...
GORE AND NEW CARS 1339 - 1444 Atrium Hall Meeting
VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE AND OFFICIALS FROM THE BIG THREE AUTOMAKERS (GM, FORD, DAIMLER CHRYSLER) DISPLAY AND DISCUSS THE ROLL OUT SUPER FUEL EFFICIENT CONCEPT CARS. LOCATION: ATRIUM HALL REAGAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 133904 ms man at mic (behind him is car) .. speaker says: 80 percent reduction .. 90 reduction in CO and hydrocarbons .. let me give you example of what fuel efficiency does .. (POOR AUDIO .. IMPROVES SOMEWHAT AFTER 1400) 133925 save 3 million gallons of diesel fuel a year .. 3 million gallons .. equivalent of putting 50,000 Toyota Presices(sp?) on road .. in this country .. 134007 same day a year ago announced similar .. with response to pickup trucks .. going to get that in half dozen cities in u.s. ... start to roll out in november of this year .. full size pickups.. such large users of fuel . 134057 only regret can't get microphone to hang on me have to talk from podium we invented aero dynamic design in this vehicle 134624 we've looked at every conceivable technology makes sense to get mass out of vehciles .. redesigned our seats .. find open web seats .. world calls benchmark .. lighting extraordinary .. what you see on precept (car sp?) is high intensity discharge head lamps with fiber optic conduits .. every other light is light emitting diodes .. 'instant on' (safety feature) .. and if people drive in washington like do in detroit they're far too close to you .. 135012 let me make it very, very clear we are here because of good work of thousands of people engineers back at our respective companies .. worked on for 7 years .. we have great debt of gratitude to own work force .. we reached and stretched further than thought possible .. pull out as he introduces ford's chief of staff john rennemake (sp?) 135128 ms john at mic .. (thanks harry for presentation) .. what he is really telling you maybe for first time really successful partnership .. incredible partnership between 7 or more depts. of government .. national labs .. supplier community technical community .. 3 autos ... celebrating roll out of vehicles .. but also celebrate incredibly successful partnership (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver 80 miles per gallon of fuel 140805 ms man at mic .. revolutionary in our time .. like to turn it over to father of .. pan as gore shakes his hand before taking mic 140834 ms gore: thank you jim great to be here with these magnificent vehicles and be able to kick tires & see what like up close 140844 jim thank you .. indeed great honor to be with jim holden .. john .. harry pierce .. also allen ruther (sp?) of united auto workers & members of teams brought us here today (shaky shot) .. 140913 my collegaues .. secretary of transportation dept. .. energy dept. .. EPA .. secretary of commerce .. former governor jim blanchard 140948 i mentioned engineers here .. would like to ask engineers present knowing many thousands back in detroit .. national labs ..(etc.) . please stand .. you all are ones .. (he and others clap) pull out and push in 141032 ms gore .. great privelege to get to know men & women .. after this set up following arduous negotiations in white house .. everybody involved went extra mile .. 141058 engineers brought .. excitement & commitment to this hard to decribe in words .. on quite a few occasions wife tipper and i had engineers and spouses to our home .. every few months different focal point .. drive trains, battery technology .. composite matierals 141134 we invited engineers and encourage them to bring spouses to washington for social occasion .. getting to interact with them socially brought home to me .. what's involved here .. spouses .. i'd like to thank spouses .. put up lot with long hours and extra commitment 141215 been some midnight oil burned and lot of weekend shifts and i appreciate that very much .. challenge you all agreed to take .. consciously designed by you to be beyond what you knew how to do 141246 i didn't understand a lot of it (referring to harry's speech) .. in negotiations that was key sticking point .. when get to point that marks boundary from what you know how to do and unknown takes leap of faith 141320 by setting goal considerably beyond .. basis if existing technologies .. expected improvements .. when they decided to make that leap of faith .. was courageous decision 141352 in our system competition is key also have uniquely american approach to challenges that involved unknown for days of lewis and clark till now 141416 private companies .. have limit to what they can justify to shareholders .. in pure exploration (audio improved) 141442 black 141515 ms from back gore and 2 men 141516 black 141519 ms car on stage 141521 bars 141525 rerack 141532 ms car push in 141549 extreme ws of audience and 3 cars on stage in spotlights (off screen speaker announces arrivals) .. secretary of transportation robby slater, secr. of energy bill richardson, administrator of EPA carol browner and deputy secr. of commerce robert mallet (sp?) they all walk and take seats in front row .. push in on them .. claps 141621 extreme ws stage area and crowd from back 141640 ws as gore and others walks on stage .. push in as he looks at car .. push in 141641 ms gore and others on stage near car .. he walks over to look inside .. looks at another car .. pull out & push in .. looks at last car .. pull out 141821 ws of gore and men at car .. push in 141846 ms gore and others .. pull out as he takes seat on stage 141912 ws gore and other in sit .. car in background .. pan to speaker at mic .. push in 141920 ms man at mic says: mr. vice president we are truly honored to be here today to speak on behalf of general motors .. my colleagues from ford and .. daimler chrysler as well 141938 coming to end point with respect to phase one of 'pngv' very unique and extraordinary partnership among academia you industry automotive supplier industry, the UAW (united auto workers), various agencies of federal government .. national labs .. never before have we put all of these intellectual resources together to try and break mode with advance vehicle technology .. push in 142021 still remember day when jack smith met with president and had discussed 'pngv project' .. he walked into my office and said we agreed to produce family (model) .. 5-passenger (vehicle) that will deliver 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalency .. i looked at jack and said jack we don't know how to do that and he said don't let that get in way .. and we haven't 142055 proof in pudding is right behind me (vehicles) .. these 3 vehicles GM precept, the ford prodigy in middle and 'exx3 dodge' for daimler chrysler are output of this 7 years partnership extraordinary partnership but for partnership these vehicles would not be here today .. ought to be model how industries .. government .. unions & automotive suppliers work together to leverage all resources and move as rapidly as possible to more energy efficiency .. and lower and lower emissions (toxic and green house effect) 142205 these 3 vehicles behind me demonstrate extraordinary advances in automotive technology .. key in phase 2 .. take technology and roll out across high value production of all vehicles .. some 130 innovations in 'gm precept (sp?)' .. we have engineering today .. working with singular purpose examine each and every one innovations (to what produce today) 142250 we've got to have real impact environmentally only way you get there is high volume of vehicles in hands of consumers on road ways, does no good .. to have pr (public relations) events .. if technologies do not end up in high volume 142318 3 companies i can assure you are absolutely committed in taking technologies and finding appropriate applications across our product lines 142328 one year ago GM announced in new york .. proposing hybrid drive systems (all vehiciles on stage have that) for transit buses .. put in operation in new york transit system .. now taken bus back 142405 entered into partnership with major bus manufacturer new flyer one of largest manufacturers of buses for north america .. and put demonstration ... across america .. in cities .. pull out 142430 extreme ws then push in 142437 we got 50 percent fuel saving in hybrid .. compared to diesel bus today .. 80 percent reduction in (particular?) .. 90 percent in CO and hydrocarbons .. 90 percent in nox .. 142518 3 million gallons in diesle fuel equivalent putting 50,000 toyota predices(sp?) on road in this country .. what's significance of that comparison .. can apply technology (where have stop & go trafic) 142552 that same day a year ago announced similar demonstration program with full size pickup trucks with parallel hybrid system and test that in half dozen cities .. and 200 plus drivers .. start to roll out in november of this year .. 142636 my love the precept .. this is truly a unique vehicle .. we have reinvented aero dynamic design .. most aero dynamic family oriented vehicle in world 142715 full size testing in wind tunnel (suyggest we may improve on that figure) .. see no air intact on front of precept .. take air in either sides and rear .. 142802 fully enclosed underbody .. took all side mirrors off .. took antenna off .. replacing exterior mirror on either side with 2 cameras combined with 3rd camera .. provide panoramic view .. in blind spots 142835 that what we did with respecst to arrow .. look to every possible energy saving .. with respect to wheels .. 16-inch spun aluminium wheels .. lightest .. on any passenger car in world .. radial .. resistance .. tires 142910 then we took a look at body itself .. aluminum space frame .. polymeric panels .. 142930 vehicle powered at front .. liquid cool permanent power ac motor .. motor becomes generator when vehicle being braked .. it's a motor .. generator (transforms in electric power) 143012 working on lithium power battery .. even more efficient .. at rear of vehicle have heat engine .. 3 cylinder 12 valve isuzu engineer ... very sophisticated .. (some electrical) 143100 multi-purpose unit 'mpu' .. . when heat engine not functioning we have electric power at rear axle as well .. recharges battery restarts diesel engine .. smoothness of shifting .. and regenerative braking .. runs AC compressor (air and heat) .. quite unique to hybrid vehciles 143205 looked at every conceivable technology to get mass out of vehicle .. aluminum alloys .. polymer .. redesigned seats .. open web seat .. open weave seat design .. very very innovative .. lighting extraodinary incandescent lighting took too much energy see high intensity .. head lamps .. every other light are light emitting diodes .. providing free safety .. these technologies are just the beginning 143324 real proof in pudding is if can get technology in high power production .. have same interest you have in energy efficient and environonmental (impact) issues . we're drive technology forward and long term vision of hydrogen based economy .. took vehicle up detroit auto show (see in week in washington) .. took diesel engine and opal trans axle out of vehicle and dropped in 9th generation portion exchange membrane .. 143433 105 peak kilowatt fuel stat .. did computer simulation .. projected deliver 108 miles per gallon composite fuel economy (he points to vehicle behind) .. if want to talk about how many miles per gallon .. get when put diesel fuel .. it's 90 miles per gallon .. committed to economically sound solutions .. including global warming .. you're going to see more and more technologies applied to more and more .. products .. (claps) .. that's our commitment to you .. we are here because of good work of thousands of people .. engineers . worked on for some 7 years .. 3 companies (GM Ford, Daimler Chrysler) including general motors .. introduce john rennemakey (sp?) ford's chief of staff ... (2 shake hands) pull out and push in 143720 ms john at mic (with ford) .. what's he telling maybe for 1st time successful partnrship .. incredible cooperation (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver nearly 80 miles per gallon of fuel .. claps (recognizes some people) .. pull out 143910 extreme ws then push in 143927 ms john at mic .. no easy challenge back in 1993 gore said new partnership .. coordinating effort so americas best scientists and engineers to develop .. technological challenge comparable to or greater than apollo project .. also recognize role of important UAW .. represented by allen russo (claps) .. under partnership auto workers, suppliers, unions (etc.) .. this is hybrid electrical vehicles as well full size family car.. pan to vehicle 144117 ms of ford's car .. john: sacrifices no performance or functionality .. also has capability when step on brakes to .. pull out .. see gore sitting to side pan back to speaker 144154 .. consistent with ford's policy of sooner, safer sooner .. (2003) our production hybrid family size .. low emissions without sarificing roominess affordability (claps) .. we're also making .. progress on hydrogen fuel cars 144235 hash
GORE AND NEW CARS 1339 - 1444 Atrium Hall Meeting
VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE AND OFFICIALS FROM THE BIG THREE AUTOMAKERS (GM, FORD, DAIMLER CHRYSLER) DISPLAY AND DISCUSS THE ROLL OUT SUPER FUEL EFFICIENT CONCEPT CARS. LOCATION: ATRIUM HALL REAGAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 133904 ms man at mic (behind him is car) .. speaker says: 80 percent reduction .. 90 reduction in CO and hydrocarbons .. let me give you example of what fuel efficiency does .. (POOR AUDIO .. IMPROVES SOMEWHAT AFTER 1400) 133925 save 3 million gallons of diesel fuel a year .. 3 million gallons .. equivalent of putting 50,000 Toyota Presices(sp?) on road .. in this country .. 134007 same day a year ago announced similar .. with response to pickup trucks .. going to get that in half dozen cities in u.s. ... start to roll out in november of this year .. full size pickups.. such large users of fuel . 134057 only regret can't get microphone to hang on me have to talk from podium we invented aero dynamic design in this vehicle 134624 we've looked at every conceivable technology makes sense to get mass out of vehciles .. redesigned our seats .. find open web seats .. world calls benchmark .. lighting extraordinary .. what you see on precept (car sp?) is high intensity discharge head lamps with fiber optic conduits .. every other light is light emitting diodes .. 'instant on' (safety feature) .. and if people drive in washington like do in detroit they're far too close to you .. 135012 let me make it very, very clear we are here because of good work of thousands of people engineers back at our respective companies .. worked on for 7 years .. we have great debt of gratitude to own work force .. we reached and stretched further than thought possible .. pull out as he introduces ford's chief of staff john rennemake (sp?) 135128 ms john at mic .. (thanks harry for presentation) .. what he is really telling you maybe for first time really successful partnership .. incredible partnership between 7 or more depts. of government .. national labs .. supplier community technical community .. 3 autos ... celebrating roll out of vehicles .. but also celebrate incredibly successful partnership (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver 80 miles per gallon of fuel 140805 ms man at mic .. revolutionary in our time .. like to turn it over to father of .. pan as gore shakes his hand before taking mic 140834 ms gore: thank you jim great to be here with these magnificent vehicles and be able to kick tires & see what like up close 140844 jim thank you .. indeed great honor to be with jim holden .. john .. harry pierce .. also allen ruther (sp?) of united auto workers & members of teams brought us here today (shaky shot) .. 140913 my collegaues .. secretary of transportation dept. .. energy dept. .. EPA .. secretary of commerce .. former governor jim blanchard 140948 i mentioned engineers here .. would like to ask engineers present knowing many thousands back in detroit .. national labs ..(etc.) . please stand .. you all are ones .. (he and others clap) pull out and push in 141032 ms gore .. great privelege to get to know men & women .. after this set up following arduous negotiations in white house .. everybody involved went extra mile .. 141058 engineers brought .. excitement & commitment to this hard to decribe in words .. on quite a few occasions wife tipper and i had engineers and spouses to our home .. every few months different focal point .. drive trains, battery technology .. composite matierals 141134 we invited engineers and encourage them to bring spouses to washington for social occasion .. getting to interact with them socially brought home to me .. what's involved here .. spouses .. i'd like to thank spouses .. put up lot with long hours and extra commitment 141215 been some midnight oil burned and lot of weekend shifts and i appreciate that very much .. challenge you all agreed to take .. consciously designed by you to be beyond what you knew how to do 141246 i didn't understand a lot of it (referring to harry's speech) .. in negotiations that was key sticking point .. when get to point that marks boundary from what you know how to do and unknown takes leap of faith 141320 by setting goal considerably beyond .. basis if existing technologies .. expected improvements .. when they decided to make that leap of faith .. was courageous decision 141352 in our system competition is key also have uniquely american approach to challenges that involved unknown for days of lewis and clark till now 141416 private companies .. have limit to what they can justify to shareholders .. in pure exploration (audio improved) 141442 black 141515 ms from back gore and 2 men 141516 black 141519 ms car on stage 141521 bars 141525 rerack 141532 ms car push in 141549 extreme ws of audience and 3 cars on stage in spotlights (off screen speaker announces arrivals) .. secretary of transportation robby slater, secr. of energy bill richardson, administrator of EPA carol browner and deputy secr. of commerce robert mallet (sp?) they all walk and take seats in front row .. push in on them .. claps 141621 extreme ws stage area and crowd from back 141640 ws as gore and others walks on stage .. push in as he looks at car .. push in 141641 ms gore and others on stage near car .. he walks over to look inside .. looks at another car .. pull out & push in .. looks at last car .. pull out 141821 ws of gore and men at car .. push in 141846 ms gore and others .. pull out as he takes seat on stage 141912 ws gore and other in sit .. car in background .. pan to speaker at mic .. push in 141920 ms man at mic says: mr. vice president we are truly honored to be here today to speak on behalf of general motors .. my colleagues from ford and .. daimler chrysler as well 141938 coming to end point with respect to phase one of 'pngv' very unique and extraordinary partnership among academia you industry automotive supplier industry, the UAW (united auto workers), various agencies of federal government .. national labs .. never before have we put all of these intellectual resources together to try and break mode with advance vehicle technology .. push in 142021 still remember day when jack smith met with president and had discussed 'pngv project' .. he walked into my office and said we agreed to produce family (model) .. 5-passenger (vehicle) that will deliver 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalency .. i looked at jack and said jack we don't know how to do that and he said don't let that get in way .. and we haven't 142055 proof in pudding is right behind me (vehicles) .. these 3 vehicles GM precept, the ford prodigy in middle and 'exx3 dodge' for daimler chrysler are output of this 7 years partnership extraordinary partnership but for partnership these vehicles would not be here today .. ought to be model how industries .. government .. unions & automotive suppliers work together to leverage all resources and move as rapidly as possible to more energy efficiency .. and lower and lower emissions (toxic and green house effect) 142205 these 3 vehicles behind me demonstrate extraordinary advances in automotive technology .. key in phase 2 .. take technology and roll out across high value production of all vehicles .. some 130 innovations in 'gm precept (sp?)' .. we have engineering today .. working with singular purpose examine each and every one innovations (to what produce today) 142250 we've got to have real impact environmentally only way you get there is high volume of vehicles in hands of consumers on road ways, does no good .. to have pr (public relations) events .. if technologies do not end up in high volume 142318 3 companies i can assure you are absolutely committed in taking technologies and finding appropriate applications across our product lines 142328 one year ago GM announced in new york .. proposing hybrid drive systems (all vehiciles on stage have that) for transit buses .. put in operation in new york transit system .. now taken bus back 142405 entered into partnership with major bus manufacturer new flyer one of largest manufacturers of buses for north america .. and put demonstration ... across america .. in cities .. pull out 142430 extreme ws then push in 142437 we got 50 percent fuel saving in hybrid .. compared to diesel bus today .. 80 percent reduction in (particular?) .. 90 percent in CO and hydrocarbons .. 90 percent in nox .. 142518 3 million gallons in diesle fuel equivalent putting 50,000 toyota predices(sp?) on road in this country .. what's significance of that comparison .. can apply technology (where have stop & go trafic) 142552 that same day a year ago announced similar demonstration program with full size pickup trucks with parallel hybrid system and test that in half dozen cities .. and 200 plus drivers .. start to roll out in november of this year .. 142636 my love the precept .. this is truly a unique vehicle .. we have reinvented aero dynamic design .. most aero dynamic family oriented vehicle in world 142715 full size testing in wind tunnel (suyggest we may improve on that figure) .. see no air intact on front of precept .. take air in either sides and rear .. 142802 fully enclosed underbody .. took all side mirrors off .. took antenna off .. replacing exterior mirror on either side with 2 cameras combined with 3rd camera .. provide panoramic view .. in blind spots 142835 that what we did with respecst to arrow .. look to every possible energy saving .. with respect to wheels .. 16-inch spun aluminium wheels .. lightest .. on any passenger car in world .. radial .. resistance .. tires 142910 then we took a look at body itself .. aluminum space frame .. polymeric panels .. 142930 vehicle powered at front .. liquid cool permanent power ac motor .. motor becomes generator when vehicle being braked .. it's a motor .. generator (transforms in electric power) 143012 working on lithium power battery .. even more efficient .. at rear of vehicle have heat engine .. 3 cylinder 12 valve isuzu engineer ... very sophisticated .. (some electrical) 143100 multi-purpose unit 'mpu' .. . when heat engine not functioning we have electric power at rear axle as well .. recharges battery restarts diesel engine .. smoothness of shifting .. and regenerative braking .. runs AC compressor (air and heat) .. quite unique to hybrid vehciles 143205 looked at every conceivable technology to get mass out of vehicle .. aluminum alloys .. polymer .. redesigned seats .. open web seat .. open weave seat design .. very very innovative .. lighting extraodinary incandescent lighting took too much energy see high intensity .. head lamps .. every other light are light emitting diodes .. providing free safety .. these technologies are just the beginning 143324 real proof in pudding is if can get technology in high power production .. have same interest you have in energy efficient and environonmental (impact) issues . we're drive technology forward and long term vision of hydrogen based economy .. took vehicle up detroit auto show (see in week in washington) .. took diesel engine and opal trans axle out of vehicle and dropped in 9th generation portion exchange membrane .. 143433 105 peak kilowatt fuel stat .. did computer simulation .. projected deliver 108 miles per gallon composite fuel economy (he points to vehicle behind) .. if want to talk about how many miles per gallon .. get when put diesel fuel .. it's 90 miles per gallon .. committed to economically sound solutions .. including global warming .. you're going to see more and more technologies applied to more and more .. products .. (claps) .. that's our commitment to you .. we are here because of good work of thousands of people .. engineers . worked on for some 7 years .. 3 companies (GM Ford, Daimler Chrysler) including general motors .. introduce john rennemakey (sp?) ford's chief of staff ... (2 shake hands) pull out and push in 143720 ms john at mic (with ford) .. what's he telling maybe for 1st time successful partnrship .. incredible cooperation (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver nearly 80 miles per gallon of fuel .. claps (recognizes some people) .. pull out 143910 extreme ws then push in 143927 ms john at mic .. no easy challenge back in 1993 gore said new partnership .. coordinating effort so americas best scientists and engineers to develop .. technological challenge comparable to or greater than apollo project .. also recognize role of important UAW .. represented by allen russo (claps) .. under partnership auto workers, suppliers, unions (etc.) .. this is hybrid electrical vehicles as well full size family car.. pan to vehicle 144117 ms of ford's car .. john: sacrifices no performance or functionality .. also has capability when step on brakes to .. pull out .. see gore sitting to side pan back to speaker 144154 .. consistent with ford's policy of sooner, safer sooner .. (2003) our production hybrid family size .. low emissions without sarificing roominess affordability (claps) .. we're also making .. progress on hydrogen fuel cars 144235 hash
GORE AND NEW CARS 1339 - 1444 Atrium Hall Meeting
VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE AND OFFICIALS FROM THE BIG THREE AUTOMAKERS (GM, FORD, DAIMLER CHRYSLER) DISPLAY AND DISCUSS THE ROLL OUT SUPER FUEL EFFICIENT CONCEPT CARS. LOCATION: ATRIUM HALL REAGAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 133904 ms man at mic (behind him is car) .. speaker says: 80 percent reduction .. 90 reduction in CO and hydrocarbons .. let me give you example of what fuel efficiency does .. (POOR AUDIO .. IMPROVES SOMEWHAT AFTER 1400) 133925 save 3 million gallons of diesel fuel a year .. 3 million gallons .. equivalent of putting 50,000 Toyota Presices(sp?) on road .. in this country .. 134007 same day a year ago announced similar .. with response to pickup trucks .. going to get that in half dozen cities in u.s. ... start to roll out in november of this year .. full size pickups.. such large users of fuel . 134057 only regret can't get microphone to hang on me have to talk from podium we invented aero dynamic design in this vehicle 134624 we've looked at every conceivable technology makes sense to get mass out of vehciles .. redesigned our seats .. find open web seats .. world calls benchmark .. lighting extraordinary .. what you see on precept (car sp?) is high intensity discharge head lamps with fiber optic conduits .. every other light is light emitting diodes .. 'instant on' (safety feature) .. and if people drive in washington like do in detroit they're far too close to you .. 135012 let me make it very, very clear we are here because of good work of thousands of people engineers back at our respective companies .. worked on for 7 years .. we have great debt of gratitude to own work force .. we reached and stretched further than thought possible .. pull out as he introduces ford's chief of staff john rennemake (sp?) 135128 ms john at mic .. (thanks harry for presentation) .. what he is really telling you maybe for first time really successful partnership .. incredible partnership between 7 or more depts. of government .. national labs .. supplier community technical community .. 3 autos ... celebrating roll out of vehicles .. but also celebrate incredibly successful partnership (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver 80 miles per gallon of fuel 140805 ms man at mic .. revolutionary in our time .. like to turn it over to father of .. pan as gore shakes his hand before taking mic 140834 ms gore: thank you jim great to be here with these magnificent vehicles and be able to kick tires & see what like up close 140844 jim thank you .. indeed great honor to be with jim holden .. john .. harry pierce .. also allen ruther (sp?) of united auto workers & members of teams brought us here today (shaky shot) .. 140913 my collegaues .. secretary of transportation dept. .. energy dept. .. EPA .. secretary of commerce .. former governor jim blanchard 140948 i mentioned engineers here .. would like to ask engineers present knowing many thousands back in detroit .. national labs ..(etc.) . please stand .. you all are ones .. (he and others clap) pull out and push in 141032 ms gore .. great privelege to get to know men & women .. after this set up following arduous negotiations in white house .. everybody involved went extra mile .. 141058 engineers brought .. excitement & commitment to this hard to decribe in words .. on quite a few occasions wife tipper and i had engineers and spouses to our home .. every few months different focal point .. drive trains, battery technology .. composite matierals 141134 we invited engineers and encourage them to bring spouses to washington for social occasion .. getting to interact with them socially brought home to me .. what's involved here .. spouses .. i'd like to thank spouses .. put up lot with long hours and extra commitment 141215 been some midnight oil burned and lot of weekend shifts and i appreciate that very much .. challenge you all agreed to take .. consciously designed by you to be beyond what you knew how to do 141246 i didn't understand a lot of it (referring to harry's speech) .. in negotiations that was key sticking point .. when get to point that marks boundary from what you know how to do and unknown takes leap of faith 141320 by setting goal considerably beyond .. basis if existing technologies .. expected improvements .. when they decided to make that leap of faith .. was courageous decision 141352 in our system competition is key also have uniquely american approach to challenges that involved unknown for days of lewis and clark till now 141416 private companies .. have limit to what they can justify to shareholders .. in pure exploration (audio improved) 141442 black 141515 ms from back gore and 2 men 141516 black 141519 ms car on stage 141521 bars 141525 rerack 141532 ms car push in 141549 extreme ws of audience and 3 cars on stage in spotlights (off screen speaker announces arrivals) .. secretary of transportation robby slater, secr. of energy bill richardson, administrator of EPA carol browner and deputy secr. of commerce robert mallet (sp?) they all walk and take seats in front row .. push in on them .. claps 141621 extreme ws stage area and crowd from back 141640 ws as gore and others walks on stage .. push in as he looks at car .. push in 141641 ms gore and others on stage near car .. he walks over to look inside .. looks at another car .. pull out & push in .. looks at last car .. pull out 141821 ws of gore and men at car .. push in 141846 ms gore and others .. pull out as he takes seat on stage 141912 ws gore and other in sit .. car in background .. pan to speaker at mic .. push in 141920 ms man at mic says: mr. vice president we are truly honored to be here today to speak on behalf of general motors .. my colleagues from ford and .. daimler chrysler as well 141938 coming to end point with respect to phase one of 'pngv' very unique and extraordinary partnership among academia you industry automotive supplier industry, the UAW (united auto workers), various agencies of federal government .. national labs .. never before have we put all of these intellectual resources together to try and break mode with advance vehicle technology .. push in 142021 still remember day when jack smith met with president and had discussed 'pngv project' .. he walked into my office and said we agreed to produce family (model) .. 5-passenger (vehicle) that will deliver 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalency .. i looked at jack and said jack we don't know how to do that and he said don't let that get in way .. and we haven't 142055 proof in pudding is right behind me (vehicles) .. these 3 vehicles GM precept, the ford prodigy in middle and 'exx3 dodge' for daimler chrysler are output of this 7 years partnership extraordinary partnership but for partnership these vehicles would not be here today .. ought to be model how industries .. government .. unions & automotive suppliers work together to leverage all resources and move as rapidly as possible to more energy efficiency .. and lower and lower emissions (toxic and green house effect) 142205 these 3 vehicles behind me demonstrate extraordinary advances in automotive technology .. key in phase 2 .. take technology and roll out across high value production of all vehicles .. some 130 innovations in 'gm precept (sp?)' .. we have engineering today .. working with singular purpose examine each and every one innovations (to what produce today) 142250 we've got to have real impact environmentally only way you get there is high volume of vehicles in hands of consumers on road ways, does no good .. to have pr (public relations) events .. if technologies do not end up in high volume 142318 3 companies i can assure you are absolutely committed in taking technologies and finding appropriate applications across our product lines 142328 one year ago GM announced in new york .. proposing hybrid drive systems (all vehiciles on stage have that) for transit buses .. put in operation in new york transit system .. now taken bus back 142405 entered into partnership with major bus manufacturer new flyer one of largest manufacturers of buses for north america .. and put demonstration ... across america .. in cities .. pull out 142430 extreme ws then push in 142437 we got 50 percent fuel saving in hybrid .. compared to diesel bus today .. 80 percent reduction in (particular?) .. 90 percent in CO and hydrocarbons .. 90 percent in nox .. 142518 3 million gallons in diesle fuel equivalent putting 50,000 toyota predices(sp?) on road in this country .. what's significance of that comparison .. can apply technology (where have stop & go trafic) 142552 that same day a year ago announced similar demonstration program with full size pickup trucks with parallel hybrid system and test that in half dozen cities .. and 200 plus drivers .. start to roll out in november of this year .. 142636 my love the precept .. this is truly a unique vehicle .. we have reinvented aero dynamic design .. most aero dynamic family oriented vehicle in world 142715 full size testing in wind tunnel (suyggest we may improve on that figure) .. see no air intact on front of precept .. take air in either sides and rear .. 142802 fully enclosed underbody .. took all side mirrors off .. took antenna off .. replacing exterior mirror on either side with 2 cameras combined with 3rd camera .. provide panoramic view .. in blind spots 142835 that what we did with respecst to arrow .. look to every possible energy saving .. with respect to wheels .. 16-inch spun aluminium wheels .. lightest .. on any passenger car in world .. radial .. resistance .. tires 142910 then we took a look at body itself .. aluminum space frame .. polymeric panels .. 142930 vehicle powered at front .. liquid cool permanent power ac motor .. motor becomes generator when vehicle being braked .. it's a motor .. generator (transforms in electric power) 143012 working on lithium power battery .. even more efficient .. at rear of vehicle have heat engine .. 3 cylinder 12 valve isuzu engineer ... very sophisticated .. (some electrical) 143100 multi-purpose unit 'mpu' .. . when heat engine not functioning we have electric power at rear axle as well .. recharges battery restarts diesel engine .. smoothness of shifting .. and regenerative braking .. runs AC compressor (air and heat) .. quite unique to hybrid vehciles 143205 looked at every conceivable technology to get mass out of vehicle .. aluminum alloys .. polymer .. redesigned seats .. open web seat .. open weave seat design .. very very innovative .. lighting extraodinary incandescent lighting took too much energy see high intensity .. head lamps .. every other light are light emitting diodes .. providing free safety .. these technologies are just the beginning 143324 real proof in pudding is if can get technology in high power production .. have same interest you have in energy efficient and environonmental (impact) issues . we're drive technology forward and long term vision of hydrogen based economy .. took vehicle up detroit auto show (see in week in washington) .. took diesel engine and opal trans axle out of vehicle and dropped in 9th generation portion exchange membrane .. 143433 105 peak kilowatt fuel stat .. did computer simulation .. projected deliver 108 miles per gallon composite fuel economy (he points to vehicle behind) .. if want to talk about how many miles per gallon .. get when put diesel fuel .. it's 90 miles per gallon .. committed to economically sound solutions .. including global warming .. you're going to see more and more technologies applied to more and more .. products .. (claps) .. that's our commitment to you .. we are here because of good work of thousands of people .. engineers . worked on for some 7 years .. 3 companies (GM Ford, Daimler Chrysler) including general motors .. introduce john rennemakey (sp?) ford's chief of staff ... (2 shake hands) pull out and push in 143720 ms john at mic (with ford) .. what's he telling maybe for 1st time successful partnrship .. incredible cooperation (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver nearly 80 miles per gallon of fuel .. claps (recognizes some people) .. pull out 143910 extreme ws then push in 143927 ms john at mic .. no easy challenge back in 1993 gore said new partnership .. coordinating effort so americas best scientists and engineers to develop .. technological challenge comparable to or greater than apollo project .. also recognize role of important UAW .. represented by allen russo (claps) .. under partnership auto workers, suppliers, unions (etc.) .. this is hybrid electrical vehicles as well full size family car.. pan to vehicle 144117 ms of ford's car .. john: sacrifices no performance or functionality .. also has capability when step on brakes to .. pull out .. see gore sitting to side pan back to speaker 144154 .. consistent with ford's policy of sooner, safer sooner .. (2003) our production hybrid family size .. low emissions without sarificing roominess affordability (claps) .. we're also making .. progress on hydrogen fuel cars 144235 hash
GORE AND NEW CARS 1339 - 1444 Atrium Hall Meeting
VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE AND OFFICIALS FROM THE BIG THREE AUTOMAKERS (GM, FORD, DAIMLER CHRYSLER) DISPLAY AND DISCUSS THE ROLL OUT SUPER FUEL EFFICIENT CONCEPT CARS. LOCATION: ATRIUM HALL REAGAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 133904 ms man at mic (behind him is car) .. speaker says: 80 percent reduction .. 90 reduction in CO and hydrocarbons .. let me give you example of what fuel efficiency does .. (POOR AUDIO .. IMPROVES SOMEWHAT AFTER 1400) 133925 save 3 million gallons of diesel fuel a year .. 3 million gallons .. equivalent of putting 50,000 Toyota Presices(sp?) on road .. in this country .. 134007 same day a year ago announced similar .. with response to pickup trucks .. going to get that in half dozen cities in u.s. ... start to roll out in november of this year .. full size pickups.. such large users of fuel . 134057 only regret can't get microphone to hang on me have to talk from podium we invented aero dynamic design in this vehicle 134624 we've looked at every conceivable technology makes sense to get mass out of vehciles .. redesigned our seats .. find open web seats .. world calls benchmark .. lighting extraordinary .. what you see on precept (car sp?) is high intensity discharge head lamps with fiber optic conduits .. every other light is light emitting diodes .. 'instant on' (safety feature) .. and if people drive in washington like do in detroit they're far too close to you .. 135012 let me make it very, very clear we are here because of good work of thousands of people engineers back at our respective companies .. worked on for 7 years .. we have great debt of gratitude to own work force .. we reached and stretched further than thought possible .. pull out as he introduces ford's chief of staff john rennemake (sp?) 135128 ms john at mic .. (thanks harry for presentation) .. what he is really telling you maybe for first time really successful partnership .. incredible partnership between 7 or more depts. of government .. national labs .. supplier community technical community .. 3 autos ... celebrating roll out of vehicles .. but also celebrate incredibly successful partnership (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver 80 miles per gallon of fuel 140805 ms man at mic .. revolutionary in our time .. like to turn it over to father of .. pan as gore shakes his hand before taking mic 140834 ms gore: thank you jim great to be here with these magnificent vehicles and be able to kick tires & see what like up close 140844 jim thank you .. indeed great honor to be with jim holden .. john .. harry pierce .. also allen ruther (sp?) of united auto workers & members of teams brought us here today (shaky shot) .. 140913 my collegaues .. secretary of transportation dept. .. energy dept. .. EPA .. secretary of commerce .. former governor jim blanchard 140948 i mentioned engineers here .. would like to ask engineers present knowing many thousands back in detroit .. national labs ..(etc.) . please stand .. you all are ones .. (he and others clap) pull out and push in 141032 ms gore .. great privelege to get to know men & women .. after this set up following arduous negotiations in white house .. everybody involved went extra mile .. 141058 engineers brought .. excitement & commitment to this hard to decribe in words .. on quite a few occasions wife tipper and i had engineers and spouses to our home .. every few months different focal point .. drive trains, battery technology .. composite matierals 141134 we invited engineers and encourage them to bring spouses to washington for social occasion .. getting to interact with them socially brought home to me .. what's involved here .. spouses .. i'd like to thank spouses .. put up lot with long hours and extra commitment 141215 been some midnight oil burned and lot of weekend shifts and i appreciate that very much .. challenge you all agreed to take .. consciously designed by you to be beyond what you knew how to do 141246 i didn't understand a lot of it (referring to harry's speech) .. in negotiations that was key sticking point .. when get to point that marks boundary from what you know how to do and unknown takes leap of faith 141320 by setting goal considerably beyond .. basis if existing technologies .. expected improvements .. when they decided to make that leap of faith .. was courageous decision 141352 in our system competition is key also have uniquely american approach to challenges that involved unknown for days of lewis and clark till now 141416 private companies .. have limit to what they can justify to shareholders .. in pure exploration (audio improved) 141442 black 141515 ms from back gore and 2 men 141516 black 141519 ms car on stage 141521 bars 141525 rerack 141532 ms car push in 141549 extreme ws of audience and 3 cars on stage in spotlights (off screen speaker announces arrivals) .. secretary of transportation robby slater, secr. of energy bill richardson, administrator of EPA carol browner and deputy secr. of commerce robert mallet (sp?) they all walk and take seats in front row .. push in on them .. claps 141621 extreme ws stage area and crowd from back 141640 ws as gore and others walks on stage .. push in as he looks at car .. push in 141641 ms gore and others on stage near car .. he walks over to look inside .. looks at another car .. pull out & push in .. looks at last car .. pull out 141821 ws of gore and men at car .. push in 141846 ms gore and others .. pull out as he takes seat on stage 141912 ws gore and other in sit .. car in background .. pan to speaker at mic .. push in 141920 ms man at mic says: mr. vice president we are truly honored to be here today to speak on behalf of general motors .. my colleagues from ford and .. daimler chrysler as well 141938 coming to end point with respect to phase one of 'pngv' very unique and extraordinary partnership among academia you industry automotive supplier industry, the UAW (united auto workers), various agencies of federal government .. national labs .. never before have we put all of these intellectual resources together to try and break mode with advance vehicle technology .. push in 142021 still remember day when jack smith met with president and had discussed 'pngv project' .. he walked into my office and said we agreed to produce family (model) .. 5-passenger (vehicle) that will deliver 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalency .. i looked at jack and said jack we don't know how to do that and he said don't let that get in way .. and we haven't 142055 proof in pudding is right behind me (vehicles) .. these 3 vehicles GM precept, the ford prodigy in middle and 'exx3 dodge' for daimler chrysler are output of this 7 years partnership extraordinary partnership but for partnership these vehicles would not be here today .. ought to be model how industries .. government .. unions & automotive suppliers work together to leverage all resources and move as rapidly as possible to more energy efficiency .. and lower and lower emissions (toxic and green house effect) 142205 these 3 vehicles behind me demonstrate extraordinary advances in automotive technology .. key in phase 2 .. take technology and roll out across high value production of all vehicles .. some 130 innovations in 'gm precept (sp?)' .. we have engineering today .. working with singular purpose examine each and every one innovations (to what produce today) 142250 we've got to have real impact environmentally only way you get there is high volume of vehicles in hands of consumers on road ways, does no good .. to have pr (public relations) events .. if technologies do not end up in high volume 142318 3 companies i can assure you are absolutely committed in taking technologies and finding appropriate applications across our product lines 142328 one year ago GM announced in new york .. proposing hybrid drive systems (all vehiciles on stage have that) for transit buses .. put in operation in new york transit system .. now taken bus back 142405 entered into partnership with major bus manufacturer new flyer one of largest manufacturers of buses for north america .. and put demonstration ... across america .. in cities .. pull out 142430 extreme ws then push in 142437 we got 50 percent fuel saving in hybrid .. compared to diesel bus today .. 80 percent reduction in (particular?) .. 90 percent in CO and hydrocarbons .. 90 percent in nox .. 142518 3 million gallons in diesle fuel equivalent putting 50,000 toyota predices(sp?) on road in this country .. what's significance of that comparison .. can apply technology (where have stop & go trafic) 142552 that same day a year ago announced similar demonstration program with full size pickup trucks with parallel hybrid system and test that in half dozen cities .. and 200 plus drivers .. start to roll out in november of this year .. 142636 my love the precept .. this is truly a unique vehicle .. we have reinvented aero dynamic design .. most aero dynamic family oriented vehicle in world 142715 full size testing in wind tunnel (suyggest we may improve on that figure) .. see no air intact on front of precept .. take air in either sides and rear .. 142802 fully enclosed underbody .. took all side mirrors off .. took antenna off .. replacing exterior mirror on either side with 2 cameras combined with 3rd camera .. provide panoramic view .. in blind spots 142835 that what we did with respecst to arrow .. look to every possible energy saving .. with respect to wheels .. 16-inch spun aluminium wheels .. lightest .. on any passenger car in world .. radial .. resistance .. tires 142910 then we took a look at body itself .. aluminum space frame .. polymeric panels .. 142930 vehicle powered at front .. liquid cool permanent power ac motor .. motor becomes generator when vehicle being braked .. it's a motor .. generator (transforms in electric power) 143012 working on lithium power battery .. even more efficient .. at rear of vehicle have heat engine .. 3 cylinder 12 valve isuzu engineer ... very sophisticated .. (some electrical) 143100 multi-purpose unit 'mpu' .. . when heat engine not functioning we have electric power at rear axle as well .. recharges battery restarts diesel engine .. smoothness of shifting .. and regenerative braking .. runs AC compressor (air and heat) .. quite unique to hybrid vehciles 143205 looked at every conceivable technology to get mass out of vehicle .. aluminum alloys .. polymer .. redesigned seats .. open web seat .. open weave seat design .. very very innovative .. lighting extraodinary incandescent lighting took too much energy see high intensity .. head lamps .. every other light are light emitting diodes .. providing free safety .. these technologies are just the beginning 143324 real proof in pudding is if can get technology in high power production .. have same interest you have in energy efficient and environonmental (impact) issues . we're drive technology forward and long term vision of hydrogen based economy .. took vehicle up detroit auto show (see in week in washington) .. took diesel engine and opal trans axle out of vehicle and dropped in 9th generation portion exchange membrane .. 143433 105 peak kilowatt fuel stat .. did computer simulation .. projected deliver 108 miles per gallon composite fuel economy (he points to vehicle behind) .. if want to talk about how many miles per gallon .. get when put diesel fuel .. it's 90 miles per gallon .. committed to economically sound solutions .. including global warming .. you're going to see more and more technologies applied to more and more .. products .. (claps) .. that's our commitment to you .. we are here because of good work of thousands of people .. engineers . worked on for some 7 years .. 3 companies (GM Ford, Daimler Chrysler) including general motors .. introduce john rennemakey (sp?) ford's chief of staff ... (2 shake hands) pull out and push in 143720 ms john at mic (with ford) .. what's he telling maybe for 1st time successful partnrship .. incredible cooperation (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver nearly 80 miles per gallon of fuel .. claps (recognizes some people) .. pull out 143910 extreme ws then push in 143927 ms john at mic .. no easy challenge back in 1993 gore said new partnership .. coordinating effort so americas best scientists and engineers to develop .. technological challenge comparable to or greater than apollo project .. also recognize role of important UAW .. represented by allen russo (claps) .. under partnership auto workers, suppliers, unions (etc.) .. this is hybrid electrical vehicles as well full size family car.. pan to vehicle 144117 ms of ford's car .. john: sacrifices no performance or functionality .. also has capability when step on brakes to .. pull out .. see gore sitting to side pan back to speaker 144154 .. consistent with ford's policy of sooner, safer sooner .. (2003) our production hybrid family size .. low emissions without sarificing roominess affordability (claps) .. we're also making .. progress on hydrogen fuel cars 144235 hash
GORE AND NEW CARS 1339 - 1444 Atrium Hall Meeting
VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE AND OFFICIALS FROM THE BIG THREE AUTOMAKERS (GM, FORD, DAIMLER CHRYSLER) DISPLAY AND DISCUSS THE ROLL OUT SUPER FUEL EFFICIENT CONCEPT CARS. LOCATION: ATRIUM HALL REAGAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 133904 ms man at mic (behind him is car) .. speaker says: 80 percent reduction .. 90 reduction in CO and hydrocarbons .. let me give you example of what fuel efficiency does .. (POOR AUDIO .. IMPROVES SOMEWHAT AFTER 1400) 133925 save 3 million gallons of diesel fuel a year .. 3 million gallons .. equivalent of putting 50,000 Toyota Presices(sp?) on road .. in this country .. 134007 same day a year ago announced similar .. with response to pickup trucks .. going to get that in half dozen cities in u.s. ... start to roll out in november of this year .. full size pickups.. such large users of fuel . 134057 only regret can't get microphone to hang on me have to talk from podium we invented aero dynamic design in this vehicle 134624 we've looked at every conceivable technology makes sense to get mass out of vehciles .. redesigned our seats .. find open web seats .. world calls benchmark .. lighting extraordinary .. what you see on precept (car sp?) is high intensity discharge head lamps with fiber optic conduits .. every other light is light emitting diodes .. 'instant on' (safety feature) .. and if people drive in washington like do in detroit they're far too close to you .. 135012 let me make it very, very clear we are here because of good work of thousands of people engineers back at our respective companies .. worked on for 7 years .. we have great debt of gratitude to own work force .. we reached and stretched further than thought possible .. pull out as he introduces ford's chief of staff john rennemake (sp?) 135128 ms john at mic .. (thanks harry for presentation) .. what he is really telling you maybe for first time really successful partnership .. incredible partnership between 7 or more depts. of government .. national labs .. supplier community technical community .. 3 autos ... celebrating roll out of vehicles .. but also celebrate incredibly successful partnership (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver 80 miles per gallon of fuel 140805 ms man at mic .. revolutionary in our time .. like to turn it over to father of .. pan as gore shakes his hand before taking mic 140834 ms gore: thank you jim great to be here with these magnificent vehicles and be able to kick tires & see what like up close 140844 jim thank you .. indeed great honor to be with jim holden .. john .. harry pierce .. also allen ruther (sp?) of united auto workers & members of teams brought us here today (shaky shot) .. 140913 my collegaues .. secretary of transportation dept. .. energy dept. .. EPA .. secretary of commerce .. former governor jim blanchard 140948 i mentioned engineers here .. would like to ask engineers present knowing many thousands back in detroit .. national labs ..(etc.) . please stand .. you all are ones .. (he and others clap) pull out and push in 141032 ms gore .. great privelege to get to know men & women .. after this set up following arduous negotiations in white house .. everybody involved went extra mile .. 141058 engineers brought .. excitement & commitment to this hard to decribe in words .. on quite a few occasions wife tipper and i had engineers and spouses to our home .. every few months different focal point .. drive trains, battery technology .. composite matierals 141134 we invited engineers and encourage them to bring spouses to washington for social occasion .. getting to interact with them socially brought home to me .. what's involved here .. spouses .. i'd like to thank spouses .. put up lot with long hours and extra commitment 141215 been some midnight oil burned and lot of weekend shifts and i appreciate that very much .. challenge you all agreed to take .. consciously designed by you to be beyond what you knew how to do 141246 i didn't understand a lot of it (referring to harry's speech) .. in negotiations that was key sticking point .. when get to point that marks boundary from what you know how to do and unknown takes leap of faith 141320 by setting goal considerably beyond .. basis if existing technologies .. expected improvements .. when they decided to make that leap of faith .. was courageous decision 141352 in our system competition is key also have uniquely american approach to challenges that involved unknown for days of lewis and clark till now 141416 private companies .. have limit to what they can justify to shareholders .. in pure exploration (audio improved) 141442 black 141515 ms from back gore and 2 men 141516 black 141519 ms car on stage 141521 bars 141525 rerack 141532 ms car push in 141549 extreme ws of audience and 3 cars on stage in spotlights (off screen speaker announces arrivals) .. secretary of transportation robby slater, secr. of energy bill richardson, administrator of EPA carol browner and deputy secr. of commerce robert mallet (sp?) they all walk and take seats in front row .. push in on them .. claps 141621 extreme ws stage area and crowd from back 141640 ws as gore and others walks on stage .. push in as he looks at car .. push in 141641 ms gore and others on stage near car .. he walks over to look inside .. looks at another car .. pull out & push in .. looks at last car .. pull out 141821 ws of gore and men at car .. push in 141846 ms gore and others .. pull out as he takes seat on stage 141912 ws gore and other in sit .. car in background .. pan to speaker at mic .. push in 141920 ms man at mic says: mr. vice president we are truly honored to be here today to speak on behalf of general motors .. my colleagues from ford and .. daimler chrysler as well 141938 coming to end point with respect to phase one of 'pngv' very unique and extraordinary partnership among academia you industry automotive supplier industry, the UAW (united auto workers), various agencies of federal government .. national labs .. never before have we put all of these intellectual resources together to try and break mode with advance vehicle technology .. push in 142021 still remember day when jack smith met with president and had discussed 'pngv project' .. he walked into my office and said we agreed to produce family (model) .. 5-passenger (vehicle) that will deliver 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalency .. i looked at jack and said jack we don't know how to do that and he said don't let that get in way .. and we haven't 142055 proof in pudding is right behind me (vehicles) .. these 3 vehicles GM precept, the ford prodigy in middle and 'exx3 dodge' for daimler chrysler are output of this 7 years partnership extraordinary partnership but for partnership these vehicles would not be here today .. ought to be model how industries .. government .. unions & automotive suppliers work together to leverage all resources and move as rapidly as possible to more energy efficiency .. and lower and lower emissions (toxic and green house effect) 142205 these 3 vehicles behind me demonstrate extraordinary advances in automotive technology .. key in phase 2 .. take technology and roll out across high value production of all vehicles .. some 130 innovations in 'gm precept (sp?)' .. we have engineering today .. working with singular purpose examine each and every one innovations (to what produce today) 142250 we've got to have real impact environmentally only way you get there is high volume of vehicles in hands of consumers on road ways, does no good .. to have pr (public relations) events .. if technologies do not end up in high volume 142318 3 companies i can assure you are absolutely committed in taking technologies and finding appropriate applications across our product lines 142328 one year ago GM announced in new york .. proposing hybrid drive systems (all vehiciles on stage have that) for transit buses .. put in operation in new york transit system .. now taken bus back 142405 entered into partnership with major bus manufacturer new flyer one of largest manufacturers of buses for north america .. and put demonstration ... across america .. in cities .. pull out 142430 extreme ws then push in 142437 we got 50 percent fuel saving in hybrid .. compared to diesel bus today .. 80 percent reduction in (particular?) .. 90 percent in CO and hydrocarbons .. 90 percent in nox .. 142518 3 million gallons in diesle fuel equivalent putting 50,000 toyota predices(sp?) on road in this country .. what's significance of that comparison .. can apply technology (where have stop & go trafic) 142552 that same day a year ago announced similar demonstration program with full size pickup trucks with parallel hybrid system and test that in half dozen cities .. and 200 plus drivers .. start to roll out in november of this year .. 142636 my love the precept .. this is truly a unique vehicle .. we have reinvented aero dynamic design .. most aero dynamic family oriented vehicle in world 142715 full size testing in wind tunnel (suyggest we may improve on that figure) .. see no air intact on front of precept .. take air in either sides and rear .. 142802 fully enclosed underbody .. took all side mirrors off .. took antenna off .. replacing exterior mirror on either side with 2 cameras combined with 3rd camera .. provide panoramic view .. in blind spots 142835 that what we did with respecst to arrow .. look to every possible energy saving .. with respect to wheels .. 16-inch spun aluminium wheels .. lightest .. on any passenger car in world .. radial .. resistance .. tires 142910 then we took a look at body itself .. aluminum space frame .. polymeric panels .. 142930 vehicle powered at front .. liquid cool permanent power ac motor .. motor becomes generator when vehicle being braked .. it's a motor .. generator (transforms in electric power) 143012 working on lithium power battery .. even more efficient .. at rear of vehicle have heat engine .. 3 cylinder 12 valve isuzu engineer ... very sophisticated .. (some electrical) 143100 multi-purpose unit 'mpu' .. . when heat engine not functioning we have electric power at rear axle as well .. recharges battery restarts diesel engine .. smoothness of shifting .. and regenerative braking .. runs AC compressor (air and heat) .. quite unique to hybrid vehciles 143205 looked at every conceivable technology to get mass out of vehicle .. aluminum alloys .. polymer .. redesigned seats .. open web seat .. open weave seat design .. very very innovative .. lighting extraodinary incandescent lighting took too much energy see high intensity .. head lamps .. every other light are light emitting diodes .. providing free safety .. these technologies are just the beginning 143324 real proof in pudding is if can get technology in high power production .. have same interest you have in energy efficient and environonmental (impact) issues . we're drive technology forward and long term vision of hydrogen based economy .. took vehicle up detroit auto show (see in week in washington) .. took diesel engine and opal trans axle out of vehicle and dropped in 9th generation portion exchange membrane .. 143433 105 peak kilowatt fuel stat .. did computer simulation .. projected deliver 108 miles per gallon composite fuel economy (he points to vehicle behind) .. if want to talk about how many miles per gallon .. get when put diesel fuel .. it's 90 miles per gallon .. committed to economically sound solutions .. including global warming .. you're going to see more and more technologies applied to more and more .. products .. (claps) .. that's our commitment to you .. we are here because of good work of thousands of people .. engineers . worked on for some 7 years .. 3 companies (GM Ford, Daimler Chrysler) including general motors .. introduce john rennemakey (sp?) ford's chief of staff ... (2 shake hands) pull out and push in 143720 ms john at mic (with ford) .. what's he telling maybe for 1st time successful partnrship .. incredible cooperation (claps) .. each of these vehicles can deliver nearly 80 miles per gallon of fuel .. claps (recognizes some people) .. pull out 143910 extreme ws then push in 143927 ms john at mic .. no easy challenge back in 1993 gore said new partnership .. coordinating effort so americas best scientists and engineers to develop .. technological challenge comparable to or greater than apollo project .. also recognize role of important UAW .. represented by allen russo (claps) .. under partnership auto workers, suppliers, unions (etc.) .. this is hybrid electrical vehicles as well full size family car.. pan to vehicle 144117 ms of ford's car .. john: sacrifices no performance or functionality .. also has capability when step on brakes to .. pull out .. see gore sitting to side pan back to speaker 144154 .. consistent with ford's policy of sooner, safer sooner .. (2003) our production hybrid family size .. low emissions without sarificing roominess affordability (claps) .. we're also making .. progress on hydrogen fuel cars 144235 hash
CLINTON FOREIGN POLICY
[CLINTON FOREIGN POLICY] [WASHINGTON, DC USA] FTG OF PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE SENATOR HILLARY CLINTON (D-NY) DELIVERING A MAJOR FOREIGN POLICY SPEECH AT GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN WASHINGTON, DC STIX 12:28:39 Wesley Clark: I believe Hillary Clinton will the best commander in chief 12:32:34 when the going gets tough, Hillary Clinton will not let the troops down. You can see it now when her campaign is facing challenges ***12:33:15 Hillary takes stage 12:34:52 Thank you. It's a great personal honor for me to be here with extraordinary leaders of our nation's military forces and to thank them for their long and dedicated service to our country. I am grateful for their confidence in my ability to lead our nation in difficult times. 12:34:52 I want to thank my long time friend General Clark who served with such distinction and success. I want to thank another long time friend Secretary Togo West, who not only served the Army but also served the Veterans Affairs Department and gave great devotion to our men and women in the military and then when they become our veterans. I want to thank Admiral Dave Stone, General John Watkins, General Joe Ballard, and I want to thank General Antonio Taguba who showed extraordinary courage in the face of very difficult challenges when he accepted an assignment to lead the investigation into what happened at Abu Ghraib. I also want to thank all the other veterans, former officers, noncommissioned officers who are here with me and I want to also express my appreciation to all who are supporting me in this campaign. We are here at such an extraordinary moment in American history. 12:35:34 The stakes have rarely been higher. I've had numerous historians tell me that America's point in our arch of destiny, today is perhaps most similar to the situation confronting President Truman when he became our president and commander in chief. Dramatic events during this past week have reminded us how volatile our world has become and how essential it is that we have sound strategy and strong leadership. From Kosovo to Cuba, from Iraq to Pakistan, to our embassy being burned in Belgrade, these are some of the most challenging spots on our global map. The world is being transformed with enormous risks and possibilities that we must meet with confidence, optimism, resolution and success. 12:36:52 The next president will inherit all of these global challenges and more from a president who failed to handle them well. A war in Afghanistan and a war in Iraq. America's reputation at an all-time low. Countries rushing to acquire nuclear weapons. 12:37:05 Crushing poverty that stymies economic and political progress in too many regions of the world. Global warming and global health pandemics. Genocide in Darfur. A rise of borderless, stateless criminal cartels. And the continuing real threat of terrorism here at home and abroad. But while these stark realities carry dangers, they also bring unprecedented opportunities if we act wisely, if we have the right kind of leadership. There isn't any doubt in my mind that we will not only navigate through these uncharted difficult waters but emerge stronger than ever, reasserting both our leadership and our moral authority. The vision I have for America is one that is rooted in those values. Values that have served us well but have been temporarily sidelined because of this administration's approach to the world. Over the past seven years, we've seen what happens when the president presents the American people with a series of false choices and then is indifferent about the consequences: force versus diplomacy, unilateralism versus multilateralism, hard power versus soft. 12:38:47 We've seen the tragic result of having a president who had neither the experience nor the wisdom to manage our foreign policy and safeguard our national security. We can't let that happen again. America has already taken that chance- one time too many. The symbol of our presidency - the American Eagle - holds arrows in one talon and an olive branch in the other. Both are symbolic tools of what we need to keep our democracy strong and our nation safe- tools that a President must know how to use in the daily course of events, but also when that 3 a.m. phone call comes to the White House because an unforeseen crisis has erupted without warning. In that split second the president has to respond and make a decision that could affect the safety and lives of millions of people here in our country and around the world. Whoever sits at that desk in the Oval Office on January 20th, 2009 needs all the tools available, all the resources at our disposal, and the wisdom to know how to use them. I propose a new American strategy to restore our moral authority, end the war in Iraq, and defend and protect our nation. We need a president who understands there is a time for force, a time for diplomacy, and a time for both, who understands that we enhance our international reputation and strengthen our security if the world sees the human face of American democracy in the good works, the good deeds we do for people seeking freedom from poverty, hunger, disease, illiteracy, and oppression. With me, this is not theoretical. This is very much who I am, what I have done, and what I will do. 12:41:08 The American people don't have to guess whether I understand the issues or whether I would need a foreign policy instruction manual to guide me through a crisis or whether I'd have to rely on advisers to introduce me to global affairs. I'm lucky to have had a pretty good inside view, over eight years in the White House and now over seven years in the Senate, of what the president goes through day in and day out dealing with all of these challenges. Obviously the work that I have done on human rights, democracy, international development gives me a deep appreciation of the importance of winning the hearts and minds of those in societies whether or not they are for us today. I believe that we can seed democracy and create new strong alliances overseas. 12:42:26 And I also know from my years serving on the Senate Armed Services Committee that our military power is absolutely essential but it cannot be viewed as the solution to every international problem. Yes, we must use force when necessary but as a last resort, not a first resort. As one piece of a comprehensive strategy to defend our nation and promote our values. I've been honored to travel to more than 80 countries representing the United States. In sessions with foreign leaders, with influential citizens from the world of business, academia, human rights and so much else. I have traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan three times. And I've seen and have said repeatedly that we must revise our strategy in Afghanistan. When I first went to Afghanistan in 2003 I was met by a soldier who said "welcome to the forgotten front lines in the war against terrorism." I regret to say that those front lines are still largely forgotten. It will take a new policy toward Pakistan - one that builds on the democratic yearnings expressed by the Pakistani people in elections last week and recognizes that the border areas between Pakistan and Afghanistan are among the most important and dangerous in the world. Ignoring these realities of what is happening on the ground in both Afghanistan and Pakistan has been one of the most dangerous failures of the Bush foreign policy. 12:44:23 I have been to Africa and have seen how disease -HIV, AIDS, Tuberculosis, Malaria - undermine progress across an entire continent. I pushed our government to start battling the global AIDS epidemic because this affects our security too. I'm very hopeful that we will make progress in Africa dealing with the multiplicity of challenges that the continent faces. It was my great honor to go to Africa in the mid 1990s as a precursor to my husband's trip and I applaud President Bush and Mrs. Bush for going back. We need a consistent coherent strategy in dealing with Africa and that is something that I will promote. I'm also very proud that the United States Joint Forces Command invited me to be the only senator to serve on the Transformation Advisory Group, which studies and proposes ideas to modernize and strengthen our military, to meet new and emerging global threats. That experience reinforced my commitment to looking at every single challenge we face not through a narrow prism but a broad overview because it is all interconnected - what kind of military we need, 12:46:03 what tools we provide our men and women who serve us is directly related to what it is we are trying to accomplish and how best to utilize those resources effectively. I know very well that in exercising foreign policy you have to know both how to find common ground and how to stand our ground. Dealing with the rising power of China provides an example. 12:46:32 I went to Beijing in 1995 and spoke out for women's rights and human rights. The Chinese government wasn't happy; they pulled the plug on the broadcast of my speech. But I took that as a compliment. Because it was important for the United States both to be represented and to make absolutely clear that human rights is an integral part of our foreign policy and that women's rights is key to that. What we have learned is that where women are oppressed and denied their basic rights we are more likely to have regimes that are more adversarial to American interests and values. 12:47:37 Today, China is most obviously the world's largest and one of its fastest growing economies. It's become a global superpower that needs to be convinced to play by the rules in the global marketplace. Here again, the Bush administration has failed. One third of our trade deficit is with China and over the course of the last seven years Bush policies have has allowed the Chinese government to become our banker. Today, China's steel comes here and our jobs go there. We play by the rules and they manipulate their currency. We get tainted fish and lead-laced toys and poisoned pet food in return. That will change when I am in the White House because I know we have got to take a consistent approach towards China. I've co-sponsored legislation to compel the Administration to take aggressive steps to stop China from manipulating its currency, to make our goods look more expensive. I'm the original co-sponsor of the Foreign Debt Ceiling Act which really means that we would require any administration to begin reversing our trade deficit and start breaking our reliance on China for not only what they provide to us in terms of the way they buy our dollars and buy our debt but also to be held to higher standards for what they import into our market. We have to make sure that American companies have a level playing field when it comes to trade. We're far from reaching that goal. And I think it's imperative that we move because what is happening is 12:49:36 that our standard of living in America is deteriorating. That has direct and serious implications for our capacity to operate effectively on behalf of our strategic interests in the world. It's very difficult to persuade the American people that we must continue to lead, that yes, there will be occasions when we have to sacrifice in furtherance of our values and interests if the standard of living, the family income here at home is deteriorating. So this is something that has to be seen as a whole. 12:49:58 Our fiscal irresponsibility over the last seven years has undermined our ability to be the leader we need to be in the world. You cannot talk about our military and our other objectives strategically and have mired ourselves in debt and dependent upon foreign countries to keep us afloat. That also goes hand in hand with our continuing refusal to have an energy policy that is in line with our strategic objectives. So when we talk about foreign policy, we have to talk about fiscal policy, energy policy and so much else besides just the narrow view that has been primarily driven by the Bush Administration over the last seven years. So, in order to address these new challenges we do have to set a new tone both here at home and around the world. That requires that we start with the most basic of duties. A commander in chief must protect and defend our nation. 12:50:59 On my first day in office, I will announce, as I have repeatedly in this campaign, that the era of cowboy diplomacy is over. That includes the doctrine of pre-emptive war. I have been against that for many years. I believe it led us into a blind alley and I don't think I need to remind the retired flag officers here today how difficult the choices made by the president have been for American military. We need a new national military strategy that employs military power wisely instead of squandering it. That requires us to begin to bring out troops home from Iraq within 60 days of the new president taking office. I believe we can redeploy one to two brigades a month but I also believe it will be dangerous. There's been a lot of talk about withdrawal and redeployment and I think it needs to be put into an appropriate context. 12:52:26 Withdrawing troops is not easy. One does not wake up in the morning and say let's bring them home. It requires planning that looks at every possible contingency. That's why last spring I began pushing the Bush administration to tell us what planning had gone on, whether they were ready to bring our young men and women home. They didn't want to talk to us about it, as is their usual response. We finally were able to secure a briefing which although classified, I can tell you was cursory. It did not inspire confidence in our readiness to do this important task of withdrawing our troops and equipment. I think it is also important that we look at what else needs to happen simultaneously. We have 100,000 or so American civilians in Iraq. They work at the embassy and other government agencies, for businesses and charities. We need a plan for them as well. And we also have Iraqis who sided with us. One of the young officers who spoke in the pre-program is someone I have known a long time, Marine Captain Iscol who began talking to me about the need to take care of those who take care of our troops, translators and drivers. When Captain Iscol was leading his men in the battle that retook Fallujah, he has said as I've heard other young marine officers who were part of that battle tell me, they would not have survived had it not been for their translators. Honor is important. It's important to our country. We are an honorable nation therefore we must do more to take care of those who sided with, protected and saved the lives of young Americans in Iraq. If I am entrusted with the presidency, America will have the courage once again to meet with our adversaries. But I will not be penciling in the leaders of Iran or North Korea or Venezuela or Cuba on the presidential calendar without preconditions, until we have assessed through lower level diplomacy, the motivations and intentions of these dictators. Raul Castro, for example, has a stark choice. He can continue to stifle human rights and economic freedom in Cuba, or he can chart a new course toward democratic reform. We need to engage with our allies in Latin America and Europe to encourage Cuba on to the right path. ***12:55:29 But we simply cannot legitimize rouge regimes or weaken American prestige by impulsively agreeing to presidential level talks that have no preconditions. It may sound good but it doesn't meet the real world test of foreign policy. I have traveled to so many countries working on issues involving some of the most intractable challenges we face. And as we see people respond to their own conditions, we have to be ready to act. The clearest example of that is what just happened in Pakistan. The Pakistani people essentially repudiated the Bush administration's policies and created a new dynamic that could lead to greater freedoms and democracy or to a greater crisis with implications for the war in Afghanistan. ***12:56:40 One thing the American people can be sure of, I will not broadcast threats of unilateral military action against a country like Pakistan just to demonstrate that I am tough enough for the job. We have to change our tone and change our course. So let's begin by reviving old fashioned diplomacy. One of my criticisms of the Bush administration is that they have such a narrow circle of people advising the President. Apparently there is only one diplomat the President will send anywhere and that is Secretary Rice. So if Secretary Rice can't get to the Middle East or get to Pakistan or get to Africa or get anywhere, you don't get the feeling that the President is engaged. I think that is a terrible failure. The president needs to have a broad circle of advisers calling upon distinguished Americans both in and out of governors to serve as presidential envoys, something that I urged when I came back from Pakistan and Afghanistan last January. I urged the White House to send a high-level presidential envoy. I said there is a lot of misunderstanding between President Musharraf and President Karzai and it is going to cause us problems. That was not accepted by the White House and instead, full support continued for President Musharraf as he moved further and further away from democracy, as his strategy for battling al Qaeda, the Taliban and other extremists proved time and time again to be inadequate. We have a new opportunity now. We need to be supporting those in Pakistan from the middle class, from the professions who are our natural allies in order to give American approval to the changes that have taken place in the elections. The more we have people invested in their own futures, the more likely they are to work with us to protect our future. That is what I will attempt to do. It is also important that we revive our commitment at a very public level to human rights and individual freedom. Let's close Guantanamo. Let's make it clear that we will never sanction torture and we will stand for the rule of law. Let's build a real coalition of allies to defeat terrorists in Afghanistan and other countries that provide a safe haven for al Qaeda. Let's make it clear that any terrorists who attack the United States, who have safe haven in any country, are putting that country at risk. That is one way to demonstrate that we will not be the aggressor, we will not engage in pre-emptive attacks, but we will defend our nation. We need, also, to begin to be serious about Darfur. Everyday we fail to act, the betrayal of fundamental values. The peace keeping force has not been deployed for reasons many of you know. Objections by members of the security counsel among others, the United States has to be pushing much more aggressively to get that done. We also do need to lead the world toward a sound energy policy that treats global warming as the crisis it is and not science fiction. I have said that I would meet with the countries that are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gas emissions until we hammered out an agreement, hopefully within a year, that would China and India who have to be part of the solution. We also need to be moving quickly toward a coming to terms with our oil companies and our oil producing country allies. We need to demonstrate our commitment to home-grown energy. We can't do that, I know, until the two oil men leave the White House but as soon as they do, we need to be ready. We will lead the world in combating AIDS. I was proud to sign a pledge to invest $50 billion by 2013 to combat AIDS across the globe. We will lead the world in standing up for women's rights and I know that this is an issue that goes to the heart of who we are as a nation. Because when women continue to comprise the majority of the world's unhealthy, unfed and unschooled, the global community cannot prosper or make progress. When women continue to be raped as a tactic of war, trafficked by criminal cartels, and subjected to violence both in and out of their homes, that compromises the dignity and humanity of the entire human family. We will also lead in providing opportunity to the world's children. When 100 million children in the developing world don't attend school and 150 million more drop out before finishing the first grade - that is a recipe for poverty, instability and extremism. 13:03:40 That's why I have introduced the bipartisan Education for All Act; $10 billion over five years for the goal of basic education for every boy and every girl around the world. No, that is the beginning of the security agenda that I would begin implementing within the first 100 days. We all know that we have a lot of work to do to repair the damage that we will inherit. 13:04:15 In this campaign people are offered clear choices. Senator McCain is a friend of mine. He is to be commended for his courageous service to our nation during the Vietnam War. But in terms of foreign and security policy, in the calamitous wake of George Bush, Senator McCain can't seem to budge from Bush approach that insists on using military force when diplomacy is needed. He has said he wants to keep our troops in Iraq; it would be fine with him for 50-100 years. I will start bringing them home within 60 days. It's also important that we combine all of our tools; economic aid, humanitarian aid, focusing on issues like disease, children's schooling and women's place, something that I believe I will be much better able to do. 13:04:58 Senator Obama, meanwhile, represents another choice. He wavers from seeming to believe that mediation and meetings without preconditions can solve the world's most intractable problems. To advocating rash unilateral military action without cooperation from our allies in the most sensitive region of the world. Electing a president should not be an either/or proposition when it comes to national security. We need a president who knows how to deploy both the olive branch and the arrows. Who will be ready to act swiftly and decisively in a crisis? Who will pursue strategic demands of hard diplomacy to re-establish moral authority and our leadership? In this moment of peril and promise, we need a president who is tested and ready, who can draw on years of real world experience working on many of the issues that we now confront. Who knows when to stand ones ground and when to seek common ground? Who has the strength and fortitude to meet the challenges head on without fear and without sowing fear? 13:06:16 I believe I am the candidate most ready today to be that kind of president and commander in chief. I will never let America's good name be disgraced. I will always protect and defend our nation and I will always advance the traditions and values that have made our country, 13:07:01 as Lincoln said, the last best hope on earth. Thank you all very much. I also want to recognize Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown and the Iraq War veteran, the lieutenant governor of Maryland. I'm proud to have his support. 13:07:51 shakes hands with generals but very dark CUTS 13:42:27 ws of Hillary Clinton at event 13:44:29 shot of press 13:46:00 shot of audience 13:46:48 shot of hands, pan up to Hillary Clinton 13:48:00 shot of press 13:48:16 shot of audience 13:49:14 closeup of one reporter 13:49:57 ws of audience 13:50:10 ws of press and audience 13:50:37 SIDE shot of hillary walking to front of stage, shaking hands 13:50:53 another side shot of hillary at podium, camera zoom out to ms 13:51:11 shot of her hugging and then approaching podium 13:51:23 walking off stageto gladhand 13:51:29 view obscured by cameras 13:51:33 good tight shot of her gladhanding 13:52:09 shot of Wesley clark gladhanding
PENTAGON PRESS BRIEFING WITH GENERAL MCKENZIE JR
PENTAGON BRFG POOL2 FS-22-HD 20220204 122500 NBC POOL General Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr., Commander, U.S. Central Command, Holds a Press Briefing FEB. 4, 2022 General Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr., commander, U.S. Central Command; Brigadier General Lance Curtis, Commanding General, 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Lead Investigator; Lieutenant General Ron Clark, Commanding General, U.S. Army Central and 3rd Army; Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton, MARCENT G5; Colonel C.J. Douglas, MARCENT G5 STAFF: All right. Good afternoon, everybody. I'm Commander Beth Teach. Thank you for joining us today. Just a couple notes at the top, we have press both here in the room with us and on the phone. We're going to take questions from both. I would add ask that you please introduce yourself and name your news organization at the start of your question. Our first two speakers, General McKenzie and Lieutenant General Clark, will frame today's brief and then we will hear from the investigation team. And we will hold questions until the end. With that, I'll direct your attention to General Frank McKenzie. GENERAL KENNETH F. MCKENZIE JR.: Thank you and good afternoon, everybody. We're with you today to brief the results of the investigation that I directed into the ISIS-K bombing at Abbey Gate at Hamid Karzai International Airport that occurred on 26 August 2021 that caused the deaths of 11 Marines, 1 soldier, and 1 sailor. We have completed our solemn duty of informing surviving family members about the results of the investigation and we're now providing it to the public in order to better inform you of the facts surrounding this tragic loss of life. While the majority of this detailed brief will be conducted by the investigating team who searched for the facts and interviewed more than 100 people, I wanted to take a moment at the beginning to provide my thoughts on the investigation and what the team determined. This brief will provide great context on the situation at Abbey Gate leading up to and during the attack as well as the aftermath. I found the results of the team's work comprehensive, credible and definitive. I found the brief you are about to receive to be powerful and moving. The volume of evidence collected, the testimony of more than 100 people, the analysis of experts, the findings of fact, and the conclusions of the team based upon that evidence gives a compelling and truthful examination of the event. GEN. MCKENZIE: The investigation found that a single explosive device killed at least 170 Afghan civilians and 13 U.S. servicemembers by explosively directing ball bearings through a packed crowd and into our men and women at Abbey Gate. The disturbing lethality of this device was confirmed by the 58 U.S. servicemembers who were killed and wounded, despite the universal wear of body armor and helmets that did stop ball bearings that impacted them but could not prevent catastrophic injuries to areas not covered. The investigation found no definitive proof that anyone was ever hit or killed by gunfire, either U.S. or Afghan. This conclusion was based upon the careful consideration of sworn testimony of more than 100 witnesses, and especially those witnesses in observation towers, both American and British, who were in locations unaffected by the blast and that had commanding views of the scene before, during and after the explosive attack. This conclusion was also confirmed by the findings and analysis of medical examiners and explosive experts, a review of all available physical evidence, and a review of all available video evidence, including an MQ-9 unmanned aerial vehicle which began observing the scene about three minutes after the attack. At this point I want to acknowledge that the investigation differs from what we initially believed on the day of the attack. At the time, the best information we had in the immediate aftermath of the attack indicated that it was a complex attack by both a suicide bomber and ISIS-K gunmen. We now know that the explosively fired ball bearings caused wounds that looked like gunshots, and when combined with a small number of warning shots, that led many to assume that a complex attack had occurred. The fact that this investigation has contradicted our first impression demonstrates to me that the team went into this investigation with an open mind in search of the truth. It also confirms the age old fact that the battlefield is a confusing and contradictory place, and it gets more confusing the closer you are to the actual action. That is why I ordered the investigation to find the truth. Our commitment to transparency has now led us to provide you our best information, information derived from a thorough and comprehensive investigation. The investigation found that military leadership on the ground was appropriately engaged on force protection measures throughout the operation of Abbey Gate, and that the medical services that were available and that were ready saved every life they possibly could through heroic efforts. This was a terrible attack that resulted in tragic outcomes and a horrific loss of life, both Afghan and American. My hope is that by the time this brief is over, you will have a clearer picture of the situation and of the attack. While nothing can bring back the 11 Marines, the soldier and the sailor that we tragically lost in this attack, it's important that we fully understand what happened. Their sacrifice demands nothing less. With that, I'll now turn it over to the investigative team to provide you an extensive brief, and following that brief they'll be prepared to take your questions. With that, I'm going to turn it over to Lieutenant General Ron Clark, the Army Forces Central Command component commander. Thank you very much. LIEUTENANT GENERAL RON CLARK:  Thank you, sir. And good afternoon. As General McKenzie just said, I'm Lieutenant General Ron Clark. I'm the commanding general of U.S. Army Central and 3rd Army. On the 15th of September 2021, I was tasked by U.S. Central Command to conduct an investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the attack on U.S. forces at Abbey Gate on the 26th of August 2021. The attack took place at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, which we will refer to throughout this briefing as HKIA. GEN. CLARK: As a result of this attack, 13 of our nation's best and brightest, our heroes, paid the ultimate sacrifice in an effort to save the lives of American citizens and thousands of Afghans during the noncombatant evacuation of HKIA. Our sincere condolences go out to the families, their loved ones and all those who suffered this tragic loss of our fallen comrades. Our multiservice investigation team conducted a comprehensive examination of the tactical-level actions on the ground by U.S. personnel at Abbey Gate. The team focused on data operations, force protection, force posture, leadership, unit readiness and all other relevant actions before, during and after the attack. For this investigation, I appointed Brigadier General Lance Curtis, the commanding general of the 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command as our lead investigator. General Curtis and our investigative team will present the comprehensive, credible and compelling facts and findings of this investigation. Lance? BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS:  Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Brigadier General Lance Curtis. I'm currently forward deployed in the CENTCOM AOR as a part of ARCENT. On the 17th of September I was appointed as a lead investigator to look at the attack on U.S. forces at Hamid Karzai International Airport on the 26th of August. At that time, I appointed a team of seven, and they're with me today. I have two Marines, Colonel C.J. Douglas of the MARCENT G5 and I have Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton, also of the MARCENT G5. I also have Lieutenant Colonel Burt Smith, Major Brad Hannon, Captain Alec Porter and Lieutenants Nicole Rodrigues and Sean Poiani. We have conducted 70 interviews of 139 people in five different countries at seven different locations. Those interviews add -- averaged from one to six hours, and we had a total of 250 exhibits that were collected during the investigation. Ladies and gentlemen, at this time, I want to talk about the key point slide, and at the end of the day, this drives the rest of the discussion. And quite frankly, some of these key points will be in contradiction to earlier information that you may have heard. Today, we're going to show you why this was not a complex attack. It was a single blast, and it did not have a follow-on attack. There were a series of crossing fires to the front of the servicemembers on the ground that created the illusion that there was a complex attack, but there absolutely was not. There were no gunshot wounds. We have universal agreement between the Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office, and also, the medical providers on the ground. There were absolutely no gunshot wounds. During the course of our investigation, we found no evidence that post-blast, U.S. servicemembers killed other U.S. servicemembers or Afghans. We refer to the Taliban as unlikely partners. Leading up to the time when we asked them to partner with us on the 16th of August, we were conducting kinetic attacks against the Taliban. Finally, we will show you conclusively why the time of the attack was 17:36 and 52 seconds. We have two overhead persistent infrared platforms that both independently detect the blast at that time, and we also have the classified chat room, which begins reporting the attack at 17:38. That was an indicator that the attack absolutely began before that. This is a timeline of key events that were important to our investigation. On the 15th of August, Kabul falls to the Taliban. Concurrently, President Ghani departs Kabul. On the 16th of August, we had the large security breach on the airfield, and we asked the Taliban to assist us in clearing the airfield at that time, and the airfield is cleared by 22:30 on the evening of the 16th. On the 19th of August, we have 2nd Battalion and 1st Marine -- 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment that opens and mans Abbey Gate. Also, the Brits from 2 and 3 PARA begin their operations out of the Baron Hotel on the 19th of August. On the 20th of August, we emplaced the Chevron, which consisted of six shipping containers at Abbey Gate. The Chevron is named because of the shape, and we'll show you some pictures that will give you a very good view of the Chevron later on. The Chevron is in place for at least two reasons: vehicle-borne IED threat mitigation, and also, it enables processing at Abbey Gate. From the 20th through the 22nd of August, the gates were closed at HKIA. This is because the intermediate staging bases were at capacity. On the 25th of August, East and North Gate closed permanently. Now, we'll explain the reasons for that. East Gate was more challenging to process, given the geographic situation of the gate. At North Gate, there were vehicle-borne IED threats, and that was a leading cause in the decision to close North Gate. From the 25th through the 26th we tracked the imminent threat streams at Abbey Gate and some of the other threat streams across HKIA. There were at least four imminent threat streams that occurred between the 25th and the 26th at Abbey Gate, and what we found is that leaders took the appropriate measures tied to these imminent threat streams. They would lower their profiles, seek cover and at times, they would even cease operations at the gate for periods of time. At 16:00 on the 26th, Gulf Company changed out 4th Platoon with 1st Platoon. This was an hour earlier than scheduled, but this was because of the high OPTEMPO that was occurring, and also, the sensory overload. This demonstrated that leaders were keeping their fingers on the pulse of the situation on the ground. We assess that leader presence was high at Abbey Gate not only on the 26th of August, but at all times. At 17:00 on the 26th, Brigadier General Sullivan, who was the Joint Task Force crisis response commander, was at Abbey Gate. That was 36 minutes before the blast. He was there for a meeting with the Brits and the Taliban. The 82nd Airborne Division commander, the 24th MEU commander were also at Abbey Gate on the 26th of August. The 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment Battalion commander was physically on the ground at the time of the blast, and he was wounded, and then we had multiple company commanders who were also on the ground at the time of the attack. At 17:36 and 52 seconds on the 26th, we have the actual attack. Then, on the 31st of August, we have all U.S. aircraft and servicemembers that depart HKIA early in the morning at 00:02. This is an overview of HKIA. The outline of HKIA, you see listed in red. The 1st of the 82nd, 1st Brigade, had half of the perimeter leading from the South Gate up to the North Gate, and then the Marines had the other half of the perimeter going from North Gate down to halfway between Abbey and South Gates. There are two comfort areas that you see as the white goose eggs. These were areas where the Afghans could have bed-down, food, water, and also medical care, if required. And then additionally, the State Department had another chance to process Afghans before they were actually put on the plane. GEN. CURTIS: There were four medical capabilities that you see listed on the map. The first one is a hospital that is at Camp Alvarado, in the upper left there. This was run by 1st Brigade of the 82nd, and they had one surgical team of four. The highest-level medical capability was the main hospital, and that's where the cursor is right now. This was a facility that was originally run by the Norwegians, but it became a joint facility. At any given time it remained a coalition flavor, in that you would have seen Norwegians there and frequently Brits and Germans as well. This had eight surgical teams of four, a very robust medical capability. And it was sometimes referred to as a Role 2 enhanced and this was because it had additional capability, think a C.T. scan. There were two Shock Trauma Platoons. The first was at the first was at the East Gate in a hardened facility. And that was run by the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment. The second was run by the 24th MEU in very close proximity to the main hospital. There were high-speed avenues of approach, indicated by the wide arrows. Most notably, long the NSU Gate and leading to the North Gate, which culminated in a traffic circle. This ultimately was a heavily influencing factor in the decision to close North Gate. Finally, I'll key in on Abbey Gate, which is highlighted in white at the bottom. In the next slide we're going to show you a better view of Abbey Gate. But as we transition to the next slide, you'll see it will be inverse of what you presently see, with the north-seeking arrow in the opposite direction. When we began the investigation, there were different units that manned Abbey Gate and they called the sections of Abbey Gate by different names. We came to a common lexicon of three major portions of Abbey Gate: inner gate, outer gate, and the Chevron. I'll start with the inner gate, which is in the yellow box. The inner gate is closest to the airfield. And once again, bear in mind this is an inverted view from what you just saw. There's an inner corridor, that spans about three football fields, leading down to the outer gate, which is also in the yellow box. There's an additional outer corridor, which is about two football fields, leading down to the Chevron -- once again, named because of the shape. The Chevron was in place on the 20th of August and was primarily oriented towards vehicle borne IED threat mitigation and also allowed processing. There are three towers that were important to our investigation. The first is the 82nd tower, and you can see where the cursor is right now. This was a little bit outside of Abbey Gate and the individuals who were there gave us a very good picture of what happened on the 26th of August before, during, and after the blast because they are outside of the blast zone, and they are unaffected by the blast. The second tower is the Marine sniper tower. I would ask you to use that as a point of orientation during the brief. It figures very prominently. Additionally, it provided Marines an overwatch security position along canal. And the last tower is the U.K. tower -- once again, also outside of the blast area. And we have individuals who were there who were not affected by the blast. And they were able to tell us what -- what happened both before, during and after the blast. The Baron Hotel is not a singular building. It's an entire complex, and you see it outlined in yellow. We have a canal that runs the length of Abbey Gate. And we have two footbridges, one that is 90 meters east of the sniper tower and the second that is next to the Baron Hotel complex. We have the actual blast location as pinpointed by post-blast EOD analysis. And finally, we have the water tower, which is important to our findings of no complex attack. And we'll talk about that later in the brief. LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOHN NAUGHTON:  Good afternoon. My name is Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton. And on this slide, I'll be discussing the flow of evacuees at Abbey Gate throughout the course of the NEO. I'll begin with how the process was originally designed, then discuss how the process evolved as conditions changed on the ground. Directing your attention to the top right portion of the slide, you'll see the Chevron obstacle we've referenced previously.  Again, the Chevron was comprised six shipping containers put in place the morning of 20 August to mitigate against possible vehicle borne improvised explosive device attacks and to establish an entry control point for the primary point of entry at Abbey Gate. The arrow on the top side of the Chevron depicts the entrance to the entry control point while the arrow on the bottom depicts the exit. As originally intended, potential evacuees would approach the Abbey corridor from the southwest and would be met by Taliban members outside the Chevron, where the Taliban would conduct an initial search and inspect their documentation. If allowed to pass through the entry control point, they'd be met inside the Chevron by either U.K. or U.S. service members. If they were U.K. evacuees, they'd be escorted into the Baron Hotel compound where they'd processed, and eventually loaded onto vehicles, and transported into HKIA for evacuation. If they were U.S. evacuees, they'd be met by Marines from 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines and escorted to the holding area they had established in the outer corridor. The following photo shows what the Chevron looked like from the ground. To orient you, this photo was taken from the outer corridor looking towards the southwest. The Baron Hotel compound is being circled on the left. The troops on the ground are primarily from 2 and 3 PARA, the U.K. units that were operating out of the Baron Hotel. In the center of the photo, six shipping containers are arrayed in the shape of a Chevron. And on top are several Taliban members holding security as they did throughout the operation. On the left side there's a vehicle lane used primarily by the U.K. And on the right side is a lane the Marines utilized as a holding area for potential evacuees. Potential evacuees in the outer corridor holing area would wait there for varying lengths of time depending on conditions on the airfield. These next two photos give you an idea of what the outer corridor would have looked like during the NEO. The photo on the left is from 22 August and it was taken from the inner corridor looking towards the outer corridor. For a point of reference, the sniper tower is being circled on the left and the actual outer gate is visible in the middle. In the outer corridor you see a large crowd of potential evacuees gather. This photo was taken on day three of no flights departing HKIA with evacuees due to the intermediate staging bases being at capacity. As a result, no additional evacuees were being allowed to enter the airfield. So the end state was that gates got backed up, as depicted in this photo. The photo in the right was taken 25 August from just inside the outer gate. The Baron Hotel compound is in the background, and on the left side of the photo is a chain-link fence with a canal on the back side. On the right side is a queue of potential evacuees stretching from the inner to the outer corridor. I'd like to draw your attention to the woman and children in yellow. Women and children under the age of 13 would have been searched by members of the female search team, which was comprised of female Marines and Corpsmen primarily from the 24th MEU who were tasked with searching and escorting women and children, and generally helped to de-escalate a variety of tense situations at the gates. The male evacuees would have been searched by male Marines. All evacuees would have been searched initially in the outer corridor. But once they entered the inner corridor, they would have undergone a more thorough search where Marines would have gone through their bags to ensure they did not bring any contraband onto the airfield. These two photos illustrate the close, personal contact between service members and evacuees required during these types of operations. Once potential evacuees moved into the inner corridor, they would enter another holding area before moving -- moving onto the inner gate area, where State Department representatives would inspect their documentation. If the State Department representatives approved their documents, evacuees would pass through the inner gate, load a bus and eventually get transported to the evacuation control center to get evacuated. COL. NAUGHTON: If their documents were rejected, the potential evacuees would be turned back over to the Marines, who would escort them back out through the gate, either to the canal area or through the Chevron. Of note, during interviews, Marines stated this was one of the most difficult and challenging tasks they dealt with throughout the NEO, as they literally had potential evacuees begging and pleading for their lives as they were being escorted back out. That said, the process was originally designed and if an evacuee were to move straight from the Chevron to the inner gate it would have been about a five-minute walk. However that rarely happened. As conditions on the ground changed the process for evacuee flow at the gate evolved. One of the reasons the process evolved was the Taliban became less and less cooperative at the Chevron. And Marines reported during interviews that there were entire days where not a single U.S. document holder entered through the Chevron. Marines also reported seeing the Taliban turn potential evacuees away, beating potential evacuees and even made allegations of Taliban shooting at potential evacuees. So as the Chevron became largely impassible and potential evacuees became more and more desperate they began to seek out and utilize alternate ingress routes to bypass (inaudible) checkpoints. These routes are generally depicted by the large yellow arrows on the left-hand side of this slide. And what we found happened was post would go out on traditional or social media highlighting the conditions and locations of Taliban checkpoint HKIA. This post on the left is calling out the conditions at the Chevron on 25 August. We also learned during the investigation that in order to maximize the number of evacuees U.S. servicemembers and government officials worked directly with human intelligence personnel on the ground at HKIA as well as a number of private organizations to talk evacuees onto routes they could use to bypass the Taliban checkpoints. So maps like the one on the right would be sent to an evacuee and would highlight the route they could use to bypass checkpoints and gain access to Abbey Gate. The result would be similar to what's seen in the photo in the center which shows large numbers of potential evacuees using side roads and back alleys to get to HKIA. So potential evacuees would make their way down these alternate routes that eventually arrive at this parking lot areas that's being circled now and then they would have a few options for getting close to the outer gate area. They could turn left down the far side canal walkway, the could utilize the canal itself or they could cross the footbridge and turn down the nearest side canal walkway. This photo was taking 25 August from the sniper tower and it's looking towards the Baron Hotel, which you can see in the background. The canal area is on the left and the canal itself is full as is the far side walkway. We assessed that the vast majority of people we see in the canal area would have gotten there by using one of the alternate ingress routes. This next photo was 26 August from further east down the canal looking towards the sniper tower, which you see being circled. The canal is in the middle of the photo. The left side of the canal is the far side walkway and the right side is the near side walkway. On the 26th both walkways were full with people trying to make their way towards the outer gate area. The next photo is also from the 26th and is taken from the far side of the canal looking towards the near side and the sniper tower. A group of Marines is at the base of the sniper tower trying to control the large crowds of potential evacuees on the near side canal walkway and they are separated by a series of Jersey barriers. The photo shows how densely packed the canal on 26 August and this gives you an idea of why there were so many causalities as a result of the attack. As people were packed in the canal shoulder-to-shoulder, chest-to-back, standing immediately in front of the blast site. It's important to highlight that early on in the operation the canal facilitated crowd control and provided some standoff between U.S. servicemembers on the near side of the canal and potential evacuees on the far side of the canal. COL. NAUGHTON: Additionally, because it was a sewage canal potential evacuees were hesitant early in the evacuation to use the canal as an avenue of approach. However that changed dramatically and rapidly as desperation levels increased and more people began using the alternate ingress routes. It's also important to note that just about every person seen in the canal is holding up some form of documentation in an effort to get identified and pulled from the canal to be evacuated. This illustrates the complex and dynamic nature of this operation that as U.S. servicemembers at Abbey Gate were tasked with identifying potential evacuees in possession of the necessary documentation, pulling them from a large, unruly crowd, and then getting them transported to the evacuation control center. As a result of our investigation we assess that it is highly likely the attacker from 26 August utilized one of the alternate ingress routes to access the Abbey Gate area. Because he would not have had to pass through a Taliban checkpoint, and he would not have had to show identification to get close enough to U.S. servicemembers to detonate his device. While the intent was to take advantage of the terrain at Abbey Gate to execute an orderly evacuation process, conditions on the ground changed, people became more desperate, and the process evolved. Regardless of the process utilized, the nature of evacuation operations requires close personal contact between U.S. servicemembers and evacuees at some point along the way. This video is from the morning of 25 August, the Marines seen in the video are from Echo Company, Second Battalion, First Marines. The two Marines you can see are standing on the jersey barriers at the base of the sniper tower. The Marine on the left is holding himself up on the chain link fence which runs adjacent to the sniper tower. The Marine on the right will get pulled into the crowd by the muzzle of his weapon, and his fellow Marines will enter the crowd to assist him. Towards the end of the video, a Marine will come into view on the left and you'll hear him call to reinforce the area. We show you this video for three reasons. First, it demonstrates how large, desperate, and aggressive the crowds were at Abbey Gate. Bearing in mind that this video was taken a little more than 24 hours prior to the attack, and we know from the investigation that the crowds at Abbey Gate swelled exponentially the evening of the 25th and into the 26th. So the crowd would have been even larger, more desperate, and more aggressive at the time of the attack. The second reason is to illustrate the level of discipline and restraint displayed by Marines on a daily basis at Abbey Gate, as the Marines could have responded with deadly force after a man grabbed the Marines rifle, but they opted not to. Finally, we show you this video to help understand why there was such a large number of Marines concentrated at the base of the sniper tower at the time of the attack on the 26th. As they needed to be there to control the large, desperate crowd and enable the evacuation to continue at Abbey Gate. (VIDEO CLIP) BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS: The next video is the only known footage of the blast itself. This is 48 meters from the blast. There's a white Hilux truck and three Marines. A single individual dressed in all black steps forward from the crowd. BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS: In that space between the Marine and the foreground his antenna is where you're going to see that individual. The blast seems to emanate from this individual. The blast builds in the V where the cursor is right now, in-between the two Marines, and then there's a building that is currently not on the screen -- it's on the left. And you will see the blast overpressure coming through that window. It looks like dust. And that gives you an idea regarding the blast effects that servicemembers on the ground were actually feeling, even 48 meters from the blast. Finally, you will see the Marines orient towards a blast, and they will seek cover. We'll play the video wants, and then we'll stop and slow down and show you key aspects of the video. Alec, play the video, please. The first thing you'll see is in that space between the Marine's antenna and his chest; you'll see an individual dressed in all black where the cursor is circling right now. The blast seems to emanate from this individual. You will see the blast build in that V between the Marines antenna on the forefront and the Marine in the center. And then you also see the overpressure. It looks like dust that's coming through the window there, giving you an idea of what individuals on the ground were feeling in the way of blast effects. Finally, you will see the Marines orient towards a blast and seek cover. MAJ. BRAD HANNON: Good afternoon, I'm Major Brad Hannon. The following videos are from an overhead platform. The video begins three minutes and eight seconds after the attack. This full video will be made available following this briefing. And the edges of the video have been blurred to protect classified data from being displayed in order to allow us to release this footage. The attack occurs at 17:36 and 52 seconds, and it's time-stamped by two different overhead persistent infrared or OPIR detection sensors. These detections of a single blast indicate the origin point of the blast to have been in the vicinity of Abbey Gate. The intelligence cell takes that report and provides the information of an explosion having occurred to the intelligence and information sharing platform. Those reports are used to redirect the aircraft you're about to see. As the footage begins, what you're seeing initially is the drone pilot orienting the camera to Abbey Gate at the Abbey inner gate. The initial movement scene is the Marines reacting to the blast moving down the inner corridor to assist at the site of the attack. This is the inner corridor area and is where State Department personnel processed evacuees during the evacuation. There are quite a few vehicles in the corridor, some of which were prepositioned as blocking obstacles for the closure of the gate before the joint tactical exfil. And some were used to evacuate casualties following triage. On the left, the drone pilot maneuvers over the outer gate now and as well as the outer corridor. On the left is the Chevron in the Baron Hotel complex. Having reached the end of the corridor, the drone pilot research is back up the corridor for the site of the attack. The video will be paused here to show you a few things. The vehicle scene on the far left of the screen is the white truck that was in the background of the previous video of the blast. The previous video would have been filmed from right here. As Brigadier General Curtis mentioned, this truck is 48 meters from the blast. The site of the attack was right here on the bottom right of the screen, just out of view due to the angle of the camera and the aircraft. Later in this video, the drone pilot reorients the camera and the aircraft to better view the site of the attack. On the left-hand side of the screen, you can see the building where the blast overpressure passed through that window in the blast video. In the center of the screen are the U-shaped jersey barriers along with the high visibility orange panel that is attached to the fence. These points of reference to note the original hole in the fence, which is important because prior to the attack, Marines would have would have had to walk 30 meters from the outer gate down the outer corridor through the hole in the fence and then back another 30 meters to the base of the sniper tower. That 60-meter distance is a long way to evacuate a casualty, and exhibiting rapid response and adaptability, the Marines shorten that distance by cutting two additional holes in the fence closer to the outer gate. Finally, I would like to point out the white vehicle on the far right, which is a visual indicator for being direct across the canal from the site of the attack. Next, the video will be fast-forwarded to the two-minute mark as the drone pilot is going to actually leave Abbey Gate for a moment. So, the footage is contextual but not relevant to the specific events as they occur. Please be advised the next segment of the video is graphic and that it clearly depicts casualty evacuation after the attack. You will not be able to identify individuals, but the movement is clearly visible. As the next segment of a video begins, the drone pilot has switched his electric optical, infrared camera to IR mode, which is better for tracking and identifying movement. The camera orients first on the parking lot area and then pans past the site of the attack and focuses on an IR light on the ground near the original hole in the fence. For the next several seconds, the camera will focus on this area as Marines continue to evacuate casualties through the original hole in the fence. At this point, about five and a half minutes after the attack, the canal has emptied significantly as compared to the photos shown in the previous portion of this brief. The far side walkway across the canal also appears distinctly different from those photos. The natural inclination of the crowd is to move away from the blast. U.K. troops, we're not allowing passage from the canal towards the Baron Hotel as a security measure. The crowd then is forced together and pushed back down towards the east past the site of the attack. In many cases, people had to run behind and over the site of the attack. The location being shown now is where a Marine cut an additional hole in the fence about 10 meters from the original hole, which shortens the evacuation distance by 20 meters. Analysis of the video footage by the drone analyst specified the fact that they did not see any gunfire at any point throughout this video, either incoming or outgoing. The location being pointed out now is the second hole that the Marines cut into the fence 10 meters from the base of the sniper tower, which again significantly shortened the evacuation distance. The video continues as Marines evacuate personnel and move them into the inner corridor where they had a pre-planned casualty collection point for initial treatment and triage. The movement of several personnel towards higher levels of care has already begun by this point in the footage. The video is paused here in order to point out a few things about the site of the attack. What is shown now is seven minutes and 21 seconds post-blast. The view clearly shows the site of the attack, which originates from here. There were three distinct large groups of potential evacuees who were injured and killed in the blast. The first being identified right now was directly surrounding the attacker on the far side walkway when he set off the device. The second is inside the canal below the wall where the device was detonated. The third large group of potential evacuees were near the base of the sniper tower, crowded and trying to work with the Marines in order to gain entry. This is the central point of where the U.S. casualties, which is being identified now. In addition to evacuation efforts, Marines moved to the outer corridor in order to assist in providing security along the wall, but again, no outgoing fire can be seen. This video will end in about 30 seconds, which is eight minutes post-attack. By 20 minutes post-attack, all U.S. casualties were evacuated and moved into the inner corridor area for triage at the casualty collection point. All U.S. personnel were pulled back into the inner corridor, and no U.S. personnel left the gate again until the next morning when the explosive ordnance disposal team performed the blast analysis at 6:00 a.m. Eventually, 2 and 3 PARA units left the Baron Hotel in order to secure the outer corridor between the Baron Hotel and the outer gate until the end of their evacuation was complete. LT COL BURT SMITH: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen; I'm Lieutenant Colonel Burt Smith. I'm going to first orient you to the slide. The blast is located at the top of the slide on the far side of the canal. The two white arrows show the fragmentation pattern from the explosion. The killed in action are depicted in blue and the wounded in action in yellow. At the time of the blast, golf company and fox company two-one Marines were conducting evacuation operations in the outer gate area. The first platoon of golf company was holding back the crown of the base of the tower of the jersey barriers and simultaneously conducting evacuation screening of those in the canal area. Echo company and weapons company of two-one Marines were supporting from the inner corridor and also conducting other operations to prepare for the eventual closure of Abbey Gate. The killed in action at Abbey Gate number 13 on the 26th of August, the closest being three servicemembers, were approximately three meters from the blast, or 10 feet. They were standing up the canal wall, searching for potential evacuees amongst the crowd. The farthest killed in action was nearly 17 years from blast located near the vehicle in the outer corridor at the bottom of the slide. There were 26 wounded in action treated at the medical facilities at HKIA on the 26th of August 19 of those were wounded and were medically evacuated on 27 August. The reason so many servicemembers have consolidated the base of the sniper tower was a necessity to hold back the crowd. And you continue to screen potential evacuees for as long as possible to save as many lives as possible. The fragmentation pattern shown on the previous slide is overlaid here on the Abbey Gate terrain. It's combined with data from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's boom tool, which measures pressure over range and determines blast effects of an explosion. Based on the size of the device, the blast effects were felt 15 meters out at Abbey Gate. Now, Zone A is marked in red, and this is where servicemembers were exposed to the fragmentation of the blast itself as well as full blast effects. Blast Zone B marked in Orange is located in the outer corridor. The servicemembers there would have been felt -- would have felt unmitigated blast effects. The three Marines in the video of the blast were located just on the edge of Blast Zone B, 48 meters. He saw the involuntarily buckled when the blast wave passed through their location. Zone C is marked in yellow it's located in the inner corridor. The servicemembers here would have been exposed to mitigated blast effects. The walls in the inner corridor and the sniper tower would have offered them some protection from the blast. Now, it's important to discuss blast effects because it explains why the number of wounded in action has actually risen after the attack. As units redeployed from HKIA, they conducted screening for traumatic brain injury, and it discovered that additional servicemembers were wounded in this attack. There are now 45 EOD servicemembers listed as wounded from this event. The Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit at HKIA conducted a post-blast analysis 13 hours after the attack on the morning of 27 August. They establish the location of the blast as the far side of the canal. The picture on the left is the view from the bomber looking across the canal at the servicemembers at the base of the tower. EOD establishes the location of the attacker because they found fragmentation noted by the yellow arrows in the inside of the near side canal wall; the attacker would have had been standing on the far side of the canal for the fragmentation to end up in that location. The picture on the right is a view of the servicemembers looking at the attacker from the base of the tower. You can see the charring on the fence behind the silhouette we've placed there; it's another indication the attacker was on the far side of the canal when the device was exploited. Now, EOD determined this was a directional device. This Command Detonated 20 pounds of military-grade explosives and was person born. They sought forensic analysis of potential delivery device mechanisms. They collected shards of backpacks and other fabric and debris. Forensic (inaudible) was inconclusive, and no delivery mechanism can be determined under the circumstances, which is why we call it a person born IED. EOD was able to conclude however it was delivered; the device would have been elevated on the attacker's body when he stepped up to the edge of the canal and exploded the ordinance, which explains why fragmentation was projected both into the canal landing in that wall and also across into the servicemembers on the far side of the canal. The fragmentation found at the blast site was five-millimeter ball bearings. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office also found ball bearings during autopsies of the 13 killed in action. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office concluded the penetrative injury suffered by those killed in action was caused solely by the ball bearings. They did not find bullet fragmentation or other evidence that gunshot wounds were suffered during the attack at Abbey Gate. Wounds from ball bearings look remarkably similar to gunshot wounds. And the first responders at Abbey Gate may have confused the cause of the injuries. Additionally, doctors treating the casualties at the hospitals at North HKIA were openly describing the injuries as gunshot wounds in front of servicemembers. These descriptions were meant to aid the providers in treating the various traumas and as a point of reference amongst them. These are not medical determinations of the cause of injuries. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office does make determinations on the cause of injuries and found that ball bearings caused catastrophic injuries to the upper chest, neck, and face as well as the lower abdomen of those killed in action at Abbey Gate. The number of potential evacuees killed and injured was difficult to determine. Open Source reporting from approximately three days after the blast concluded that over 160 to 170 were killed by this explosion in this attack. (inaudible) the number of potential factories outside Abbey Gate in the vicinity of the canal area at the time of the blast as shown in the pictures in the upper left and the upper right combined with statements from servicemembers who were at or at Abbey Gate post-blast we found this number to be reasonable under the circumstances. Now, in a few moments, we'll talk -- we'll discuss the lack of a complex attack, but it should be noted there was outgoing small arms fire in the form of warning shots post-blast. This came from the U.S. servicemembers as well as coalition forces. Based on the evidence collected during the investigation, we concluded the shots fired post-blast did not contribute to the injury suffered by the potential evacuees at Abbey Gate. The injuries suffered from potential evacuees are attributed solely to the blast. COLONEL C.J. DOUGLAS:  I am Colonel C.J. Douglas, and I will discuss the details and the key finding that this was not a complex attack. The attack at Abbey Gate was a single personal born improvised explosive device with no associated enemy small arms fire. Through a review of the overhead persistent infrared detections sensor data, the U.S. Explosive Ordnance Disposal report, and subsequent interviews with personnel in the Abbey Quarter and surrounding area, the investigation determined there was only one explosion. Early reports describe the complex attack, including reports of gunfire and gunshot wounds. We now know this is not true. Additionally, there is no proof that any U.S. or Afghan person was injured or killed by gunfire. Several factors contributed to the initial belief that this attack was complex, including the fog of war and disorientation due to blast effects, the Marines' heightened alert toward the Taliban, and the presence of gunfire used for warning shots. Within seconds of the blast, Marines experienced mental and physical friction. Mentally, they worked through the uncertainty about what had just occurred and the possibility that the Taliban could be responsible. Very quickly Marines determined the Taliban were neither involved nor threatening U.S. personnel. Physically, Marines experienced blast effects which caused disorientation. Several interviews discussed the presence of teargas which was released when the CS canisters worn on the Marines equipment were punctured by ball bearings from the blast. At this point, Marines were simultaneously enduring teargas and blast effects while responding to a mass casualty situation. Plainly put, the blast created instant chaos and sensory overload. And as you've seen from the pictures and videos, this effected the enormous potential evacuee population as well. Through a number of interviews with personnel who were not impacted by the blast, witnesses confirmed gunfire was present as warning shots were fired from three separate locations in order to maintain crowd control. For context, these events all happened in a very short amount of time. I'll explain how and where the gunfire originated. The two blue dots closest to the Baron Hotel depict U.K. forces that fired warning shots across the frontage of Marines in the quarter and over the heads of evacuees. The shots were fired in order to assist with dispersing the crowds within the quarter. The third blue dot depicts a Marine element that fired four warning shots over the head of an individual who displayed concerning behavior and appeared to be observing the casualty site. This individual of interest ultimately fled unarmed. These events occurred a short time after the attack, and resulted in nearly simultaneous gunfire from three separate points, travelling across the frontage of servicemembers operating within a confined space. That confined space caused an echo, which created the illusion of a firefight. The fourth blue dot depicts the location of a team of Marines who observed gunfire going across their frontage to the east. During interviews, this team of Marines stated they observed a military age male, armed with an AK-47 on top of the two story building with a water tower. Although the Marines did not see him fire, they believe he exhibited hostile intent when they observed him with the weapon and also observed the subsequent gunfire across their frontage following the blast. They engaged him, but did not see any effect. Further interviews concluded that no one had seen any effect on the individual. In closing, interviews with personnel located at two positions that were outside the blast effect area confirmed that the gunfire observed within Abbey Gate corridor was simply warning shots that were fired to disperse the crowd and there was no complex attack. Another key aspect of the investigation reviewed the medical capabilities. We have universal agreement between the Armed Forces Medical Examiners Office, and also the highly experienced medical providers on the ground that the wounds sustained by the killed in action at Abbey Gate were so catastrophic that none could be saved. The investigation heard important witness accounts from doctors and first responders who explained that triage was very effective at the point of injury, and there was a robust medical capability, including nine surgical teams of four and a shock trauma platoon located close to Abbey and East Gates. An ER doc, assigned to the shock trauma platoon directly contributed to the saved lives. Fortuitously leaders on the ground kept medical capabilities in place longer than originally planned. This meant that at the time of the attack we were in the best possible position on the ground to respond. Although still tragic, medical providers assured that every servicemember that could be was saved. Ladies and gentlemen, it's been an honor to brief you today with the intent of taking you virtually to Abbey Gate. All of that in effort to gain a better understanding of the conditions on the ground, as well as the exceptional professionalism, determination, and courage of our Marines, soldiers, and sailors. We look forward to answering any or all of your questions at this time. STAFF: We'll start with AP on the phone, Lita Baldor. Q: Hi, Lita with the Associated Press. I was wondering if you could address a little bit more fully what if anything, the Taliban may have been able to do to prevent this. I mean, was there -- because you say there were a number of avenues that were being used, that people knew about to some degree -- was there a deliberate, I guess lack of effort by the Taliban to control this? Does the Taliban bear any responsibility? GEN. CURTIS: This is General Curtis. What I can tell you is that as we mentioned previously in the brief, there was a 1700 meeting that occurred right before the attack, 36 minutes before the blast. This was actually a topic of discussion that was being discussed at that briefing between Brigadier General Sullivan, the Brits and the Taliban. And I would also like to point out that what also is heavily influencing to this situation is that the situation over a very condensed time period changed dramatically. And the numbers that were actually at Abbey Gate swelled significantly, and that certainly impacted the situation. STAFF: (Inaudible). Q: General Curtis, how can you rule out that the Taliban did not know that this bomber was heading in that direction? Is it possible that the bomber knew about the 5 o'clock meeting and was just late and (is ?) trying to disrupt that meeting? And how -- later when you say that it was quickly determined that Taliban were not involved by the Marines there, how can you say that? What evidence do you have? GEN. CURTIS: The meeting, once again, that occurred at 1700, 36 minutes before the blast. This was also an opportunity for the Taliban to share any information that they had with U.S. forces, and our best indicators are that they did that. We don't have any evidence through the course of our investigation that leads us to believe that the Taliban knew about this attack. Q: But then why would we -- if there was so much intelligence that morning why would the gate still (close at ?) 5:36? Wasn't it supposed to be closed already? Was it kept open for some reason? GEN. CURTIS: Jennifer, there were several times when there was discussion of closing the gate. And I don't want to anchor everything on that 1700 meeting, but I know for a fact that's another topic that was being discussed. So there are several influencing factors on the time, you know, and keeping the gate open. One influencing factor certainly is that there are still individuals that are being identified in that large crowd that fit the criteria. A second influencing factor is that we have coalition forces who still have individuals that we know they're trying to also evacuate, but those are two lead influencing factors. And then another is that we're also very mindful of what happened on the 16th of August when we actually had Afghans that flooded the airfield. We absolutely want to prevent another situation like that because we know that that can influence several things. It can throw off our timelines for departure and it also takes a lot of time to clear those crowds. Q: Lastly, there were reports at the time that the identity of this bomber was known in advance. Is that true? GEN. CURTIS: Jennifer, there is a separate investigation that is being conducted by the FBI that's taking a look at that. That's outside the scope of our investigation. STAFF: Courtney Kube, NBC. Q: Hi. Two things. So I just want to be clear that meeting that you've been referencing, the 5 p.m. meeting, part of that on the discussion -- of the discussion of that was when to close the gate. Just to be clear that the decision was made there that the gate was not going to close yet. Correct? GEN. CURTIS: What I would tell you, Courtney, is that it was a topic of discussion. I would not say that the decision was made in that meeting, but it was a topic of discussion at the time. Q: What time did the gate usually close? I mean, was it usually... GEN. CURTIS: Well, I think -- I think there's a difference between the gate actually closing and ceasing operations at the gate. There's a -- there's a very big difference. So there are always individuals that are there, but whether or not they're actually processing evacuees is different. So ceasing operations, lowering profile, seeking cover, and also not processing is very different from actually closing. Q: And then just one more. On the timeline there's a 25-26 August reference that says there were four minute threat streams reported at Abbey Gate and 2/1 leaders take probate action. Can you tell us about those four threat streams? What specifically was the action? GEN. CURTIS: There were multiple threat streams during the course of operations at HKIA. Those particular threat streams, I won't go into details on them, but what I can tell you is they were consistent with other reporting that had occurred but they were very nonspecific. So there was nothing coming out of those particular threat streams at that time that would have led them to believe, you know, that what occurred at 1736 and 52 seconds was about to occur. Q: I mean, now, I mean, there's no Americans there. This operation is completely over. Is there a reason you can't tell us a little bit more about what you were -- what I'm curious is were there -were there threat streams coming in, so you were focusing your security more on something else and that's maybe how this bomber was able to get in? I'm wondering if -- can you -- can you shed any light on that? GEN. CURTIS: Well, I -- as I mentioned, Courtney, I think the threat streams were not specific at that particular time. STAFF: And we'll take one from the phone. Tara Copp, Defense One, if you're on the line. Q: Thank you both -- thank you all for doing this. I have a couple of follow up questions. We haven't been able to see the video of the marine being pulled into the crowd, but after that event happened were there any discussion about putting up additional defenses for the marines there right along the perimeter if not a Jersey barrier or something similar instead of just more personnel? And then secondly, has there been any evidence gathered from the scene, fragments, et cetera, that has helped in the law enforcement investigation in identifying the affiliation of the bomber? Thank you. GEN. CLARK: Well, Tara, thanks for that question. As we look at -- you couldn't see the video, but basically it showed two marines standing on top a Jersey barrier. One was pulled into the crowd by the barrel of his weapon by a potential evacuee. In that case what I'd like to highlight is that, again, this is a noncombatant evacuation. So rather than using deadly force or force really of any kind the marines showed great restraint, discipline, and courage by just retrieving their teammate from the crowd and moving on. Part of the reason there were no additional barriers or constraints had to do with the fact that they were actively pulled potential evacuees from the crowd, which included American citizens and others. So again, they had to have access to the crowd and they had to have close personal contact with those that they were trying move to approach a location to get processed. I'd also offer that if you go back to the slide that showed where our service members were wounded or killed, a number of service members were on top of the wall, again, for the purpose of trying to identify individuals to be evacuated as a part of the noncombatant evacuation operation. Q: So it sounds like there wasn't really an option to add additional barrier protection for all of those service members on the wall. GEN. CLARK: They provided protection in other ways. There were -- there were means through which we know that the device was command detonated, not detonated by some sort of phone or remote control device because of counter measures that were used at the gate at the time. Based on the threats and the streams that the command received and pushed all the way down to company level, commanders on the ground took the appropriate measures to lower their profile, cease operations if they needed to, or close the gate if necessary to protect the force because the bottom line is we evacuated 124,000 people out of HKIA. In order to get that kind of volume through a screening process that requires them to have appropriate documentation and to be physically checked on the ground, it's an arduous test, but again it takes close, personal contact on the part of marines, soldiers, and sailors in order to do that. STAFF: Nancy? Q: Thank you. In the presentation you throughout described a deterrence and security situation on all fronts. The Taliban wasn't checking documents or letting in Americans or those with documentation at these new routes that opened up, and I was just wondering if you could help me understand a couple things. One, who made the determination to not close the gate, and on what basis was that made? You talk about these meetings, and it seems that there were several. Who had the authority? Who decided let's keep the gate open? GEN. CLARK: Commander on the ground was Rear Admiral Pete Vasely. He was the commander of U.S. Forces Afghanistan and all of their forces on the ground were under his command and control. Every day, not just on the -- not just on the 26th but every day forces on the ground there, specifically the commander of JTF82, Major General Donahue, was tasked by General Sullivan to meet with the Taliban because HKIA was basically a defense in depth. So the Taliban being unlikely partners, as we described in the brief, there was an ongoing dialogue about how we were to continue to work with them to facilitate the evacuation. Q: So I appreciate that, but I guess what I don't understand is there are those yellow arrows coming in that showed how people were divided in half in through the original checkpoint. Why was there not additional security measures put in by the U.S. at that point, or some way to sort of be able to inspect people coming in that way? GEN CURTIS: Sir may I? So I think it's very important to once again go back to the fact how quickly this happened. And I also would mention that it is vitally-important that at this time, there is a constant assessment that is going on between the risk to force and the risk to mission. So trying to push potential U.S. servicemembers out that far really would have dramatically increased the risk to our servicemembers. Q: Well, then, and my final question is based on your findings, is there a scenario in which this could have been prevented? And if so, how? GEN. CURTIS: Based on our investigation at the tactical level, this was not preventable and the leaders on the ground followed the proper measures, and any time there was an imminent threat warning they followed the proper procedures: they lowered their profile, they sought cover, and at times, they even ceased operations at the gate. GEN. CLARK: And if I can caveat, the reason that we identified the number of leaders who were on the ground throughout the course of the day on the 26th is because, again, it's understanding of the hazards of our chosen profession and knowing that the leaders need to be on the ground to share those same hardships with their subordinates. So understanding that the mission is -- is very difficult, but necessary, those leaders were on the ground to ensure there was no problem. Q: Yes, General, but what I'm hearing you guys say is with the resources available and the -- and the mission before them, it was not preventable. That's -- that's what I'm hearing (inaudible). GEN. CLARK: That's correct. Q: Thank you. STAFF: We have time for one more question. Oren Liebermann, CNN? Q: You spoke to U.S. forces, as well as -- as well as coalition forces. What effort was made, if any, to speak to Afghan witnesses who were there through intermediaries? It seems you have the perspective of those -- of -- of the U.S. forces who generally would have had HKIA behind them, so they're looking in one direction, but not Afghan witnesses, of which there were, certainly, many who survived who had the -- the opposite perspective, 180-degrees view. Was there any effort made through intermediaries to reach out to any of those? GEN. CURTIS: A challenge for us was that by the time we started investigating this, obviously, U.S. forces had already left. But I think a very important aspect regarding that was that what we did have was we had individuals who were able to tell us -- you know, I talked about the individuals in the tower -- those -- that's one example -- unaffected by the blast and able to tell us what happened before, during and after the blast, and unaffected by what actually happened. So talking to actual Afghans -- very difficult, given the current structure of Afghanistan, and also the fact that U.S. forces had -- had already left. Q: We -- we -- we used, for example -- and I'm using this broadly -- we -- we're in touch with Qatar to get U.S. citizens out even just a few days ago, there was a flight. Was there any effort made through Qatar or through somebody else that has people on the ground there to reach out to the Afghan witnesses? If not, why not? It seems like they'd have a valuable perspective. GEN CURTIS: Yeah. That was -- during the course of our investigation we did not have an opportunity to speak with Afghans on the ground. Q: And one more Q: How many U.S. and -- and coalition servicemembers in all opened fire with the warning shots? And do you know how many rounds were fired in total, ballpark? GEN. CURTIS: Yeah, so the -- from the Brit locations, the estimate was 25 to 30 rounds. From the 3rd Marine location, you know, they had the individual that caused concern to them; approximately four rounds from there. And then from the last location, I think that exact round count is unknown at this time. Q: Thanks. (CROSSTALK) STAFF: OK, we've got to wrap it up, you guys. Q: Just a quick clarification about the 5:00 P.M. meeting: Were you asked by your partners to keep the gate open during that meeting? GEN. CURTIS. It was a topic of discussion. I know that. That's the extent of my knowledge regarding that meeting. STAFF: All right, we're going to wrap it up, you guys. Thanks so much.
PENTAGON PRESS BRIEFING WITH GENERAL MCKENZIE JR - REMOTE
PENTAGON BRFG REMOTE FS-19-HD 20220204 122500 NBC POOL General Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr., Commander, U.S. Central Command, Holds a Press Briefing FEB. 4, 2022 General Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr., commander, U.S. Central Command; Brigadier General Lance Curtis, Commanding General, 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Lead Investigator; Lieutenant General Ron Clark, Commanding General, U.S. Army Central and 3rd Army; Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton, MARCENT G5; Colonel C.J. Douglas, MARCENT G5 STAFF: All right. Good afternoon, everybody. I'm Commander Beth Teach. Thank you for joining us today. Just a couple notes at the top, we have press both here in the room with us and on the phone. We're going to take questions from both. I would add ask that you please introduce yourself and name your news organization at the start of your question. Our first two speakers, General McKenzie and Lieutenant General Clark, will frame today's brief and then we will hear from the investigation team. And we will hold questions until the end. With that, I'll direct your attention to General Frank McKenzie. GENERAL KENNETH F. MCKENZIE JR.: Thank you and good afternoon, everybody. We're with you today to brief the results of the investigation that I directed into the ISIS-K bombing at Abbey Gate at Hamid Karzai International Airport that occurred on 26 August 2021 that caused the deaths of 11 Marines, 1 soldier, and 1 sailor. We have completed our solemn duty of informing surviving family members about the results of the investigation and we're now providing it to the public in order to better inform you of the facts surrounding this tragic loss of life. While the majority of this detailed brief will be conducted by the investigating team who searched for the facts and interviewed more than 100 people, I wanted to take a moment at the beginning to provide my thoughts on the investigation and what the team determined. This brief will provide great context on the situation at Abbey Gate leading up to and during the attack as well as the aftermath. I found the results of the team's work comprehensive, credible and definitive. I found the brief you are about to receive to be powerful and moving. The volume of evidence collected, the testimony of more than 100 people, the analysis of experts, the findings of fact, and the conclusions of the team based upon that evidence gives a compelling and truthful examination of the event. GEN. MCKENZIE: The investigation found that a single explosive device killed at least 170 Afghan civilians and 13 U.S. servicemembers by explosively directing ball bearings through a packed crowd and into our men and women at Abbey Gate. The disturbing lethality of this device was confirmed by the 58 U.S. servicemembers who were killed and wounded, despite the universal wear of body armor and helmets that did stop ball bearings that impacted them but could not prevent catastrophic injuries to areas not covered. The investigation found no definitive proof that anyone was ever hit or killed by gunfire, either U.S. or Afghan. This conclusion was based upon the careful consideration of sworn testimony of more than 100 witnesses, and especially those witnesses in observation towers, both American and British, who were in locations unaffected by the blast and that had commanding views of the scene before, during and after the explosive attack. This conclusion was also confirmed by the findings and analysis of medical examiners and explosive experts, a review of all available physical evidence, and a review of all available video evidence, including an MQ-9 unmanned aerial vehicle which began observing the scene about three minutes after the attack. At this point I want to acknowledge that the investigation differs from what we initially believed on the day of the attack. At the time, the best information we had in the immediate aftermath of the attack indicated that it was a complex attack by both a suicide bomber and ISIS-K gunmen. We now know that the explosively fired ball bearings caused wounds that looked like gunshots, and when combined with a small number of warning shots, that led many to assume that a complex attack had occurred. The fact that this investigation has contradicted our first impression demonstrates to me that the team went into this investigation with an open mind in search of the truth. It also confirms the age old fact that the battlefield is a confusing and contradictory place, and it gets more confusing the closer you are to the actual action. That is why I ordered the investigation to find the truth. Our commitment to transparency has now led us to provide you our best information, information derived from a thorough and comprehensive investigation. The investigation found that military leadership on the ground was appropriately engaged on force protection measures throughout the operation of Abbey Gate, and that the medical services that were available and that were ready saved every life they possibly could through heroic efforts. This was a terrible attack that resulted in tragic outcomes and a horrific loss of life, both Afghan and American. My hope is that by the time this brief is over, you will have a clearer picture of the situation and of the attack. While nothing can bring back the 11 Marines, the soldier and the sailor that we tragically lost in this attack, it's important that we fully understand what happened. Their sacrifice demands nothing less. With that, I'll now turn it over to the investigative team to provide you an extensive brief, and following that brief they'll be prepared to take your questions. With that, I'm going to turn it over to Lieutenant General Ron Clark, the Army Forces Central Command component commander. Thank you very much. LIEUTENANT GENERAL RON CLARK:  Thank you, sir. And good afternoon. As General McKenzie just said, I'm Lieutenant General Ron Clark. I'm the commanding general of U.S. Army Central and 3rd Army. On the 15th of September 2021, I was tasked by U.S. Central Command to conduct an investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the attack on U.S. forces at Abbey Gate on the 26th of August 2021. The attack took place at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, which we will refer to throughout this briefing as HKIA. GEN. CLARK: As a result of this attack, 13 of our nation's best and brightest, our heroes, paid the ultimate sacrifice in an effort to save the lives of American citizens and thousands of Afghans during the noncombatant evacuation of HKIA. Our sincere condolences go out to the families, their loved ones and all those who suffered this tragic loss of our fallen comrades. Our multiservice investigation team conducted a comprehensive examination of the tactical-level actions on the ground by U.S. personnel at Abbey Gate. The team focused on data operations, force protection, force posture, leadership, unit readiness and all other relevant actions before, during and after the attack. For this investigation, I appointed Brigadier General Lance Curtis, the commanding general of the 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command as our lead investigator. General Curtis and our investigative team will present the comprehensive, credible and compelling facts and findings of this investigation. Lance? BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS:  Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Brigadier General Lance Curtis. I'm currently forward deployed in the CENTCOM AOR as a part of ARCENT. On the 17th of September I was appointed as a lead investigator to look at the attack on U.S. forces at Hamid Karzai International Airport on the 26th of August. At that time, I appointed a team of seven, and they're with me today. I have two Marines, Colonel C.J. Douglas of the MARCENT G5 and I have Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton, also of the MARCENT G5. I also have Lieutenant Colonel Burt Smith, Major Brad Hannon, Captain Alec Porter and Lieutenants Nicole Rodrigues and Sean Poiani. We have conducted 70 interviews of 139 people in five different countries at seven different locations. Those interviews add -- averaged from one to six hours, and we had a total of 250 exhibits that were collected during the investigation. Ladies and gentlemen, at this time, I want to talk about the key point slide, and at the end of the day, this drives the rest of the discussion. And quite frankly, some of these key points will be in contradiction to earlier information that you may have heard. Today, we're going to show you why this was not a complex attack. It was a single blast, and it did not have a follow-on attack. There were a series of crossing fires to the front of the servicemembers on the ground that created the illusion that there was a complex attack, but there absolutely was not. There were no gunshot wounds. We have universal agreement between the Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office, and also, the medical providers on the ground. There were absolutely no gunshot wounds. During the course of our investigation, we found no evidence that post-blast, U.S. servicemembers killed other U.S. servicemembers or Afghans. We refer to the Taliban as unlikely partners. Leading up to the time when we asked them to partner with us on the 16th of August, we were conducting kinetic attacks against the Taliban. Finally, we will show you conclusively why the time of the attack was 17:36 and 52 seconds. We have two overhead persistent infrared platforms that both independently detect the blast at that time, and we also have the classified chat room, which begins reporting the attack at 17:38. That was an indicator that the attack absolutely began before that. This is a timeline of key events that were important to our investigation. On the 15th of August, Kabul falls to the Taliban. Concurrently, President Ghani departs Kabul. On the 16th of August, we had the large security breach on the airfield, and we asked the Taliban to assist us in clearing the airfield at that time, and the airfield is cleared by 22:30 on the evening of the 16th. On the 19th of August, we have 2nd Battalion and 1st Marine -- 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment that opens and mans Abbey Gate. Also, the Brits from 2 and 3 PARA begin their operations out of the Baron Hotel on the 19th of August. On the 20th of August, we emplaced the Chevron, which consisted of six shipping containers at Abbey Gate. The Chevron is named because of the shape, and we'll show you some pictures that will give you a very good view of the Chevron later on. The Chevron is in place for at least two reasons: vehicle-borne IED threat mitigation, and also, it enables processing at Abbey Gate. From the 20th through the 22nd of August, the gates were closed at HKIA. This is because the intermediate staging bases were at capacity. On the 25th of August, East and North Gate closed permanently. Now, we'll explain the reasons for that. East Gate was more challenging to process, given the geographic situation of the gate. At North Gate, there were vehicle-borne IED threats, and that was a leading cause in the decision to close North Gate. From the 25th through the 26th we tracked the imminent threat streams at Abbey Gate and some of the other threat streams across HKIA. There were at least four imminent threat streams that occurred between the 25th and the 26th at Abbey Gate, and what we found is that leaders took the appropriate measures tied to these imminent threat streams. They would lower their profiles, seek cover and at times, they would even cease operations at the gate for periods of time. At 16:00 on the 26th, Gulf Company changed out 4th Platoon with 1st Platoon. This was an hour earlier than scheduled, but this was because of the high OPTEMPO that was occurring, and also, the sensory overload. This demonstrated that leaders were keeping their fingers on the pulse of the situation on the ground. We assess that leader presence was high at Abbey Gate not only on the 26th of August, but at all times. At 17:00 on the 26th, Brigadier General Sullivan, who was the Joint Task Force crisis response commander, was at Abbey Gate. That was 36 minutes before the blast. He was there for a meeting with the Brits and the Taliban. The 82nd Airborne Division commander, the 24th MEU commander were also at Abbey Gate on the 26th of August. The 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment Battalion commander was physically on the ground at the time of the blast, and he was wounded, and then we had multiple company commanders who were also on the ground at the time of the attack. At 17:36 and 52 seconds on the 26th, we have the actual attack. Then, on the 31st of August, we have all U.S. aircraft and servicemembers that depart HKIA early in the morning at 00:02. This is an overview of HKIA. The outline of HKIA, you see listed in red. The 1st of the 82nd, 1st Brigade, had half of the perimeter leading from the South Gate up to the North Gate, and then the Marines had the other half of the perimeter going from North Gate down to halfway between Abbey and South Gates. There are two comfort areas that you see as the white goose eggs. These were areas where the Afghans could have bed-down, food, water, and also medical care, if required. And then additionally, the State Department had another chance to process Afghans before they were actually put on the plane. GEN. CURTIS: There were four medical capabilities that you see listed on the map. The first one is a hospital that is at Camp Alvarado, in the upper left there. This was run by 1st Brigade of the 82nd, and they had one surgical team of four. The highest-level medical capability was the main hospital, and that's where the cursor is right now. This was a facility that was originally run by the Norwegians, but it became a joint facility. At any given time it remained a coalition flavor, in that you would have seen Norwegians there and frequently Brits and Germans as well. This had eight surgical teams of four, a very robust medical capability. And it was sometimes referred to as a Role 2 enhanced and this was because it had additional capability, think a C.T. scan. There were two Shock Trauma Platoons. The first was at the first was at the East Gate in a hardened facility. And that was run by the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment. The second was run by the 24th MEU in very close proximity to the main hospital. There were high-speed avenues of approach, indicated by the wide arrows. Most notably, long the NSU Gate and leading to the North Gate, which culminated in a traffic circle. This ultimately was a heavily influencing factor in the decision to close North Gate. Finally, I'll key in on Abbey Gate, which is highlighted in white at the bottom. In the next slide we're going to show you a better view of Abbey Gate. But as we transition to the next slide, you'll see it will be inverse of what you presently see, with the north-seeking arrow in the opposite direction. When we began the investigation, there were different units that manned Abbey Gate and they called the sections of Abbey Gate by different names. We came to a common lexicon of three major portions of Abbey Gate: inner gate, outer gate, and the Chevron. I'll start with the inner gate, which is in the yellow box. The inner gate is closest to the airfield. And once again, bear in mind this is an inverted view from what you just saw. There's an inner corridor, that spans about three football fields, leading down to the outer gate, which is also in the yellow box. There's an additional outer corridor, which is about two football fields, leading down to the Chevron -- once again, named because of the shape. The Chevron was in place on the 20th of August and was primarily oriented towards vehicle borne IED threat mitigation and also allowed processing. There are three towers that were important to our investigation. The first is the 82nd tower, and you can see where the cursor is right now. This was a little bit outside of Abbey Gate and the individuals who were there gave us a very good picture of what happened on the 26th of August before, during, and after the blast because they are outside of the blast zone, and they are unaffected by the blast. The second tower is the Marine sniper tower. I would ask you to use that as a point of orientation during the brief. It figures very prominently. Additionally, it provided Marines an overwatch security position along canal. And the last tower is the U.K. tower -- once again, also outside of the blast area. And we have individuals who were there who were not affected by the blast. And they were able to tell us what -- what happened both before, during and after the blast. The Baron Hotel is not a singular building. It's an entire complex, and you see it outlined in yellow. We have a canal that runs the length of Abbey Gate. And we have two footbridges, one that is 90 meters east of the sniper tower and the second that is next to the Baron Hotel complex. We have the actual blast location as pinpointed by post-blast EOD analysis. And finally, we have the water tower, which is important to our findings of no complex attack. And we'll talk about that later in the brief. LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOHN NAUGHTON:  Good afternoon. My name is Lieutenant Colonel John Naughton. And on this slide, I'll be discussing the flow of evacuees at Abbey Gate throughout the course of the NEO. I'll begin with how the process was originally designed, then discuss how the process evolved as conditions changed on the ground. Directing your attention to the top right portion of the slide, you'll see the Chevron obstacle we've referenced previously.  Again, the Chevron was comprised six shipping containers put in place the morning of 20 August to mitigate against possible vehicle borne improvised explosive device attacks and to establish an entry control point for the primary point of entry at Abbey Gate. The arrow on the top side of the Chevron depicts the entrance to the entry control point while the arrow on the bottom depicts the exit. As originally intended, potential evacuees would approach the Abbey corridor from the southwest and would be met by Taliban members outside the Chevron, where the Taliban would conduct an initial search and inspect their documentation. If allowed to pass through the entry control point, they'd be met inside the Chevron by either U.K. or U.S. service members. If they were U.K. evacuees, they'd be escorted into the Baron Hotel compound where they'd processed, and eventually loaded onto vehicles, and transported into HKIA for evacuation. If they were U.S. evacuees, they'd be met by Marines from 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines and escorted to the holding area they had established in the outer corridor. The following photo shows what the Chevron looked like from the ground. To orient you, this photo was taken from the outer corridor looking towards the southwest. The Baron Hotel compound is being circled on the left. The troops on the ground are primarily from 2 and 3 PARA, the U.K. units that were operating out of the Baron Hotel. In the center of the photo, six shipping containers are arrayed in the shape of a Chevron. And on top are several Taliban members holding security as they did throughout the operation. On the left side there's a vehicle lane used primarily by the U.K. And on the right side is a lane the Marines utilized as a holding area for potential evacuees. Potential evacuees in the outer corridor holing area would wait there for varying lengths of time depending on conditions on the airfield. These next two photos give you an idea of what the outer corridor would have looked like during the NEO. The photo on the left is from 22 August and it was taken from the inner corridor looking towards the outer corridor. For a point of reference, the sniper tower is being circled on the left and the actual outer gate is visible in the middle. In the outer corridor you see a large crowd of potential evacuees gather. This photo was taken on day three of no flights departing HKIA with evacuees due to the intermediate staging bases being at capacity. As a result, no additional evacuees were being allowed to enter the airfield. So the end state was that gates got backed up, as depicted in this photo. The photo in the right was taken 25 August from just inside the outer gate. The Baron Hotel compound is in the background, and on the left side of the photo is a chain-link fence with a canal on the back side. On the right side is a queue of potential evacuees stretching from the inner to the outer corridor. I'd like to draw your attention to the woman and children in yellow. Women and children under the age of 13 would have been searched by members of the female search team, which was comprised of female Marines and Corpsmen primarily from the 24th MEU who were tasked with searching and escorting women and children, and generally helped to de-escalate a variety of tense situations at the gates. The male evacuees would have been searched by male Marines. All evacuees would have been searched initially in the outer corridor. But once they entered the inner corridor, they would have undergone a more thorough search where Marines would have gone through their bags to ensure they did not bring any contraband onto the airfield. These two photos illustrate the close, personal contact between service members and evacuees required during these types of operations. Once potential evacuees moved into the inner corridor, they would enter another holding area before moving -- moving onto the inner gate area, where State Department representatives would inspect their documentation. If the State Department representatives approved their documents, evacuees would pass through the inner gate, load a bus and eventually get transported to the evacuation control center to get evacuated. COL. NAUGHTON: If their documents were rejected, the potential evacuees would be turned back over to the Marines, who would escort them back out through the gate, either to the canal area or through the Chevron. Of note, during interviews, Marines stated this was one of the most difficult and challenging tasks they dealt with throughout the NEO, as they literally had potential evacuees begging and pleading for their lives as they were being escorted back out. That said, the process was originally designed and if an evacuee were to move straight from the Chevron to the inner gate it would have been about a five-minute walk. However that rarely happened. As conditions on the ground changed the process for evacuee flow at the gate evolved. One of the reasons the process evolved was the Taliban became less and less cooperative at the Chevron. And Marines reported during interviews that there were entire days where not a single U.S. document holder entered through the Chevron. Marines also reported seeing the Taliban turn potential evacuees away, beating potential evacuees and even made allegations of Taliban shooting at potential evacuees. So as the Chevron became largely impassible and potential evacuees became more and more desperate they began to seek out and utilize alternate ingress routes to bypass (inaudible) checkpoints. These routes are generally depicted by the large yellow arrows on the left-hand side of this slide. And what we found happened was post would go out on traditional or social media highlighting the conditions and locations of Taliban checkpoint HKIA. This post on the left is calling out the conditions at the Chevron on 25 August. We also learned during the investigation that in order to maximize the number of evacuees U.S. servicemembers and government officials worked directly with human intelligence personnel on the ground at HKIA as well as a number of private organizations to talk evacuees onto routes they could use to bypass the Taliban checkpoints. So maps like the one on the right would be sent to an evacuee and would highlight the route they could use to bypass checkpoints and gain access to Abbey Gate. The result would be similar to what's seen in the photo in the center which shows large numbers of potential evacuees using side roads and back alleys to get to HKIA. So potential evacuees would make their way down these alternate routes that eventually arrive at this parking lot areas that's being circled now and then they would have a few options for getting close to the outer gate area. They could turn left down the far side canal walkway, the could utilize the canal itself or they could cross the footbridge and turn down the nearest side canal walkway. This photo was taking 25 August from the sniper tower and it's looking towards the Baron Hotel, which you can see in the background. The canal area is on the left and the canal itself is full as is the far side walkway. We assessed that the vast majority of people we see in the canal area would have gotten there by using one of the alternate ingress routes. This next photo was 26 August from further east down the canal looking towards the sniper tower, which you see being circled. The canal is in the middle of the photo. The left side of the canal is the far side walkway and the right side is the near side walkway. On the 26th both walkways were full with people trying to make their way towards the outer gate area. The next photo is also from the 26th and is taken from the far side of the canal looking towards the near side and the sniper tower. A group of Marines is at the base of the sniper tower trying to control the large crowds of potential evacuees on the near side canal walkway and they are separated by a series of Jersey barriers. The photo shows how densely packed the canal on 26 August and this gives you an idea of why there were so many causalities as a result of the attack. As people were packed in the canal shoulder-to-shoulder, chest-to-back, standing immediately in front of the blast site. It's important to highlight that early on in the operation the canal facilitated crowd control and provided some standoff between U.S. servicemembers on the near side of the canal and potential evacuees on the far side of the canal. COL. NAUGHTON: Additionally, because it was a sewage canal potential evacuees were hesitant early in the evacuation to use the canal as an avenue of approach. However that changed dramatically and rapidly as desperation levels increased and more people began using the alternate ingress routes. It's also important to note that just about every person seen in the canal is holding up some form of documentation in an effort to get identified and pulled from the canal to be evacuated. This illustrates the complex and dynamic nature of this operation that as U.S. servicemembers at Abbey Gate were tasked with identifying potential evacuees in possession of the necessary documentation, pulling them from a large, unruly crowd, and then getting them transported to the evacuation control center. As a result of our investigation we assess that it is highly likely the attacker from 26 August utilized one of the alternate ingress routes to access the Abbey Gate area. Because he would not have had to pass through a Taliban checkpoint, and he would not have had to show identification to get close enough to U.S. servicemembers to detonate his device. While the intent was to take advantage of the terrain at Abbey Gate to execute an orderly evacuation process, conditions on the ground changed, people became more desperate, and the process evolved. Regardless of the process utilized, the nature of evacuation operations requires close personal contact between U.S. servicemembers and evacuees at some point along the way. This video is from the morning of 25 August, the Marines seen in the video are from Echo Company, Second Battalion, First Marines. The two Marines you can see are standing on the jersey barriers at the base of the sniper tower. The Marine on the left is holding himself up on the chain link fence which runs adjacent to the sniper tower. The Marine on the right will get pulled into the crowd by the muzzle of his weapon, and his fellow Marines will enter the crowd to assist him. Towards the end of the video, a Marine will come into view on the left and you'll hear him call to reinforce the area. We show you this video for three reasons. First, it demonstrates how large, desperate, and aggressive the crowds were at Abbey Gate. Bearing in mind that this video was taken a little more than 24 hours prior to the attack, and we know from the investigation that the crowds at Abbey Gate swelled exponentially the evening of the 25th and into the 26th. So the crowd would have been even larger, more desperate, and more aggressive at the time of the attack. The second reason is to illustrate the level of discipline and restraint displayed by Marines on a daily basis at Abbey Gate, as the Marines could have responded with deadly force after a man grabbed the Marines rifle, but they opted not to. Finally, we show you this video to help understand why there was such a large number of Marines concentrated at the base of the sniper tower at the time of the attack on the 26th. As they needed to be there to control the large, desperate crowd and enable the evacuation to continue at Abbey Gate. (VIDEO CLIP) BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS: The next video is the only known footage of the blast itself. This is 48 meters from the blast. There's a white Hilux truck and three Marines. A single individual dressed in all black steps forward from the crowd. BRIGADIER GENERAL LANCE CURTIS: In that space between the Marine and the foreground his antenna is where you're going to see that individual. The blast seems to emanate from this individual. The blast builds in the V where the cursor is right now, in-between the two Marines, and then there's a building that is currently not on the screen -- it's on the left. And you will see the blast overpressure coming through that window. It looks like dust. And that gives you an idea regarding the blast effects that servicemembers on the ground were actually feeling, even 48 meters from the blast. Finally, you will see the Marines orient towards a blast, and they will seek cover. We'll play the video wants, and then we'll stop and slow down and show you key aspects of the video. Alec, play the video, please. The first thing you'll see is in that space between the Marine's antenna and his chest; you'll see an individual dressed in all black where the cursor is circling right now. The blast seems to emanate from this individual. You will see the blast build in that V between the Marines antenna on the forefront and the Marine in the center. And then you also see the overpressure. It looks like dust that's coming through the window there, giving you an idea of what individuals on the ground were feeling in the way of blast effects. Finally, you will see the Marines orient towards a blast and seek cover. MAJ. BRAD HANNON: Good afternoon, I'm Major Brad Hannon. The following videos are from an overhead platform. The video begins three minutes and eight seconds after the attack. This full video will be made available following this briefing. And the edges of the video have been blurred to protect classified data from being displayed in order to allow us to release this footage. The attack occurs at 17:36 and 52 seconds, and it's time-stamped by two different overhead persistent infrared or OPIR detection sensors. These detections of a single blast indicate the origin point of the blast to have been in the vicinity of Abbey Gate. The intelligence cell takes that report and provides the information of an explosion having occurred to the intelligence and information sharing platform. Those reports are used to redirect the aircraft you're about to see. As the footage begins, what you're seeing initially is the drone pilot orienting the camera to Abbey Gate at the Abbey inner gate. The initial movement scene is the Marines reacting to the blast moving down the inner corridor to assist at the site of the attack. This is the inner corridor area and is where State Department personnel processed evacuees during the evacuation. There are quite a few vehicles in the corridor, some of which were prepositioned as blocking obstacles for the closure of the gate before the joint tactical exfil. And some were used to evacuate casualties following triage. On the left, the drone pilot maneuvers over the outer gate now and as well as the outer corridor. On the left is the Chevron in the Baron Hotel complex. Having reached the end of the corridor, the drone pilot research is back up the corridor for the site of the attack. The video will be paused here to show you a few things. The vehicle scene on the far left of the screen is the white truck that was in the background of the previous video of the blast. The previous video would have been filmed from right here. As Brigadier General Curtis mentioned, this truck is 48 meters from the blast. The site of the attack was right here on the bottom right of the screen, just out of view due to the angle of the camera and the aircraft. Later in this video, the drone pilot reorients the camera and the aircraft to better view the site of the attack. On the left-hand side of the screen, you can see the building where the blast overpressure passed through that window in the blast video. In the center of the screen are the U-shaped jersey barriers along with the high visibility orange panel that is attached to the fence. These points of reference to note the original hole in the fence, which is important because prior to the attack, Marines would have would have had to walk 30 meters from the outer gate down the outer corridor through the hole in the fence and then back another 30 meters to the base of the sniper tower. That 60-meter distance is a long way to evacuate a casualty, and exhibiting rapid response and adaptability, the Marines shorten that distance by cutting two additional holes in the fence closer to the outer gate. Finally, I would like to point out the white vehicle on the far right, which is a visual indicator for being direct across the canal from the site of the attack. Next, the video will be fast-forwarded to the two-minute mark as the drone pilot is going to actually leave Abbey Gate for a moment. So, the footage is contextual but not relevant to the specific events as they occur. Please be advised the next segment of the video is graphic and that it clearly depicts casualty evacuation after the attack. You will not be able to identify individuals, but the movement is clearly visible. As the next segment of a video begins, the drone pilot has switched his electric optical, infrared camera to IR mode, which is better for tracking and identifying movement. The camera orients first on the parking lot area and then pans past the site of the attack and focuses on an IR light on the ground near the original hole in the fence. For the next several seconds, the camera will focus on this area as Marines continue to evacuate casualties through the original hole in the fence. At this point, about five and a half minutes after the attack, the canal has emptied significantly as compared to the photos shown in the previous portion of this brief. The far side walkway across the canal also appears distinctly different from those photos. The natural inclination of the crowd is to move away from the blast. U.K. troops, we're not allowing passage from the canal towards the Baron Hotel as a security measure. The crowd then is forced together and pushed back down towards the east past the site of the attack. In many cases, people had to run behind and over the site of the attack. The location being shown now is where a Marine cut an additional hole in the fence about 10 meters from the original hole, which shortens the evacuation distance by 20 meters. Analysis of the video footage by the drone analyst specified the fact that they did not see any gunfire at any point throughout this video, either incoming or outgoing. The location being pointed out now is the second hole that the Marines cut into the fence 10 meters from the base of the sniper tower, which again significantly shortened the evacuation distance. The video continues as Marines evacuate personnel and move them into the inner corridor where they had a pre-planned casualty collection point for initial treatment and triage. The movement of several personnel towards higher levels of care has already begun by this point in the footage. The video is paused here in order to point out a few things about the site of the attack. What is shown now is seven minutes and 21 seconds post-blast. The view clearly shows the site of the attack, which originates from here. There were three distinct large groups of potential evacuees who were injured and killed in the blast. The first being identified right now was directly surrounding the attacker on the far side walkway when he set off the device. The second is inside the canal below the wall where the device was detonated. The third large group of potential evacuees were near the base of the sniper tower, crowded and trying to work with the Marines in order to gain entry. This is the central point of where the U.S. casualties, which is being identified now. In addition to evacuation efforts, Marines moved to the outer corridor in order to assist in providing security along the wall, but again, no outgoing fire can be seen. This video will end in about 30 seconds, which is eight minutes post-attack. By 20 minutes post-attack, all U.S. casualties were evacuated and moved into the inner corridor area for triage at the casualty collection point. All U.S. personnel were pulled back into the inner corridor, and no U.S. personnel left the gate again until the next morning when the explosive ordnance disposal team performed the blast analysis at 6:00 a.m. Eventually, 2 and 3 PARA units left the Baron Hotel in order to secure the outer corridor between the Baron Hotel and the outer gate until the end of their evacuation was complete. LT COL BURT SMITH: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen; I'm Lieutenant Colonel Burt Smith. I'm going to first orient you to the slide. The blast is located at the top of the slide on the far side of the canal. The two white arrows show the fragmentation pattern from the explosion. The killed in action are depicted in blue and the wounded in action in yellow. At the time of the blast, golf company and fox company two-one Marines were conducting evacuation operations in the outer gate area. The first platoon of golf company was holding back the crown of the base of the tower of the jersey barriers and simultaneously conducting evacuation screening of those in the canal area. Echo company and weapons company of two-one Marines were supporting from the inner corridor and also conducting other operations to prepare for the eventual closure of Abbey Gate. The killed in action at Abbey Gate number 13 on the 26th of August, the closest being three servicemembers, were approximately three meters from the blast, or 10 feet. They were standing up the canal wall, searching for potential evacuees amongst the crowd. The farthest killed in action was nearly 17 years from blast located near the vehicle in the outer corridor at the bottom of the slide. There were 26 wounded in action treated at the medical facilities at HKIA on the 26th of August 19 of those were wounded and were medically evacuated on 27 August. The reason so many servicemembers have consolidated the base of the sniper tower was a necessity to hold back the crowd. And you continue to screen potential evacuees for as long as possible to save as many lives as possible. The fragmentation pattern shown on the previous slide is overlaid here on the Abbey Gate terrain. It's combined with data from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's boom tool, which measures pressure over range and determines blast effects of an explosion. Based on the size of the device, the blast effects were felt 15 meters out at Abbey Gate. Now, Zone A is marked in red, and this is where servicemembers were exposed to the fragmentation of the blast itself as well as full blast effects. Blast Zone B marked in Orange is located in the outer corridor. The servicemembers there would have been felt -- would have felt unmitigated blast effects. The three Marines in the video of the blast were located just on the edge of Blast Zone B, 48 meters. He saw the involuntarily buckled when the blast wave passed through their location. Zone C is marked in yellow it's located in the inner corridor. The servicemembers here would have been exposed to mitigated blast effects. The walls in the inner corridor and the sniper tower would have offered them some protection from the blast. Now, it's important to discuss blast effects because it explains why the number of wounded in action has actually risen after the attack. As units redeployed from HKIA, they conducted screening for traumatic brain injury, and it discovered that additional servicemembers were wounded in this attack. There are now 45 EOD servicemembers listed as wounded from this event. The Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit at HKIA conducted a post-blast analysis 13 hours after the attack on the morning of 27 August. They establish the location of the blast as the far side of the canal. The picture on the left is the view from the bomber looking across the canal at the servicemembers at the base of the tower. EOD establishes the location of the attacker because they found fragmentation noted by the yellow arrows in the inside of the near side canal wall; the attacker would have had been standing on the far side of the canal for the fragmentation to end up in that location. The picture on the right is a view of the servicemembers looking at the attacker from the base of the tower. You can see the charring on the fence behind the silhouette we've placed there; it's another indication the attacker was on the far side of the canal when the device was exploited. Now, EOD determined this was a directional device. This Command Detonated 20 pounds of military-grade explosives and was person born. They sought forensic analysis of potential delivery device mechanisms. They collected shards of backpacks and other fabric and debris. Forensic (inaudible) was inconclusive, and no delivery mechanism can be determined under the circumstances, which is why we call it a person born IED. EOD was able to conclude however it was delivered; the device would have been elevated on the attacker's body when he stepped up to the edge of the canal and exploded the ordinance, which explains why fragmentation was projected both into the canal landing in that wall and also across into the servicemembers on the far side of the canal. The fragmentation found at the blast site was five-millimeter ball bearings. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office also found ball bearings during autopsies of the 13 killed in action. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office concluded the penetrative injury suffered by those killed in action was caused solely by the ball bearings. They did not find bullet fragmentation or other evidence that gunshot wounds were suffered during the attack at Abbey Gate. Wounds from ball bearings look remarkably similar to gunshot wounds. And the first responders at Abbey Gate may have confused the cause of the injuries. Additionally, doctors treating the casualties at the hospitals at North HKIA were openly describing the injuries as gunshot wounds in front of servicemembers. These descriptions were meant to aid the providers in treating the various traumas and as a point of reference amongst them. These are not medical determinations of the cause of injuries. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office does make determinations on the cause of injuries and found that ball bearings caused catastrophic injuries to the upper chest, neck, and face as well as the lower abdomen of those killed in action at Abbey Gate. The number of potential evacuees killed and injured was difficult to determine. Open Source reporting from approximately three days after the blast concluded that over 160 to 170 were killed by this explosion in this attack. (inaudible) the number of potential factories outside Abbey Gate in the vicinity of the canal area at the time of the blast as shown in the pictures in the upper left and the upper right combined with statements from servicemembers who were at or at Abbey Gate post-blast we found this number to be reasonable under the circumstances. Now, in a few moments, we'll talk -- we'll discuss the lack of a complex attack, but it should be noted there was outgoing small arms fire in the form of warning shots post-blast. This came from the U.S. servicemembers as well as coalition forces. Based on the evidence collected during the investigation, we concluded the shots fired post-blast did not contribute to the injury suffered by the potential evacuees at Abbey Gate. The injuries suffered from potential evacuees are attributed solely to the blast. COLONEL C.J. DOUGLAS:  I am Colonel C.J. Douglas, and I will discuss the details and the key finding that this was not a complex attack. The attack at Abbey Gate was a single personal born improvised explosive device with no associated enemy small arms fire. Through a review of the overhead persistent infrared detections sensor data, the U.S. Explosive Ordnance Disposal report, and subsequent interviews with personnel in the Abbey Quarter and surrounding area, the investigation determined there was only one explosion. Early reports describe the complex attack, including reports of gunfire and gunshot wounds. We now know this is not true. Additionally, there is no proof that any U.S. or Afghan person was injured or killed by gunfire. Several factors contributed to the initial belief that this attack was complex, including the fog of war and disorientation due to blast effects, the Marines' heightened alert toward the Taliban, and the presence of gunfire used for warning shots. Within seconds of the blast, Marines experienced mental and physical friction. Mentally, they worked through the uncertainty about what had just occurred and the possibility that the Taliban could be responsible. Very quickly Marines determined the Taliban were neither involved nor threatening U.S. personnel. Physically, Marines experienced blast effects which caused disorientation. Several interviews discussed the presence of teargas which was released when the CS canisters worn on the Marines equipment were punctured by ball bearings from the blast. At this point, Marines were simultaneously enduring teargas and blast effects while responding to a mass casualty situation. Plainly put, the blast created instant chaos and sensory overload. And as you've seen from the pictures and videos, this effected the enormous potential evacuee population as well. Through a number of interviews with personnel who were not impacted by the blast, witnesses confirmed gunfire was present as warning shots were fired from three separate locations in order to maintain crowd control. For context, these events all happened in a very short amount of time. I'll explain how and where the gunfire originated. The two blue dots closest to the Baron Hotel depict U.K. forces that fired warning shots across the frontage of Marines in the quarter and over the heads of evacuees. The shots were fired in order to assist with dispersing the crowds within the quarter. The third blue dot depicts a Marine element that fired four warning shots over the head of an individual who displayed concerning behavior and appeared to be observing the casualty site. This individual of interest ultimately fled unarmed. These events occurred a short time after the attack, and resulted in nearly simultaneous gunfire from three separate points, travelling across the frontage of servicemembers operating within a confined space. That confined space caused an echo, which created the illusion of a firefight. The fourth blue dot depicts the location of a team of Marines who observed gunfire going across their frontage to the east. During interviews, this team of Marines stated they observed a military age male, armed with an AK-47 on top of the two story building with a water tower. Although the Marines did not see him fire, they believe he exhibited hostile intent when they observed him with the weapon and also observed the subsequent gunfire across their frontage following the blast. They engaged him, but did not see any effect. Further interviews concluded that no one had seen any effect on the individual. In closing, interviews with personnel located at two positions that were outside the blast effect area confirmed that the gunfire observed within Abbey Gate corridor was simply warning shots that were fired to disperse the crowd and there was no complex attack. Another key aspect of the investigation reviewed the medical capabilities. We have universal agreement between the Armed Forces Medical Examiners Office, and also the highly experienced medical providers on the ground that the wounds sustained by the killed in action at Abbey Gate were so catastrophic that none could be saved. The investigation heard important witness accounts from doctors and first responders who explained that triage was very effective at the point of injury, and there was a robust medical capability, including nine surgical teams of four and a shock trauma platoon located close to Abbey and East Gates. An ER doc, assigned to the shock trauma platoon directly contributed to the saved lives. Fortuitously leaders on the ground kept medical capabilities in place longer than originally planned. This meant that at the time of the attack we were in the best possible position on the ground to respond. Although still tragic, medical providers assured that every servicemember that could be was saved. Ladies and gentlemen, it's been an honor to brief you today with the intent of taking you virtually to Abbey Gate. All of that in effort to gain a better understanding of the conditions on the ground, as well as the exceptional professionalism, determination, and courage of our Marines, soldiers, and sailors. We look forward to answering any or all of your questions at this time. STAFF: We'll start with AP on the phone, Lita Baldor. Q: Hi, Lita with the Associated Press. I was wondering if you could address a little bit more fully what if anything, the Taliban may have been able to do to prevent this. I mean, was there -- because you say there were a number of avenues that were being used, that people knew about to some degree -- was there a deliberate, I guess lack of effort by the Taliban to control this? Does the Taliban bear any responsibility? GEN. CURTIS: This is General Curtis. What I can tell you is that as we mentioned previously in the brief, there was a 1700 meeting that occurred right before the attack, 36 minutes before the blast. This was actually a topic of discussion that was being discussed at that briefing between Brigadier General Sullivan, the Brits and the Taliban. And I would also like to point out that what also is heavily influencing to this situation is that the situation over a very condensed time period changed dramatically. And the numbers that were actually at Abbey Gate swelled significantly, and that certainly impacted the situation. STAFF: (Inaudible). Q: General Curtis, how can you rule out that the Taliban did not know that this bomber was heading in that direction? Is it possible that the bomber knew about the 5 o'clock meeting and was just late and (is ?) trying to disrupt that meeting? And how -- later when you say that it was quickly determined that Taliban were not involved by the Marines there, how can you say that? What evidence do you have? GEN. CURTIS: The meeting, once again, that occurred at 1700, 36 minutes before the blast. This was also an opportunity for the Taliban to share any information that they had with U.S. forces, and our best indicators are that they did that. We don't have any evidence through the course of our investigation that leads us to believe that the Taliban knew about this attack. Q: But then why would we -- if there was so much intelligence that morning why would the gate still (close at ?) 5:36? Wasn't it supposed to be closed already? Was it kept open for some reason? GEN. CURTIS: Jennifer, there were several times when there was discussion of closing the gate. And I don't want to anchor everything on that 1700 meeting, but I know for a fact that's another topic that was being discussed. So there are several influencing factors on the time, you know, and keeping the gate open. One influencing factor certainly is that there are still individuals that are being identified in that large crowd that fit the criteria. A second influencing factor is that we have coalition forces who still have individuals that we know they're trying to also evacuate, but those are two lead influencing factors. And then another is that we're also very mindful of what happened on the 16th of August when we actually had Afghans that flooded the airfield. We absolutely want to prevent another situation like that because we know that that can influence several things. It can throw off our timelines for departure and it also takes a lot of time to clear those crowds. Q: Lastly, there were reports at the time that the identity of this bomber was known in advance. Is that true? GEN. CURTIS: Jennifer, there is a separate investigation that is being conducted by the FBI that's taking a look at that. That's outside the scope of our investigation. STAFF: Courtney Kube, NBC. Q: Hi. Two things. So I just want to be clear that meeting that you've been referencing, the 5 p.m. meeting, part of that on the discussion -- of the discussion of that was when to close the gate. Just to be clear that the decision was made there that the gate was not going to close yet. Correct? GEN. CURTIS: What I would tell you, Courtney, is that it was a topic of discussion. I would not say that the decision was made in that meeting, but it was a topic of discussion at the time. Q: What time did the gate usually close? I mean, was it usually... GEN. CURTIS: Well, I think -- I think there's a difference between the gate actually closing and ceasing operations at the gate. There's a -- there's a very big difference. So there are always individuals that are there, but whether or not they're actually processing evacuees is different. So ceasing operations, lowering profile, seeking cover, and also not processing is very different from actually closing. Q: And then just one more. On the timeline there's a 25-26 August reference that says there were four minute threat streams reported at Abbey Gate and 2/1 leaders take probate action. Can you tell us about those four threat streams? What specifically was the action? GEN. CURTIS: There were multiple threat streams during the course of operations at HKIA. Those particular threat streams, I won't go into details on them, but what I can tell you is they were consistent with other reporting that had occurred but they were very nonspecific. So there was nothing coming out of those particular threat streams at that time that would have led them to believe, you know, that what occurred at 1736 and 52 seconds was about to occur. Q: I mean, now, I mean, there's no Americans there. This operation is completely over. Is there a reason you can't tell us a little bit more about what you were -- what I'm curious is were there -were there threat streams coming in, so you were focusing your security more on something else and that's maybe how this bomber was able to get in? I'm wondering if -- can you -- can you shed any light on that? GEN. CURTIS: Well, I -- as I mentioned, Courtney, I think the threat streams were not specific at that particular time. STAFF: And we'll take one from the phone. Tara Copp, Defense One, if you're on the line. Q: Thank you both -- thank you all for doing this. I have a couple of follow up questions. We haven't been able to see the video of the marine being pulled into the crowd, but after that event happened were there any discussion about putting up additional defenses for the marines there right along the perimeter if not a Jersey barrier or something similar instead of just more personnel? And then secondly, has there been any evidence gathered from the scene, fragments, et cetera, that has helped in the law enforcement investigation in identifying the affiliation of the bomber? Thank you. GEN. CLARK: Well, Tara, thanks for that question. As we look at -- you couldn't see the video, but basically it showed two marines standing on top a Jersey barrier. One was pulled into the crowd by the barrel of his weapon by a potential evacuee. In that case what I'd like to highlight is that, again, this is a noncombatant evacuation. So rather than using deadly force or force really of any kind the marines showed great restraint, discipline, and courage by just retrieving their teammate from the crowd and moving on. Part of the reason there were no additional barriers or constraints had to do with the fact that they were actively pulled potential evacuees from the crowd, which included American citizens and others. So again, they had to have access to the crowd and they had to have close personal contact with those that they were trying move to approach a location to get processed. I'd also offer that if you go back to the slide that showed where our service members were wounded or killed, a number of service members were on top of the wall, again, for the purpose of trying to identify individuals to be evacuated as a part of the noncombatant evacuation operation. Q: So it sounds like there wasn't really an option to add additional barrier protection for all of those service members on the wall. GEN. CLARK: They provided protection in other ways. There were -- there were means through which we know that the device was command detonated, not detonated by some sort of phone or remote control device because of counter measures that were used at the gate at the time. Based on the threats and the streams that the command received and pushed all the way down to company level, commanders on the ground took the appropriate measures to lower their profile, cease operations if they needed to, or close the gate if necessary to protect the force because the bottom line is we evacuated 124,000 people out of HKIA. In order to get that kind of volume through a screening process that requires them to have appropriate documentation and to be physically checked on the ground, it's an arduous test, but again it takes close, personal contact on the part of marines, soldiers, and sailors in order to do that. STAFF: Nancy? Q: Thank you. In the presentation you throughout described a deterrence and security situation on all fronts. The Taliban wasn't checking documents or letting in Americans or those with documentation at these new routes that opened up, and I was just wondering if you could help me understand a couple things. One, who made the determination to not close the gate, and on what basis was that made? You talk about these meetings, and it seems that there were several. Who had the authority? Who decided let's keep the gate open? GEN. CLARK: Commander on the ground was Rear Admiral Pete Vasely. He was the commander of U.S. Forces Afghanistan and all of their forces on the ground were under his command and control. Every day, not just on the -- not just on the 26th but every day forces on the ground there, specifically the commander of JTF82, Major General Donahue, was tasked by General Sullivan to meet with the Taliban because HKIA was basically a defense in depth. So the Taliban being unlikely partners, as we described in the brief, there was an ongoing dialogue about how we were to continue to work with them to facilitate the evacuation. Q: So I appreciate that, but I guess what I don't understand is there are those yellow arrows coming in that showed how people were divided in half in through the original checkpoint. Why was there not additional security measures put in by the U.S. at that point, or some way to sort of be able to inspect people coming in that way? GEN CURTIS: Sir may I? So I think it's very important to once again go back to the fact how quickly this happened. And I also would mention that it is vitally-important that at this time, there is a constant assessment that is going on between the risk to force and the risk to mission. So trying to push potential U.S. servicemembers out that far really would have dramatically increased the risk to our servicemembers. Q: Well, then, and my final question is based on your findings, is there a scenario in which this could have been prevented? And if so, how? GEN. CURTIS: Based on our investigation at the tactical level, this was not preventable and the leaders on the ground followed the proper measures, and any time there was an imminent threat warning they followed the proper procedures: they lowered their profile, they sought cover, and at times, they even ceased operations at the gate. GEN. CLARK: And if I can caveat, the reason that we identified the number of leaders who were on the ground throughout the course of the day on the 26th is because, again, it's understanding of the hazards of our chosen profession and knowing that the leaders need to be on the ground to share those same hardships with their subordinates. So understanding that the mission is -- is very difficult, but necessary, those leaders were on the ground to ensure there was no problem. Q: Yes, General, but what I'm hearing you guys say is with the resources available and the -- and the mission before them, it was not preventable. That's -- that's what I'm hearing (inaudible). GEN. CLARK: That's correct. Q: Thank you. STAFF: We have time for one more question. Oren Liebermann, CNN? Q: You spoke to U.S. forces, as well as -- as well as coalition forces. What effort was made, if any, to speak to Afghan witnesses who were there through intermediaries? It seems you have the perspective of those -- of -- of the U.S. forces who generally would have had HKIA behind them, so they're looking in one direction, but not Afghan witnesses, of which there were, certainly, many who survived who had the -- the opposite perspective, 180-degrees view. Was there any effort made through intermediaries to reach out to any of those? GEN. CURTIS: A challenge for us was that by the time we started investigating this, obviously, U.S. forces had already left. But I think a very important aspect regarding that was that what we did have was we had individuals who were able to tell us -- you know, I talked about the individuals in the tower -- those -- that's one example -- unaffected by the blast and able to tell us what happened before, during and after the blast, and unaffected by what actually happened. So talking to actual Afghans -- very difficult, given the current structure of Afghanistan, and also the fact that U.S. forces had -- had already left. Q: We -- we -- we used, for example -- and I'm using this broadly -- we -- we're in touch with Qatar to get U.S. citizens out even just a few days ago, there was a flight. Was there any effort made through Qatar or through somebody else that has people on the ground there to reach out to the Afghan witnesses? If not, why not? It seems like they'd have a valuable perspective. GEN CURTIS: Yeah. That was -- during the course of our investigation we did not have an opportunity to speak with Afghans on the ground. Q: And one more Q: How many U.S. and -- and coalition servicemembers in all opened fire with the warning shots? And do you know how many rounds were fired in total, ballpark? GEN. CURTIS: Yeah, so the -- from the Brit locations, the estimate was 25 to 30 rounds. From the 3rd Marine location, you know, they had the individual that caused concern to them; approximately four rounds from there. And then from the last location, I think that exact round count is unknown at this time. Q: Thanks. (CROSSTALK) STAFF: OK, we've got to wrap it up, you guys. Q: Just a quick clarification about the 5:00 P.M. meeting: Were you asked by your partners to keep the gate open during that meeting? GEN. CURTIS. It was a topic of discussion. I know that. That's the extent of my knowledge regarding that meeting. STAFF: All right, we're going to wrap it up, you guys. Thanks so much.
CAMPAIGN 2012 / SANTORUM BLUE ASH OH FNC 033012
IN INTERPLAY AS: 5226 CAMPAIGN 2012 SANTORUM BLUE ASH OH 030312 FTG OF GOP PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE RICK SANTORUM GIVING A SPEECH IN BLUE ASH OH 09:13:56 Wide shot of audience/crowd/platform 09:51:33 Tight, medium shot of 'coal jobs' signs, people holding them up. 9:52:07 Rick Santorum:.thank you.thank you.it's great to be in Tony Perkins home town.I didn't know that this was your hometown.its great to have you hear Tony.coal jobs.I am up for that right there.thank you so much for coming out today.thank you for welcoming our family here.on the gun lap as we head out to a stretch to a big win in Ohio.it's great to be here.my wife Karen.the three of our kids came out here today because they wanted us to run the gun lap with us.as we push across the finish line here in Ohio.we are going to be heading to Tennessee and Oklahoma..we are going to be working on those states.to not just have a big win in Ohio but to have a great day on super Tuesday.led by Ohio.let me introduce the family.first and foremost.my soul mate..my partner who has just been an amazing support for me in this race.because she has been for all of years of marriage.she has been a political widow in many respects.being out there in public life..and not just having time away, but having to take all the arrows coming at you..that sometimes don't land on you but on others.she has stood there she has taken it..she is someone who is an encourager.really believes we are soul mates.really believes in the principles that I articulate. 9:54:02 They are from her heart as well as mine and that is my wife Karen.Karen.by the way my wife Karen is a registered nurse.so is my mom and my sister.I am surrounded by moms and nurses.she is also a lawyer and an author so I think she can live up to the job of First Lady what do you think? Now as you know Karen and I have been married 21 years.we have 7 children..a lot of times I go out.I talk to people and they say, " can I stay at the Lincoln bedroom?" And I say, with 7 kids you are going to have to share a room.but we are really excited.to bring a big family to Washington.to the United States government and talk about those values. that made our country great and our children.we got three of them here..numbers 2,3, and 4.I know they don't like to be referred to this way.just for your reference.we have children ages 20-3 and a half.and..yeah great time to be running around the country for president when you have kids that age.they've been on the road, and they will be on the road with us this week.my son john.my son Daniel, and my daughter sarah-maria.my oldest Elizabeth who is travelling with me for the rest of the week.she was out doing events with me out in the state and she was helping me hold caucuses in the morning. 9:56:09 We are trailing in the polls out there but we feel like we are doing pretty well out there..it would be a nice surprise heading into super Tuesday events to have a good lift out of the state of Washington.but she is also in Idaho campaigning today.and then we got the three little ones at home.I know on behalf of Karen and the family we want to thank all of you for praying for little Bella, she is doing great. She is a happy and healthy little girl. I just want to thank all of you who came out..thank you.such a great crowd here on a Saturday morning. I want to thank Mike of course for all the courage.one of the things I found in political life.that I don't see very often in politicians..particularly as we see in this race when you are running for president.when you make a mistake and stand up and say I was wrong.I appreciate Mike with the courage to do that, and I really appreciate he and Fran's support. So thank you very much Mike and Fran. And I just want to say. 9:57:42 This campaign is about..liberty. It's about the future of our country.what kind of country are we going to pass on to our kids..we are all stewards of a great inheritance, of this country and it's the obligation of every generation to pass on something better to our children something better.whether it's in our own family, own community and own country.and I think there is a lot of people who have anxiety.and even pessimism in this country about the state of where America is the state of our economy, the state of our culture.the state of our national security.we seem to be with this president, managing the decline of our military.managing the decline of freedom in our culture..we have a president who doesn't believe in the American spirit.and believes we need to go back and go back to the days before America..and who should be controlling over folks who simply aren't capable.that's the attitude.the condescending attitude.that this president has with respect to the American people.that is why this election is so important.there are things that are going in place.with respect to .that will make it very, very hard to turn back.and with respect to Obama Care.anybody up for repealing Obama Care? .We are not going to do it unless we win this election.and when we win this election on this critical issue.unless we have a candidate that can take it to the president.on principle, what this bill does to our country.you have one candidate in this race that has never supported a government mandated healthcare system.one candidate in this race that has supported free market economics for 20 years..health savings accounts.you know who the principles authors of health savings accounts were 20 years ago? Rick Santorum and John Kasick..your governor and I worked together.we worked on ideas on how to save money, instead of having calls.remember when Clinton was asking for calls for government run health care.we were looking for answers way back when.. 10:01:12 We were trying to be ahead of the curve.and we both worked on it.and then eventually when I was in the senate.that's the kind of conviction conservative. folks who never.didn't come..but came because they wanted to know how this country works best.and worked throughout my career to make sure we advanced the cause of liberty.the cause of free people and limited government and Obama Care is the linchpin that will end that in America.because unlike other dependency programs.other entitlement programs those are focused on the people on the margins of society.we need to have some safety net for people who are elderly or disabled.or are experiencing temporary poverty and need a little hand up.that is not what Obama Care is.it will take a little less than 50% of people in this country..and put every single American in the position that they would have depend on the government for their healthcare.that will be the end of liberty as we know it in America.because now the government will have the ability to say if you want to .you got to come to us..we control you.we own you. that is what our founders fought against.the tyranny.of government control..remember back in 1776.we were subjects to the crown.the people served the sovereign..they were beholden to the sovereign for whatever scrapes the sovereign wanted to give.because they controlled the rights, the people in power.and our founder said no, 2000 years our emperor and kings.dictators and queens ruling the people in the world.life expectancy in 2000 years didn't change..the kind of economy didn't change.in America a group of people who believed in this document.the declaration of independence.that we know these truths to be self evident.that all men are created equal.that are endowed not by their king, but by their creator.what are trying to do, imposing your morality on us.this is a country that is a great country.because we don't believe.that rights come from other people.the value of every person in America.ladies and gentleman.that great experiment that transformed the world.the time at our father life expectancy was 35 years of age..now it's 80.why? 10;05;32 Not because of other cultures that transformed.but because America transformed the world and now we have a president who runs around the world, apologizing for America. I will never apologize for the greatness of this country. With Obama care being implemented everything changes. We need to make that case to the American public. They're beginning to see it, with mandates, mandates that impose their values, not just on people of faith but everybody. The idea that government can tell you to buy a certain product and this is the product you will get and here's how you will pay for it. Here all of the things surrounding this thing is going to be put together and structured by the government. 10;06;33 you'll have limited choices of what the government tells you you must have. I've never been for that. Here's the problem, the problem is you have a candidate running against me in Ohio, who is uniquely unqualified to make the case against Barack Obama and the American people. That what he is doing is not just robbing us of our economic freedom, robbing us of our first amendment rights, robbing us of limited government, exploding the size of government and the debts and deficits that we're going to have. 2 trillion dollars in funding in Obamacare in the next ten years, he can't make the argument. 10;07;57**The reason is, is because he made the argument for Obama to do it. We just had yesterday, unearthed an op-ed, governor Romney has said over the course of his campaign that I never recommended that they adopt my program in Massachusetts, I never that. Oh yes he did. In a 2009 USA today op-ed he recommended, he made suggestions to president Obama , including the individual mandate and taxing people that don't buy insurance. That is the individual mandate.*** That is exactly what he did in Massachusetts, which was driving healthcare costs through the roof and creating waiting lines and delays and rationing. 10;08;12 It is what he recommended to the president. You know it'd bad enough that he recommended it, it's worse that he didn't come clean in this primary that he did it. But he is not alone about coming forward with the truth about what he recommended and what he did. In the case of what we have seen with Obama, forcing people of faith to violate their deep moral convictions and do what the government tells them to do. It's an impingement on liberty that can happen when you give them the power over you. Governor Romney said he never did that in Massachusetts, he said no you got it wrong. 10;09;06 Well he did and forced hospitals catholic hospitals to give the morning after pill, which is an abortifacient. Whoops I'll just have to belt it out. Thank you I appreciate it. So the bottom line is governor Romney is not only done the things that Barack Obama is doing with Obamacare, he is not only imposing a government mandate, but he is imposing the government's involvement in violating peoples conscience. He is uniquely unqualified to go against Barack Obama in the biggest issue in this election. The question is to the people of Ohio, why would we nominate someone who give the most important issue regarding liberty, the issue that rallied the Tea Party to a great victory in 2010, here in Ohio and across this country, because this issue strikes at the heart of Liberty. Why would the **Republican party in the midst of this great assault on liberty...(Santorum is interrupted by a crowd member).Are you guys Romney supporters. (crowd laughs)..(crowd member interrupts again)..Santorum: nothing is slowing me down in this race folks.** 10;11;14 we will make the case against Barack Obama, we will draw the contrasts. This race of the general election is going to be about issues it has to be. **it's not going to be about who has the most money to beat up in their opponent, because let me assure you that whomever the republican nominee is, not going to have as much money as the president of the United States has. They are not going to be able to win your elections on by outspending your opponent three and four to one. You're going to win the election because you can motivate people , because you can draw contrasts, you can take the resources you have and make the most of it. Is anybody doing that in this race.** folks you have to have a vision about liberty, it's a vision about building a great and just society from the bottom up and not the top down. It's believing in you, in free people, believing in the entrepreneurial spirit of America. That is what will take, and take the tax code in this country and unburden and unshackle the American public from this complex code and take the personal tax code, the individual tax code, and eliminate it. Take two rates, 28% and 10% and say five deductions: churches, charities, pensions, healthcare and housing. That's it, just five simple deductions. 10;12;48 Now governor Romney and Barack Obama they are not trying to make any kind of big changes to the tax code. ***Maybe that's because I actually do my taxes and they don't.*** I know how hard it is to do this tax code. I figured if you were going to be in public life and create this kind of tax policy, you should live with the consequences by filling them out. I practice what I preach. We need a corporate tax code that is dynamic and allows businesses to compete on an even playing field and so they can spend their time growing their businesses and figuring out ways to innovate and employ more people instead of hiring more people to comply with a complex tax code and structure their business around a tax code that incentivizes certain behavior that the government thinks should be followed. So we take the tax code that takes a 35% tax, which is the highest in the world, and interestingly enough even though the tax is 35% the effective rate, in other words what they would collect on business income is about 18% because of all of the deductions and exclusions. Alright let's cut the tax rate to 17.5%, get rid of all of the deductions, we do a little tax cut, but what we do is liberate business to focus on growing there business, not focus on taxes. 10;14;44 and there is one area that we want to focus on and grow even faster, because this is an area that is built in this belt of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and that is the great industrial renaissance that occurred in and built this great country. This is was the industrial heartland of America and they now refer to it as the "rust belt". We are going to refer to it after this program, where take the corporate for manufacturers and eliminate it and cut it to 0, we are going to be the "stainless steel" belt across this country again. WE will attract manufactures that will compete with every country in the world, we can , the only reason we can't, the reason that we have lost jobs is not because of the entrepreneurs, the business man, or the workers , It's because government, taxation and regulation is pressuring American business and crushing manufacturers. It's one thing to crush business here in America and make it hard for the hotels, for the restaurants, because they don't compete against China and Mexico who want to take those jobs away. So we put that heavy burden on manufactures and we have folks who can't compete here in America with those jobs, but we have folks who lose those jobs overseas and they're not going to some other businesses, that's the problem. WE are 20% more expensive to do business here in America versus our trading partners because, and that's excluding labor costs, of government. 10;16;45 So we eliminate the corporate tax and we say to those who sent their businesses overseas, come back and if you bring them back you can take those profits, which are estimated to be about 1.7 trillion dollars sitting in overseas banks, they are not coming back to America because there is a 35% tax on those profits and so they leave them there. What I've said is if you bring that money back and invest it in plant equipment her in south west Ohio, you won't pay any corporate tax. You build plants and equipment here in America, you create jobs, and we will zero out your taxes. Of course to really get this economy going, we have got to do something about crushing the regulation that this administration has put in place. We're not just focused on the Obamacare regulations, but the EPA, NRD, FDA, go on down the list at the alphabet soup of government agencies and they're out there doing what they're doing with healthcare, we know best, we can run your business, we can run your farm, we can run your life better than you can. So they are passing crushing regulation after regulation. The president passed 150 regulations that cost the economy over 100 million dollars a year. That is two and a half times the average under the Clinton Administration. He has decided that they are going to go full throttle, they are going to put in place all of these things in hopes of being able to dictate to you and run this economy, because they believe it works. People say he wants to destroy America, it's not, he really believes he knows better and that the experts in Washington know better, he believes that. I give him credit for standing up for what he believes in, but I wish he would just admit that to the American public instead of trying to say I believe in free people, no he doesn't. he believes in government control. 10;19;02 Folks on day one, I am going to repeal every single one of those high cost regulations. Two more things, number one I see all of these coal signs up here. My grandfather was a coalminer and I believe that the energy, whether it's coal or gas or oil that's in the ground, unlike President Obama, I believe it's an asset to improve our quality of life. At every turn, whether it's drilling off shore, the president says no, mining on federal lands the president says no, Alaska no, keystone pipeline no. We need a president that can say yes to energy and provide a better standard of living in our country. WE have tremendous resources and the president at every turn says no. We have an opportunity not just to create jobs, tens of thousands of jobs, but the quality of life in America is directly tied to affordability and availability of energy. 10;20;50***Every time you go to the pump and you look at that price going up and you see that extra zero at the end of your bill, think of that zero as an O for Obama.*** that's what your paying extra for. 10;21;04 Folks we need a president that is going to go out and tell the American public about what the real problems confronting this country. The biggest problem we all know is not just government control, but is an explosion of the federal budget, a crushing debt, an immoral debt that we are putting on the next generation of America. For this president to have trillion dollar deficits, trillion. I remember when I was in Congress the left would go crazy when they heard about 200 billion dollar deficits. This was immoral, Obama running for reelection, I can't imagine these kind of huge deficits and now we have in reality trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see. The only thing that this president wants to cut, is the only thing that this government has a principle responsibility for and that is protecting this country through the defense department. This president looks at the entire budget and says well the big problem here is that we have got too much defense spending. He has got a half a trillion dollars so far and another half a trillion dollars proposed, yet he is adding a 2 trillion dollar entitlement. Let me give you an idea, when I was a boy, the defense department was 60% of the federal budget, it now not 40 not 30 not even 20% of the federal budget, it is 17%. According to the president that is the problem. When I was a boy entitlement spending was less than 10% of the budget, it's not 10 or 20 or 30 or 40% of the budget, it is 60% of the budget and with Obamacare it will go over much higher than that. 10;23;15 The President says no don't cut that, don't cut the programs where we take money from some, give it me and redistribute it to those who we believe deserve it more than the people who took it. You see Margaret Thatcher said the problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money. As you see we have, that's we are borrowing a trillion dollars. We have run out of other people's money but that doesn't slow them down at all does it. They just go out and borrow it and put it on the next generations tab. Long after they are gone. Ladies and gentleman we are going to need a president that is going to go up and tell the truth that we need to balance this budget in five years and in my budget, I will spend less money every year than the year before so that we get to a balanced budget in five years. I will go across this country and talk about liberty and the best guarantee of liberty is when the government is limited, which is why we need to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution that limits the size of government, to 18% of the economy. If we limit government to 18% of the economy, which is the historic average since world war II, is will guarantee your freedom, because government will necessarily be limited, that's the vision. 10;25;03 As Toni and some of the other speakers said he can cut government and we can grow the economy, but unless the basic building blocks of our society are strong, then we will not be able to sustain it. Of the family. the community, the church, the small business, the local civic and community organization. Those mediating institutions of our society, that allow you to be able to go not to the government if you happen to be in need or you happen to have a problem. To go to your family, to your church, to your employer, to go to the people that who are there to help. That's how America was able to keep government limited, because the grass roots of America, the roots were deep and strong, but now we have places in America where those roots are non-existent in America. We go to the neighborhoods in Cincinnati, where there are no dads, where the churches have bailed out, where the community organizations exist and what do you find, government everywhere. Do you find freedom, do the people who live in those community feel safe growing up at night, do businesses feel comfortable putting their business there? Not even the church's want to locate there because of the problems that are confronted with the society that has allowed the family to break down, morality and freedom that has been broken down. 10;27;05 can the president pass a law to change that? Of course not. When I talk about these issues, the left acts like it's fingernails on a chalk board. They just hate me, anybody talking about these issues, but when you eliminate all of these mediating institutions and it's just you out there alone, then government becomes your refuge. That's how government gets bigger and that is how government becomes your refuge, and that's how more power goes to the people in control. WE need to have a society that has a conversation,. That gets together and, yes at the community level, but a national discussion. Ideas germinating from the best and the brightest about how we can reconnect fathers to their children, mothers and fathers together. Raise children were they have an opportunity to rise and succeed at the best possible level. You see this country, is a great country because it was built from the bottom up. But the changes at the top and the reason that America grew so fast, excuse me government grew so fast in the last thirty or forty years, is in response to the problems going on at the grass roots. Ladies and gentleman we have an obligation as conservative to do our duty. It's not just to go out and win against the less conservatives. It's going out and reclaiming the family, the community, the non-profit organizations one at a time. 10;29;06 We will win this race because we have a vision that connects to the American public more than the presidents vision. We will win this race because we have someone who connects with average Americans better in the presidents distant, we know best for you attitude. There is one candidate in this race that can draw the contrast and paint the vision, connect with the voters that we need in order to win this election, which is all American voters. Give me the opportunity to go out and make the case, give me the opportunity to go out and stand for the values that you believe in this room and that are commonly held values throughout this country. Give America the opportunity to out and over the next three days and make a difference. This race is going to be close in the long haul, we are going to outspent, but we have been outspent in every race so far. We will make a difference if you make a difference. So I ask all of you to step forward. At the end of that declaration of independence, as one of the speakers said earlier, there is a phrase. As they signed that document and in many cases, I'm sure they thought that they signed their life away because they thought that they were committing an act of treason against the most powerful country in the world and they did it because they believed deeply that this vision for a new country, a new world, was something worth sacrificing and worth dying for and so this document. So they signed that document and at the end of that document they said we pledge to each other as we do here today, we pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 10;31;35 No one is asking to pledge your life here today ad in the next three days, no one is asking you to pledge your fortune in these next three days, but if you go t RickSantorum.com, there is an opportunity to pledge a portion of your fortune. On that point we just reported that raised 9 million dollars in the month of February. And here is the interesting part, 2/3 of the donations we received were small dollar numbers. We had a hundred and thirty thousand donations. 2/3 of governor Romney's donations where maxed out donations. That's the difference between this race. The big old boy network, the insiders, those who have a stack in keeping things just a little different, they don't like what's going on, but not too big of a change. As opposed to grass roots America with $10 and $20 donations. I have people come up to me, a women came up to me and gave me her tips as a pet groomer, thirteen dollars. I had a young man come up to me and give me seven dollars. Which is all the money he said he had and he just wanted to make sure that he was investing in his future. Those are the donations that we get. People who realize what is at stake and realize that someone with a track record of standing up for what we believe in and not switching positions as the climate changes. 10;33;41 Someone you can trust, someone who is a fighter, someone who is a scraper, who is a first generation Italian-American for a steel town in western Pennsylvania. We haven't had too many of those in the White House and it's about time we get one of those. I am asking you to put your honor on the line, the honor of being given a great inheritance, and the honor that each one of us has. The honor that we have to maintain to hand off an America that we got. Ladies and gentleman 2008, President Obama went around this country and convinced you that if you elected him..I know but Ohio did vote for him. Convinced Ohioans that they needed a president that they could believe in, that could take and solve their problems, pay their mortgage. He believed, he got Americans to believe that they could have a president that they could believe in, but in this election. But in this election we are going to show the establishment in Washington, that America doesn't want this president and never really wanted a president that could solve all of their problems. They don't want a president that they can believe in they want a president that can believe in them. That's what this election is all about. Go out and help us. Thank you. 10;36;01
PAUL RYAN FAREWELL ADDRESS AS SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE
1250 RYAN FAREWELL ADDRESS FS26 76 CBS POOL INTRO BY TREY GOWDY Wednesday, December 19, 2018 House Speaker Paul Ryan delivers remarks in his farewell address NYRS: WASH 6 13;17;06 RYAN: Thank you, Trey. Thank you for being a great colleague, an even better friend, and most importantly, thank you for combing your hair today, Trey. (LAUGHTER) This version's a good one. Thank you. Everybody's laughing because you know exactly what I'm talking about, don't you? I want to thank -- I see all my friends and colleagues here. I want to thank you all for joining me here today. I want to thank our librarian of Congress, Dr. Hayden, for having us here in this beautiful hall. Thank you very much. (APPLAUSE) I remember meeting your mom right here on this stage not too long ago. You know, any time I come here, I can't help but think back to this pivotal time in my life. It was the summer of 2012. I was about to speak at a local Chamber of Commerce group when I got this phone call right up there in the reading room, which is what many of us members of Congress go to. 13;18;21 And the phone call was from Beth Myers from the Romney campaign. And at this point, you know, I knew that I was being vetted for vice president, but I hadn't heard anything. I didn't know how serious this was. I was kind of -- I didn't think they'd pick a guy from the House anyway. So Beth starts to walk me through how I would need to fly up to Boston incognito. She goes through all these logistics of what is about to occur, and it just starts occurring to me that my life, my family's life is about to change dramatically. And that call was right outside that door there. And we hang up. I go up to the reading room and give that speech, and then I realize I've got to go vote on the floor. It was the last votes before the August recess. So at this very moment when I want to be alone with my thoughts, I want to -- I walked right into a swarm of colleagues and reporters, just keeping mum. 13;19;13 It's one of those inflection points you just remember at certain crossroads in your life. This building, that moment -- it reminds me right now that your plan, your direction can change in an instant. I have had a number of improbable turns in my life. I don't know what's next. But before I go, I am grateful to have the chance to share a few thoughts and to say goodbye. I'm grateful to say goodbye to you, to this job, and to this incredible institution we call the House of Representatives. RYAN: Long time ago, I came here to Capitol Hill as an intern for one semester in college. The plan was pretty simple: one semester here in Washington, learn something -- that's it. Since then, I have been surrounded by some incredible people, the mentors who help set me on the right path -- Jack Kemp, Bill Bennett, Bob Woodson - 13;20;23 The intellectual giants who guided me in the things that I wanted to pursue, the people of southern Wisconsin who gave me the chance to work for them, the staff who always made me better, the President and the Vice President for being my partners in government, the colleagues who became life-long friends, and, of course, my family. This whole thing started as a family affair. My mom, my brother Tobin, my sister-in-law, they ran my first campaign. My mom was my scheduler... (LAUGHTER) ...and so no one would turn down your mom when she calls to ask you to go speak to their group, it was -- it was a great set-up. But it ends with family, too. I would not have been able to serve as Speaker were it not for the sacrifices that Janna, Liza, Charlie and Sam made. 13;21;20 Being a husband and a dad is everything to me. So we have come a long way together in this improbable journey. So from the bottom of my heart, thank you, thank you all. Thank you. (APPLAUSE) You know, over the years and especially lately, I've always thought about this, I've been thinking to myself whether my dad would be proud of me, would he be proud of what I'm doing, what I did? I lost him at a young age before he really had a chance to shape my path in life. I don't know what he thought I would make of myself, I was too young. But this was certainly not my plan, not even close. All I keep thinking is -- every time I go back to this is -- what a country. 13;22;19 I mean what a country, where someone of an unassuming Midwest upbringing gets the chance to be a part of all of this. What a country. You can pursue whatever your passion is wherever it takes you. I mean that's the American idea, isn't it? The condition of your birth isn't your destiny, your struggle isn't your destiny, it's part of your journey. You know, it's all laid out right there in the first words of the Constitution, before first principles even, a first mission to achieve a more perfect union. We are conditioned to recognize that we are imperfect, but we are called to do better. So we revere these beautiful founding principles -- liberty, free enterprise, consent to the governed -- and then we go to work to apply them to the problems of the day and we build up the country's fundamental resilience, the antibodies that protect us from whatever is going to come our way. 13;23;24 That's how we advance the American idea, that's how we build a more confident America. As Trey said, as all of my colleagues here know, I never wanted to become Speaker. I was just a policy guy, I like to think I still am. But what I realize now is you don't really become Speaker, at least I don't see it that way. I don't see power as something you take for yourself, it's -- it's -- it's not a prize to claim or a trophy to raise. You accept a temporary trust to be a steward of the greatest legislative body in the world and it is an awesome thing. RYAN: Again, just recently, the people have spoken, and soon the House will become the care of a new majority and what I know will be a spirited Republican minority. I wish the next leaders well. But it is be -- it is precisely because this is so momentary. It's because you are here for just a small part of history, that you are inspired to do big things. 13;24;27 And on this score, we have achieved a great deal. We have much to be proud of. Three years ago when we last gathered in this hall, we began a great journey to set our nation on a better path, to move our economy from stagnation to growth, to restore our military might, and we have kept our promises. This House is the most productive we have had in at least a generation. To date, we have passed 1,175 bills, more than half of them with bipartisan support. And because it is my duty as speaker, nearly -- to say this, nearly 750 of those bills are still stuck in the United States Senate. (LAUGHTER) But the rest of them made it into law, and that was in -- that's an enormous achievement. And we have taken on some of the biggest challenges of our time. And we have made a great and lasting difference in the trajectory of this country. We began a historic rebuilding of our military and our national defense. We enacted new tough sanctions on some of our biggest foes. 13;25;29 We ushered in a new career and technical education system, something so many of us have been talking about for so long. Record regulatory reform to help small businesses. A long-sought expansion of domestic energy production to be followed by America's new energy dominance. To stem the tide of opioid addiction, the most significant effort against a single drug crisis in congressional history. Criminal justice reform to give more people a chance at redemption, making its way through. We're doing this all the way up to the end. A landmark crackdown on human trafficking that is already yielding results and saving lives. A V.A. with real accountability and finally better care for our veterans. And after years of doubt, years of the Senate saying that it could not be done, we achieved the first major overhaul of our tax code in 31 years. (APPLAUSE) Think about it, because I know I have a lot. I see Kevin back there. He's thought about this a lot. 13;26;52 We went from the worst tax code in the industrialized world to one of the most competitive. That's something I worked on literally my entire adult life. And it's something that will help improve the lives of people for a long time to come. It's one of those sort of elusive generational reforms. It's why we do this. Now certainly, one Congress cannot solve all that ails us. Not every outcome has been perfect. But that's our great system at work. And I'm darn proud of what we've achieved together, to make this a stronger and a more prosperous country. You know, my mentor, Jack Kemp, he once said that the central task of any political party is to offer people superior ideas of government. I see it as even more than a task or an obligation. I see it as a labor of love. 13;27;41 Yes, you can make a career out of criticism. You can deal from that deck all day long. Many people do, and I certainly don't begrudge them that. It seems like an easy living. RYAN: But well-done is always, always a better pursuit than well-said, isn't it? In this business, you catch slings and arrows. It is a price that I have been happy to pay because nothing is as fulfilling as pursuing an idea that will truly make a difference in people's lives, and seeing it through from start to finish. To me, that is the ultimate proving ground of politics. It is the great manifestation of this experiment in self-government. 13;28;15 And I've got to tell you, the more you get into it, when you choose to truly engage in the process, rather than merely endure it, the more you come to see that even our most complex problems are solvable. I've got to say, I leave here as convinced I was (sic) at the start that we face no challenge that can (sic) be overcome by putting pen to paper on good sound policy, by addressing head-on the problems of the day. The state of politics, though, is another question. And frankly, that's one I don't have an answer for. You know, we have a good sense of what our politics should look like: a great clash of ideas; a civil passionate discourse through which we debate and resolve our differences; a system of government -- our system doesn't just allow for that, our system depends on that. 13;29;21 One side may win, one side may lose, we dust ourselves off and then we start anew knowing that each one fought in pursuit of their honest ideals. But today, too often, genuine disagreement quickly gives way to intense distrust. We spend far more time trying to convict one another than we do trying to develop our own convictions; being against someone has more currency than being for anything. And each of us -- each of us has found ourselves operating on the wrong side of this equation from time to time. And all of this gets amplified by technology. With an incentive structure that preys on people's fears and algorithms that play on anger, outrage has become a brand. And as with anything that gets marketed, it gets scaled up, it becomes more industrialized, more cold, more unfeeling. And that's the thing. For all the noise, there is actually less passion, less energy. 13;30;27 We, sort of, default to lazy litmus test and shopworn denunciations. It's just emotional pabulum fed through a trough of outrage. It's exhausting. It saps (ph) meaning from our politics and it discourages good people from pursuing public service. I mean, the symptoms of it are in our face all the time, and we have to recognize that its roots run deep, deep into our culture, deep into our society today. And all of this pulls on the threads of our common humanity in what could be our unraveling. But nothing, nothing says it has to be this way. We all struggle. We are all fighting some battle in our lives. So why do we insist on fighting one another so bitterly? This kind of politics starts from place of outrage and then seeks to tear us down from there. So big question: 13;31;31 How we get back to aspiration and inclusion, where we start with humility and then we seek to build on that? I don't know the answer to that. What I -- what I offer today instead is something to keep in mind as we all try to navigate through this moment. RYAN: Our culture is meant to be shaped not by our political institutions, but by the mediating institutions of civil society, of our community. These are the places where we come together with people of different backgrounds: churches, charities, teams, PTA meetings. It's where we build up our social capital, that currency that keeps us rooted to where we live and how we live with one another. Rediscovering that human connection is one lane on the road back to aspiration and inclusion as the guiding influences of public life. As I said, the drivers of our broken politics are more obvious than the solutions. And so this is a challenge I hope to spend more time wrestling with in my next chapter. I say, as I look ahead to the future, this much I know: 13;32;27 Our complex problems are absolutely solvable; that is to say, our problems are solvable if our politics will allow it. There are three big ones in particular that I think we can tackle in the years ahead as a country. They are challenges that have vexed this country for many years. And as I leave, I recognize so much more work needs to be done, and if we get them right, we can be certain that this will be another great century for our country. You all know that finding solutions to help people lift themselves out of poverty is a personal mission for me and for many others. I think we've made a real progress here in a relatively short time. Four years ago, when our nation marked the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, we exposed some pretty hard truths. For all the billions spent, all the bureaucracies and programs created, we barely knew -- moved the needle. But we have begun to break this monolith. New opportunity zones, which are part of tax reform, will bring more investment into distressed communities. Social impact bonds will push more private capital toward community leaders that are solving big problems. 13;33;58 Whether it's helping the homeless or -- or reducing recidivism, new workforce reforms, job-training programs and case management approach -- those are things that will help more people move from welfare to work. We've got a long way to go, no two ways about it. But this is what I find to be so dynamic about free enterprise: It is not just about creating jobs; it's about restoring the meaning of a job, the meaning of work. It's not just about getting people off of the sidelines; it's about helping get people on the path of life. And I firmly believe that solving our poverty challenges once and for all will require not just a great undertaking, but a great rethinking of how we help the most vulnerable among us, and it begins with realizing that the best results come from within communities. 13;34;48 Where solutions are tailored and targeted for people's needs. This battle will be won eye to eye, soul to soul, and Bob (ph), thank you for showing me that. We've got great advocates for welfare reform in our party like my friend, Tim Scott, but I challenge my party here. Do not let this issue drift from your consciousness. Every life matters, and every person deserves a chance to succeed. Let us keep advancing ideas to allow people to live lives of self-determination. This is great work, and we can achieve this. 13;35;32 Second, I believe that we can be the generation that saves our entitlement programs. Frankly, we need to be, and I acknowledge plainly that my ambitions for entitlement reforms have outpaced the political reality, and I consider this our greatest unfinished business. You know, we all know what needs to be done: strong economic growth, which we have, and entitlement reform to address the long-term drivers of our debt. RYAN: Our revenue is about to return to its 50-year average. What continues to plague us is a mandatory spending system that is deeply out of balance and unsustainable. This was the case when I came here 25 years ago and it is the case today. Not too long ago, few were willing to recognize the scope of this problem, let alone engage on solutions. Our government wasn't even inclined to examine our long-term fiscal picture, it didn't even work that way. We had to go about changing the debate before we could begin to even try and change peoples minds. And, look, I'm proud that every year I was Budget Chairman, we passed in the House a road map to balancing the budget and paying off our debt and that Tom Price and Diane Black did the same, as well. 13;36;55 In this Congress, we came within one vote of real health care entitlement reform, think about that. Federal health care spending, it remains the principle driver of entitlement spending. Our bill would've reformed two of our major health care programs to make them sustainable and to meet the health care needs of our country. So we have come a long way and we are closer than people realize and ultimately, solving this problem will require a greater degree of political will than exists today and I regret that. But when the time comes to do this, and it will because it must, the path ahead will be based upon the framework that we have laid out to solve this problem. 13;37;43 We can get there; we really can tackle this problem before it tackles us. Here's the third challenge that I think we will have to address as a country, we have to fix our broken immigration system. Right now, we are again locked in another short-term battle over one aspect of this issue, and no matter what the outcome is in the coming days, the larger problem will remain. The system will be in need of serious reform and no less than our full potential as a nation here is at stake. But the right mix of policy solutions, it's there. Border security and interior enforcement, for starters, but also a modernization of our visa system so that it makes sense for our economy and for our people, so that anyone who wants to play by the rules, work hard and be a part of our American fabric can contribute. 13;38;38 That includes the Dreamers, those who came here through no fault of their own and ultimately the undocumented population. In order to fix the system, you have to reset the system. In order to truly enforce the law, you have to get people right with the law. Again, we came closer in this Congress than people realize, and next year, the Supreme Court will make a ruling and then both parties can and should go back to the table. Getting this right is an economic and moral imperative and it would go a long way toward taking some of the venom out of our discourse. If we do these three things -- make progress on poverty, fix our immigration system and confront this debt crisis -- we can make this another great century for our country. 13;39;32 Look, I recognize that these challenges are ones we haven't made much progress on in recent years, but I've got to tell you, I am confident we still have it in us to solve them. A good friend of mine recently commented to me that amid the frenzy of politics today, he's got more faith in our system of government than ever before. As he put it, in our system, really bad ideas, they get killed and good ideas, they just take time. RYAN: Our problems are solvable if our politics will allow it. I know it. I have seen it. In a confident America, we don't shrug our shoulders and we don't pass the buck. We roll up our sleeves and we get on with our work. A confident America leads the world too. Not with bluster, but with steady principled action. 13;40;30 Remember, history really does have a way of repeating itself. The democratic capitalist model again faces a generation-defining moment and test. Much of our day to day attention is focused on threats from illegal (ph) regimes and radical Islamic extremism, as it should be. That said, I strongly urge leaders in both parties to devote more time and energy to the direct challenges that China poses to the West. China unabashedly offers an alternative in the form of an authoritarian model with a veneer of 21st century capitalism. And the sense I get from when I have been traveling overseas as speaker is that our allies wonder whether we're really still in the game here or not. When we show that our way of doing things still has juice, that we can do the most good for the most people, liberty gains ground. 13;41;28 When we get complacent, we risk seeing more countries go in the direction of the autocrats. A confident America, it stands up to its challengers by committing to the pillars of international relations, by leading. In addition to rebuilding our military and giving our intelligence community the tools it needs, this Congress has worked to strengthen our security cooperation with our allies, particularly through NATO and the Indo-Pacific region. And good security cooperation that goes hand in hand with strong economic ties. That's why we need to continue to pursue good free trade agreements that open up new markets to American-made products. There's a lot of effort on this front, it needs to continue. We don't want our competitors writing the rules of the road and shutting us out and a confident America exercises clear moral leadership. 13;42;24 We need to continue to work together to promote things like global health initiative, fight human trafficking and be a voice for the voiceless. Our economy is strong. Our military might is second to none and clear American leadership in the world makes the most of both of those things. So for each of the challenges that I have discussed here today, there are people of good will in both parties who are ready and willing to take action. Everyone does not need to agree on everything. And everyone doesn't need to disagree on everything either. All you need is enough people of good faith willing to take up an idea, that's a good start. So what comes next? Well, we're going to have a lot of new faces around Congress next year. You know, I hear a lot of good things about that new fresh-faced guy from Utah. (LAUGHTER) So here's my advice to members new and members old. This place is full of wonders and opportunity but do your best to stay grounded. The way I think of it is either you change things or things change you so you have to keep your sense of self. You got to work hard around here at staying who you are. Insist on it. It's what I've been praying about literally every morning since I first came here, to keep my sense of self. I knew when I took this job - 13;43;45 I knew when I became speaker I would become a polarizing figure; it just comes with the territory. RYAN: But the one thing I leave most proud of is I like to think I'm the same person now that I was when I arrived, still never forget that excitement that brought you here. Remember how awestruck you felt the first time you stepped on the House floor. Keep that feeling. Especially when the so-called experts tell you you need to tack this way or tack that way. Hone your abilities to advance ideas. Sit down with people who know some -- more about something than you do. Listen. Keep at it. Invest in the process. You're going to hit roadblocks. That's OK. Give yourself some grace. But timing is everything. So you have to get it right. You have to be prepared. You may not get too many shots at it, so you have to be ready when the moment for action demands action. 13;44;54 And focus on good relationships with your colleagues. Get to know people on the other side of the aisle. Get to know the human side of serving with people. Build personal relationships so that it's not just transactions. You want real relationships. Having real relationships? That will help you overcome pitfalls and build trust. I see a lot of real relationships right here in front of me. And most of all, when you give your word you have to keep your word. It's really important. Give your word only, though, if you can keep it. And keep a balanced temperament. Sense of gratitude. Which brings me to this. To everything there is a season. And for me, this season of service is coming to a close. I have had the chance to do something that I love so much for so long. 13;44;38 To do my small part to advance the American idea. And I leave as I came here, an optimist to the core. I wouldn't have it any other way. Nothing is impossible if you are willing to go out and fight for it. If nothing else, I simply ask you to remember one thing: We are each part of a larger story, a greater cause. And what we have here is a miracle. It really is. And this miracle has made us the most free and the most prosperous nation on earth ever. Cherish that. Marvel at that. 13;46;23 Always dream big. Always raise your gaze. For just as remarkable as what we have achieved is what we have the capacity to do, still. So here's to the people. Here's to the people's house. Here's to possibilities. 13;46;49 Thank you for everything. God bless America. (APPLAUSE) END
WHITE HOUSE COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM BRIEFING
VTR57 WH COVID RESPONSE TEAM BRFG 1100 LIVESTREAM Press Briefing by White House COVID-19 Response Team and public health officials. 110359 SLAVITT>> Good morning. Thank you for joining us. Today, I'm joined by Doctors Walensky and Fauci. The cases of Covid-19 are once again on the rise. Dr. Walensky will highlight the public health consequences and strong public health recommendations for the next few weeks. In the meantime, we are vaccinating the country as quickly as humanly possible, now averaging 2.7 million vaccinations over the last 7 days. 110429 Yesterday, the US recorded 3.28 million vaccinations. This is significant progress towards the President's now doubled vaccination goal of 200 million shots in his first 100 days in office, and toward our ultimate goal of getting all Americans vaccinated as equitably and efficiently as possible. As we said on Friday, vaccine manufacturers report to us that they remain on track to meet their targets by the end of the month. 110502 And Moderna announced that it has released its 100 millionth dose this morning. As of today, 73% of seniors have now received their first dose and 36%, more than 1 in 3 adults, have received their first dose. That's 36% of adults. Overall, now, more than 50 million Americans, approaching 1 in 5 adults are fully vaccinated. 110538 The effort is an immensely complex endeavor and pulling it off requires tens of thousands of people doing their part. And we are grateful to everybody on the frontlines of this pandemic. This is good news. We're headed in the right direction, but we can't slow down. Millions remain unvaccinated and at risk. We need to keep increasing vaccine supply, the number of vaccinators in the field, and adding more safe and convenient places for Americans to get vaccinated, especially as more states begin to open vaccine eligibility to all adults. [11:06:15] Now today, as part of this ongoing effort to help meet the President's goal of 200 million shots in his first 100 days, we're announcing two new federally run mass vaccination sites. The first is that America's concentre convention complex in St. Louis, Missouri. And the second is at Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana. Soon local residents will be able to get a shot at both of these sites, and together they will be capable of administering 6000 shots per day. [11:06:55] We now have 21 operational sites and have already administered a combined 1.7 million shots. These sites are run by the federal government in close partnership with state and local officials, and they are placed in communities with high risk. According to CDCs social vulnerability index with a direct goal of ensuring we're equitably distributing vaccines, and reaching communities that have been hurt the most by the pandemic. [11:07:25] Before I turn it over to Dr Wollensky, I want to close by reiterating what the President said last Thursday. Help is here and hope is around the corner, but we're not there yet, as Dr Wollensky will report. The worst thing we could do now, would be to let up. We cannot get complacent. We cannot let our guard down. It's imperative for us to stick to the science and follow public health guidance. That means continuing to wear masks. Masks save live. It means continuing to socially distance, socially distancing save lives. And it means getting vaccinated when it's your turn. Because getting vaccinated saves lives, not just your own, but your family and friends and neighbors too. With that I'm going to turn this over to Dr Lansky. And then a Dr. Fauci for some important updates. DR. ROCHELLE WALENSKY [11:08:20] WALENSKY>> Thank you, Andy. I'm glad to be back with you all today, I want to begin with an overview. Started on trends in the data. Yesterday, we in the United States surpassed 30 million cases of COVID-19. CDC's most recent data show that the seven day average of new cases is slightly less than 60,000 cases per day. This is a 10% increase compared to the prior seven day period. Hospitalizations have also increased. The most recent seven day average about 48 admission - 4,800 admissions per day is up from 4600 admissions per day in the prior seven day period, and deaths, which typically lag behind cases and hospitalizations, have now started to rise, increasing nearly 3% to a seven day average of approximately 1000 deaths per day. 110916 When I first started at CDC about two months ago, I made a promise to you: I would tell you the truth, even if it was not the news you wanted to hear. Now is one of those times when I have to share the truth, and I have to hope and trust you will listen. I'm going to pause here. I'm going to lose the script, and -- 110934 I'm going to reflect on the recurring feeling I have of impending doom. We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are, and so much reason for hope. But right now, I'm scared. I know what it's like, as a physician, to stand in that patient room -- gowned, gloved, masked, shielded -- and to be the last person to touch someone else's loved one because their loved one couldn't be there. 111003 I know what it's like when you're the physician, when you're the healthcare provider, and you're worried that you don't have the resources to take care of the patients in front of you. I know that feeling of nausea when you read the crisis standards of care, and you wonder whether there are going to be enough ventilators to go around and who's going to make that choice. And I know what it's like to go up to your hospital every day, and see the extra morgue sitting outside. 111030 I didn't know at the time what it was -- when it would stop. We didn't have the science to tell us. We were just scared. We have come such a long way. Three historic scientific breakthrough vaccines, and we are rolling them out so very fast. So I'm speaking today not necessarily as your CDC director and not only as your CDC director, but as a wife, as a mother, as a daughter, to ask you to just please hold on for a little while longer. 111101 I so badly want to be done. I know you all so badly want to be done. We are just almost there, but not quite yet. And so, I'm asking you to just hold on a little longer, to get vaccinated when you can, so that all of those people that we all love will still be here when this pandemic ends. [11:11:20] The trajectory of the pandemic in the United States, States looks similar to many other countries in Europe, including Germany, Italy, and France look like just a few weeks ago and since that time those countries have experienced a consistent, and worrying spike in cases. 111140 We are not powerless. We can change this trajectory of the pandemic, but it will take all of us recommitting to following the public health prevention strategies consistently while we work to get the American public vaccinated. [11:11:54] I'm calling on our elected officials, our faith based communities our civic leaders, and our other influencers in communities across the nation. And I'm calling on every single one of you to sound the alarm to carry these messages into your community and your spheres of influence, we do not have the luxury of inaction, for the health of our country. We must work together now to prevent a for the search. [11:12:20] And after that, honestly, I want to reflect on so many reasons we have to be helpful hopeful and why your actions today can get us out of this soon as I shared last week we to continue to get more and more real world evidence on the protection of COVID-19 vaccines provide and CDC scientists have been working since these vaccines were first authorized to expand the evidence supporting their effectiveness. Today I'm excited to share information about a new CDC led study that's being published in the MMWR. This study assesses the real world effectiveness of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines that prevented infections among nearly 4000 healthcare personnel, first responders and other essential workers in six states from mid December to mid March. [11:13:10] The study found that the risk of infection was reduced by 90%, after individuals received the two recommended doses of the vaccine. The study also found that for people starting to get a protective effect, even after the first dose, the risk of infection decreased by 80% after two weeks. Findings of this are all consistent with the clinical trial data. Importantly, people in the study received self collected nasal swabs, each week for laboratory testing, allowing CDC to look at evidence of COVID-19 infection whether or not people had symptoms. A small number of infections were asymptomatic, [11:13:45] however most infections occurred among people whose infections were identified by testing before they developed symptoms or knew they were infected. This study also demonstrates that two vaccines can reduce the risk of COVID-19 infections, not just in symptomatic infections but also in asymptomatic or pre symptomatic infections. The study is tremendously encouraging and complements other recent studies published in New England Journal of Medicine and discussed by Dr. Fauci last week, among similar populations with high risk of exposure to COVID-19 because of their occupations. [11:14:25] These findings also underscore the importance of getting both of the recommended doses of the vaccine in order to get the greatest level of protection against COVID-19, especially as our concerns about variants escalate. Our national vaccination efforts are working. As of yesterday, over 93 million people have received one or more doses of vaccine and over 51 million people have been fully vaccinated and CDC is collaborating across the government with our state, territorial local and tribal partners to get vaccines to communities and to get vaccinations into arms as quickly as possible through a multitude of channels, [11:15:05] including the Federal retail pharmacy program for famous community vaccination centers and mobile clinics, and through hearses community health center program. These efforts are rapidly advancing our goal to getting 200 million shots in arms during the first 100 days of this administration, over one in three adults in this country have already received one dose. Finally I want to share today but CBC is making important updates to the list of underlying medical conditions that can increase risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. This update is keeping up with my commitment to leave with science, to have clear information on our website and to better describe the signs underlyings conditions. After a thorough review of the evidence we have simplified the list of underlying conditions for consumers and created a new page for healthcare providers. This will make it easier for patients and the public and providers to understand the important information related to their underlying medical conditions and its impact and potential impact on COVID-19 severity. 111610 We've also opted the -- updated the list of underlying medical conditions to include substance use disorders, based on evidence that having these conditions can increase risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19. [11:16:22] You can now visit the CDC website to learn more about these underlying medical conditions and the science evidence used to support their inclusion in the list.I reach out to you, both with my concerns my concerns, and also my hope, so that you can all be here to hear this message, healthy, and vaccinated, in the months ahead. Thank you, and I'll turn things over to that perfect. DR. ANTHONY FAUCI [11:16:50] FAUCI>> Thank you very much Dr Lensky I'd like to make a few comments over the next couple of minutes that extend what you just heard from Dr Wollensky and that is the importance of vaccination to prevent severe disease and why we cannot pull back on our mitigation efforts. This is a paper. From the Annals of Internal Medicine from some time ago which showed that about 1/3 of people with SOS COVID to infection never develop symptoms, that's the good news. Next slide. Of those who do develop symptoms about 80% have mild to moderate symptoms but about 20% or more have severe disease with case fatality rates, varying from a few percent to up to 20% for those requiring mechanical ventilation. Now let me show you something that is very dramatic, if you look at the multi system manifestations of COVID-19. They are Multitudinous. The most important and common of which is the acute respiratory distress syndrome. But we know now there are neurological disorders cardiac dysfunction, acute kidney injury hypercoagulability. Bottom line, this is a very serious disease, which has already led to the death of about 550,000 people in the United States. Next slide. This slide is very dramatic, if you look on the left hand part of the slide, it's a normal CT scan of the lung, the area that looks black and dark on normal lung, because there are air spaces on the right hand side of the slide is a patient that I made rounds on at the NIH Clinical Center last week. [11:18:37] If you look at this, even a non physician non radiologists can determine that there's something very, very wrong with the lungs on the right hand side with the white blotches being infiltration of the lung, that even with the patient being under the top medical care that we're giving them at our hospital still may very likely have residual scarring of the lung. After improvement. Next slide. This is another patient we serve at the Clinical Center, who developed a brain infarct as shown on the left hand part of the slide with the arrow pointing to the infarcted part of the brain. Bottom line, as Dr Wollensky said in her experience at Mass General, the same at the NIH Clinical Center. This is a very, very bad disease, The fundamentals to prevent acquiring this other public health measures that Dr. Wilson ski mentioned, but also vaccination, absolutely critical. Next slide. If you look at the prevention of hospitalization and death among the five vaccines on the left hand part of the slide, with one exception of a hospitalized patient in the vaccine arm of a mark of do more damage study virtually 100% protection against hospitalizations and death. In other words, you can prevent what I showed you on the previous two slides by getting vaccinated. And on the last slide, what you see in red is hospitalizations, going down, as in the blue bars vaccinating people going up. The bottom line, hanging there is Dr lynskey said, we really need to hold on to the public health measures as we get more and more people from two to three plus million people vaccinated every day, it will be a race between the vaccine, and what's going on with the dynamics of the outbreak. And we can win this by just hanging there a bit longer. Back to you, Andy. Q&A [11:20:48] SLAVITT>> Thank you Dr. Fauci, and Dr Orlinski. Let's go to questions. STAFF>> First question, we'll go to Ed O'Keefe at CBS. Q>> Thank you guys for doing this again as always, I have one other question, but given what the director just said, I guess I want to follow up a little bit and ask if I heard you correctly, you said you're concerned about impending doom. What is it that you saw in the data that is causing you to sort of start to feel this way again. And then was curious if you guys can discuss what is the government for the administration's current role in issuing these so called passports or certificates and why is it taking a little while longer for the US to do that with places like Japan and China and the EU are further along. [11:21:40] SLAVITT>> So, Dr Lenski Why don't you take the first question and I'll endeavor to take the second. 112147 WALENSKY>> When we were stagnating at around 40 to 50,000 cases a day for a couple of weeks there, we didn't see trends going down anymore but things were sort of holding steady. What we've seen over the last week or so is a steady rise in cases. We're now in the 60 to 70,000 range. And when we see that uptick in cases, what we have seen before is that things really have a tendency to surge, and surge big. 112214 We know that cases sometimes can be a week or two behind the behaviors that lead to those cases, the mixing that leads to those cases. We know that travel is up, and I just worry that we will see the surges that we saw over the summer and over the winter, again. [11:22:30] SLAVITT>> thank you. I'll take your second question, we can with this, we recognize this is a tricky and important subject, but the core here is that Americans like people around the world who are vaccinated will want to be able to demonstrate that vaccination in various forms, this is going to hit all all parts of society. And so -- 112255 Naturally, the government is involved. But unlike other parts of the world, the government here is not viewing its role as the place to create a passport, nor a place to hold the data of citizens. We view this as something that the private sector is doing and will do. What's important to us, and we're leading an interagency process right now to go through these details, are that some important criteria be met with these credentials: 112332 Number one, that there is equitable access. That means whether or not people have access to technology or whether they don't. [11:23:40] It's also important that we recognize that there are still many many millions and millions of Americans that have not yet been vaccinated. So that's a fundamental equity issue privacy of the information security of the information, and a marketplace of solutions are all things that are part of what we believe in, as is the ability for people to access this free, and in multiple languages. So I think you will see more from us as we complete our interagency process, but this is not slowing down the process in any way, even though the government has its own needs, so does the private sector and the private sector and other groups working together are marching in that direction. It is important for us and it will be we will be very clear about how that will happen that the guidelines that I just talked about, are part of that process. >> Next question. >> Next one is from Julian at the Los Angeles Times. >> Hi everybody, I wanted to see it again specifically speak to why this ride is happening, are you seeing in restaurants are you seeing it in people's homes are you seeing the workplaces, and also, the administration has been urging people to be careful, you know, Since the new president of office in January. Why is the administration's efforts not working in this situation. Let's go round here maybe start with you Dr Wollensky and then Dr. Fauci would come after that. WALENSKY>> Yeah, I think we're investigating some of these outbreaks at a local level with individual states 112521 I think we are seeing that many of these states are opening up at levels that we wouldn't necessarily recommend. I am working with the governors. I will be speaking with them tomorrow to try and buckle down on trying to refrain from opening up too fast. You know, in the context of the fact that we're scaling up these vaccines, I think we've seen an uptick in travel. We have seen an uptick in travel, much more travel is happening. 112549 I think people want to be done with this. As I mentioned, I too want to be done with this. The thing that's different this time is that we actually have it in our power to be done, with the scale up of vaccination. And that will be so much slower, if we have another surge to deal with as well. [11:26:05] SLAVITT>> Dr. Bracci anything you want to add to that. FAUCI>> Yeah I think anyone really needs to appreciate that we really do want to get back to normal as quickly as we possibly can but I think one of the explanations. In answer to the question that we just heard is that if we open up completely. Now, that is premature given the level of infection that Dr. Wilson ski described in her formal presentation. So -- 112633 That's the reason why we're essentially pleading with people, even though we have -- all of us -- an urge, particularly with the warm weather coming, to just cut loose. We've just got to hang in there a bit longer, and I think the reason we're seeing this plateauing and a bit of a little increase, that we hope doesn't turn into a surge, is because we are really doing things prematurely right now, with regard to opening up. [11:26:57] SLAVITT>> credits we. Please, doctor perhaps. WALENSKY>> one other comment on that and that is our concern about variants we've been watching the variance really carefully. 112706 We know about 26% of all sequenced virus is now the B.117 variant. It is more transmissible than the wild type variants, so we're watching that carefully, and that may be one of the reasons in terms -- if people are not doing the things -- masking, distancing -- to protect themselves, this variant is probably less forgiving and more infections will occur. [11:27:30] SLAVITT>> CHRIS We recognize that it's difficult for people to both feel optimism and display caution at the same time, we believe one of the most important pieces of this formula, that the public tells us is just clear, consistent, honest, direct, straightforward information. That's why in these briefings, as you'll see, Dr. Fauci talks very directly and shows data very directly and Dr Wollensky presents information and recommendations very clearly, it's not always what people want to hear, but it's always directly what people, for the most part, say that they're looking for which is just the straight story that they can assimilate and help them make decisions. 112811 We hope that they're hearing quite clearly a consistent message today, which is that we don't have a long time, necessarily, to be in the state with -- but we are not out of this pandemic yet. If we do our jobs, it can be short as possible. Next question. [11:28:32] >> I shall go to Zeke Miller at AP gov in a column just a couple of quick follow ups on all these points. Q>> Can you proceed to explain why you don't think the federal government is the right place to have set up a vaccine vaccination passport and the data privacy concerns and widespread adoption and equity concerns that you that you just raised Andy, Shouldn't the federal government in the best position to respond to those. In the case of and then separately when it comes to the travel and the virus, guidance, Dr wattsy, Dr. Fauci, should we expect to be hearing more from the President about the need for people to double down on these restrictions we've heard him publicly referencing. We have not heard the president, sort of lead the charge of that and then finally, and he started and started hitting for the third question here. Can you speak to how the 11 million doses of j&j vaccine are expected to be shipped this week will be Setubal being allocated to the existing formula or will they be deployed in a different, different way. [11:29:44] Okay, so wehave vaccine passport, we have travel guidelines which I will work to brought to you Dr lynskey and then we have 11 million j&j doses. Usually I forget the third question if there's a third question by the time we get to it. You know, relative to the vaccine, passport, we think it's very important for the public, job one is for the public to become comfortable if they're considering taking a vaccine, why that is in their best interest, and we think all of the data and all of the results, and all the impact in the slide that Dr. Fauci showed are the preponderance of the reason we're just so fortunate to be in this position relative to these vaccines. We do know that there is a segment of the population that is concerned that the government will play too heavy-handed of a role in monitoring their vaccinations and that mandates will be coming from the federal government and in point of fact, it would discourage people, to feel like that was the role we're playing. So we think we can have the best of all worlds. We think we can essentially put forward guidelines and guidance, and given the federal government's source and role in society, for everything from the TSA to the VA to Departments of Health and Human Services and CDC, I could go on and on, we have a major impact in what will get done. [11:31:09] So we're putting forward our principles very clearly, we will be even more clear in the time ahead, and we believe, based on everything we know that that will influence the outcome and the way we describe. So with that let me ask your doctor wilensky to see if you can address the travel question. 113127 WALENSKY>> Yeah. Our recommendations have been very consistent with travel. You should have a pre-travel test. You should quarantine for seven days. You should have a post-travel test and then, you should monitor for symptoms between 7 and 14 days. We have been consistently discouraging travel, saying "please keep it limited to only essential travel." And what we're seeing now is more travel than we saw -- than we saw throughout the pandemic, including the Christmas and New Year's holidays. 113156 I think people have taken advantage of what they perceive as a relative paucity of cases, a relative lull in where we were, to take advantage of their time of Spring Break, of holiday travel and -- and what I would just say is: you know, we've seen surges after every single holiday. And so, you know, July 4th, Labor Day, Christmas. And -- and we're seeing the uptick of that right now, so we -- I would just sort of reiterate the recommendations from CDC saying: please limit travel to essential travel for the time being. [11:32:25] SLAVITT>> You final question was being. The final question was about Johnson and Johnson doses. And indeed, led me to the premise of your question, Johnson Johnson is due to deliver 11 million doses. And as a single dose regimen. That's an enormous step forward for the country. My message to the states, tribes and territories and everyone else is Get ready. This is an enormous opportunity to accelerate more people. And tomorrow we will be talking with the governors, and others about how we're going to split that up. >> Next question. >> Next we'll go to Caitlin Collins was CNN. [11:33:11] Thanks very much. I have two questions. One, if each of you could answer this, with the release of the World Health Organization report. Can each of you say whether or not you trust the findings of this report, maybe yes or no to keep it short. And then secondly to doc to CDC Director Dr Olinsky, thank you for speaking so candidly about the data that you're seeing, but of course that raises questions about restrictions that we were seeing be loosened and a lot of states, and also on the President's call for 100 days of mask wearing, do you expect him to re up that call or extend it past the 100 days, given the numbers that you're seeing. SLAVITT>> Okay, Dr. Fauci do would you like to go first, unload who question. 113355 FAUCI>> Yeah, Kaitlan, I'd like to see that report first. And I also would like to inquire as to the extent in which the people who were on that group had access directly to the data that they would need to make a determination. Once I get that information, I'll be able to more adequately answer whether I trust it or not. But I want to read the report first, and then get a feel for what they -- what they really had access to or did not have access to. [11:34:27] SLAVITT>> Dr Wollensky. WALENSKY>> Yeah, I don't have much to add to what Dr. Fauci has said with regard to the report, and simply to say, as I too have not yet had an opportunity to see. With regard to the surging. We are working closely with, with the states, I will be speaking with the governor's tomorrow to try and reinforce the need for these for current restrictions to not open up. I think what we do with masking will really depend on where we are 40 days from now. >> Yeah, I've just add, God to my inbox this morning. So I've been reserved judgment as well. Next question. >> We have time for one more question we'll go to Shannon flirts with MedPage Today, Q>>I thank you for taking my question, Dr Lensky I wondered if you could expand on what you said regarding substance use disorders, and the concerns around exacerbating the risk of COVID-19 among those people are there other groups that there's increased risk of COVID outcomes and are there any people that you're taking off the list. And how would that change any policies or recommendations going forward. 113546 WALENSKY>> Yeah, thank you for that. I would invite you to sort of visit the list. It's sort of a more -- a comprehensive review. We do know that we've seen data that folks who have substance use disorders have increased risk of severe disease. There's a medical review, a scientific review with that as well, and an updated list of the scientific review of all the disorders that -- or the underlying conditions that may exacerbate COVID-19. [11:36:15] SLAVITT>> Thank you. Thanks for those questions I invite everybody to tune into the President's remarks later today. And we will be doing this briefing again later in the week. [end]
ZIMMERMAN TRIAL POOL 070113 P1
INT BROLL GEORGE ZIMMERMAN TRAYVON MARTIN TRIAL / SWITCHED POOL FEED / ALSO INCLUDES EVIDENCE FROM PREVIOUS DAY'S HEARING KATIE HUBER LOG **NOTE: JUDGE'S COMMENTS IN CAPS **NAMES OF WITNESSES IN RED **VISUAL DESCRIPTIONS IN (PARENTHESES) **GOOD STATEMENTS/VIDEO BOLD 8:56:26 (zimmerman walking in.... black suit, white shirt, blue tie SMILING!) 9:00:28 PLEASE BE SEATED. GOOD MORNING. ON RECORD. READ FOR JURY? omara: propositions..... we can wait. OK LETS BRING THE JURY IN 9:02:10 PLEASE BE SEATED. GOOD MORNING. WELCOME BACK. QUESTIONS: DISCUSSIONS ABOUT THE CASE? NO HANDS RAISED. READ OR LISTEN TO REPORTS? NO HANDS RAISED. USE ELECTRONIC DEVICE FOR RESEARCH? NO HANDS RAISED. READ OR CREATE SOCIAL MEDIA? NO HANDS RAISED. STATE CALL YOUR WITNESS. 9:03:07 mantei: Dr. Hirotaka Nakasone 9:03:34 west: matter with this witness, if we may approach. YOU MAY APPROACH (sidebar) 9:07:16 (sworn in) 9:07:45 mantei: name, job, duties? hirotaka nakasone. operational technology division with FBI. performs variety of duties as senior scientists.... development of speaker recognition systems... voice related forensic examination..... 9:09:19 how long in current position? since 2009 as senior scientist for 4 years. 9:09:41 what you've done and your qualifications? michigan state university thesis, speakers recognition.... assistant professor for 18 months. LA federal research project for development of computer systems... stayed there for 7 years since 1985. title was voice specialist. joined FBI in august of 1991 for same responsibilities. qualified by FBI to conduct forensic examinations in 1994. doing this ever since 9:11:29 Ph.D. thesis, anything independently than just your work? yes. moved to LA, research grants provided to continue my work as I wrote in the thesis... joined bureau FBI voice identification.... FBI was using spectrograph comparisons or voice prints, ineffective. subjectivity in examination involved... initiated a lot of research projects to identify for forensic applications... variety of papers related to speaker recognition technologies 9:13:22 how many papers? maybe 30 or 40 9:13:35 actual work in lab for FBI and other agencies, how many actual voice samples have you conducted voice identification? anywhere from 40-80 cases a year, best guess would be handle, analyze, written report about 3,000 cases. 9:14:28 testified as an expert before? yes, however most of the time when I testify in court room, never testify to results or examination. testify to talk about reliability of speakers recognition technologies. how many times? 20-30 times 9:15:18 expert if no objections? west: no objections, encourage the jury to listen to him as an expert 9:15:49 members identify a number of method used... automated or computer based speaker recognition, phonetic, spectrograph, or aural comparison method... practiced by different scientist in different disciplines... listening approach by phoneticians... people involved in automated speaker technicians are scientists and engineers in the government industries... not only in US but throughout the world 9:17:07 differences between the aural and automated approach? even when a scientist might say they are using a method, only one underlying.... listening method. computer technology must be supervised by appropriate examiners 9:18:00 idea of what kind of sample needed to conduct analysis? what we do in the laboratory first is to evaluate suitability of the data. listen carefully, make sure speech samples at hand are naturally spoken, evidence of intoxication must be removed from analysis, emotional state of the speech... uttering voice samples with extreme happiness, giggling and laughter... removed.... run into voice being uttered when person going through stress or undue depressions... unnatural voicing, yelling, screaming... must be removed from analysis in standard operating speakers. check other aspects, duration must be at least 30 seconds after blank or silence removed... meaningful is 30 seconds-3 minutes.... speech sample drops to 10 seconds or 14 seconds... conclude the voice duration is not good enough for analysis... check the amount of reverberation.... remove if a long amount. 9:20:48 two samples, record one from recording incriminating and suspects voice in quiet room.... telephone line with bad quality.... land line is decent, could be useable... cell phone type distorts voice... confront disparity, examiner is mandated to stay away from further analysis 9:21:41 factors that affect analysis, variations going on with speaker... emotional state... variables that could go on with recording, other environmental recordings? yes. thank you for bringing that up... effects of distance to voice regarded as something to be careful of... two terms to describe those. far field recording vs. near field recording... lips close to microphone near field recording, captures voice clearly... far end of the room, 10 ft-15 ft. away we call this far field recording or voice... 9:23:25 has problems because it weakens signal, noise comes with it... mixed with the noise... echoes from multiple bouncing walls, smears the voice... far field voice tends to have very poor signal to noise ratio. the ratio of signal divided by noise presence signal. in this court room maybe 40 DB, I'm talking about 80 DB and signal to noise ratio is rhythmic expression.... 80-40 gives me the voice about the 40 db signal to noise ratio.... its more than 1000 times.... my voice is louder 1000 times than ambient noise 9:25:18 typical telephone conversation has 20-30 DB noise ratio... far field would be less than 10, 5-6 DB signal to noise ratio... not real suitable for analysis by computer approach... doesn't preclude human listener though 9:25:59 mantei: samples in this case, march 2012... receive recordings to attempt analysis on this case? yes. copy of report, operational technology received from Tampa FBI office, march 23rd 2012. how many recordings? 8 recordings. 2 in CD-R. 2 recordings in this case 9:26:51 called the lauer 911 call, with screams... familiar with it? yes I am 9:27:03 as far as that call goes, what did you do when you got it and able to do with it? case assigned to me to do voice comparison, another assigned for something else. concentrate on what I did... follow standard operating procedure, listened to entire recording... a little over 4 minutes, check my note. 2 minutes and 34 seconds... pertinent portion was around 45 seconds... beginning of recording until a loud noise or gun-shot like audio event... 45 seconds, listened to entire conversation exchange between female recorder and 911 operator... hear voices going in the background, altercations... yelling for help. that yelling was screaming... screaming goes in and out when dispatcher and female were talking... screaming comes up isolated some times. can't analyze voice that is stepped over by something else... discounted those areas, came up with 2.53 seconds of screaming standing by itself 9:29:29 in 45 second portion, series of that... how long total stepped on and not stepped on? total it reached a little less than 19 seconds... 18.80 seconds. of those 16 seconds were overlapped by other voices... less than 3 seconds was only area where nothing else but screaming was coming through 9:30:19 do with that amount of sample and type? checked and I have to render my final conclusion, that voice sample or utterance is not fit for voice comparison... judgment based on research and common sense understanding in scientific communities. 9:31:01 concluded you couldn't make comparisons? correct 9:31:14 nature of sounds itself that also made it harder to conduct comparison? signal to noise ratio was poor... distance between telephone set and female recorder using... altercation taking place. no visual information, by listening we could tell that was far field recording. another slight reverberation contained in the screams 9:32:21 whether you can compare sample to known voice.... what are you able to tell about age of person giving sample? common belief among scientific communities, guess age from voice is complicated... approximate, but very often we know people make mistakes.. hear on phone... young man's voice, guy is very young, 20 yr. old but could be a 55 yr. old talking... may think this may is very old but can turn out to be 18 or 19... depends upon the individual too... guessing age is complicated 9:33:49 generalized parameters of pitch of voice in genders and ages? pitch is the psychological perception of vibrations in vocal cord... mine opening and closing 100 times per second... called 100 Hz. maybe 120... average pitch of grown male is around 120 Hz. on the hand, the average adult female voice has about 220 Hz per second... twice as high as man.. small child produce 400 Hz on the average... small child as highest known pitch 9:35:16 based upon speech samples while everyone is talking in normal speech... pitch goes all over the place when in extreme conditions. roller coaster voice or pilots voice before crash in ground.. raise higher into 500, 600, 700 Hz. regardless of age. normally we accustomed to hear a person's pitch... when we speak, pitch is baseline, energy. not because of pitch... created by tube in vocal track, starts at lips to the end of the vocal cord. 15-17 cm. constantly changing, creates resonance... changes when under extreme emotional state 9:37:00 made attempts and taken exemplars and estimate age? occurred to me, but decided it was not possible to determine.. done that before, analyzed variety of voices in past. sometimes able and sometimes not? true I have analyzed voice from 16 yr. old man and 20 yr. old man... able to identify the voice, in other cases more often that that... not recommend to police office, do not get samples from young boy going through voice change... unique situations....one person goes through and completes at different time... 9:38:48 take as late as how in life? I can't recall exact year, but usually voice established at age 20, plus or minus a couple years 9:39:11 most people are undergoing that change? yes. 9:39:20 complicating factors is resonance and phone recordings and ability to accurately determine that? repeat 9:39:38 one of the things that affects ability to get a read on age of voice sample, recorded sample and other factors... compression by cell phones and microphone itself? attempt and accuracy of estimating age, listen to recorded voice is same as listening to live voice, without looking at face... no difference between the two 9:40:33 hearing live is same ability as recording? correct if listener not familiar with voice he's listening to 9:40:54 aural or listening approach, what does that involve? two types of listening identification... called familiar voice recognize by listening, second is unfamiliar by listening... familiar happens every day. most of us run into the situation.. in the office, colleagues talking around corner.. tell right away who it is... familiar voice recognition. phone call by mother on other end, don't have to hear whole conversation to recognize your mother... typical phenomenon that happens in our life... go to unfamiliar voice ID, talking about listening to hundreds of phone calls... triggered me, and try to compare with other voice I caught in different telephone conversations.... voice comparison is part of unfamiliar voice recognition. 9:43:06 in forensic environment and others are in.... usually given a voice that was coming from incriminating recording... questionable voice... then given another from suspects, attempt to compare the two unfamiliar voices, typical scenario that forensic examiner encounter. 9:44:13 mathematical models or statistics must be utilized as assistance to help our examiners 9:44:29 unfamiliar voice ID, use other techniques need type of sample you told us earlier.... have a sample like this, which is more suited for making identification on familiar voice? this case, better than by familiar voice ID than listening only.... set of requisites for the familiar voice ID is reliable... when we listen to voice in our life... intentionally encoding persons voice... speaking normally, slowly, excited, emotional... stored in brain... must have ability to retrieve those features when confronted with task to compare later voice... ability to compare a particular feature coming from later voice against feature stored in my brain.... particular case, best approach would be familiar voice recognition who have heard him in his whole life speaking and uttering in conditions in screaming, yelling, under similar set ups 9:47:14 better if you were attempting familiar voice ID, have someone who's heard under variety of conditions as opposed to talking back and forth? yes. best approach given this sample? yes. 9:47:45 moment? YES CROSS 9:48:14 west: good morning. have this marked, please 9:48:27 approach the witness? SHOW TO COUNCIL FIRST. west: cv 9:48:44 familiar with that? yes. my curriculum vitae 9:48:52 training and experience you talked about, references to publication and research as a voice expert? yes. this lists my professional affiliation, half a dozen memberships in technical associations and also lists awards I received in past, FBI Directors Award... my current effort in establishing scientific working group... speaker recognition... formed, launched and kicked off march this year. 40 members. 16 voting, the rest are advisory... bulk is made up of highly reputable scientists in forensic and technical field, US government, federal state and academia... 9:50:59 talk about that for a moment, working group... a group of scientists in voice identification, pulled together to meet regularly in issue of speaker identification? correct. started and primary position? born in 2009 when interagency symposium was held, lack of consensus or integrated............ amongst scientists and engineers 9:52:54 role? I am the elected chairperson of that working group... known as research development tested subcommittee... best practice subcommittee... interoperability voice standards.... type 11... science in support of law subcommittee.. 9:54:17 reputable scientists agree with me in terms of the voices produced in screaming... no validity and results of analysis would be uttering and unreliable... by utilizing advance electronic device or algorithms 9:55:01 found this group? helped coordinate it and get funding to establish.... particular group are sponsored by FBI... also sponsored by national institute of standards. NIST? correct. 9:55:43 funding from your efforts and participation with NIST? yes. NIST is administration of speaker meetings and remote conferences and coordination of website... technical assistance... NIST is one who has been providing since 1996 throughout the world... reputable in terms of coordinating scientific and blind testing.... performance of technology.... computer domain and human listening ability... HASR, human assisted speaker recognition 9:57:10 NIST effort to promote methodologies, has a methodology that could further speaker recognition industry, provide to NIST and recognize by scientific community? yes. NIST function from what I understand, goals or missions if promotion of the science... variation of technology by participants... not charged with evaluation of system as applied in specific areas.... technology variations, not yet as of today specific evaluations 9:58:39 best if I come up with analogy, automotive... engines inside, perform differently in each car. NIST engine itself, don't go up to how mounted and what body style 9:59:10 methodology for analyzing voices has opportunity to submit that method in hands on trial to test performance, correct? rephrase the question 9:59:36 don't want to get too sidetracked, those practiced in the field can participate in evaluation.. given samples to analyze that NIST standardizes and compare with others? I think that's about right. blind test... data prepared by NIST and participants never have chance to look until given... limited time to crunch numbers 10:00:26 as result with NIST and experience with the working group, sounds like you are current in so far as what's happening in scientific community? completely familiar with cutting edge scientific studies 10:01:00 there is no methodology or science that can reliably evaluate screams as to speaker identification? correct! NIST has not addressed extreme voice samples like that. 10:01:37 working group includes academics? yes. and representatives from communities... DOJ that's FBI.... US secret service... intelligence communities.... 10:02:27 here with special permission of FBI legal counsel? yes... allow me to testify for this case. 10:02:45 as a result, scope of testimony is limited? that is correct. 10:03:02 FBI lab a forensic lab? yes 10:03:16 what forensic means in context of work you do... focus toward positive use in court room setting? narrow definition... forensic. what you defined is narrow.... any evidence created should be able to be produced as evidence in court room... broad forensic means analysis conducted for investigator guidance 10:04:18 in other words, those agencies were actively engaged in terrorism activity may not get into court room but would be broader forensic? correct. forensic style means added or bigger of the analysis... writing a report always as if subpoenaed by the court... substantiated by evidence and actual analysis.... in my earlier... no single examiner can issue reports... second examiners have to confirm results.... no confirmation, examiner has to move to conflict resolution... finally approved and go out 10:05:55 a forensic context has added rigor? yes 10:06:04 in your lab, other scientists review work before final report is issued? yes. mandated 10:06:18 does that work include blind panel testing or blind review of info? it happens under situation where we are asked what words were being spoken, buried in the nose... listeners bias can play into decision, move into blind test... examiner calls one at a time without telling him what he ought to be able to hear. half a dozen to a dozen will be involved in blind test 10:07:25 listen to question recording without first being exposed to other analyst? correct. exposing others would lead to guaranteed bias.... trained not to induce any potential bias 10:08:02 well recognized there can be that bias, listen to something at same time as other, influenced by opinion? always danger of biasing others. don't tolerate that? correct 10:08:31 good law enforcement practice, investigate a case with voice samples? Objection! Scope and Outside Permitted Testimony. SUSTAINED 10:08:54 west: could we be heard on that, important issue. ALREADY QUALIFIED ON EXPERT AS VOICE ID, PLEASE MOVE ON 10:09:12 west: may I make nakasone my witness, call him this minute as my witness... NOT HERE AS LAW ENFORCEMENT. (west was frustrated and caught off guard) 10:09:36 who do you work for? FBI. part of DOJ? yes. work for law enforcement in LA? yes. training before yourself? yes 10:09:58 techniques in science and lab to avoid listener bias part of what might go to field agents, conduct their investigation with the practices from the lab? our practice at lab is meant to be applied by forensic examiners trained in our environment... governed by lab.... personally I really haven't guided law enforcement how to do it except when asked by special agents.... when asked I provide guidelines 10:11:45 examiner bias carry into field if subject recording? Object! LET ME HEAR THE REST... played for people to identify... high risk of examiner bias, played recording with each other at same time to see reactions? Object! Well far from experts testimony, not law enforcement, doesn't train them... gives advice... beyond scope in general terms. west: may I be heard at the bench (sidebar) 10:19:47 west: court overruled the objection, I can proceed? YES YOU MAY. examiner bias where a group were asked to listen to recording to see if they could recognize recording, involved putting all in the same room at same time when recordings were played... increase risk of infecting reliability of ID based on circumstances of that process? I do believe there's an increase on listener bias already built in... blind test, or if we want multiple people add validity and reliability... chance to gage what others are saying, risk of including bias in end results 10:21:29 advising law enforcement what to do to play recording to group, recommend they play it one by one? don't that, provided recommendation numerous times 10:21:55 in your scientific community its common sense? correct 10:22:04 can't think of any reason why someone would do it in group? Object! Speculation. SUSTAINED. any good reason? Same Objection. SUSTAINED.... any reason for it to be... Objection SUSTAINED 10:22:50 move CV into evidence. QUESTION OR MOVING INTO EVIDENCE. I'm setting up. MY QUESTION IS ARE YOU ASKING A QUESTION OR MOVING INTO EVIDENCE. I'm sorry, moving into evidence 10:23:38 pride yourself because of work you do with FBI and active participation in scientific community at large? yes 10:24:00 already said that among people you work with, consensus on what's suitable for forensic analysis? correct 10:24:17 your decision was not based on personal view about what's reliable? strongly believe my opinion is supported by my colleagues in science community 10:24:39 suitability of samples in this case, screaming on that recording... evaluated it, took the total amount of speech and said that was 18 seconds? correct. out of the 45 second period of screams and gun shot? correct 10:25:16 removed the masking noise or overlapped speech, considerably less to work with? yes. 2.53 seconds 10:25:35 only 2.53 seconds could be suitable to start with for that decision? yes. cleanest area if we attempt to do analysis... not just for voice ID but any kind 10:26:09 up to 3 minutes for analysis, normal or screaming? normal conversational speech 10:26:25 notion of balanced speech? computer takes statistics of dynamic variations of 1000 different known speech features... significant models, takes speech samples...... there are 44 different sounds in English. before those known 44 phonics to occur, takes a while... one word may be produced 3 different phonics.... "Say" is 3 phonics. "help" 3 different phonics 10:27:58 we need reasonable speech duration's... varies depending on vocabulary used... empirical studies, determine that somewhere around 30 seconds speech samples would carry... 10:28:27 30 seconds of normal speech? in conversational speech. not yelling help over and over for 30 seconds? continues to yell for 30 seconds, we can count as one word or 3 phonics, far less than what is required to do meaningful scientific analysis 10:29:08 maybe if its 15 or 16 seconds, maybe you can do voice analysis... 14 or 10 is questionable... normal speech duration as many as these phonemes? correct.... if I continue talking like this for 14 seconds, my 30 second speech contains pause... doesn't carry information, after removed... you would have core or vocal speech information, 70% or 50% range... have 30 seconds of natural spoken speech, fair to predict you will have 15 seconds.... after pauses extracted... comfortable for analysis... standard operating procedure at 10 seconds have to call it quit 10:31:01 if you have 30 seconds of normal speech, after pauses you may have only 15 seconds left to analyze? typical scenario we get into it 10:31:23 any amount..... when you listen to recordings in this case, trying to reach a decision whether person is under high stress or life threatening situation? assess normal and examiners have already been exposed to noted conditions... allowed to make that judgment 10:32:05 heard screams yourself in this case, under life threatening situation? yes. under extreme emotional state 10:32:25 facing death situation.... very extreme and emotional state 10:32:35 extremely challenging for you whether there can be any kind of further analysis at all? along with our report, talk to Tampa FBI field agents who submitted this case... recommended him not record a reacted screaming voice 10:33:13 recommended another recording or not? recommended he do not try to encode a reenacted voice. 10:33:35 told agent not to attempt to do a reenactment recording for use in this case? yes 10:33:52 what's you get unknown sample ready for analyzing, comparing with known sample of persons voice? correct. don't ever do analysis just listening on its own? only given unknown voice, no voice comparison but evaluating if voice is sufficient information for us... if given another sample we have to compare with 10:34:44 decision to tell agent not to do reenactment was because no other one would possibly give you an exemplar worthy of reliable comparison? extremely difficult to recreate in similar situation. scream isn't just raised pitch, physiological structure could be different... under different conditions.. resonance mechanism can change to... don't believe we can recreate the unique situation... it doesn't happen every day. it's difficult 10:36:07 screaming is physiologically different than talking, but really loud? correct. complete different type, scientists don't know how they are different 10:36:28 no amount of screaming speech whether its 2.53 seconds or 10 seconds or 30 minutes that would be suitable for analysis that we are able to do now in current state of the art? correct 10:37:00 said that because of the changes that come about when screaming under stress that it has such a profound impact on the way they sound you can't say hold old the person is that's screaming? I don't think it's possible from extreme voice 10:37:42 screams you heard could be made by a 27 year old, 35 yr. old or 50 yr. old man? under similar circumstance, very very challenging, scientific community wont guess or estimate age of person screaming. didn't do that in this case? I did not attempt 10:38:25 based upon what you know in work and member of community, to do so would be fool's errand, screaming for life? in my opinion that's the consensus among scientific group members 10:39:11 with all of that, saying science doesn't really help us in this case figure out who's screaming? unfortunately that is correct 10:39:30 the best chance if any would be lay witnesses that have familiarity of the voice of zimmerman or martin or both? that is my opinion, correct 10:39:51 still same challenges because limited speech, high diress? person of familiar voice recognition would be best, still a challenge... characterized by the fact that this person has familiarity.... in position of the information about specific features they can extract from yelling and screaming.... same features they retreat from their memory... producing audio information in same situation 10:41:04 same situation is still issue... connect recording here with something familiar, best chance in this case to identify the voice? doesn't have to be exact same, but under similar conditions 10:41:34 urge caution to jury, lay witness testimony can identify voice with all the things you talked about... listening to opinions and suggest context of case? Object! THE JUDGE WILL GIVE INSTRUCTIONS. OBJECTION SUSTAINED 10:42:25 moment? YES YOU MAY REDIRECT 10:42:56 mantei: best type of person to make judgments on sample like this is someone who's heard potential speaker under similar circumstances? correct. upset or stressed before? yes 10:43:26 advantage over someone who's never heard person upset or stressed before? I think the person who has heard same features both voices would be more reliable than individual who claims familiar with certain people but everything he heard from this person are normal conversations 10:44:08 referenced talking about standards of 30 seconds and that sort of thing of speech, relates to desire to conduct computer assisted exam, not lay listener approach? correct 10:44:40 idea of.... talking on phone with mom, a word or two? correct 10:44:53 idea of examiner bias, try to avoid it... make things as ideal as possible? yes. 10:45:15 attempt to control as many variables as you can.... law enforcement techniques mirror what should go on in lab? no. no saying about what they do unless requested to give guidance. we prefer voices recorded with high phonetic microphone, but they are recorded by random devices and we take them all 10:46:05 talking in context of having scientist conduct unfamiliar voice analysis, don't know or have never heard speakers voice before? yes 10:46:26 however though that happens in the voice line up situation, we recommend to FBI agents 10:46:56 the effort guide them to remove bias effect happen not only for unfamiliar voices but also equally important... same safeguard against bias would be important in familiar voice recognition as well... to remove risk of bias and improve credibility of results 10:47:40 voice line ups, victim of crime asked to come down and listen to what was said? sometimes... not enough quality in voice recordings happening in federal cases... find someone familiar with voices, advise them if 3 or 4 are familiar... have each listen to voice separately one at a time... part of my recommendation 10:48:45 talking about potential for bias, it's a potential? yes. have you and another familiar with moms voice, compromise your ability to recognize voice? always a chance... might get compromised 10:49:19 there's a chance, going to happen? Objection! Leading. OVERRULED. if two voices compare, so obviously different or same the chance of examiner bias might be lesser than situation in which two voices sound alike or difficult to analyze.... examiners human, tendency to follow the leader... happens and bias issue is very serious topic embedded within scientific working group 10:50:24 bias work both ways, if you go into it not wanting or assuming you're not hearing the same voice? go either way 10:50:41 familiar voice ID goes, more scientific computer help us here? correct. no way for computer to contain all sort of features coming from voice. one shot analysis 10:51:18 one shot, best person is someone who's heard voice under similar circumstances? correct RE-CROSS 10:51:33 west: at FBI lab, don't limit analysis to just the computer automated speaker recognition? correct. our approach is called a hybrid approach... method of automated speaker recognition in computer and a trained examiner... numbers from computer cannot be utilized as a so-so report... conducting examination independently from computers.... computers cannot extract... two components moving together, called automated speaker recognition with human in the loop 10:52:58 trained in speaker recognition? correct. computer can't assess whether person was happy or sad or voice was produced under normal diress... depend on trained examiners... go hand in hand 10:53:44 spectrograph was employed more in the past, FBI does not use that approach? used up to last year. FBI modernized it on May 15 2012... examiners will not use spectrograph any more for voice comparisons.... replaced. 10:54:26 event occurred on February 26 2012, any method that includes aural, spectrographic and automated speaker recognition that would be suitable for analyzing screams in this case? none RE-RE-DIRECT 10:55:06 suitable under protocol.... no suitable methodology? yes. no technology or scientific device were suitable to analyze voice we had... not preclude familiar voice recognition by individuals 10:55:40 MAY NAKASONE BE EXCUSED? yes. yes. GOOD TIME FOR RECESS? RECESS FOR 15 MINUTES 10:55:59 15 MINUTE RECESS ============================= 11:09:31 (zimmerman back in court) 11:11:22 PLEASE BE SEATED. BACK ON RECORD. READY FOR JURY rionda: jury instructions... various interviews and need to be relevant... NO OBJECTIONS TO EITHER OF THESE? correct. rionda: we met late Friday, redactions for defendants interview. parts of interviews with defendant... agreement with both sides... REDACTED COPIES INTRODUCED INTO EVIDENCE? correct. some audio and video.... transcripts are not introduced. READY FOR JURY? yes 11:14:03 PLEASE BE SEATED. NEXT WITNESS.... Doris Singleton 11:15:03 omara: name? Doris Singleton. occupation? police officer Sanford PD. unit? neighborhood response unit. how long? December will be 9 years 11:15:26 previous assignments? road patrol, school resource officer, investigator with narcotics. how long with narcotics? 3 or 4 years 11:15:54 prior to Sanford PD, any law enforcement? out of college, parole officer 11:16:08 education? bachelors from university of Florida. probation officer academy... police academy... training as we go on 11:16:29 February last year... assignment? narcotics unit as investigator 11:16:43 Feb. 26 2012, on or off duty? off duty... call for twin lakes? yes. 11:17:00 how? sergeants in investigation unit have on call status and take turns... sergeant Santiago was on call sergeant for investigative call outs 11:17:29 assigned to assist Chris serino? yes. lead investigator? yes. go to crime scene? straight to police department. requested? Santiago 11:17:57 purpose of what? not told until I got there... not to go to scene but PD? yes. told that Zimmerman was en route to police department 11:18:19 zimmerman present at PD when you got there? yes. see him in court today? yes. standing 11:18:40 came into contact, interview room? yes. officers present there? in two way mirror... Adam Johnson and Tim smith were there 11:19:09 describe how big the room is? 8 ft by 5 ft. not good at measurements... table and chair? yes. 11:19:28 talking to zimmerman? yes. recorded? yes. how? recorded on voice recorder they give us 11:19:48 video recording? it does. why not vide tapped? did not know how to activate that system 11:20:01 not required to inform them about recording, but did you? I did inform him and place recorder in visible locations. Miranda rights? yes. form to do that? yes 11:20:28 states 174 into evidence...... recognize exhibit? I do. 11:20:44 what do you recognize it to be? Miranda warning card I read from that night and I signed and zimmerman signed 11:20:59 process of informing rights, recorded? yes 11:21:18 ask defendant if he understood rights? yes. did he? he said he understood. waive rights and talk to you? he did. ask questions and respond? yes 11:21:38 did you threaten defendant for a statement? no. promise him anything for a statement? no. prior experience, influence under alcohol or drugs? yes. defendant under influence? no indication he was under influence of anything 11:22:17 spoke to you any problems? no he spoke clearly 11:22:25 understand you problems? he never said he misunderstood anything. injuries? yes. discuss with him? yes. did he need medical treatment? he said that he didn't from what I recall, then later on in interview he said he wasn't sure 11:23:03 discuss with him if he desired he could? yes. he declined? yes. express pain that he couldn't think? no 11:23:24 done so, interrupted and had him checked out? if he asked at all for any reason, if he wanted to go to hospital I would've made that happen 11:23:45 contact on Feb. 26th evening? yes 11:23:51 recall what time? between 8:00 and 9:00... would be a guess 11:24:06 blood on nose? crusted blood under nose. back of head? yes. use tissues to stop bleeding? yes. tissue box in room and he was using those 11:24:35 move into evidence states exhibit 178... defendants interview with office singleton. COME INTO EVIDENCE 11:25:13 opportunity to review audio recording? yes. interview is you asking zimmerman questions? yes 11:25:36 during interview, not been to scene? no I was not at the scene. not able to quiz him or challenge, unaware of facts? knew nothing going into speak with him. purpose? to get a statement 11:26:03 (interview with Singleton playing--- Miranda rights) 11:28:33 you haven't been out there, referring to what? crime scene 11:28:42 (interview continues... the neighborhood has had a lot of crimes.... my wife saw our neighbors get broken into and she was scared.... so I decided to start a neighborhood watch program.... names of officers..... a few times where I've seen suspicious person in neighborhood call police... they always get away... never seen him in the neighborhood, raining out, leisurely walking, taking time, when I drove by he stopped and looked at me, I know all the kids in my neighborhood all the adults... raining and he was walking casually not trying to get out of rain,) 11:31:29 what happened there? Santiago was at crime scene and he chirped my Nextel phone... he wanted to find out from George if there were any phone numbers to see if there was video surveillance of the gate 11:32:10 (interview continues....) 11:32:18 is that Santiago asking you and it's not clear in the recording? right. tape or video at gate viewing cars coming in and out? 11:32:39 (interview continues.... last time they cameras were down. contact for 11:33:14 what are we talking about for contact? if he knew someone who could get that information, how to get surveillance from camera if existed... assume he would know as the watch person... 11:33:45 (interview continues....) looking through his cell phone now..... I go out and come back in so he can look for the contact from his cell phone 11:34:37 find out the 43, what does he mean? get the information... but I haven't left the room yet based on what I heard. 11:35:40 asking defendant to find the number in his phone? yes, retrieved it and asked him to look for the number being requested 11:37:04 what's going on now? walked out of room and relayed information through my Nextel 11:37:25 even though you walked out, recorder still going on? yes. recorder stayed in room 11:38:37 (called before, police had come out, but they know the area well.. cut between buildings... the burglars.... I don't recall... called a few times... probably have the records, called a half a dozen times... this time I was leaving to go to grocery store, saw him walking in neighborhood in front of house I had called about before.... walking leisurely and looking houses, pulled car inside and called non-emergency line. armed at this point? yes.... reported suspicious person, asked me where he went and I wasn't sure, lost visual, he told me to tell him direction and I said not really... then I see him circling my car and goes back into darkness...) 11:40:29 (heading down road and he dips between two houses? yes. comes back out and circles my car while on police. saying anything? I couldn't hear... rolled up my windows. car was running, lights were on? yes. walking completely around the car? yes. dispatcher asked me where he went I didn't know what street I was on... or where he went so I got out to look for the sign to see if I could see where he cut through. dispatcher told me where are you and I said I'm trying to find out where he went and he said we don't need you to do that and I said all right.... I had gone through dog walk and walked back through to my street) 11:42:03 ( told them where my car was, walking back through to where my car was and he jumped out and asked me what the fucks your problem homie and he says now you do and punched me in the nose... try to defend myself, started punching in my face, screaming for help, couldn't see or or breathe.. still standing? no fell to ground after first punch... fell backwards into grass and he grabbed... wailing on my head and yelling for help, hitting my head into... tried to sit up and he grabbed my head and started hitting my head into sidewalk... tried to slide into grass so he'd stop hitting me.... guy comes out and says calling 911 and I said no help me he's killing me.... he said you're going to die... still hitting head... when I slid my jacket came up when he said I was going to die I felt him going for my firearm, so I grabbed him and shot him) 11:44:35 falls off and says alright you got it.... fall to side? I don't remember... vision was blurry. didn't fall towards you? I don't remember. I think when I shot him it pushed him back, I didn't know what he was hitting, thought it was bricks... got on top of him and held his hands cause he was still talking and said stay down don't move and then somebody comes out... he says he's calling police and I said I need help with this guy and then an officer shows up... he asks me who this guy and I said I did and I put my hands on my head and told police where my firearm was) 11:46:04 (after you shot him he said you got me, after you got on top did he say anything else... ow ow ow..... whole time on phone with dispatcher? yes. still on phone when he jumped out? no. did someone else call before the shot, someone else might've been on the phone while being beat up? yes.) 11:46:53 (never seen him before? I don't recall, they always come at dark... African American early 20s... taller than me... slender build... wearing? hoody and sweatpants or jeans.. dark colors? gray hoody and pants were denim color snow wash denim. hair style? hood on. how's your head? I can't feel) 11:47:53 (broke your nose.... need to go to hospital? I don't know, they said they didn't.... is this bump, I can't tell what's normal for you.... chuckles....) 11:48:24 examining sides of heads at this time? stood up and went to his side to see all sides of head 11:48:36 (person who said I'm calling for you, recognize that person? no. don't know if they were resident? they were looking from back patio. see more than that person? no. nobody came to assist in pulling off, between two houses? behind the houses.... gone back behind and were on way back out? yes. neighborhood is square like this, row of houses here, road, houses here... parked car here, mail box here, went through dog walk here.... this is asphalt and so I walk straight through for a street sign, when I walk back that's when I saw him.... I guess he was upset I called police 11:50:23 (when I walked past I didn't see him, looked to see if he was there... waiting somewhere... where was your cell phone? in my hand..... disconnected with you? yes. put cell phone away, walk back towards him I saw him coming at me I don't remember if I had time to call) 11:51:24 (slugged you? just hit me. what did he say before that? you got to problem homie and I said I don't have one and he said now you have a problem and hit me... nose first? yes. hitting head on sidewalk, dog walk... row of houses) 11:52:13 (went to sit up, grabbed by my head and banged into.... see this guy and screamed help me? I don't know I screamed like 50 times.... remember what they look like? no. police got there? yes I got on my feet.... a resident with a flash light... when police got there I was already standing up.... seconds between the time or? awhile) 11:53:19 (put you at gun point? I don't know, put hands on head and turned my back. who shot him and I said I did. I have my gun on my right side on my holster and he said I know you do but I have to cuff you first. take you where? here... police car right away? no ambulance put peroxide on my head and my face to get blood off.... anything else? no. in charge or watch group? yes. not doing it that night? no.... ) 11:54:35 (called police to have them check out... just call, don't try to make contact with them? yes) 11:54:52 during interview, indication he was drawing something? yes it was a pad in there, attempted to draw location.... use Google map to draw from that? yes. not clear to me, got print out of the Google map and had him show me using the map 11:55:36 (interview continues..... 11:56:01 gotten the map now? yes. how? went on computer and typed retreat view circle, printed the page 11:56:19 use that to have him draw what's going on? yes.. make markings on map itself 11:56:35 (interview continues.... put x where you first saw guy? right about here. entrance? yes. first saw him and then where were you? in this section. saw him here? yes. from there... call police where are you? in the club house. pass him? yes. behind you? well.... circles your car? I lost contact with him. continues past you? yes. pass me through here... where he might've been... behind these houses. comes back and circles your car? looks into my vehicle but doesn't circle it... comes back? yes. I drive my car up here. that's where I parked. comes and circles car? yes might've been closer to these houses... right around there) 11:59:29 (came around here and ended up here... circles your car? yes. comes from where? I don't know. just notice he's circling? yes. description to them? yes. walked back into the darkness here. make the turn? I don't know. still in car watching him walk away? yes. which direction and address... I got out of vehicle to look at this houses address, no sign there, walked through dog walk to see if there was a sign there or address I can see better... are you following him and I said I don't know where he went... didn't know where I was at but was able to give description of the club house...) 12:01:28 (follow him... walk here and just go back to car? no. dispatcher says do you still want a police officer.... I said yes and they said well where and I said at my car... all dark here? yes. dark down here? yes. at what point and from what bushes does he jump out? along here. bushes on walk way? sides of building... walking this way, jump in front of behind you... I don't recall... hiding at this t? yes. where do you end up when you guys are on the ground? punched me in face, fell backwards don't know where we ended up.) 12:03:11 (man with flashlight, what building? no. saw someone here? yes. jumps out of bushes in this area? yes. what type of gun?.....) 12:04:00 rionda: states 176.... recognize? yes this is the Google map he wrote on.... using in last interview? yes. 12:04:56 see it there? yes. Google map you used in having him describe his actions? yes same map 12:05:18 pointing to pink here, what is that? car... where he first noticed travyon 12:05:44 car in pink, writing that in him or you? he wrote that down and I may have put the arrow... driving and next in pink with x what is that? where trayvon was when he first saw him 12:06:28 using this map, the line? the line that leaves the car shows route of car and line of x is where he passes him and goes to the right of the club house. clubhouse here? yes 12:07:01 x and some lines here? should say 911, where car went when he said 911.. 12:07:31 significance here? first place he says car is, line, shows him going there.... 911 where he was when he called from car.... two lines going parallel? x is martin line showing x stops at car at some point when martin looks into the car? that's what George says.... where he leaves you when he ends out of your sight? arrow that goes straight and goes behind the houses. 12:08:52 lost sight of trayvon martin? yes. something here.... pink and writing there... significance? the car from 911 leaves the club house... where he goes from there, initially wrote he stopped there but moved here.... 12:09:38 what's happens here? the circle is where martin circled his car 12:09:55 defendant claims occurred after that? leaves that area and goes straight into the T... says that at the top he doesn't know if he continued straight or goes down... went this way or this way? yes, my understanding 12:10:36 got out of car to locate address.... lines going this way? he goes all the way across the T to the other side 12:11:09 going like this? yes. all the way to this street? yes. 12:11:31 says that where he was there he no longer knew his direction... then claim? discusses with dispatch if police should still come, agreed they will 12:11:59 what else? walk past to the vehicle, says it happens at the intersect of the t. right here? yes. not sure where he came from... 12:12:27 zimmerman says he comes out of bushes, where on this map he came out of? right in some areas you could see bushes, but I can't see them in this are 12:12:53 says that's when trayvon approaches him and says what he said 12:13:02 x here? location where he was calling for help and saw someone from a residence 12:13:28 interview and then second interview with Google map, any additional steps... give him a paper to write out written statement? yes.. statement form to explain what he told me to be detailed and put that in writing 12:14:04 written statement, sit with him or how did it occur? when I gave him the paperwork, I left the room. came back he was done, had him sign them... I didn't read them 12:14:34 gave him paper... states exhibit 175... recognize? I do.. the statement he wrote 12:14:58 4 pages? I believe, but ill check... yes its 4 12:15:13 what do you mean by that? witnessed that he signed and that's his signature on this page.... and I did as well 12:15:58 exhibit 175, the pages are numbered in some fashion? yes down at the down, 1 of 4.... 12:16:26 just getting... what's there? preset print and he fills out information. indicate what? name, address, DOB, phone number, city, vehicle.... WE NEED TO TAKE THAT DOWN...... (social security number listed perhaps) 12:17:42 go into written part of exhibit... first part here, his hand writing? yes. read what he wrote? in august 2011 my neighbor's house was broke into while she was home with infant son. the intruders attempted to attack her and her child; however SPD reported to scene and the robbers fled. my wife saw the intruders running from home and became scared of rising crime in our neighborhood.... formed watch program... instructed to call non-emergency line if we saw something suspicious and 911 if it was a crime... tonight I was on way to grocery store when I saw a male causally walking in rain looking into homes, pulled car over and called... told dispatcher what I witness and they took note of my location and suspect who possibly fled.... 12:20:22 suspect was his word or you were using words? no I told him to put in writing what he explained to me 12:20:54 page 2, top part... his name and highlight first part if you could? dark area... suspect circled my vehicle.. couldn't hear if he said anything, disappeared behind/ between some of the houses.... dispatcher asked for my locations and I could not remember the name of the street, so I got out of car to look for sign. asked for direction... 12:22:21 go ahead? I told dispatcher I did not know, but was out of vehicle looking for street sign and direction the suspect went. dispatcher told me not to follow and that an officer was en route... as I headed back to my vehicle, suspect emerged from darkness and said you got a problem and I said no and the suspect said you do now.... and looked maybe..... 12:23:40 highlight the first part, uses the word suspect, uttered those words or informed him to use that word? no. page 3...? finished off and looked and tried to find my phone to dial 911, suspect punched me in the face... fell backwards onto my back, suspect go on top. yelled help, suspect told me shut the fuck up as I tried to sit up right... grabbed my head and continued to yell.... sit up, suspect slams head into sidewalk 12:25:10 head felt like it was going to explode... tried to slide out from under suspect and continue to yell help, as I slid, the suspect covered my mouth and nose and stopped my breathing... felt suspect reached for my now exposed firearm and say you're going to die tonight mother fucker.... I unholstered my firearm in fear for my life as he had assured/assumed he was going to kill..... 12:26:36 pull up page 4.... my life as he assured he was going to kill me. fired one shot into his torso.. suspect sat back allowing me to sit up and said you got me. I slide out from underneath him and got on top of the suspect holding hands away from his body... in another/ an onlooker appeared and asked me if I was ok and I said no and he said I was calling 911 and I said I don't need you to call 911, I called them I need you to restrain. SPD arrived and asked who shot him, I said I did and placed my hands above my head and told him where on my person the firearm was holstered... cuffed me and disarmed me... placed me in back of vehicle. 12:28:25 signed that last page like all others? yes. defendant continues to refer to martin was suspect? he did in the statement. in prior statements he did not? suspect in writing statements only 12:28:54 police talk about them as a suspect? yes we do... if we suspect them of a crime they're a suspect 12:29:09 good time for recess for lunch? GOOD TIME FOR RECESS FOR LUNCH... NO DISCUSSIONS ABOUT THE CASE. NO REPORTS ABOUT THE CASE. NO ELECTRONIC DEVICE ABOUT THE CASE. NO SOCIAL MEDIA ABOUT THE CASE. ASSURANCE? yes. BACK AT 1:30. FOLD NOTEPADS DOWN AND FOLLOW JARVIS TO JURY ROOM 12:30:25 OFFICER SINGLETON, FREE FOR LUNCH... STILL ON WITNESS STAND, DONT DISCUSS WITH ANYONE. 12:30:41 ANYTHING ELSE WE NEED TO TAKE UP? NO 12:30:47 COURT IN RECESS FOR LUNCH UNTIL 1:30 ============================================== The Zimmerman trial enters its 2nd week today. While week 1 appears to have largely gone to the defense, the critical question of who started the fight between George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin has yet to be answered. Prosecutors may look to use Zimmerman's own words given via several recorded statements to police to disprove his claim that he shot Martin to save his own life. Look for the state to call investigators Christopher Serino and Doris Singleton to testify. Several prior interviews show that neither investigator believed Zimmerman's account, leading Serino to unsuccessfully recommend manslaughter charges be filed against him. The prosecution's case against Zimmerman may hinge on their testimony.