FAR RIGHT WING
DON KLADSTRUP ABC CS ON THE AFRIKANER RESISTANCE MOVEMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA. 00:00:50 THE AFRIKANER RESISTANCE MOVEMENT OR AWB TRAINS IN HAND TO HAND COMBAT AT A TRAINING CAMP. THE UNIT CALLED THE IRON GUARD TRAINS. AWB SUPPORTERS CLASH VIOLENTLY W/ RIOT POLICE AND THEIR DOGS. A MEMBER OF THE WHITE WOLVES LAUGHS WHILE STANDING TRIAL FOR SHOOTING MORE THAN 15 BLACKS. AWB LEADER EUGENE TERREBLANCHE MAKES THREATS AGAINST BLACKS DURING A SPEECH. CI: PERSONALITIES: TERREBLANCHE, EUGENE. ORGANIZATIONS: WHITE SUPREMACIST, SOUTH AFRICA. RIOTS: SOUTH AFRICA.
TERRE'BLANCHE SOT
00:00:00:00 SOT Eugene Terre'Blanche, leader of right-wing Afrikaner Resistance Movement (AWB): "[There is] no force in the world who can stop a nation when he's (sic) trying to fig ...
ROCK MUSIC
INTERVIEW WITH THE ALBERT BROTHERS, RON AND HOWARD. MUSIC PRODUCERS. RON AND HOWARD BOTH SIT AT RECORDING STUDIO MIXING BOARD. HOWARD EXPLAINS HOW THEIR CAREERS BEGAN INCLUDING ENGINEERING RECORDS FIRST AND HAVE BEEN PRODUCING NAME ACTS SINCE 1970. TALK ABOUT HOW WHEN THEY STARTED THERE WAS NO COMPETITION IN MIAMI AND THEY LEARNED BY TRIAL AND ERROR AND BY THEIR IGNORANCE THEY CREATED SOME SOUNDS THAT NO ONE HAD HEARD BEFORE. ATLANTIC RECORDS BEGAN SENDING THEIR ARTISTS DOWN TO THEIR STUDIO. CRITERIA STUDIOS BECAME KNOWN AS ATLANTIC SOUTH. ARTISTS THEY PRODUCED INCLUDED: ARETHA FRANKLIN, WILSON PICKETT, BROOK BENTON, THE RASCALS, DELANEY AND BONNIE ETC. RON TALKS ABOUT HOW THEY STARTED EXPERIMENTING WITH PUTTING MICROPHONES ON EACH DRUM RATHER THAN ONE MICROPHONE FOR THE WHOLE DRUM KIT. (VIDEO QUALITY VARIES THROUGHOUT THE INTERVIEW.) HOWARD TALKS ABOUT WORKING WITH THE AVERAGE WHITE BAND AWB AND HOW BACK THEN THEY WERE JUST WHITE KIDS TRYING TO PLAY BLACK MUSIC AND IT JUST DIDN'T SOUND GREAT. A FEW YEARS LATER THEY SOUNDED GREAT. RON MENTIONS THE ALLMAN BROTHERS AND HOW THEY DIDN'T REALIZE THEY WERE WORKING ON WHAT WOULD LATER BE LEGENDARY SONGS. TALKS ABOUT THE SONG "MIDNIGHT RIDER" VOCAL BEING RECORDED IN ONE TAKE. TALKS ABOUT JOE WALSH THOUGHT HE WAS REHEARSING THE SOLO FOR "ROCKY MOUNTAIN WAY" AND AFTER ONE TAKE THEY STOPPED AND THEY DECIDED THAT WAS THE SOLO THEY SHOULD USE ON THE RECORD.
STATE DEPARTMENT BRIEFING (1994)
STATE DEPARTMENT SPOKESPERSON CHRISTINE SHELLEY BRIEFS REPORTERS AND COMMENTS ON SOUTH AFRICA AND THE HEATHROW MORTAR ATTACKS.
[The funeral of Eugène Terre'Blanche in South Africa]
A2 / France 2
WS traffic on Tay Road Bridge in Dundee
View of oncoming traffic on the Tay Road Bridge with views of Dundee in the background. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. WS traffic on Tay Road Bridge in Dundee at Fife side of the Tay Road Bridge on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
[South Africa: unity at risk]
A2 / France 2
WS overlooking Dundee port and Firth of Tay
Wide shot from extinct volcano, Dundee Law, of Dundee port and the Firth of Tay going out to sea. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. WS overlooking Dundee port and Firth of Tay at Dundee Law on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
Australia Iraq - Inquiry into wheat company payments to Iraq
NAME: AUS IRAQ 311005N TAPE: EF05/0967 IN_TIME: 10:16:22:03 DURATION: 00:01:25:06 SOURCES: AuBC DATELINE: Canberra, 31 Oct 2005 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Internet SHOTLIST 1. Various interiors of parliament during debate 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister: "The fact that money coming from AWB Ltd. ended up in the pockets of the loathsome Saddam Hussein regime is something that I find, and I know many of my colleagues and I'm sure many on the other side of the house, find quite unacceptable. I make no judgment beyond the findings of the Volcker inquiry about the conduct of AWB Ltd. My own knowledge and comments I've received regarding the people who run that company suggest that they are people of complete integrity. I make no judgements to the contrary, Mr. Speaker. But given the seriousness of the issue, I believe that there should be an independent inquiry into whether there was any breach of Australian law by those Australian companies referred to in the Volcker report. I believe that that inquiry should be armed with appropriate powers and I've sought advice on what sort of inquiry would be appropriate. And when I've received that advice I'll have something further to say on the matter." 3. Various interiors of parliament during debate STORYLINE: The government will hold an inquiry into whether an Australian wheat company broke any laws by making payments that ended up in the coffers of Saddam Hussein's regime as part of the corruption-riddled UN oil-for-food program in Iraq, Australia's prime minister announced on Monday. According to a damning 623-page report by an independent commission into the program last week, AWB Ltd., formerly known as the Australian Wheat Board, was the largest single supplier of humanitarian goods under the oil-for-food program, selling 6.8 (m) million tons of wheat to Iraq and receiving payments from the UN of more than 2.3 (b) billion US dollars from 1997 to 2003. The independent commission, led by former US Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, said that from 1999 AWB also had to arrange for transport of wheat once it reached Iraq, which it did by paying Jordanian company Alia Transport. But Alia was partly owned by the Iraq government and payments to Alia "were tantamount to payments to the government of Iraq," the report said. Paying the Saddam regime for services was banned under the oil-for-food program. The report said AWB paid a total of 221.7 (m) million US dollars in so-called "side payments" for transportation of its wheat in Iraq. Prime Minister John Howard told parliament he would launch an independent inquiry into AWB's involvement in the food-for-oil program. "The fact that money coming from AWB Ltd. ended up in the pockets of the loathsome Saddam Hussein regime is something that I find ... quite unacceptable," Howard told parliament. Howard said he had made no judgment about AWB's behaviour beyond Volcker's findings. "My own knowledge and comments I've received regarding the people who run that company suggest that they are people of complete integrity," Howard said. "But given the seriousness of the issue, I believe that there should be an independent inquiry into whether there was any breach of Australian law by those Australian companies referred to in the Volcker report," he added. Howard noted that the report concluded "evidence does not suffice to conclude that AWB had actual knowledge of Alia's partial ownership by the government of Iraq, that it had actual knowledge of the fact that Alia did not actually perform trucking services for AWB's wheat, or that it had actual knowledge of the fact that Alia remitted the payments it received from AWB to the government of Iraq." Andrew Lindberg, managing director of the AWB, said last week the company did not know money it believed it was paying for transport was being diverted to the Saddam regime.
SOUTH AFRICA: RIGHT WING LEADER TERRE'BLANCHE (2)
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/0361 IN_TIME: 17:00:46 - 19:13:13 // 19:37:26 - 19:55:55 LENGTH: 03:32 SOURCES: All APTN except shots 1-4 = SABC, shots 15-16 & 19 = ETV RESTRICTIONS: SABC & ETV = No Access South Africa, All No Access Internet FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: Afrikaans/Eng/Nat XFA South African right-wing leader Eugene Terre'Blanche arrived at court on horseback Thursday to hand himself over to the authorities and begin serving 12 months in jail for the assault of a black man. He gave one last outburst, claiming that the South African government is run by criminals and murderers, before kissing his horse goodbye and walking into the courtroom. His surrender sparked shouts of joy among the crowd of 200 to 300 blacks who came to witness the event. His spell in jail removes from the political scene a man popular amongst right-wing extremists, but despised by those who blame him for setting off bombs that killed 21 people on the eve of South Africa's first all-race election in 1994. Inside his house in the Transvaal on Thursday, Eugene Terre'Blanche was preparing to surrender to South Africa's authorities who had given him a 1300 G-M-T deadline to turn himself in. But the leader of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement (A-W-B) he had no intention of going quietly. He sent his horse on ahead of him to the local courthouse, to make sure his departure grabbed as many headlines as possible. Dressed in black, Terre'Blanche climbed in the saddle and rode up to the courthouse around half an hour ahead of the deadline. But he still had one last outburst left to deliver before giving himself up. SOUNDBITE: (Afrikaans) "All law-abiding people, everyone who sees what's going on in this country support me whether they are white, black or brown." Question: "What's your message to the government?" Answer: "The message to the government is that they must come and see the people here and put their own house in order. It won't help to lock up a Boer if they are also not prepared to lock up the criminals and murderers in their cabinet and parliament." SUPER CAPTION: Eugene Terreblanche, AWB Leader That said, he bade farewell to his horse and walked into the court. Many Blacks who had gathered outside were overjoyed. But not all were happy - some said his punishment for beating a black garage attendant was not enough. SOUNDBITE: (English) "It's not nice, he must get more. A life sentence." SUPER CAPTION: VOX POP At the height of Terre'Blanche's popularity, before South Africa's first all-race election in 1994, many blacks lived in terror of the violence wrought by the A-W-B. The party's activists are blamed for killing 21 people on the eve of the 1994 poll. Terre'Blanche was finally ordered to jail for assaulting gas station attendant John Ndzima in 1996, and for inciting his dog to attack him - claims which he denies. For Ndzima, the nightmare does not end with Terre'Blanche going to jail. SOUNDBITE: (Afrikaans) "I am now very afraid. Afraid because his people, his supporters - Eugene is a big man, his supporters are very dangerous." SUPER CAPTION: John Ndzima, Victim of Terre'Blanche The A-W-B leader plans to ask for a separate cell because he fears for his safety. But a spokeswoman for the prison service said Terre'Blanche's request will not be granted automatically - it will be processed like that of any other inmate. SOUNDBITE: (English) "No, there will be no special privileges for him unless he can give us a doctor's certificate for meals or whatever, but it will be treated as we will treat any other prisoner who will have requests, and the head of the prison will look at those requests." SUPER CAPTION: Sarie Peens, Spokeswoman for South African Correctional Services Department Terre'Blanche probably has reason to fear reprisals from black inmates, but also from Afrikaner Resistance Movement followers who did his dirty work and who are now serving prison sentences for it. They bitterly resent Terre'Blanche, who threatened race war ahead of the 1994 elections, for not owning up to his alleged role in their crimes. Terre'Blanche has been granted appeal against a second sentence for the attempted murder of another black man who was left brain-damaged and paralysed after the attack. If that fails, he could be spending a further five years in prison when his present sentence is over. SHOTLIST: Potchefstroom and Ventersdorp, South Africa, 30 March 2000 and file SABC - No Access South Africa - Ventersdorp, 30 March 2000 1. Exterior Terre'Blanche's farm 2. Terre'Blanche supporter walks towards house 3. Terre'Blanche's horse in horse-trailer 4. Car with Terre'Blanche onboard driving away APTN - Potchefstroom, 30 March 2000 5. Various shots AWB (Afrikaner Resistance Movement) band playing 6. Terre'Blanche arriving at court on horseback 7. Crowds at court 8. SOUNDBITE: (Afrikaans) Eugene Terre'Blanche, AWB Leader 9. Terre'Blanche gets off horse 10. Terre'Blanche saying goodbye to horse 11. Terre'Blanche going into court, pan to crowd of jubilant black people 12. AWB supporters outside 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop 14. Masked AWB supporter with flag ETV - No Access South Africa - Ventersdorp, 27 March 2000 15. Wide-shot assault victim John Ndzima working fuel pump 16. SOUNDBITE: (Afrikaans) John Ndzima, Victim of Terre'Blanche APTN - Potchefstroom, 30 March 2000 17. Prison sign 18. Guards on gate ETV Potchefstroom, 30th March 2000 19. Terre' Blanche drives through prison gates APTN - Potchefstroom, 30th March 2000 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sarie Peens, Spokeswoman for South African Correctional Services Department 21. Prison gate closes?
Dundee city centre facing High Street
View of Dundee city centre facing Reform Street and High Street. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. Dundee city centre facing High Street at Dundee city centre on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
SOUTH AFRICA/ WHITE LAND MURDERERS APPEARANCE
A2 / France 2
Australia Howard 3 - WRAP Aus PM testifies at oil-for-food inquiry, adds presser
NAME: AUS HOWARD 3 20060413I TAPE: EF06/0320 IN_TIME: 10:23:04:12 DURATION: 00:02:32:05 SOURCES: AuBC Australia DATELINE: Sydney -13 April 2006/FILE RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: April 13, 2006 1. Wide of police security with protesters nearby 2. Various of Australian Prime Minister John Howard arriving at inquiry, protesters shouting 3. Various of shouting protester being arrested and placed in back of police vehicle 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister "The appearance by me earlier this week, by the foreign minister and also by the trade minister, demonstrates absolutely how open, transparent and accountable the government is being in relation to this matter. Australia alone has established an inquiry, a public inquiry, with the powers of a royal commission and that includes compelling the production of documents which is crucial in relation to a matter such as this. And I think overwhelmingly this demonstrates how open and transparent the government has been." FILE 5. Various of inquiry April 13, 2006 6. Howard comes down steps, leaving inquiry 7. Protester with sign saying " Not Happy" 8. Howard gets in his car and drives off April 13, 2006 9. Howard walking into news conference 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister "Look, it''s very simple. When you have a prime minister and two senior ministers fronting a commission on oath and answering questions, you can hardly be said to run a government that''s hiding something or covering up something. I mean they (the Australian opposition) keep changing their tune - first of all we were corrupt, then we were covering up things, then we were turning a blind eye, then we were incompetent. The reality is that we alone have exposed ourselves to the rigour of this kind of public inquiry and like everybody else I await the findings." 11. Wide of Howard at news conference STORYLINE: Australian Prime Minister John Howard testified on Thursday at an independent inquiry examining allegations that Australia''s monopoly wheat exporter paid millions of dollars in kickbacks to Saddam Hussein. Howard said his senior advisers did not alert him to a string of warnings that the Australian Wheat Board (AWB) was allegedly using the United Nation''s now discredited oil-for-food programme to secure contracts. Howard, who spent just 50 minutes on the stand, was the most senior of three government ministers to testify this week at a so-called Royal Commission into alleged bribes paid to Baghdad by the Australian Wheat Board. All three denied being told of the multimillion-dollar corruption accusations until UN officials began investigating the company, now known as AWB Ltd. Howard said, "Australia alone has established an inquiry, a public inquiry, with the powers of a royal commission and that includes compelling the production of documents which is crucial in relation to a matter such as this. And I think overwhelmingly this demonstrates how open and transparent the government has been." In his written statement, Howard said he is bombarded with some 68,000 cables each year from his foreign affairs and trade ministry and that four senior advisers vet them and only tell him about the ones they deem important enough. Howard said that the contents of the relevant cables were not brought to his attention during the period in question. Questioned by inquiry lawyer John Agius about a January 2000 cable from an Australian official warning the government that another country, since identified as Canada, had complained to the United Nations about AWB possibly being involved in oil-for-food corruption, Howard said his advisers likely would have dismissed it. And asked by Agius why his advisers did not pass on a US army captain''s 2003 warning that Saddam was demanding kickbacks on all oil-for-food contracts, Howard replied that they probably did not consider it new information. Howard said that it was the government''s belief that AWB was a "company of great reputation" and he would never would have thought it would have "behaved corruptly". The commission''s chairman, retired Judge Terence Cole, who went to law school with Howard, refused to allow a lawyer for AWB executives to question the prime minister, saying the issues he wanted to raise already were covered by Agius'' questions. Opposition lawmakers accuse the government of rigging the inquiry''s powers to ensure it cannot hold ministers accountable for failing to stop the alleged corruption. Howard said, "I mean they (the Australian Opposition) keep changing their tune - first of all we were corrupt, then we were covering up things, then we were turning a blind eye, then we were incompetent." Howard is the first prime minister to appear at such a high-level inquiry since former Labour leader Bob Hawke testified at a probe into Australia''s intelligence agencies in 1983. Speaking to reporters before testifying, Howard said his appearance and that of two senior ministers who took the stand earlier this week underscored the probe''s transparency. The inquiry was called to examine whether any AWB executives acted unlawfully in their oil-for-food dealings. Cole does not have the power to file charges but can recommend that executives be prosecuted if they are found to have broken Australian laws.
Dundee City Centre facing Old Steeple
View of historic 15th century Old Steeple (St Marys) Parish Church of Scotland, with bronze penguins on dwarf wall. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. Dundee City Centre facing Old Steeple at Dundee city centre on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
SOUTH AFRICA/ DEATH EUGÈNE TERRE BLANCHE
A2 / France 2
SAFRICA MURDER 2
AP-APTN-1830: SAFRICA MURDER 2 Tuesday, 22 May 2012 STORY:SAFRICA MURDER 2- FARMWORKER GUILTY IN WHITE SUPREMACIST MURDER LENGTH: 01:56 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: AP CLIENTS ONLY TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 742266 DATELINE: VENTERSDORP, 22 MAY LENGTH: 01:56 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Wide exterior courthouse in Ventersdorp, location for the verdict in the Eugene Terreblanche murder trial 2. Cutaway clock tower and South African flag 3. Martie Terreblanche, Eugene Terreblanche's widow getting into a car after leaving court 4. Cutaway police 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Steyn Van Ronge, head of the AWB (Afrikaner Resistance Movement): "Well, we are friends, we were friends and I'm very disappointed, the fact that he's not still with us any more. So what, life goes on. And we go on." 6. Mid setup shot of Andre Visagie, leader of the Vaal People's Republicans, a white supremacist group in South Africa 7. Cutaway AWB supporters standing across the road 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Andre Visagie, leader of the Vaal People's Republicans, a white supremacist group in South Africa: "We are satisfied with the verdict as a whole, and we would like to hear what the sentence is going to be. For us, it is very very important to see what the sentence is going to be, because if the court, in this case, does not send out a very harsh message out there to the farm murderers, it will continue and then I can assure you that there will be no chances of having a new South Africa." 9. AWB supporters outside court 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Pule Plaatjie, Ventersdorp resident and trade union supporter: "We are not racist, but they behave like racists. Here is the root of racism, so we are going to fight against those things. And we'll see what we can do for Mhlangu and the teenager. We are not going to lose hope." 11. Wide Van Ronge and AWB supporters outside the courthouse 12. Wide vehicle departing the courthouse STORYLINE A court found a black farmworker guilty on Tuesday of murdering a white supremacist in rural South Africa. A younger farmworker was acquitted of murder, but found guilty on other charges. The two black farmworkers were accused of beating 69-year-old Eugene Terreblanche to death with an iron rod in April 2010. The verdict ends a case that has lasted two years and fanned racial tensions in Ventersdorp, west of Johannesburg. Protesters scuffled outside the courthouse where the verdict was read. Scores of white demonstrators gathered in support of Terreblanche's family facing off against a larger crowd of black supporters of the accused. But the tensions did not explode into broader violence, and the crowd showed little reaction to the verdict. Police have described Terreblanche's murder as the climax of an alcohol-fuelled dispute over unpaid wages. But during the trial, defence lawyers alleged the farmworkers had been abused by Terreblanche and acted in self defence. Terreblanche had been jailed in 1997 and sentenced to six years for the attempted murder of a black security guard and assaulting a black petrol station worker. Prosecutors rejected allegations that Chris Mahlangu, who was found guilty of murder on Tuesday, had been sexually abused by Terreblanche. The defence lawyers say their case was weakened by poor police work. A substance believed to have been semen that witnesses reported seeing on Terreblanche's body apparently was not preserved as evidence. The younger suspect, Patrick Ndlovu, was acquitted of murder but found guilty of breaking and entering with intent to steal. Ndlovu initially was not named because of his age. He turned 18 during the trial. Terreblanche co-founded the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, known by its Afrikaans initials as the AWB, to seek an all-white republic within South Africa. His influence had waned by the time he died. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2012 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-05-22-12 1449EDT
WS Dundee city centre facing Murraygate
View of Murraygate in Dundee city centre. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. WS Dundee city centre facing Murraygate at Dundee city centre on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
Surf presentation international competition
RFO
Australia Howard - PM Howard comment on oil for food inquiry
NAME: AUS HOWARD 20061127I TAPE: EF06/1140 IN_TIME: 10:51:25:02 DURATION: 00:02:36:04 SOURCES: AuBC DATELINE: Canberra, 27 Nov 2006 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Australia SHOTLIST No Access Australia 1. Various shots of Cole Report on Australian Wheat Board 2. Wide shot of Australian Prime Minister John Howard and media 3. SOUNDBITE (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister: "This has been from the very beginning a totally open and transparent enquiry. The government has hidden nothing. Almost without precedent, not totally, I appeared, the Foreign Minister appeared, the Trade Minister appeared, at the inquiry. We answered questions under oath. And we were cross examined, and we were fully accountable with the same rules applying to us as apply to any citizen that is called to give oath before a court. We didn't have anything to hide and the commissioner has found that there was no wrong doing on the part of any of my ministers." 4. Cutaway of journalists 5. SOUNDBITE (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister: "Swift action will be taken to implement the recommendations regarding consideration of prosecutions of people and of certain activities. It will be for the law enforcement authorities to decide whether those prosecutions go forward. It is not for me to comment on whether or not they should occur." 6. Cutaway of journalists 7. SOUNDBITE (English) John Howard, Australian Prime Minister: "No country in the world established such a transparent investigation as did this country. We have done more to get to the bottom of the manipulation of the oil-for-food programme than any government in the world and that was done because we abhor corruption in any form either here or around the world. It has not been an easy exercise but it's an exercise that a country must go through in the wake of the sort of findings of a man such as Mr Paul Volcker." 8. Wide shot of Howard 9. Various shots of report STORYLINE An independent inquiry recommended on Monday that criminal charges should be pursued against 12 officials of Australia's monopoly wheat exporter over multimillion-dollar illegal payments that the company paid under the UN's Iraqi oil-for-food programme. The final report from the Royal Commission into payments by the Australian Wheat Board, now known as AWB Ltd., under the UN's corruption-riddled Iraq oil-for-food programme was made public on Monday, when it was formally tabled in Parliament. In his report, former judge Terence Cole said he found no material suggesting illegal activity by the Commonwealth or any of its officers. The Commonwealth of Australia is a formal title used for the government. The report said that 11 officers might have breached Australian corporate law, and that a twelfth might be guilty of criminal conspiracy. It was not immediately clear what penalties they might face. The report recommended that a police task force be set up to consider prosecuting those adversely mentioned in the report and Prime Minister John Howard immediately promised to do so. "Swift action will be taken to implement the recommendations regarding consideration of prosecutions of people and of certain activities," Howard said. Howard also announced the government would "urgently review" the system that gives AWB a monopoly over Australia's wheat exports, and would announce the findings shortly. Howard ordered the inquiry last year after an investigation by former US Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker exposed the AWB as the largest source of suspect payments under the oil-for-food program. In 1999-2003, AWB executives authorised 222 (m) million US dollars in bogus transport fees to a Jordanian trucking company part-owned by Saddam's government, Volcker found. Payments to Saddam were illegal under UN sanctions. At a news conference after the report was released, Howard said the report disproved claims that the government had been negligent for allowing the illegal payments, as the opposition had alleged. Howard, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer and former Trade Minister Mark Vaile testified before the inquiry in April, rare appearances by leaders at such a proceeding. "No country in the world established such a transparent investigation as did this country," Howard said. All denied ever having seen the cables or having any knowledge that AWB was breaking UN sanctions.
FAR-RIGHT SOUTH AFRICA
A2 / France 2
Dundee city centre facing Robert Burns statue
View of Robert Burns statue in front of McManus Galleries, a Gothic Revival-style building which houses a museum and art gallery with a collection of fine and decorative art as well as a natural history collection. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. Dundee city centre facing Robert Burns statue at Dundee city centre on October 05, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)
South Africa: extreme right and apartheid
SONUMA-RTBF
SOUTH AFRICA: RIGHT WING LEADER TERRE'BLANCHE (V)
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/0362 IN_TIME: 20:39:52 LENGTH: 01:33 SOURCES: All APTN except shot 1.20 = ETV RESTRICTIONS: ETV = No Access South Africa/Internet FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: Voice and effects VOICED BY: PHILIPPA MEAGHER Dressed in black, South African right-wing leader Eugene Terre'Blanche arrived at court on horseback on Thursday, to hand himself over to the authorities and begin serving 12 months in jail for the assault of a black man. Terre'Blanche gave one last outburst, claiming that the South African government was run by criminals and murderers, before patting his horse goodbye and walking into the courtroom. VOICEOVER: 0.00 UPSOUND - Band playing 0.02 Terre'Blanche was seranaded by a band of his supporters as he arrived at the courthouse astride a black horse. As he handed himself over to the authorities to begin serving 12 months in jail for the assault of a black man he remained defiant, labelling the government in South Africa criminals and murderers. 0.22 UPSOUND: Terre'Blanche addressing the crowd 0.25 Gazing down at the crowd with a smirk on his face, the white supremacist vowed that he would emerge from prison a stronger man. 0.32 TerreBlanche's Afrikaner Resistance Movement is reviled by many South Africans for setting off the bombs that killed 21 people on the eve of South Africa's first all-race election in 1994. He was ordered to jail for assaulting gas station attendant John Ndzima in 1996, and for inciting his dog to attack him. He had been free on bail after his 1997 conviction, but his request to appeal was rejected Monday. On Thursday, Terre'Blanche was accompanied by about a dozen followers, some dressed in khaki uniforms and wearing red armbands with swastika-like symbols. 1.08 Spectators looked on from the main gates, as Terre'Blanche was taken by police vehicle to a prison, 77 miles west of Johannesburg after his surrender. His lawyer has requested a separate cell claiming TerreBlanche holds fears his safety. Like other inmates, Terre'Blanche can ask to be placed in an isolation cell, although such requests are not automatically granted. SHOTLIST: Potchefstroom and Ventersdorp, South Africa, 30 March 2000 and file APTN - Potchefstroom, 30 March, 2000 0.00 UPSOUND: AWB band playing 0.06 Terre'Blanche arriving at court on horseback 0.09 Shaking hands with supporters on horseback 0.20 Cutaway of people watching 0.22 UPSOUND: Eugene Terre'Blanche, AWB Leader 0.33 Cutaway supporters in uniform with AWB flag 0.38 Terre'Blance riding horse and getting off 0.44 Cutaway of security at courthouse gate 0.50 Pats his horse goodbye and walks up steps of courthouse 1.03 Mid shot of walking up courthouse, pan to black jeerers APTN - Potchefstroom, 30 March, 2000 1.07 Wideshot exterior Potchefstroom prison 1.12 Midshot sign reading: "Correctional Services Potchefstroom" 1.13 Wideshot of prisoners working in grounds 1.17 Guards waiting for him to arrive ETV - No Access South Africa - Potchefstroom, 29th March 2000 1.20 Terre'Blance in white car goes through prison gates XFA?
WS Dundee rebuild area near former Hilton Hotel
View of rubble and development work at Riverside rebuild project in Dundee. Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland with a population of some 130,000. It was once a major centre for producing jute, marmalade and ships as well as supporting industries like whaling and publishing. Biomedical and technological industries arrived in the late 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10 per cent of the digital-entertainment industry in the UK. WS Dundee rebuild area near former Hilton Hotel at Near Tay Road Bridge, Dundee on October 26, 2013 in Dundee, Scotland (Footage by First Freedom/Getty Images)