Top Row wins Christmas Stakes at Santa Anita Park
Title card: "Track Opening in California Draws 50,000" / tilt-down horses in paddock at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, CA, prior to start of race; spectators look on / crowd in stands and on lawn as horses parade past; VO bugle call / pan WS crowd / horses in paddock / crowd with horses parading past / MS horses parade / WS scoreboard lights up with information / tilt-down, pan crowds on ground / horses emerge from starting gate, race / POV from grandstand as horses race past / worm's-eye shot horses approach, kick up dirt as they pass / cheering crowd / horses in backstretch, VO announcer on loudspeaker / crowds behind fence turn heads as horses pass by / horses round curve into home stretch with Ariel Cross leading / WS home stretch; Top Row pulls into lead / Top Row wins race, setting new record
PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL ABC UNI 2020
TVU 25 PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL ABC UNI 022720 2020 **WAS REFED LATER** Former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg talked about the coronavirus at the top of his remarks in Rock Hill, South Carolina calling for Trump administration to change ACA to qualify Coronavirus as preventive covered service. (will send a fuller note after the event ends) 185749 Before we're talking politics I do need to address what's in the news, because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for national and global response to the threat as a coronavirus is beyond all politics. And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership, and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided Above all, by science, and not by politics and why 185837 important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage, do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act when it comes to treatment or screening the same as we would with a flu shot. Everybody 185912 screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that you further further treatments, new approaches and ultimately that seem to be developed and this is where leadership is so important, is why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States, that the public and private sectors are coordinated on development solutions. And it's why we need international leadership, to make sure that countries around the world are coordinated to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous. 185957 Will be refeeding the entire remarks later in the evening. Former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg talked about the coronavirus at the top of his remarks in Rock Hill, South Carolina calling for Trump administration to change ACA to qualify Coronavirus as preventive covered service. 185749 Before we're talking politics I do need to address what's in the news, because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for national and global response to the threat as a coronavirus is beyond all politics. And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership, and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided Above all, by science, and not by politics and why 185837 important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage, do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act when it comes to treatment or screening the same as we would with a flu shot. Everybody 185912 screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that you further further treatments, new approaches and ultimately that seem to be developed and this is where leadership is so important, is why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States, that the public and private sectors are coordinated on development solutions. And it's why we need international leadership, to make sure that countries around the world are coordinated to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous. 185957 He was asked about protecting healthcare professionals from Coronavirus and said: Is should not be a politically controversial idea, but in these times it needs to be set. And we need to make sure that the federal role for coordination and emergency or emergency response is there not just to protect populations, but to protect those who protect the populations. Often it is first responders and even men who are most at risk when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues. And this is exactly the kind of issue that's going to characterize the future of national security. Not only are we going to have to deal with military issues like we always have terrorism issues which is what I specialize on military issues like cyber security and election security and global epidemics that no respect national borders and won't like that. More than ever before. We've got to make sure we have the resources lined up we gotta make sure there is an action plan, and the institutional resources together, you know, this White House actually dismantle the office and the National Security Council, who was responsible for coordinating the exact opposite we'd be putting out the pads to a local public health department that right now would be in a position to give guidance to the clinical staff on how to protect themselves from just these kinds of education. This is why we need to shore up in magnify not subtract from the apparatus that was already there, but there needs to be fortified consider, and then backup local apartments with we know how stretched local departments. You know the county health department should be able to set a strategy for dealing with issues like this but so yeah so little resources, it's all they can do just to keep up with restaurant inspections COLOR: I wanted to note that this event like some of the others this week were majority white. I counted 38 black voters in the crowd out of 900 people that the campaign says was in attendance. The majority of the black people were from a parent education group who are in the state traveling around lobbying 2020 candidates. Rock Hill does have a sizable African American population in the city, the county and neighboring areas. When I drove to the event and walked in many of the license plates were from North Carolina which isn't a surprise Rock Hill isn't that far from the border. Something I also want to note was that Chasten Buttigieg did not hit the stage as he usual at his bigger campaign rallies. Justin and I haven't seen Chasten at any of the South Carolina campaign stops. And to the best of my knowlege he hasn't appeared at a campaign event this year. He was however in Charleston for the Debate. Chasten arrived in the state on Sunday, and just so happened to be on my flight from DC to South Carolina. **OTR: A source close to the campaign told me and Briana Stewart last year that Chasten does not like South Carolina and told the campaign he did not want to campaign down here END OF OTR *** TVU 25 PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 022720 2020 [20:32:29] Amy, for your support. [20:32:30] Thank you audio for the swift response time. [20:32:35] Thank you, Jim, for the work of the party. I always say that the county party committee is the unsung hero of the Democratic Party, so thanks to watch you for what you and everybody here is doing. As an Indiana Democrat, I insist that there is no such thing as a permanently red state or county or precinct. I know that you understand that. [20:33:03] Before talking politics, I do need to address what's in the news today because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for a national and global response to the threat of the Corona virus is beyond all politics. [20:33:19] And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. [20:33:30] And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided above all by science and not by politics, which is why we need leaders who listen to science. [20:33:51] It's also going to be important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment, which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act. [20:34:14] When it comes to treatment or screening, the same as we would with a flu shot, we've got to make sure everybody is covered. There are steps around screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that few first further treatments, new approaches and ultimately a vaccine can be developed. And this is where leadership is so important. [20:34:43] It's why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States that the public and private sectors are coordinating on developing solutions. And it's why we need international leadership to make sure that countries around the globe are coordinating to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous to everybody. [20:35:04] So let's get this right and let's put this beyond politics. [20:35:12] So having said a little bit about that picture, let me invite you to form another picture. [20:35:17] That is the one that's always on my mind when I think about what's at stake in these elections. If you've ever seen me speak, you might know that it's the picture that I always want to invite fellow Americans to envision, because it really is in our future. And it's the picture of what it'll be like the first time that the sun comes up over the Carolinas. And Donald Trump is no longer the president of the United States. [20:35:45] Are we ready for that? [20:35:50] Sooner the better. [20:36:01] I mean, wouldn't it be nice just to put the chaos behind us? Aren't you're ready to put the exhaustion behind us? Would it be good to put the tweets behind us? And I don't even think that's a partisan statement anymore. [20:36:19] I'm talking not only to fellow diehard Democrats, but quite a few independents and a healthy number of what I like to call future former Republicans who feel just as passionate as I do about making that happen. [20:36:32] And you are welcome in this effort. [20:36:34] If you are crossing party lines to be here, because we need to make sure that we gather together the American people in a vision for something better no matter how you voted in the past. And I don't think we're defined by what we've done in the past. I think we're defined by our view toward the future. [20:36:53] Now, if we want to bring that day about sooner rather than later, though, a lot depends on the decisions that are about to be made, including the decisions that will be made in the next few days, bearing on who the nominee of our party of my party is going to be. [20:37:09] And that's why I'm here. One more time to look you in the eye and to ask you for your support. [20:37:15] If you are already on board, I'm here to thank you and urge you to spread that word to everybody you know. [20:37:37] Pete's looking pretty strong. [20:37:46] If you're still making up your mind, though, then I'm here to try to convince you and to offer a picture of where it is, I believe that we can go together because so much is in your hands. [20:37:58] And I know how seriously you take that decision that especially in these early states is so important. So I want to begin by inviting you to. [20:38:17] For example, president who likes to talk about the forgotten men and women and says that he cares about the working class. But then if you look at the economic policies, the only economic promises kept has been to cut taxes for corporations and the wealthiest among us. Don't you think he ought to be held to account by somebody who is not a millionaire and actually lives in the industrial Midwest and can speak to what it would look like to have an economy that works for us? [20:38:49] We got a president who likes to cloak himself in the language of religion. [20:38:54] This president. Don't you think it would make sense for him to be held to account by somebody who can insist to fellow believers that God does not belong to a political party in the United States? [20:39:15] This is a country that belongs to people of every religion and of no religion equally. [20:39:20] And I think upholding that is perfectly compatible with being a person of faith, calling out to other people of faith. [20:39:32] And don't you think a president who likes to talk tough, likes to beat his chest and throw himself military parades, but avoided serving when it was his turn? Don't you think it would make sense for him to have to confront on a debate stage a veteran who can remind him why pardoning war criminals and punishing war heroes is not the action of a patriot? [20:40:06] I'm ready to go toe to toe with this president. I'm looking forward to it. [20:40:21] Now, that is a real difference, there's a real difference in approach, though, on how I want to do this. [20:40:27] That's different from my friend Senator Sanders. I respect the ideals that he's speaking about, but I believe at a time like this, we've got to earn the presidency by calling people in, not by calling people names online. [20:40:41] We've got to build out our majority by making sure we have solutions that harness and galvanize that American majority, not polarize. [20:40:53] And I would argue at a moment like this, what Americans are looking for is not only a president who can lead us forward on policy, but also a president whose style makes it possible to turn on the TV, look at the White House and actually feel your blood pressure go down a little bit stead of up through the roof. That's part one of offering to. [20:41:16] But here's the really good news. There is a pretty healthy American majority that wants to see a new president that agrees on who we against. But there is a bigger majority that can agree on what it is we are for where we need to take this country. And it is in the name of harnessing that majority that we built this campaign. [20:41:36] For example, the American people already agree that we must act to ensure that there is no such thing as an uninsured American. And we can do that right now with Medicare for all who want it. Right now, we got an American majority that understands that part of how we can honor our troops is to make sure that they are not deployed into endless war and to honor our veterans when they come home too, by taking care of them. [20:42:04] We see that right now. We got American majority right now that wants to see wages rise, expects corporations to be held accountable and stands with workers so that we can see to it that one job is enough in the United States of America. Whether you've got a college degree or not. There is already a healthy American majority insisting that we come together to reform the immigration system. [20:42:37] Recognizing that immigration is part of the lifeblood of the United States of America. A growing coalition that insists that we take action right now to ensure that your race has no bearing on your health or your wealth or your access to educational opportunities or your experience with law enforcement. [20:43:00] We got to act now to make that a reality. [20:43:09] We've got to have right now a way to awaken that American majority that knows what is at stake in supporting the next generation and those who educate them by insisting that the next secretary of education be one who actually believes in public education and supports our teachers. [20:43:33] We see the opportunity to do this right now and we got to act fast to make this happen. [20:43:40] These things can't wait. They can't wait 10 years. They can't wait four years. And I'm meeting people everywhere I go who remind me of what's at stake sometimes at campaign events, sometimes just by chance. Not that long ago, I met somebody who I had served with overseas. I just ran into her by chance at the airport. I had not seen her since we were both in Afghanistan, hadn't seen her since she was injured in an insider attack. And when I asked her how she was doing, I saw her walking down the concourse. She's wearing a sweatshirt from there, a t shirt from the Wounded Warrior Project that said some assembly required. [20:44:18] And she picked up her Ernie and tapped on the part of her leg. They couldn't save on the prosthetic and said, you know, the Navy, fix me up just fine and then let me know. [20:44:25] She's looking forward to her next deployment. [20:44:29] Because our troops will do whatever is required of them by the American people. They can't wait for us to have a commander in chief who actually cares about what is going on in the military. [20:44:49] I met a mother at a campaign event not long ago who let me know she was fearing for the life of her son because she cannot get through a wait list to get him the attention that he needs for a mental illness. [20:45:00] The time has come for us to demonstrate that we know that mental illnesses and substance use deserve to be discussed as openly and treated as readily as any physical issue. [20:45:13] We're already there and we can't wait to do something about it because lives are on the line. [20:45:24] But the focus on meeting remind me the six some of them aren't even voters, some of them aren't even old enough yet to vote. [20:45:30] They're the ones who really get my attention. I had an 11 year old come to an event to mine, raise his hand and ask about prescription drug affordability policy. [20:45:40] I thought. Smart kid. [20:45:43] And he was. But the reason he was asking was not that he was an emerging health care policy buff. He's asking because he's worried about how he'll be able to afford insulin when he grows up and leaves home and tries to go out on his own. He's worried about this at the age of 11. [20:46:00] This shouldn't be his problem and he can't wait for us to act to make sure there's no such thing as an unaffordable prescription in the United States of America. [20:46:16] Had a 13 year old come to an event, let me know that she had purchased or asked her parents to purchase for Christmas, asked for a bulletproof backpack. That was what was on her mind going into Christmas season. [20:46:31] And she cannot wait for us to act to demonstrate that we get that the Second Amendment is not an excuse to do nothing whatsoever to protect her life and to protect this country from gun violence. [20:46:42] We've got to act. And Democrats, Independents and Republicans know it. [20:46:52] And then I think about the 10 year old who came to one of my events, let me know that he'd been elected mayor of his school. I'm not sure what that means, but that's the office he holds. [20:47:01] And he pointed out very politely that he is planning to be here in the year twenty one hundred. And that when he is, he'll be looking back on these years that we're in right now to see whether we made the decisions necessary so that the climate would be one where he and his future kids and grandkids could thrive. [20:47:21] They can't wait for us to act to lead the world in doing something about climate change before it destroys economic and life opportunities for the next generation. None of this can wait. [20:47:34] And the good news is we don't have to wait because the American people are there. We just got to make sure that we get Washington working a little more like our best run cities and towns run the other way around. [20:47:46] We got to make sure that if an idea commands a majority among the American people, that that will actually lead to a majority in the American Congress. By presidential leadership. And that is why I'm running for this office. [20:48:00] I didn't seek the presidency because I got it into my head one day that I'd like to occupy it. I'm seeking this office because of a belief, a conviction about what it is for. I believe the presidency has a purpose and that the purpose of the presidency is not to glorify the president. [20:48:17] It is to unify and empower the American people to do these big things. [20:48:20] That's why I'm asking for your vote. [20:48:37] And that's what everybody here has a chance to make happen on Saturday. [20:48:41] Or if you've if you've made the great journey from over the border from North Carolina, you've got to wait until Tuesday. [20:48:47] But we need your help to. [20:48:52] You can't even call it Super Tuesday anymore, it's just next Tuesday and we're going to need help there, too. So our numbers have grown a little bit since I first turned up about a year ago trying to get known, but it's still never too big of a room for conversation. So we have gathered up your questions as you were coming in. [20:49:09] We've put them in our famous fishbowl. And I'd like you to welcome back to the stage, one of our great team members, Oriol Brandee, who's going to guide the discussion in moderate, be your voice. I'm very biased. But don't we have the best team of organizers and volunteers and staff and leaders? [20:49:35] Hi, Ray. [20:49:37] This is a good one. What would you do to protect health care providers during this pandemic? [20:49:44] All right. So this is part of why we need to be paying attention to what the CDC has to say and the advice of experts. Now, listening to science should not be a politically controversial idea. But in these times, it needs to be said and we need to make sure that the federal role for coordination and emergency emergency response is there not just to protect populations, but to protect those who protect the populations. [20:50:09] Often it is first responders and medical staff who are most at risk when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues. And this is exactly the kind of issue that's going to characterize the future of national security. Not only are we going to have to deal with military issues like we always have terrorism issues, which is what I specialized on in the military, but issues like cybersecurity and election security and global epidemics that don't respect national borders. [20:50:37] And at a moment like that more than ever before. We've got to make sure we have the resources lined up. We've got to make sure there is an action plan and the institutional resources to do it. You know, this White House actually dismantled the office in the National Security Council that was responsible for coordinating efforts in a pandemic. [20:50:55] The exact office that we be putting out, the guidance to a local public health department, that right now would be in a position to give guidance to the clinical staff on how to protect themselves from just these kinds of contagion. This is why we need to shore up in magnified, not subtract from the the apparatus that was already there. [20:51:13] But there needs to be fortified considerably and that backup local departments to look. We know how stretched local departments are. You know, a county health department should be able to set a strategy for dealing with issues like this. But so often they have so little resources. It's all they can do just to keep up with restaurant inspections and maybe flu shots. It's why I'm proposing that we put federal dollars into helping county health departments be the chief public health strategists, both for emergency and for day to day needs. [20:51:51] You are very composed and I enjoy your thoughtful answers. How do you resonate in a culture driven by sound bites and drama? This is from Jen. [20:52:00] Jennifer, by the way, it's your question. Give it give a holler so I can look at her. So I think precisely because I'm a pretty passionate person. I've developed a certain discipline making sure that that it doesn't get things don't get a rise out of me more than they have to. Partly something I learned as mayor where you are responsible not only for solving problems, but for setting a tone. [20:52:27] And I think most of us can agree that we could use a different tone coming out of the White House and what we got. Right. Now, the current media environment and online environment, they definitely reward certain things more than others and waving your arms gets rewarded and hollering gets rewarded and being outrageous gets rewarded. And that's part of how this president got elected. But I also don't think we're gonna be able to defeat this president with some equal and opposite Democratic version that has different policies, but the same style. [20:53:06] I think we're gonna have something totally different. [20:53:10] And what I found is that actually part of how we've been able to cut through has been to just take a different approach. You know, the American people, as a general rule, like to have kind of the opposite of whatever we just had as a matter of style in the White House. And I would argue I have something to offer in that regard. And this is a campaign that started with I mean, I don't have any personal fortune. [20:53:33] We didn't have a national large scale email list. I only had four people on the staff. When we got started. But what we had was this idea that our politics could be designed around a sense of belonging that we could build, where everybody could see themselves in the future we're trying to create. And that vision attracted supporters, it attracted organizers and a brilliant staff. And we were able to grow from that unlikely beginning to the position we're in now, where it's cut through a lot of the more traditional noisemaking that gets rewarded in politics. And so more than ever, I believe that approach is going to serve us well. And I think it'll serve us well in the White House to. [20:54:21] What is your plan to fix our educational system, how to teach a child that it wasn't never meant to educate them? Black and brown children specifically. And this is from our friends at the powerful parent network. [20:54:41] Well, thank you for coming here to share your concerns and let me begin by acknowledging that so many parents and in particular black and brown parents and children have been let down by our educational system. [20:54:54] There's no escaping that. [20:54:59] That is the consequence of segregation. It is the consequence of institutional racism. It is the constant consequence of the lack of economic empowerment for black and brown communities, which is why that's a big focus in our Frederick Douglass plan and it's a consequence of our inability to put the right resources into schools. [20:55:19] So what do we do about it? Well, first of all, let's put our money where our mouth is. [20:55:23] It's why schools in those areas where there is the greatest poverty and the greatest student need should be getting the most resources. [20:55:37] It means recognizing that education in the future may not look exactly like it did in the past. The world is changing. The workplace is changing. Experiences are changing. We need a new focus on things like social and emotional learning. We need new forms of problem-solving to be taught and we need to support that. [20:55:56] And I believe if we get this right, we will be supporting parents and teachers in ways that reinforce each other. [20:56:09] And I understand why this has parents frustrated with their options and looking for any way possible to make sure there are more options for their children. I also think that if we solve this the right way, put the right resources into it and make sure whatever innovations develop in nontraditional schools ultimately are used to support and lift up traditional schools to. [20:56:39] ALTERNA being let down. [20:56:50] Can you describe the moment you competently knew you were going to run for president? This is from Adam. [20:56:58] Well, it's it's not like you wake up one day and just think I would be president. At least I hope not. There'd be a terrible way to get into this. And I did not think when I was running for mayor that after two, if we had two successful terms governing the city of South Bend, that would be on to the White House. I'm mindful that there's probably no other time in the history of the republic when it would make sense for somebody like me to be doing something like this. [20:57:23] Well, what I also saw was a moment where we needed to bring a different kind of perspective to Washington, because we come to accept a certain level of political warfare from Washington that wasn't getting us there. I also noticed that my party was struggling to connect with communities in the so-called Rust Belt, like my hometown of SBN, a racially diverse, low income city that was shaken by the loss of factories and was trying to get back on its feet. And we found a new way forward without pretending that we could turn back the clock. [20:57:54] And you know, what I see is there are so many communities, mid-sized cities like mine, rural communities, even pockets of our biggest cities in the less fashionable zip codes that are looking for somebody to speak for them. I saw that there was a desire for a new generational voice in our party and. [20:58:18] You know, belonging to the generation, that was the first to experience school shootings that, you know, that that became widespread when I was a student and now we've had a second generation go through that, shame on us if we let there be a third we can act on. Belonging to the generation that served, provided a lot of troops after 9/11, first thing first time ever set foot in South Carolina was on a bus that took me to the vicinity of Fort Jackson for for training. [20:58:49] And now seeing that you could be old enough to deploy and have not been alive on 9/11. Realizing economically that our generation could be the first in history not to do better than our parents economically. If we don't change, then I began to realize that the voice that I represented was different from the others. Others who I respect, who I admire. But what I have to offer is just different. And. When you realize that you bring a perspective that's different than then you kind of have to step up. [20:59:18] And we didn't know if enough people would agree with me or not. But the only way to find out was to step forward and see what kind of support we could get. And then there was one other really important conversation, if you wanna talk about the moment that it became a green light. That's where you check with your spouse and see what he thinks. [20:59:36] And very important step. [20:59:44] And look, it's not we've been married for less than a year. This is not a great thing to do to your your first year of marriage. But in the end, he said, look, if if you promise two things, then we can do this together. One is that we will always be true to our values and what we believe in and what got us into this. [21:00:07] And the other is that we find a way to have some fun along the way. And we've had a lot of fun along the way. You know, we have we have what we call the rules of the road, which are the values that guide our campaign. I see a few folks wearing the T-shirt that has our rules on respect, belonging, truth, teamwork, boldness, responsibility, substance, discipline, excellence. [21:00:30] But the one we round out the list with is joy. And it is easy to forget the role of joy in Paul, especially politics these days. It can come down to a kind of grim determination sometimes. But you've got to find some joy in the fact that we're in the middle of the most important process going on in democracy in the world and that we reach out and connect with other people, as I hope some of you have in the community of supporters of this campaign, to build that sense of belonging that can show and not just tell what kind of White House we could create, what kind of country we could create. And this is our way of making good on that promise that I made as we were folding laundry and having one more conversation about whether this is a good idea. [21:01:13] So that's. [21:01:23] All right. Unfortunately, this is our last question. I know we were having so much fun, but the last question of the evening is with the highest deficit, this country has faced 21 children trillion. Children 2 21 trillion plus the large ticket items. Other candidates have proposed. How are you going to balance your policy priorities in the deficit? [21:01:49] Very important. And again, if there's your question, give a shout. I believe that, first of all, I believe my party has got to get more comfortable talking about deficits. [21:01:59] If you look at modern history, we've always already been the better ones at handling it, but we don't like to talk about it. It's not fashionable on our side of the aisle. [21:02:09] Probably because we're so tired of the deficit being used as an excuse to block investments that are needed. So I understand that. But we should be talking about this issue because it matters. And under this president, we've seen a trillion dollar deficit contributed to that 21 trillion dollar debt that runs the risk of crowding out the ability to fund the progressive priorities we care about from education to infrastructure to health. [21:02:31] So what do we do about it? Well, I'm pleased to report that when an outside group evaluated all of the different candidates plans, ours was the only one where if you did all the math on everything we think we need to spend and all the revenue we're going to raise has to come out ahead and it'll start reducing the deficit. [21:02:46] I think that's a good thing. [21:02:53] And there's two things we do in order to make that so first of all, we're smart about what we promise. [21:02:58] Don't get me wrong, we're pro proposing major investments. Really, major. I mean, bigger than we've seen in a presidential campaign in a very long time. Investments in our infrastructure, investments in making sure that we get ahead of the issue of climate change. But these are investments that will ultimately pay for themselves. [21:03:15] And we're also making sure that we constrain them a little bit. We figured out a way to get everybody health care. That's one and a half trillion dollars instead of 30 or 40. That's still a lot of money, but we can actually find that much money. [21:03:30] When it comes to college, I believe passionately in making sure college is affordable for everybody. But one difference in my plan is it's gonna be free for most Americans. But if you're the top income group that that tough group. I still wish you well in your studies, but I do need you to go ahead and pay tuition. [21:03:46] Because then we can save those dollars for other things. [21:03:50] So we're being a little more careful on the spending side. [21:03:53] The other thing is we're gonna be honest about revenue. We are in fact, going to have to raise revenue. [21:03:58] Now, it doesn't have to hit the middle class, but we need to take common sense steps so that when you got a company like Amazon making billions in profits and paying zero in taxes, I mean less in taxes than you and I did. [21:04:10] Something's off. We need to roll back the Trump corporate tax cut and insist that the wealthy pay their fair share. We do that. The deficit starts to shrink. [21:04:23] One more big thank you, NREL, for being our voice and guiding our conversation. Thank you. [21:04:28] And to everyone here. Thank you so much for being part of this. I got one more thing to ask of you. [21:04:35] And it is to bottle up whatever sense of hope propelled you into this room today with me and to spread it to those, you know, who maybe you're this close to walking away from it all, because I know how exhausting it has been to follow politics, to follow the news, to watch what was going on on the floor of the Senate during that impeachment trial. I understand how that is so exhausting that for some it may have created a temptation to switch it off and walk away, which is the last thing we can afford to do right now. [21:05:04] And the good news is it's 20/20 and we're voters and that means it. Yeah, the Senate was the jury then. But the verdict is up to us now. And we're going to have the last word. [21:05:17] So you got to take that sense of hope. [21:05:20] You wouldn't be here if there wasn't some sense of hope that it mattered who is in charge. I wouldn't be here either. There's a reason why they took the word hopeful and turned it into a noun and use it as another word for candidate. You ever notice out of a 20 hopeful? That's what I'm doing here. How fitting? Because running for office is an act of hope. It is an expression of hope to be here to step up, to help anybody run for office, to donate, to volunteer, to vote. [21:05:46] You are here as an act of hope. Can I look to you to spread that to those you know? [21:05:53] Are you ready for that Carolina sunrise, we put this White House behind us. Are you ready to make history together on Saturday, on Super Tuesday and all the way into November? Then with your help, I believe you will help me become the next president of the United States, and I will do everything I can to make you proud. Thank you for being here. Thank you for caring. Please keep spreading the word and let's give ourselves a lot to celebrate. Thank you. [21:06:22] Thank you. Thank you.
THE IRISH DERBY
Curragh, Republic of Ireland (Southern Ireland, Eire). <br/> <br/>GV. Crowd at Curragh racecourse, many with umbrellas. SV. Crowds around bookmakers. CU. Two young men. SV. Famous tipster Prince Monolulu shaking hands with small child. GV. Crowds around paddock. SV. Christmas Island parading in paddock playing up a little bit. SV. The paddock. SV. Relko parading, looking healthy. GV. The number board. GV. Horses parading on course. SV. Relko on left of picture parading. GV. The parade. SV. Relko prancing a bit. SV. Men looking through binoculars. CU. Man looking through binoculars. SCU. Woman looking through binoculars. GV. The horses at the start. Relko having been withdrawn, the tapes go up and they're off. CU. Woman looking through binoculars. GV. Horses coming round final bend into the straight. SCU. Men watching. GV. Inside the final furlong, Ragusa in front followed by Vic Mo Chroi and Tiger. Ragusa passes the post first with Vic Mo Chroi second and Tiger third. GV. Ragusa being led in, jockey Garnet Bougoure dismounts. SV. Sir Gordon Richards shaking hands with Mrs Mullion, wife of the owner of Ragusa. SV. Ragusa with trainer Paddy Prendergast.
SNCF: reimbursements that are falling behind
FR3 / France 3
PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 2020
TVU 25 PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 022720 2020 TIMECODES FROM ORIGINAL FEED Former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg talked about the coronavirus at the top of his remarks in Rock Hill, South Carolina calling for Trump administration to change ACA to qualify Coronavirus as preventive covered service. (will send a fuller note after the event ends) 185749 Before we're talking politics I do need to address what's in the news, because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for national and global response to the threat as a coronavirus is beyond all politics. And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership, and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided Above all, by science, and not by politics and why 185837 important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage, do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act when it comes to treatment or screening the same as we would with a flu shot. Everybody 185912 screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that you further further treatments, new approaches and ultimately that seem to be developed and this is where leadership is so important, is why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States, that the public and private sectors are coordinated on development solutions. And it's why we need international leadership, to make sure that countries around the world are coordinated to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous. 185957 Will be refeeding the entire remarks later in the evening. Former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg talked about the coronavirus at the top of his remarks in Rock Hill, South Carolina calling for Trump administration to change ACA to qualify Coronavirus as preventive covered service. 185749 Before we're talking politics I do need to address what's in the news, because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for national and global response to the threat as a coronavirus is beyond all politics. And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership, and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided Above all, by science, and not by politics and why 185837 important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage, do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act when it comes to treatment or screening the same as we would with a flu shot. Everybody 185912 screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that you further further treatments, new approaches and ultimately that seem to be developed and this is where leadership is so important, is why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States, that the public and private sectors are coordinated on development solutions. And it's why we need international leadership, to make sure that countries around the world are coordinated to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous. 185957 He was asked about protecting healthcare professionals from Coronavirus and said: Is should not be a politically controversial idea, but in these times it needs to be set. And we need to make sure that the federal role for coordination and emergency or emergency response is there not just to protect populations, but to protect those who protect the populations. Often it is first responders and even men who are most at risk when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues. And this is exactly the kind of issue that's going to characterize the future of national security. Not only are we going to have to deal with military issues like we always have terrorism issues which is what I specialize on military issues like cyber security and election security and global epidemics that no respect national borders and won't like that. More than ever before. We've got to make sure we have the resources lined up we gotta make sure there is an action plan, and the institutional resources together, you know, this White House actually dismantle the office and the National Security Council, who was responsible for coordinating the exact opposite we'd be putting out the pads to a local public health department that right now would be in a position to give guidance to the clinical staff on how to protect themselves from just these kinds of education. This is why we need to shore up in magnify not subtract from the apparatus that was already there, but there needs to be fortified consider, and then backup local apartments with we know how stretched local departments. You know the county health department should be able to set a strategy for dealing with issues like this but so yeah so little resources, it's all they can do just to keep up with restaurant inspections COLOR: I wanted to note that this event like some of the others this week were majority white. I counted 38 black voters in the crowd out of 900 people that the campaign says was in attendance. The majority of the black people were from a parent education group who are in the state traveling around lobbying 2020 candidates. Rock Hill does have a sizable African American population in the city, the county and neighboring areas. When I drove to the event and walked in many of the license plates were from North Carolina which isn't a surprise Rock Hill isn't that far from the border. Something I also want to note was that Chasten Buttigieg did not hit the stage as he usual at his bigger campaign rallies. Justin and I haven't seen Chasten at any of the South Carolina campaign stops. And to the best of my knowlege he hasn't appeared at a campaign event this year. He was however in Charleston for the Debate. Chasten arrived in the state on Sunday, and just so happened to be on my flight from DC to South Carolina. **OTR: A source close to the campaign told me and Briana Stewart last year that Chasten does not like South Carolina and told the campaign he did not want to campaign down here END OF OTR *** TVU 25 PETE BUTTIGIEG ROCK HILL SC TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 022720 2020 [20:32:29] Amy, for your support. [20:32:30] Thank you audio for the swift response time. [20:32:35] Thank you, Jim, for the work of the party. I always say that the county party committee is the unsung hero of the Democratic Party, so thanks to watch you for what you and everybody here is doing. As an Indiana Democrat, I insist that there is no such thing as a permanently red state or county or precinct. I know that you understand that. [20:33:03] Before talking politics, I do need to address what's in the news today because I know it's on all of our minds and what's going on with the need for a national and global response to the threat of the Corona virus is beyond all politics. [20:33:19] And it's an example of what is at stake in presidential leadership and in making sure that we have the right strategies as a country going forward to keep us safe. [20:33:30] And so I believe it is particularly important at a time like this that the strategy of the United States government to keep us safe is guided above all by science and not by politics, which is why we need leaders who listen to science. [20:33:51] It's also going to be important that we make sure that barriers like cost and coverage do not get in the way of the opportunity to delay the spread of infection and making sure that we have treatment, which is why I am calling on the administration to classify this as eligible as a preventive covered service under the Affordable Care Act. [20:34:14] When it comes to treatment or screening, the same as we would with a flu shot, we've got to make sure everybody is covered. There are steps around screening and around treatment that can be taken right away. And then there are steps that will need to be taken in the future in order to make sure that few first further treatments, new approaches and ultimately a vaccine can be developed. And this is where leadership is so important. [20:34:43] It's why we need presidential leadership to make sure within the United States that the public and private sectors are coordinating on developing solutions. And it's why we need international leadership to make sure that countries around the globe are coordinating to deal with a virus that does not care what country it is in and is equally dangerous to everybody. [20:35:04] So let's get this right and let's put this beyond politics. [20:35:12] So having said a little bit about that picture, let me invite you to form another picture. [20:35:17] That is the one that's always on my mind when I think about what's at stake in these elections. If you've ever seen me speak, you might know that it's the picture that I always want to invite fellow Americans to envision, because it really is in our future. And it's the picture of what it'll be like the first time that the sun comes up over the Carolinas. And Donald Trump is no longer the president of the United States. [20:35:45] Are we ready for that? [20:35:50] Sooner the better. [20:36:01] I mean, wouldn't it be nice just to put the chaos behind us? Aren't you're ready to put the exhaustion behind us? Would it be good to put the tweets behind us? And I don't even think that's a partisan statement anymore. [20:36:19] I'm talking not only to fellow diehard Democrats, but quite a few independents and a healthy number of what I like to call future former Republicans who feel just as passionate as I do about making that happen. [20:36:32] And you are welcome in this effort. [20:36:34] If you are crossing party lines to be here, because we need to make sure that we gather together the American people in a vision for something better no matter how you voted in the past. And I don't think we're defined by what we've done in the past. I think we're defined by our view toward the future. [20:36:53] Now, if we want to bring that day about sooner rather than later, though, a lot depends on the decisions that are about to be made, including the decisions that will be made in the next few days, bearing on who the nominee of our party of my party is going to be. [20:37:09] And that's why I'm here. One more time to look you in the eye and to ask you for your support. [20:37:15] If you are already on board, I'm here to thank you and urge you to spread that word to everybody you know. [20:37:37] Pete's looking pretty strong. [20:37:46] If you're still making up your mind, though, then I'm here to try to convince you and to offer a picture of where it is, I believe that we can go together because so much is in your hands. [20:37:58] And I know how seriously you take that decision that especially in these early states is so important. So I want to begin by inviting you to. [20:38:17] For example, president who likes to talk about the forgotten men and women and says that he cares about the working class. But then if you look at the economic policies, the only economic promises kept has been to cut taxes for corporations and the wealthiest among us. Don't you think he ought to be held to account by somebody who is not a millionaire and actually lives in the industrial Midwest and can speak to what it would look like to have an economy that works for us? [20:38:49] We got a president who likes to cloak himself in the language of religion. [20:38:54] This president. Don't you think it would make sense for him to be held to account by somebody who can insist to fellow believers that God does not belong to a political party in the United States? [20:39:15] This is a country that belongs to people of every religion and of no religion equally. [20:39:20] And I think upholding that is perfectly compatible with being a person of faith, calling out to other people of faith. [20:39:32] And don't you think a president who likes to talk tough, likes to beat his chest and throw himself military parades, but avoided serving when it was his turn? Don't you think it would make sense for him to have to confront on a debate stage a veteran who can remind him why pardoning war criminals and punishing war heroes is not the action of a patriot? [20:40:06] I'm ready to go toe to toe with this president. I'm looking forward to it. [20:40:21] Now, that is a real difference, there's a real difference in approach, though, on how I want to do this. [20:40:27] That's different from my friend Senator Sanders. I respect the ideals that he's speaking about, but I believe at a time like this, we've got to earn the presidency by calling people in, not by calling people names online. [20:40:41] We've got to build out our majority by making sure we have solutions that harness and galvanize that American majority, not polarize. [20:40:53] And I would argue at a moment like this, what Americans are looking for is not only a president who can lead us forward on policy, but also a president whose style makes it possible to turn on the TV, look at the White House and actually feel your blood pressure go down a little bit stead of up through the roof. That's part one of offering to. [20:41:16] But here's the really good news. There is a pretty healthy American majority that wants to see a new president that agrees on who we against. But there is a bigger majority that can agree on what it is we are for where we need to take this country. And it is in the name of harnessing that majority that we built this campaign. [20:41:36] For example, the American people already agree that we must act to ensure that there is no such thing as an uninsured American. And we can do that right now with Medicare for all who want it. Right now, we got an American majority that understands that part of how we can honor our troops is to make sure that they are not deployed into endless war and to honor our veterans when they come home too, by taking care of them. [20:42:04] We see that right now. We got American majority right now that wants to see wages rise, expects corporations to be held accountable and stands with workers so that we can see to it that one job is enough in the United States of America. Whether you've got a college degree or not. There is already a healthy American majority insisting that we come together to reform the immigration system. [20:42:37] Recognizing that immigration is part of the lifeblood of the United States of America. A growing coalition that insists that we take action right now to ensure that your race has no bearing on your health or your wealth or your access to educational opportunities or your experience with law enforcement. [20:43:00] We got to act now to make that a reality. [20:43:09] We've got to have right now a way to awaken that American majority that knows what is at stake in supporting the next generation and those who educate them by insisting that the next secretary of education be one who actually believes in public education and supports our teachers. [20:43:33] We see the opportunity to do this right now and we got to act fast to make this happen. [20:43:40] These things can't wait. They can't wait 10 years. They can't wait four years. And I'm meeting people everywhere I go who remind me of what's at stake sometimes at campaign events, sometimes just by chance. Not that long ago, I met somebody who I had served with overseas. I just ran into her by chance at the airport. I had not seen her since we were both in Afghanistan, hadn't seen her since she was injured in an insider attack. And when I asked her how she was doing, I saw her walking down the concourse. She's wearing a sweatshirt from there, a t shirt from the Wounded Warrior Project that said some assembly required. [20:44:18] And she picked up her Ernie and tapped on the part of her leg. They couldn't save on the prosthetic and said, you know, the Navy, fix me up just fine and then let me know. [20:44:25] She's looking forward to her next deployment. [20:44:29] Because our troops will do whatever is required of them by the American people. They can't wait for us to have a commander in chief who actually cares about what is going on in the military. [20:44:49] I met a mother at a campaign event not long ago who let me know she was fearing for the life of her son because she cannot get through a wait list to get him the attention that he needs for a mental illness. [20:45:00] The time has come for us to demonstrate that we know that mental illnesses and substance use deserve to be discussed as openly and treated as readily as any physical issue. [20:45:13] We're already there and we can't wait to do something about it because lives are on the line. [20:45:24] But the focus on meeting remind me the six some of them aren't even voters, some of them aren't even old enough yet to vote. [20:45:30] They're the ones who really get my attention. I had an 11 year old come to an event to mine, raise his hand and ask about prescription drug affordability policy. [20:45:40] I thought. Smart kid. [20:45:43] And he was. But the reason he was asking was not that he was an emerging health care policy buff. He's asking because he's worried about how he'll be able to afford insulin when he grows up and leaves home and tries to go out on his own. He's worried about this at the age of 11. [20:46:00] This shouldn't be his problem and he can't wait for us to act to make sure there's no such thing as an unaffordable prescription in the United States of America. [20:46:16] Had a 13 year old come to an event, let me know that she had purchased or asked her parents to purchase for Christmas, asked for a bulletproof backpack. That was what was on her mind going into Christmas season. [20:46:31] And she cannot wait for us to act to demonstrate that we get that the Second Amendment is not an excuse to do nothing whatsoever to protect her life and to protect this country from gun violence. [20:46:42] We've got to act. And Democrats, Independents and Republicans know it. [20:46:52] And then I think about the 10 year old who came to one of my events, let me know that he'd been elected mayor of his school. I'm not sure what that means, but that's the office he holds. [20:47:01] And he pointed out very politely that he is planning to be here in the year twenty one hundred. And that when he is, he'll be looking back on these years that we're in right now to see whether we made the decisions necessary so that the climate would be one where he and his future kids and grandkids could thrive. [20:47:21] They can't wait for us to act to lead the world in doing something about climate change before it destroys economic and life opportunities for the next generation. None of this can wait. [20:47:34] And the good news is we don't have to wait because the American people are there. We just got to make sure that we get Washington working a little more like our best run cities and towns run the other way around. [20:47:46] We got to make sure that if an idea commands a majority among the American people, that that will actually lead to a majority in the American Congress. By presidential leadership. And that is why I'm running for this office. [20:48:00] I didn't seek the presidency because I got it into my head one day that I'd like to occupy it. I'm seeking this office because of a belief, a conviction about what it is for. I believe the presidency has a purpose and that the purpose of the presidency is not to glorify the president. [20:48:17] It is to unify and empower the American people to do these big things. [20:48:20] That's why I'm asking for your vote. [20:48:37] And that's what everybody here has a chance to make happen on Saturday. [20:48:41] Or if you've if you've made the great journey from over the border from North Carolina, you've got to wait until Tuesday. [20:48:47] But we need your help to. [20:48:52] You can't even call it Super Tuesday anymore, it's just next Tuesday and we're going to need help there, too. So our numbers have grown a little bit since I first turned up about a year ago trying to get known, but it's still never too big of a room for conversation. So we have gathered up your questions as you were coming in. [20:49:09] We've put them in our famous fishbowl. And I'd like you to welcome back to the stage, one of our great team members, Oriol Brandee, who's going to guide the discussion in moderate, be your voice. I'm very biased. But don't we have the best team of organizers and volunteers and staff and leaders? [20:49:35] Hi, Ray. [20:49:37] This is a good one. What would you do to protect health care providers during this pandemic? [20:49:44] All right. So this is part of why we need to be paying attention to what the CDC has to say and the advice of experts. Now, listening to science should not be a politically controversial idea. But in these times, it needs to be said and we need to make sure that the federal role for coordination and emergency emergency response is there not just to protect populations, but to protect those who protect the populations. [20:50:09] Often it is first responders and medical staff who are most at risk when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues. And this is exactly the kind of issue that's going to characterize the future of national security. Not only are we going to have to deal with military issues like we always have terrorism issues, which is what I specialized on in the military, but issues like cybersecurity and election security and global epidemics that don't respect national borders. [20:50:37] And at a moment like that more than ever before. We've got to make sure we have the resources lined up. We've got to make sure there is an action plan and the institutional resources to do it. You know, this White House actually dismantled the office in the National Security Council that was responsible for coordinating efforts in a pandemic. [20:50:55] The exact office that we be putting out, the guidance to a local public health department, that right now would be in a position to give guidance to the clinical staff on how to protect themselves from just these kinds of contagion. This is why we need to shore up in magnified, not subtract from the the apparatus that was already there. [20:51:13] But there needs to be fortified considerably and that backup local departments to look. We know how stretched local departments are. You know, a county health department should be able to set a strategy for dealing with issues like this. But so often they have so little resources. It's all they can do just to keep up with restaurant inspections and maybe flu shots. It's why I'm proposing that we put federal dollars into helping county health departments be the chief public health strategists, both for emergency and for day to day needs. [20:51:51] You are very composed and I enjoy your thoughtful answers. How do you resonate in a culture driven by sound bites and drama? This is from Jen. [20:52:00] Jennifer, by the way, it's your question. Give it give a holler so I can look at her. So I think precisely because I'm a pretty passionate person. I've developed a certain discipline making sure that that it doesn't get things don't get a rise out of me more than they have to. Partly something I learned as mayor where you are responsible not only for solving problems, but for setting a tone. [20:52:27] And I think most of us can agree that we could use a different tone coming out of the White House and what we got. Right. Now, the current media environment and online environment, they definitely reward certain things more than others and waving your arms gets rewarded and hollering gets rewarded and being outrageous gets rewarded. And that's part of how this president got elected. But I also don't think we're gonna be able to defeat this president with some equal and opposite Democratic version that has different policies, but the same style. [20:53:06] I think we're gonna have something totally different. [20:53:10] And what I found is that actually part of how we've been able to cut through has been to just take a different approach. You know, the American people, as a general rule, like to have kind of the opposite of whatever we just had as a matter of style in the White House. And I would argue I have something to offer in that regard. And this is a campaign that started with I mean, I don't have any personal fortune. [20:53:33] We didn't have a national large scale email list. I only had four people on the staff. When we got started. But what we had was this idea that our politics could be designed around a sense of belonging that we could build, where everybody could see themselves in the future we're trying to create. And that vision attracted supporters, it attracted organizers and a brilliant staff. And we were able to grow from that unlikely beginning to the position we're in now, where it's cut through a lot of the more traditional noisemaking that gets rewarded in politics. And so more than ever, I believe that approach is going to serve us well. And I think it'll serve us well in the White House to. [20:54:21] What is your plan to fix our educational system, how to teach a child that it wasn't never meant to educate them? Black and brown children specifically. And this is from our friends at the powerful parent network. [20:54:41] Well, thank you for coming here to share your concerns and let me begin by acknowledging that so many parents and in particular black and brown parents and children have been let down by our educational system. [20:54:54] There's no escaping that. [20:54:59] That is the consequence of segregation. It is the consequence of institutional racism. It is the constant consequence of the lack of economic empowerment for black and brown communities, which is why that's a big focus in our Frederick Douglass plan and it's a consequence of our inability to put the right resources into schools. [20:55:19] So what do we do about it? Well, first of all, let's put our money where our mouth is. [20:55:23] It's why schools in those areas where there is the greatest poverty and the greatest student need should be getting the most resources. [20:55:37] It means recognizing that education in the future may not look exactly like it did in the past. The world is changing. The workplace is changing. Experiences are changing. We need a new focus on things like social and emotional learning. We need new forms of problem-solving to be taught and we need to support that. [20:55:56] And I believe if we get this right, we will be supporting parents and teachers in ways that reinforce each other. [20:56:09] And I understand why this has parents frustrated with their options and looking for any way possible to make sure there are more options for their children. I also think that if we solve this the right way, put the right resources into it and make sure whatever innovations develop in nontraditional schools ultimately are used to support and lift up traditional schools to. [20:56:39] ALTERNA being let down. [20:56:50] Can you describe the moment you competently knew you were going to run for president? This is from Adam. [20:56:58] Well, it's it's not like you wake up one day and just think I would be president. At least I hope not. There'd be a terrible way to get into this. And I did not think when I was running for mayor that after two, if we had two successful terms governing the city of South Bend, that would be on to the White House. I'm mindful that there's probably no other time in the history of the republic when it would make sense for somebody like me to be doing something like this. [20:57:23] Well, what I also saw was a moment where we needed to bring a different kind of perspective to Washington, because we come to accept a certain level of political warfare from Washington that wasn't getting us there. I also noticed that my party was struggling to connect with communities in the so-called Rust Belt, like my hometown of SBN, a racially diverse, low income city that was shaken by the loss of factories and was trying to get back on its feet. And we found a new way forward without pretending that we could turn back the clock. [20:57:54] And you know, what I see is there are so many communities, mid-sized cities like mine, rural communities, even pockets of our biggest cities in the less fashionable zip codes that are looking for somebody to speak for them. I saw that there was a desire for a new generational voice in our party and. [20:58:18] You know, belonging to the generation, that was the first to experience school shootings that, you know, that that became widespread when I was a student and now we've had a second generation go through that, shame on us if we let there be a third we can act on. Belonging to the generation that served, provided a lot of troops after 9/11, first thing first time ever set foot in South Carolina was on a bus that took me to the vicinity of Fort Jackson for for training. [20:58:49] And now seeing that you could be old enough to deploy and have not been alive on 9/11. Realizing economically that our generation could be the first in history not to do better than our parents economically. If we don't change, then I began to realize that the voice that I represented was different from the others. Others who I respect, who I admire. But what I have to offer is just different. And. When you realize that you bring a perspective that's different than then you kind of have to step up. [20:59:18] And we didn't know if enough people would agree with me or not. But the only way to find out was to step forward and see what kind of support we could get. And then there was one other really important conversation, if you wanna talk about the moment that it became a green light. That's where you check with your spouse and see what he thinks. [20:59:36] And very important step. [20:59:44] And look, it's not we've been married for less than a year. This is not a great thing to do to your your first year of marriage. But in the end, he said, look, if if you promise two things, then we can do this together. One is that we will always be true to our values and what we believe in and what got us into this. [21:00:07] And the other is that we find a way to have some fun along the way. And we've had a lot of fun along the way. You know, we have we have what we call the rules of the road, which are the values that guide our campaign. I see a few folks wearing the T-shirt that has our rules on respect, belonging, truth, teamwork, boldness, responsibility, substance, discipline, excellence. [21:00:30] But the one we round out the list with is joy. And it is easy to forget the role of joy in Paul, especially politics these days. It can come down to a kind of grim determination sometimes. But you've got to find some joy in the fact that we're in the middle of the most important process going on in democracy in the world and that we reach out and connect with other people, as I hope some of you have in the community of supporters of this campaign, to build that sense of belonging that can show and not just tell what kind of White House we could create, what kind of country we could create. And this is our way of making good on that promise that I made as we were folding laundry and having one more conversation about whether this is a good idea. [21:01:13] So that's. [21:01:23] All right. Unfortunately, this is our last question. I know we were having so much fun, but the last question of the evening is with the highest deficit, this country has faced 21 children trillion. Children 2 21 trillion plus the large ticket items. Other candidates have proposed. How are you going to balance your policy priorities in the deficit? [21:01:49] Very important. And again, if there's your question, give a shout. I believe that, first of all, I believe my party has got to get more comfortable talking about deficits. [21:01:59] If you look at modern history, we've always already been the better ones at handling it, but we don't like to talk about it. It's not fashionable on our side of the aisle. [21:02:09] Probably because we're so tired of the deficit being used as an excuse to block investments that are needed. So I understand that. But we should be talking about this issue because it matters. And under this president, we've seen a trillion dollar deficit contributed to that 21 trillion dollar debt that runs the risk of crowding out the ability to fund the progressive priorities we care about from education to infrastructure to health. [21:02:31] So what do we do about it? Well, I'm pleased to report that when an outside group evaluated all of the different candidates plans, ours was the only one where if you did all the math on everything we think we need to spend and all the revenue we're going to raise has to come out ahead and it'll start reducing the deficit. [21:02:46] I think that's a good thing. [21:02:53] And there's two things we do in order to make that so first of all, we're smart about what we promise. [21:02:58] Don't get me wrong, we're pro proposing major investments. Really, major. I mean, bigger than we've seen in a presidential campaign in a very long time. Investments in our infrastructure, investments in making sure that we get ahead of the issue of climate change. But these are investments that will ultimately pay for themselves. [21:03:15] And we're also making sure that we constrain them a little bit. We figured out a way to get everybody health care. That's one and a half trillion dollars instead of 30 or 40. That's still a lot of money, but we can actually find that much money. [21:03:30] When it comes to college, I believe passionately in making sure college is affordable for everybody. But one difference in my plan is it's gonna be free for most Americans. But if you're the top income group that that tough group. I still wish you well in your studies, but I do need you to go ahead and pay tuition. [21:03:46] Because then we can save those dollars for other things. [21:03:50] So we're being a little more careful on the spending side. [21:03:53] The other thing is we're gonna be honest about revenue. We are in fact, going to have to raise revenue. [21:03:58] Now, it doesn't have to hit the middle class, but we need to take common sense steps so that when you got a company like Amazon making billions in profits and paying zero in taxes, I mean less in taxes than you and I did. [21:04:10] Something's off. We need to roll back the Trump corporate tax cut and insist that the wealthy pay their fair share. We do that. The deficit starts to shrink. [21:04:23] One more big thank you, NREL, for being our voice and guiding our conversation. Thank you. [21:04:28] And to everyone here. Thank you so much for being part of this. I got one more thing to ask of you. [21:04:35] And it is to bottle up whatever sense of hope propelled you into this room today with me and to spread it to those, you know, who maybe you're this close to walking away from it all, because I know how exhausting it has been to follow politics, to follow the news, to watch what was going on on the floor of the Senate during that impeachment trial. I understand how that is so exhausting that for some it may have created a temptation to switch it off and walk away, which is the last thing we can afford to do right now. [21:05:04] And the good news is it's 20/20 and we're voters and that means it. Yeah, the Senate was the jury then. But the verdict is up to us now. And we're going to have the last word. [21:05:17] So you got to take that sense of hope. [21:05:20] You wouldn't be here if there wasn't some sense of hope that it mattered who is in charge. I wouldn't be here either. There's a reason why they took the word hopeful and turned it into a noun and use it as another word for candidate. You ever notice out of a 20 hopeful? That's what I'm doing here. How fitting? Because running for office is an act of hope. It is an expression of hope to be here to step up, to help anybody run for office, to donate, to volunteer, to vote. [21:05:46] You are here as an act of hope. Can I look to you to spread that to those you know? [21:05:53] Are you ready for that Carolina sunrise, we put this White House behind us. Are you ready to make history together on Saturday, on Super Tuesday and all the way into November? Then with your help, I believe you will help me become the next president of the United States, and I will do everything I can to make you proud. Thank you for being here. Thank you for caring. Please keep spreading the word and let's give ourselves a lot to celebrate. Thank you. [21:06:22] Thank you. Thank you.
AME-31 16mm
HOME MOVIES CASTLE FILMS - COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NEWS IN A NUTSHELL
News in a Nutshell. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Paris and Hanover' - (France and Germany) Various shots of the football match between Arsenal and Racing Club. C/U of man clapping and smoking a cigar. Arsenal win by 5 goals to nil. Various shots of rugby match between Germany and France, crowds watch. France win by 6 points to 3. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Pen Enys Point' (St. Ives, Cornwall). M/S of the "Bessemer City" after it has been run aground and split in two. Various shots of the two halves of the ship a short distance away from each other, the camera pans down each piece. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'London E.C.' - L/S of students from Northampton Engineering College holding their rag. They walk along in a line wearing handkerchiefs on their heads, they shout then start throwing soot and eggs at each other. Various shots as they walk around in a long line chanting, then run away into the college on Clerkenwell Road. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Olympia' (London) - M/S of Lord William Richard Morris Nuffield smiling and walking up to shake a man's hand. M/S profile of him, he is there to open the Cycle Show. L/S of the crowd. M/S of him making a speech, various shots of different bicycles on show. M/S of Lord Nuffield on a bicycle touring the show. M/S of a bicycle with three seats, and a very thin model man pedalling. M/S of small motorcycle and car. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Millwall' M/S of Italian ship "Iris" in Millwall dock, with firemen onboard, various shots as they thread their hoses down the burning ship into the hold which contains cattle food. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Rome' (Italy) - L/S of huge parade through Rome to celebrate 14th anniversary of fascist march on the city. Hundreds of banners are being waved. L/S of crowds running to hear Benito Mussolini's speech, camera pans across them. M/S of Mussolini pinning a medal to a soldier. L/S of platform, L/S of crowds, M/S of Mussolini on balcony. Various shots of crowds waving. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Wanstead and Liverpool' - Bonfire night approaches. L/S of nannies pushing children in big prams, others ride on a horse and cart. L/S of a huge bonfire with children walking around. M/S as they climb to the top to add bits of extra wood. M/S of little girls watching. M/S of a boy leading an elephant along, she is holding a stick. M/S as she walks along with the branch. C/U of the branch in her trunk, she drops it on the bonfire, children wave and cheer. M/S as she walks along pulling wood for the bonfire on cart attached to her with chains. <br/> <br/>Intertitle - 'Washington' (America, USA) - Cardinal Pacelli visits America. L/S as Cardinals emerge from church, people bend and kiss Cardinal Pacelli's hand. Various shots of him as he walks along. M/S of young priests walking with him. C/U of his face. M/S as he rides away in a car with another Cardinal. M/S as he greets people. M/S's as he places a wreath on a tomb. M/S as he walks up and enters a big house. M/S as people greet him and kiss his hand. Various shots of him on the lawn. <br/> <br/>Note: the soundtrack to this last item is missing. The items 'Chancellor Von Schuschnigg virtual dictator of Austria', 'Roosevelt re-elected by enormous majority'. Hammond's wonderful cricket performance in Australia', and 'Christmas Pie trailer' are missing from this edition.
SNCF: the delay ... in refunds
A2 / France 2
DN-B-321 Beta SP
NEWSREELS
REVIEWS 1957 (aka REVIEW OF THE YEAR - 1957)
Full title reads: "Reviews 1957". <br/> <br/>GV From ship, ice flows on water. CU Bow of ship ploughing through ice. GV Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's ship in the Antarctic ploughing through ice. SV Duke with beard, looking over side of ship. Top View Seal moving along ice. CU Duke wearing duffle coat. <br/> <br/>SV Lion and Lioness laying under tree in South Africa. GV Ext. South African observatory. Angle shot Int. with telescope in observatory. SV Man looking through telescope. CU Moon in the sky. LV Int. Man at control panel operating huge radio telescope at Jodrell Bank. Angle shot Telescope. SV Machinery operating telescope on rails. Aerial shot Jodrell radio telescope. SV American Army doctor Major Simons with container lowered over him. GV Balloon ascending. He went 19 miles up. AS Balloon ascending. GV Ext. Moscow, Russia / Soviet Union. SV Sputnik dog - Laika - being put into container. CU Girl assistant. SV Sputnik II dog being put into container GV Ext. rocket being fired. CU Rocket ascending. CU Sputnik dog inside rocket. LV People in Moscow looking through small telescopes. GV Satellite going across sky. <br/> <br/>GV Rockets being raised for firing position (American). GV American rockets being raised. LV English rocket being prepared for firing by British troops. CU Sergeant giving instructions. CU Rocket. GV Bloodhound rocket being fired. LV Rocket ascending boosters come away. SV Sir William Penny arriving in South Australia. SV Valiant bomber carrying H bomb. SV Men standing with backs to explosion, terrific flash comes over screen - Christmas Island atomic test bomb. GV Hydrogen bomb exploding & mushroom effect. <br/> <br/>SV Deep freeze mother with her baby Stephen sitting beside her husband and elder child. CU Deep freeze mother holding baby. SV Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh arriving at Cheam School with Prince Charles stepping out of car & being greeted. SV Boys from Cheam school watching. CU Prince Charles standing by the Queen. <br/> <br/>LV Sir Anthony Eden walking to his ship for health trip to New Zealand (after his resignation) (A young Edward 'Ted' Heath is behind them). SV Eden and Lady Clarissa Eden walk to gangway. GV Port Said, Egypt. SV Evacuation of British troops from Suez Canal Zone. Troops marching on to tank carrier. CU United Nations flag flying from stern of ship. GV Night, leaving Port Said. Statute of De Lesseps. GV Duchess of Kent being escorted to platform during Gold Coast / Ghana Independence Celebrations. LV Locals watching. GV Night. Cheering. LV Premiere Kwame Nkruma dancing on platform. GV Riots in Paris, France over Algeria - cars burning. CU Car burning. Petrol burning in road. SV Police rioting with civilians. LV Late Aga Khan being weighed in diamonds. SV Son Aly talking to Indian. GV Mosque. GV Muslims at prayer. SV New Aga Khan - Karim, son of Aly Khan. GV Russian troops crossing Red Square, Moscow. SV Russian leaders 1. to r. Zhukov, Bulganin, Khruschev, Malenkov, Molotov and two others. SV Russian troops parading. SV Zhukov on Yugoslavian aerodrome. <br/> <br/>SV Queen presenting Althea Gibson with trophy at Wimbledon Tennis tournament. SV Spectators applauding. SV Althea Gibson being kissed by Darlene Hard. SV Danish girl Greta Anderson treading wearily out of water and almost falls over after swimming English Channel. CU She tries to climb out on her hands and knees. SV Half collapsing she is held up by a man. GV Derek Ibbotson taking the lead in his record-breaking mile. GV Crowd applauding. CU Ibbotson. <br/> <br/>SV Stanley Matthews surrounded by people being crowned King of Soccer in Africa. CU Stanley looking worried. CU Pan CBE smiling Stanley at Buckingham Palace after receiving award. GV Crowds surging forward on golf course at Lindrick watching Ryder Cup. SV Dai Rees making winning putt the strikes ball in hole and shakes hands with American. GV Start of Motor racing Grand Prix at Monza, Italy. LV Cars come round bend. GV Cars come down straight. LV Car No 20 being pursued by Stirling Moss No 18. SV Crowd looking on. LV No. 18 car coming in, Moss wins, crowds round car. CU Moss & Katie Molson, he has laurel wreath round neck and she holds helmet. SV Moss & Katie after wedding, he kisses her. <br/> <br/>GV Fire raging in shop in London's Oxford Street, upper floors alight. SV Injured woman being carried towards ambulance. GV Fire leaping out of first floor window. GV Bus crashed against wall of bank. SV Firemen jacking back of bus up to release trapped people. SV Body on stretcher being taken away. SV Bus on pavement. GV Int. Mass congregation for enthronement of Dr William Godfrey as Archbishop of Westminster. GV Sailing ship Pamir putting to sea. VS Boys working on deck. GV Sun going behind cloud. VS of ship in heavy storm. GV Collapsed house, large hole in road. SV Badly damaged house. <br/> <br/>GV New York GV Boat carrying Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh coming across to United States of America (USA). GV Queen on deck surrounded by officials, ship 'Mayflower II' in dock. CU Person in Pilgrim costume standing on board. CU Queen smiling, man points. SV Sign 'Welcome to the City of New York'. GV Procession down Broadway. AS Ticker tape being thrown out of window. GV Queen's car going along. AS Tape thrown out of windows with Union Jacks & Stars & stripes being flown from balcony. SV Queen on top of Empire State Building. AV New York. <br/> <br/>GV White House, Washington DC, United States of America (USA). CU President Dwight D Eisenhower sitting at desk. <br/> <br/>GV Prime Minister Harold Macmillan & Prime Minister Felix Gaillard in France. <br/> <br/>GV Oil field. SV King of Morocco walking with Mr Bourguiba. <br/> <br/>GV Street riots in France, police waving batons. GV Paris - River Seine & Eiffel tower. <br/> <br/>GV Queen Elizabeth II's boat pulls away from bank of River Seine SV. President Rene Coty & Queen with Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh sitting on board. GV Dancing by side of river. GV People in period costumes & bonfires alight. GV Mass of fireworks going up. SV Queen, Coty & Duke smiling & chatting. <br/> <br/>(Neg.)
PETE BUTTIGIEG SPARKS NV RALLY REFEED ABC UNI 2020
TVU 29 PETE BUTTIGIEG SPARKS NV RALLY REFEED ABC UNI 021620 2020 SPARKS, NV - Pete Buttigieg packed another high school gym with over 1,000 people tonight. According to the campaign, 1,238 were shoulder-to-shoulder in the room. Buttigieg took a trip down memory lane at the start of his rally at Sparks High School, talking about his notable trips to the area this campaign cycle. He brought up his trip in September when he experienced his first snow of the season and the time he held a rally in this very same gym and the lights shut off while he was on stage. "We were having a great conversation I'm sure some of you were here we were talking about where the country was headed. I was answering questions, and then lights went out and the sound went out and I summon my best deep voice and tried to project out off the brick walls in this space. And nobody could see anything and then somebody put their cell phone flashlight on and then somebody else did it and then somebody else did and pretty soon. This whole room was lit up and we could see each other just fine." [232946] The energy in the room today was electrifying throughout this whole rally. Supporters kept waving their posters around (camera was blocked countless times) and you could feel the vibration in the room when people started stomping on the hardwood floors of this gym after Buttigieg delivered his classic line of imagining the day Donald Trump is no longer the president of the United States. [233112] Buttigieg brought up Rush Limbaugh during this event and the homophobic comments he made on Wednesday. A voter asked Buttigieg how he would counter homophobic attacks and that's when he dived into his experience with that just this week. Rush "I'm pretty good at holding my tongue. But it is tempting to point out some differences between my understanding of family values, and those of this president and his supporters like Rush Limbaugh." [234359] He was also asked which of Trump's "messes" would he clean up first if elected president. "Well, we're gonna have a lot to choose from. There's gonna be a lot of executive orders to do and to undo on that first day. We gotta - we gotta deal with climate right away, they're rolling back clean air and clean water protections we got to rejoin the Paris Climate accord on day one." [234240] In one of the lighter moments that had the room laughing, Buttigieg was asked if he knew how to say "dump Trump" in Norwegian, one of the languages Buttigieg knows. However, this one stumped him and he got some help from a voter. "I learned something new today," Buttigieg said after several attempts to repeat what he was being told in Norwegian. [235036] TVU 29 PETE BUTTIGIEG SPARKS NV RALLY REFEED ABC UNI 021620 2020 [23:27:36] Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you. [23:27:46] Thank you so much, Mayor Kambalda, and somebody other mayors look up to, and it's just like he said, when you're mayor, you just gotta get things done. You don't have the luxury of alternative facts. You don't have the luxury of printing your own currency. [23:28:01] You certainly don't have the luxury of shutting down your own government to prove a point. You just get the job done. And the time has come to get Washington working a little more like our best run cities. [23:28:10] Some towns run the other way around. [23:28:17] We have campaigned so many places I can't see straight. [23:28:21] They actually put a little they put a little sticker on the table by the door when I come out that says what city I'm in. [23:28:28] Just in case I can't keep track anymore. But I'm never going to forget Sparks. [23:28:38] First of all, I'm from the one of the snowiest places that I know. [23:28:43] But the first snow of the campaign season when we came into the fall in September was when we were right here to see you. [23:28:50] I didn't think I'd have to come to Nevada and see you for a snow. [23:28:55] If that wasn't enough to remember you by, we're having a great conversation. I'm sure some of you were here. We were talking about where the country was headed. I was answering questions and then lights went out in the Santillana. [23:29:09] And I summon my best deep voice and tried to project out off the brick walls in this space and nobody could see anything, and then somebody put their cell phone flashlight on. And then somebody else did it and then somebody else did. And pretty soon this whole room was lit up and we could see each other just fine. [23:29:31] What a great, great indication of what it's going to take for us to turn this country around. Every one of us doing what we can to light up a room, to light up a community, to light up this country, because the time has come for a brighter day. The United States of America. [23:29:55] A lot of things have come and gone in those months since I saw you last. [23:29:59] But one thing that has changed is the image that guides all the work that we do. And I'm an invite you one more time to visualize it with me, just in case this is the last time I get to see it before the voting, before the caucus. It's that image of the first time that the sun comes up over the mountains of the desert in Nevada. And Donald Trump is no longer the president of the United States. [23:30:38] Are you ready for that day to come? [23:30:46] Are you ready to put the chaos behind us? [23:30:51] Are you ready to put the tweets behind us? Me, too. [23:30:58] We got to make sure that that day comes sooner rather than later. And that's a big part of what this campaign is about. I don't even think that's a partisan statement anymore, because not only am I meeting fellow diehard Democrats who've been working to bring that day about, I'm seeing a lot of independents who feel the exact same way. [23:31:16] And even some what I like to call future former Republicans who are very welcome to join us in this effort. [23:31:23] We're together on this much that we can do better than the current president of the United States. And this is our chance. This is our only chance to get it done. [23:31:34] And I know that it can be frustrating to watch the news, especially watching things play out in Washington these last few weeks, watching what the GOP Senate did to send the message that anything is OK. Even cheating and involving a foreign government in U.S. elections. [23:31:49] But the great thing about being alive and able to vote in the year 2020 is, yeah, the Senate might have been the jury last week, but now the verdict is up to us on this president. [23:32:00] Other senators to. [23:32:08] So we'd better make sure we get this right. And this is our chance to choose the nominee who's going to bring an end to this presidency. [23:32:17] Now, don't you think it might be a good idea for a president who talks about working people, but the only economic promise he's kept is tax cuts for giant corporations. [23:32:26] Don't you think it might make sense for him to have to stand on the debate stage next to somebody who's not a millionaire, who actually lives and works in the industrial Midwest in the exact kind of community that he's let down to hold him to account? [23:32:46] Wouldn't it be nice for a president who tries to cloak himself in religion? I mean, this president. Tell you, you got to vote a certain way because of your religion. [23:32:59] Don't you think it makes sense to have somebody up there next to him, a believer, not afraid to talk about why God does not belong to a political party and that this country belongs to people of every religion and of no religion equally? [23:33:20] Don't you think a president who avoided serving when it was his turn and throws himself military parades ought to be held to account by a war veteran ready to talk about why there is nothing patriotic in pardoning war criminals and punishing war heroes? [23:33:42] I'm ready to go toe to toe with this president. [23:33:47] But here's even better news. We have an opportunity not just to defeat this president, but to win big enough to send Trumpism itself into the history books. [23:34:00] If if we draw as many people as we possibly can into this effort, if we build a politics, it's about belonging, not about exclusion. [23:34:10] But that means calling everybody in and looking to the future. We always win. Democrats win the White House one. We are focused on the future. And at a time like this, with the country so polarized and so divided. If people think their only choice is between the revolution or the status quo, it might not be obvious where they even fit in that future. [23:34:31] Let's build a future that everyone belongs in. Matching bold progressive change with unity and belonging for everybody in this country. [23:34:41] That's our chance. [23:34:45] And the good news is, as challenges our country will be the day that that sun comes up and we're facing new and difficult challenges from global pandemics to cyber security, threats to gig work in the tech economy, changing what it means to be a worker in this country. [23:35:00] We also have something very important going for us that as many people agree on who we're against in the White House. There's an even bigger majority that can agree on what we are for. That's what we have going for us. [23:35:15] We are for an economy where work is rewarded, workers are empowered, and one job is enough to get by on whether you got a college degree or not. [23:35:32] We are for honoring our troops, not just with a bumper sticker, but with a commander in chief who will see to it that they are never deployed into a conflict that can be avoided and that we bring an end to endless war. We are for fixing our health care system so that there is no such thing as an uninsured American while allowing you to choose what the right health care plan is for you. [23:36:05] And speaking of health, we are for taking just as much resources and openness as we bring into physical medical issues. And finally, having that same openness and comfort, talking with dealing with and healing physical, not just physical, but mental health and addiction issues to. [23:36:30] We are for taking the steps today to make this into a country where your race has no bearing on your health or on your wealth or on your access to education or on your experience with law enforcement in the United States of America. [23:36:44] We must act to make that a reality. [23:36:51] We are for the understanding that our country has been built up by the contributions of those who immigrate, seeking to contribute and give us a better life and give their families a better future. [23:37:04] And we recognize that this country can manage our border in a way that matches our values as well as our laws. We are for a better future in immigration. [23:37:20] Youknow, sunni-led us Sullivan, Kenneth up yobbo suggested by his astill based on. [23:37:31] We are for investing in our future by investing in education and giving our educators the benefit of secretary of education, who believes in public education and supports our teachers. [23:37:52] So you see, we know what we are for as a country and we have an opportunity to build together to galvanize, not polarize a historic American majority to make that happen. [23:38:03] That's the opportunity at hand. And we can't wait. This can't wait 10 years. This can't wait for years. [23:38:09] I see it in the faces that I am meeting, not just voters like you who I am asking to support me for this office, but people I meet who are not yet old enough to vote. [23:38:20] Who asked questions demonstrating the stakes right now? Had an 11 year old come to an event of mine. Stick his hand up and ask about prescription drug affordability. [23:38:30] That's pretty cool. [23:38:31] You got an emerging health policy buff here today explained the reason he was asked Hughes because he's worried about whether his family is going to be able to afford the insulin that he needs in order to live. [23:38:43] That shouldn't even be his problem. And he can't wait for us to see to it that there is no such thing as an unaffordable prescription, no matter where you get your health insurance in the United States of America. [23:39:00] At a 13 year old let me know that for Christmas, she asked for a bulletproof backpack because she's so afraid of what could happen at her school. [23:39:08] She can't wait for us to act to see to it that the Second Amendment can no longer be confused for an excuse to do nothing at all about common sense gun laws to save lives in this country. [23:39:28] A 10 year old come to one of my events and politely make the point that he's planning to be here in the year twenty one hundred. [23:39:34] And then when he is, he's going to be looking back on the decisions we made in 2020 and see whether we did what it took in time to create a climate where he and his future kids and grandkids could thrive. [23:39:46] He and the next generation cannot wait for us to act on climate and lead the world in facing the climate challenge as the global security threat of our time. [23:39:55] Now is the time to ask. [23:40:02] So you see the urgency and you see the opportunity in front of us. And I believe that we can meet these challenges. I'm convinced that we can do it, not because it will be easy, but because we have no other choice. And because that's what the White House exists to do. [23:40:18] I'm asking for your support to become president of the United States, not because I got it into my head one day that I'd like to occupy that office, but because of what I believe the office is for. [23:40:31] I believe the purpose of the presidency is not the glorification of the president, but the empowerment and the unification of the American people to do these big things. That's why I'm asking for your support. [23:40:49] And here in Nevada, a state that famously thinks for itself and looks to the future. [23:40:54] I believe that we have an opportunity for a storied result on Saturday that will help propel us toward that better future. With your help. [23:41:07] Now, I'm a big believer in dialog, and so our numbers have grown a little bit since I first turned up in Nevada looking for friends, but I still don't think there's ever too big of a room to have a conversation. So we gathered up your questions on the way in there and there are no cards in our famous fishbowl and to moderate guide our conversation. I'd like you to welcome, welcome, my friend, Mayor Crystal Bolden, back to the stage to be our moderator for the Q and. [23:41:39] All right, we all know a mayor can't avoid questions where there at the AC's game or the Riverwalk or at the farmer's market. All right. First question, Pete. Which of Trump's messes will you clean up? First. [23:41:57] That was your question. Go ahead and give a shout out to all that. Well, we're going to have a lot to choose from. [23:42:08] There's going to be a lot of executive orders to do and to undo on that first day. We've got to we've got to deal with climate right away. They're rolling back clean air, clean water protections. We've got to rejoin the Paris Climate Accord on day one. [23:42:28] We got a backup working people on day one from right to work to the way they're undermining apprenticeships, the way they're blocking wage growth for American workers. [23:42:38] That's got to get action right away. We're going to have to work on our democracy, reversing the kind of voter suppression that's going on in different parts of the country. The 21st Century Voting Rights Act. [23:42:50] And it will be so important in order to keep America safe. To get to work immediately on restoring the credibility of the United States because our lives depend on. [23:43:07] Pete, how do you plan to counter homophobic attacks? [23:43:12] Yeah, this one got a little bit fun this last few days. All right, all Rush Limbaugh was saying sad things about. [23:43:27] I'm pretty good at holding my tongue, but it is tempting to point out some differences between my understanding of family values and those of this president and his supporters like Rush Limbaugh. [23:43:44] Let me tell you this. This president will find something to attack you on, and if he can't find something, you'll make something up. [23:43:52] We know that that's going to happen. [23:43:54] But I'll tell you this much. You know, we weren't sure what was going to happen when I made the decision to come out. It's a very personal decision. I came home from my deployment and I just knew that I was too old to not be dating anybody in in order to date when you were sitting mayor. You kind of have to go ahead and come out. [23:44:12] No way to know the political consequences. It's not like you could do a poll. Hey, you know, Mayor Pete was gay. Would you be less likely to vote for him? Right. [23:44:19] Kind of kind of blows your cover. [23:44:36] And. I just had to trust the voters were going to judge me based on the job that I was doing for them. They know what happened. [23:44:43] I got reelected in Indiana with 80 percent of the vote. [23:44:48] People are going to judge based on what matters to them, and I believe that's true now more than ever. [23:44:57] Pete, how will you take on big pharma? [23:45:02] So if that's you give away all as prey on the minds of a few folks in here. Well, I got a little bit of batting practice on this because when opioid makers made decisions that devastated communities, including mine, we took action. We sued them and we're winning. So I know a thing or two about taking on Big Pharma. [23:45:23] Now we have got to act on the affordability of prescription drugs. Don't get me wrong, if you invent a wonderful miracle treatment, I want you to do well. [23:45:33] But what we're seeing right now is different from that. When you see what they're doing to the prices of things that people need in order to live insulin medication for cancer, things we need in order to live. And you see the prices going up, not because they have to. [23:45:48] Not because there's a shortage of a rare ingredient. [23:45:51] They're doing it because they can. [23:45:53] Well, that's up to us. So when I'm president, any company that's jacking up drug prices faster than the rate of inflation will face a tax penalty so severe that they realize it's not worth doing in the first place. [23:46:04] That's the first. [23:46:11] And we're also going to take the common sense step of allowing the federal government, particularly Medicare, to actually negotiate the prices of drugs with prescription drug makers. [23:46:21] That's how we're going to get drug prices under control. [23:46:28] Pete, how did it happen that you've managed to go from mayor of a small Midwestern town to a candidate? And what gave you the inspiration? [23:46:38] Well, part of it is we were talking about earlier is the idea that maybe the mayoral perspective is a little bit more what we need in Washington right now than the inside the Beltway perspective. [23:46:52] And also thinking about the perspective of my community was a city that was described as dying. [23:46:59] When I first ran for mayor and we got on our feet, we got a long way to go, but we changed the trajectory of our city together. And so when people say, what makes you think a mayor ought to be running for president, you're not even a mayor of one of the biggest and most famous cities in the country. [23:47:15] My point is that's that's part of the point, because there are communities and by the way, in our biggest cities, there are neighborhoods, just as there are whole towns across America that have felt left out of all of the processes that are getting attention in Washington, that we needed a different kind of voice. [23:47:33] And then we've got to bring that voice to Washington. [23:47:36] Look, this was not what I guess I would be doing at the end of my second term as mayor. [23:47:42] When I first ran, I ran it in order to help fix what was going on in my city. [23:47:45] But right now, I see a country I see a White House that needs not just good policies, but it needs the instincts of a mayor who knows that you are a walking symbol. You're a walking symbol when you're a mayor of the unity of your community. [23:48:01] You remind people so different from each other, they have nothing in common besides the same community that they live in. [23:48:06] You remind them that they at least share that much. And at a time when we need that, when we need somebody to call our country to its highest values, frankly, I think we just need a president who you could look at and feel your blood pressure go down a little bit instead of up to the roof. [23:48:29] I began to realize that I had something to offer. [23:48:32] And then once I made sure Chason and I were on the same page and we made that decision together, we we realized that the only way to know for sure if we were on the right track was to put it to the voters. [23:48:44] And it was a wild thing to do. [23:48:46] When we started, this thing had four people on our committee staff. I'm not a millionaire. No personal fortune to kick in, no name recognition, no big email list. [23:48:56] But the amazing thing about American democracy is you get a shot. One high school, gym and backyard and diner and coffee shop at a time. You get a shot to look eye to eye with voters and make the case and ask them for their support. And so against all odds, I'm standing before you with a long way to go, humbly asking for your vote, but also walking into this building with the lead in Democratic delegates for the nomination. [23:49:22] It shows. [23:49:42] All right, Pete. How do you say dump Trump in Norwegian? [23:49:52] Is there an actual original picture here? [23:49:54] This fight was to Mahamadou? Maybe. It's not all. [23:50:09] Briefly to. [23:50:14] Hopefully I didn't say something dirty. That's a little past my little past, my knowledge of Norwegian goodness one more time. [23:50:25] I believe, Kryten. Yeah. All right. [23:50:28] I learned something new today. Thanks, Scott. [23:50:37] Amazing when you get a roomful of a thousand people in America. There is somebody who knows a lot about everything. [23:50:45] FTS If the Democrats don't control both houses of Congress, how will you work with the GOP to accomplish your agenda? It's an important question. [23:50:56] So here's the good first of all. My first instinct is to reach across the aisle again. Mayors have to do that, especially Democratic mayors in places like Indiana have to do that in or to get anything done. [23:51:08] So that's where we'll start. [23:51:10] And I went through three Republican governors and we found ways to work together on different things. But for that to work, there has to be good faith. [23:51:18] And we know that good faith is in short supply, especially in the Senate and House GOP today. So if that's not working, I have another plan. [23:51:27] And the plan involves the big blue and white airplane that comes with the Oval Office that the president uses mostly for the purpose of traveling among golf courses with his name on it. [23:51:38] I don't even golf. [23:51:48] But what I will do. [23:51:51] Is take advantage of the fact that the things we're talking about, they were just my idea or Democratic Party ideas. [23:51:59] These are things that most Americans want, even in conservative states. The increase in the minimum wage that they are blocking a real paid family leave policy. Doing something about gun violence. Acting on climate. Delivering health care for every American. This is something that's not just popular in a deep blue, far left district is what the American people want. Even in the red states. [23:52:20] And so the best use of that airplane, if you ask me, is to fly on right into the backyard of a member of the congressional GOP who is not only defying my White House, but defying their own voters and have that conversation with the voters. [23:52:39] Of course, that's plan B. Plan is to have enough coattails that we're not dealing with a Republican majority in Congress. [23:52:48] And make sure we got a wrong. [23:52:57] As president, how would you depolarize America and restore decency to the American conversation? [23:53:05] Well, that just might be the most important part of the job. [23:53:10] Again, when you're married, there comes a point right, where you realize that it's not just about the policies. It's not just about the management. It's about what tone you set for your community. So much more so for the presidency. [23:53:21] And it's not about ignoring our differences. It's not about watering down our values or pretending we'll agree on everything. It's sending that message that when we especially when we disagree. [23:53:32] We got to do it in good faith. We got to do it as one country that has a common faith. [23:53:37] It's something I learned in the military. You know, when somebody got in my vehicle and we were getting ready to go outside the wire. [23:53:44] They didn't care if I was going home to a girlfriend or a boyfriend that didn't care if I was a Democrat and Republican. We were totally different from each other. But we need to trust each other with our lives because we had. [23:53:54] And our whole country is in that same situation right now. [23:53:57] So I will work every day to invite the American people to remember what we do have in common, that we share basic values about what kind of country this ought to be and about how we ought to treat each other. And frankly, the best way for me to answer that question is not to tell you in words, but to try to show it in the way our campaign is run. And you're all part of that, too. [23:54:19] I see volunteers here, organizers modeling our values. [23:54:27] Reaching out to one another to folks who who may not agree with us on everything, but we're still glad you're here. [23:54:40] Reaching out within our party. I don't believe in the politics of clubbing people over the head and telling them they're wrong until they give up. [23:54:48] I believe in the politics as inviting as many people as possible into this conversation. We can show, not tell how to do that. [23:54:55] In the course of this campaign. And you're already doing it by the spirit you bring into this room. And I thank you for it, because that is how it begins before the first votes really count. [23:55:09] We've got our last question. [23:55:13] What is your stance on immigration issues? All right. [23:55:16] So, first of all, I'm here because of immigration. My father decided that he would leave his home country, this tiny country called Malta. [23:55:26] It's about the size of St. Joseph County, Indiana. And he left because he wanted to get a great education. [23:55:32] And he had a mentor who told him, you know, if you stay here, I promise you, you can be a very big fish in a very small pond. [23:55:39] And he said, I'd rather be a medium sized fish in the biggest pond of all. And that's more or less what happened. He got his education, became an American citizen, became a professor, found himself somebody from a place where they even have a word for snow wound up in South Bend, Indiana, and the lake effect zone downwind from Chicago. [23:55:59] And that's what my family is here. And I have seen my city. [23:56:03] Which was again described as dying just a decade ago, losing thousands of people after the factories closed. [23:56:08] Now growing and a big part of why we're growing is immigration, especially a Latino community that has breathed new life into neighborhoods that were empty. [23:56:17] Now, that is part of the lifeblood of our city and of our country. [23:56:25] And the important thing to recognize is it is not taking something away from one of us to welcome another one of us. [23:56:35] It is about Ed. It is about multiplication. [23:56:40] Immigrants are taxpayers. Immigrants are doctors. [23:56:46] Immigrants are neighbors and family members, and we have a responsibility to just fix the system that frankly requires more here as workers than it is willing to admit as citizens. [23:57:00] The president says we're full. We're not full. [23:57:04] We are ready to grow as a country in the way that we always have at our best moments. [23:57:08] And yes, that means making sure that we have a process, but we've got to make sure the process is fixed. And right now, the process is broken. We will have full, real comprehensive immigration reform when I am president. [23:57:21] And in the meantime, at the border, while we're figuring out the laws. [23:57:25] One thing you will never see under my administration as a for profit facility for the detention of children. [23:57:31] Our morality and our humanity is at stake. [23:57:41] One more big thank you to Mayor Crystal Bolden for being your voice. [23:57:49] US mayors like to call him the mayor from the future because he's always a couple of steps ahead. [23:57:55] And so glad you've been able to share this time with. And again, if you're a supporter, I'm so thankful and I'm urging you to reach out to everybody that, you know, if you're still thinking it over. Hopefully now I've had one more chance to ask for your vote and you understand what I believe is at stake in this election. [23:58:12] And the only other thing I have to ask you is to bottle up whatever sense of hope propelled you into this room and share it with anybody in your life who is so exhausted and so dispirited and so depressed by the news that they might have walked away completely from the process, which is how even if we walk away, that's how the cynics win. [23:58:30] This is our chance. The power is in our hands. [23:58:33] And I believe there must be some hope that brought you into this room. I know why the word hope went out of style for a little while. [23:58:40] In our politics, because of the division and the bleakness and the meanness of the moment that we're in. [23:58:45] But I believe that running for office is an act of hope. [23:58:49] That's why they took the word hopeful. You notice this in the news. [23:58:53] They took the word hopeful and they turned it into a noun and they use it as another word for candidate. I'm a twenty, twenty hopeful. [23:58:59] That's what I'm doing here, because running is an act of hope. And you are here is an expression of hope. [23:59:10] So are you ready to share that with everybody that you know? And are you ready for that? Desert Sunrise when we put this presidency behind us? And are you ready to make history on Saturday in the Nevada caucuses? Then let's do that together and go on and win in November. Thank you for coming. [23:59:32] Thank you for caring. Let's go out there and get this done. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much.
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PETE BUTTIGIEG FAIRFAX VA TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 2020/HD
TVU 29 PETE BUTTIGIEG FAIRFAX VA TOWN HALL REFEED ABC UNI 022320 2020 Former South Bend Mayor talked about Senator Bernie Sanders supporters as well as had a very unusual riff about race during his remarks at Washington-Liberty High School a school that was renamed post-Charlottesville's 2017 Unite the Right rally. He continued his jab at Sanders targeting people who call names online. 164531 In a few short days we could go one way or the other is a party, so much depends on getting this right now. I respect my friend senator Sanders I believe the ideals he talks about our ideals we all share. But I also believe that the way we will build a movement to defeat Donald Trump is to call people into our tents, not to call them names online. The vision of replacing this President is one that speaks to my fellow diehard democrats, yes. 164604 But we are also calling out to the independents. And we are delighted to see some of the ranks of what I like to call a "future former republican" signing up for this, and you are welcome to be on our side. We can do this, together. According to the campaign 8853 people showed up to the event at Washington - Liberty High School in Arlington, Virginia. If the name sounds familiar the school was renamed post Charlottesville <https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwtop.com%2Farlington%2F2019%2F01%2Farlington-co-school-board-votes-to-rename-washington-lee-high-school%2F&data=02%7C01%7CJenna.X.Levine.-ND%40abc.com%7C58cf966cc0c84db717d708d7b8c28415%7C56b731a8a2ac4c32bf6b616810e913c6%7C1%7C0%7C637181017945756039&sdata=VQITUxGTj3KQPcprpAlcFbwHO67tY6bN%2BsFmtV0XJ%2BA%3D&reserved=0> as the school distanced itself from Confederate General Robert E. Lee, which was the source of great debate in the community. His last public event in the state last June where he held a "grassroots fundraiser" in historic Old Town Alexandria, Virginia which had over 600 RSVP's (Included in this email was my note about the Alexandria event from June which lacked diversity as well.) That event like today was mostly white, and was in general proximity to public transit. I saw little diversity in the crowd which to be honest is a stark contrast to Rep. Tulsi Gabbard's event last week which held was 10 minutes away that had a very diverse sold out crowd of 350 people. Although those are apple and oranges candidate comparison it again highlights an existing problem Buttigieg has. In a crowd where people came from across the D.C. area (and even Pennsylvania) although he Attracted a crowd of several thousands they lacked the diversity. According to the 2018 census Virginia is 69.5% white; 19.9 % African American; 9.6% Hispanic or Latino and 6.9% Asian. At the event I was struck by his remarks on race, at a school which has battled race and what the confederacy means in 2020. Although the name of the school has changed, I noticed in the outdoor stadium several signs that still say Washington-Lee. Buttigieg was asked about what he was going to do as president when it comes to low income housing for poor and vulnerable communities, he gave pretty much a standard answer but migrated to declare that black lives are at stake and pivoted in an unexpected way to talk about policing and race. His remarks were pretty stark considering he was speaking to a nearly all White Crowd. 170409 This could be a matter of life and death. Black lives are at stake, not only in reforming how policing works in the United States, but also housing because every family deserves to be able to live in a safe neighborhood. Every family deserves to be able to live in a neighborhood free of contamination from environmental pollution, which we know disproportionately happens to black and Latino and native homeowners and houses. 170437 We have to act with every bit of the intention that got us to this point to get us to a better point. Buttigieg also faced a few protestors including two women who held a sign that said priavet healthcare kills (fed in an oncloud) and a man who appeared to storm the stage during the rope line with Buttigieg and his husband Chasten. The man was quickly removed (I barely got the image of him on the stage) but did get an okay shot of the red head being dragged away by Buttigieg's advance staff. 1724. According to police I spoke to they didn't arrest him, but suspected that the campaign grabbed the guy and sent him on his way. TIMECODES BELOW FROM ORIGINAL FEED @Bernie 164531 I respect my friend Senator -- (164534 FEED FREEZES) Sanders I believe the ideals he talks about our ideals we all share. 164540 ...but I also believe that the way we will build a movement to defeat Donald Trump is to call people into our tents, not to call them names online. The vision of replacing this President is one that speaks to my fellow diehard democrats, yes. 164604 But we are also calling out to the independents. And we are delighted to see some of the ranks of what I like to call a "future former republican" signing up for this, and you are welcome to be on our side. We can do this, together. Black Lives at Stake 170409 This could be a matter of life and death. Black lives are at stake, not only in reforming how policing works in the United States, but also housing because every family deserves to be able to live in a safe neighborhood. Every family deserves to be able to live in a neighborhood free of contamination from environmental pollution, which we know disproportionately happens to black and Latino and native homeowners and houses. 170437 We have to act with every bit of the intention that got us to this point to get us to a better point. TRINT [16:42:30] Thank you so much. [16:42:37] You know how to make a guy from Indiana feel right at home. [16:42:43] Thank you so much to our phenomenal supporters. Thanks, everybody, for joining us today. This is what it feels like to build a new kind of presidency. [16:42:53] And you are right in the middle of it. [16:42:58] We are so thrilled to be here. I'll be honest. We're running on adrenaline. Twenty four hours ago, we were in Nevada. Let's say we're in Colorado. This morning, we were in church in South Carolina. And now I'm thrilled to join you right here in the Commonwealth of Virginia. [16:43:19] Whereas, you know, just over a week from now is an opportunity to make history. An opportunity to change the course of this country and so much depends on the choice that we're about to make. If you've ever seen me speak, you know how I like to begin. [16:43:40] Which is to invite everybody to form in your own mind, your own version of the image that guides this whole campaign. [16:43:49] And that is how it's going to feel the first time that that sun comes up over the Potomac. And Donald Trump is no longer the president of the United States. [16:44:09] Feels good to think about it read. Aren't you ready to put the chaos behind us? Will it feel good to put the cruelty behind us? [16:44:24] Who's ready to put the tweets behind us? [16:44:28] That's going to be a good day and we have a responsibility to make sure that day comes about sooner rather than later. [16:44:39] The good news about being a voter in 2020 is we had a chance if you watched what played out in Mitch McConnell Senate during this impeachment trial. If you felt the frustration, if you felt the exhaustion, maybe even felt that terrible temptation to turn it all off and walk away. Now is our chance to remember that they might have been the jury then. But the verdict is off to us. Now on this president and on those senators who protected him. [16:45:16] Let's use that choice wisely. [16:45:21] But that means that in a few short days we could go one way or the other as a party. So much depends on getting this right. Now I respect my friend said. [16:45:39] But I also believe that the way we will build the movement to defeat Donald Trump is to call people into our tent, not to call them names online. The vision of replacing this president is one that speaks to my fellow die hard Democrats. Yes, but we also calling up to the independents and we are delighted to see some of the risks of what I like to call future former Republicans signing up for this. [16:46:13] And you are welcome to be at our side. We can do this together. We have to do this together. And you're welcome. But that means building a tent big enough to draw us in and harnessing, galvanizing, mobilizing, not polarizing the American majority ready to see that happen. We can solve the big challenges of our time, deliver health care to every American and give everybody the freedom to walk away from their health insurance companies toward a public plan. [16:46:53] America will support that just so long as we give you the freedom to decide whether you want that public plan in the first place. [16:47:00] That's how we build this, Vegard. [16:47:06] We're going to need a nominee ready to bring Americans together and we're going to need a nominee who understands that we dare not treat the presidency like it is the only office that matters. [16:47:24] Right here in Virginia, your legislature is demonstrating the power of doing the right thing at the state level. When we get those offices into the right hands. So when voices from those frontline districts that are so critical to keeping the House in the right hands when voices working on those Senate races, we're going to need so badly in order to make sure that the judiciary is not permanently remade in the wrong direction. [16:47:59] We had better make sure we've got a nominee at the top of the ticket who can not just take back the White House, but keep the House in the right hands. And Sen. Mitch McConnell pocket. We dare not ignore, we dare not dismiss, and we absolutely dare not attack those voices in the Democratic Party focusing on keeping those seats in the right hands because the next president is going to need that in order to get any of our big, bold ideas done. [16:48:39] Also think it would help for herself, a nominee who can challenge this president and call him out. This president wants to talk about being there for the forgotten people, even though the only economic from the city is cap his tax cuts for giant corporations. [16:49:03] How about making sure he is held to account on a debate stage by a Democratic nominee who actually lives and worked in a middle class neighborhood in the industrial Midwest in the heart of the so-called Rust Belt and can talk about what it means to have an economy that actually works for us. For a president who likes to cloak himself in the language of religion, this president sends out the likes of Rush Limbaugh to give instructions on family values. [16:49:53] Wouldn't it be a good idea to have him held to account by a nominee? Prepared to insist that America belongs to people of every religion and of no religion equally. Wouldn't it be a good idea for our nominee to be prepared to call out to fellow believers with the message that God does not belong to a political party in the United States of America? [16:50:25] And if this president keeps up that tough talk, keeps beating his chest and throwing himself military parades, maybe the time has come for a war veteran to stand next to him and educate him on how pardoning war criminals is not the act of a patriot. [16:51:00] You are building a campaign that will defeat this president and this is all one shot, so we've got to get it right. And the good news is we have an American majority not only to defeat this president, not only agreeing on what it is the rule against, but in the even bigger and more powerful majority insisting on what it is that we have for. [16:51:29] That's the real reason I asked you to picture the sun coming up that day. It's not just that we got to bring that sunrise about. It's that on that day. The next president will face challenges, the likes of which we barely thought of a few years ago. [16:51:43] And we are going to need to harness the American majority determined to do something about it. [16:51:49] The American people already understand that this is a country that must elevate wages, empower workers and see to it that one job is enough. [16:51:58] Whether you've got a college degree or not. [16:52:05] There is an American majority right now prepared to act in insisting that there be no such thing as an uninsured American. And speaking of health care, the American people already understand that in order to truly have good health in this country, we've got to take that same level of urgency, the same resources and the same openness that we have for physical medical issues. [16:52:33] And finally, bring it to bear on substance use and mental health, too. We're going to bring it out of the shadows and do something about it. There's already a powerful American majority that understands that part of how you honor our troops. It was not just to say so on a bumper sticker, but to give them a commander in chief who will bring an end to endless war and never allow them to be sent into a conflict that could have been prevented. [16:53:06] Right now, we've got an American majority that understands that immigration is part of the lifeblood of this country that supports dreamers and a pathway to citizenship. And we'll send the message to those caught in limbo that it's their basis to buy his time in. We have an American majority now ready to act so that this can become a country where your race has no bearing on your health or your wealth or on your experience with law enforcement, the United States of America. We must act now to make that a reality. [16:53:48] Right now, an American majority stands ready to defend the next generation by backing up those who educate them with a secretary of education who believes in public education and supports our teachers. [16:54:08] So you see the American people are already there and now we have to have the presidential leadership to get these things done. This is not something that can wait. We cannot wait 10 years. We cannot wait for years. [16:54:30] Well, I go I meet Americans who remind me what is on the line just by chance, because I was campaigning, I was in the airport, ran into somebody I had served with, hadn't seen since we were both in Afghanistan, hadn't seen since she was injured in an insider attack. And I saw her walking down the airport concourse wearing a t shirt from the Wounded Warrior Project that said some assembly required. [16:54:59] And when I asked her how she was doing. She lifted up her knees and tapped on her prosthetic leg, the part they couldn't save. She said the navy fixed me up just fine. And she's looking forward to her next deployment. She can't wait for a commander in chief who actually understands the meaning of being sent into war by the decisions of the United States president. [16:55:24] But the ones who really get my attention are the Americans I am meeting who are not yet even old enough to vote. [16:55:37] We had an eleven year old come to one of my events and raise his hand to ask about prescription drug affordability. [16:55:46] I thought, this is pretty cool. He's a smart kid. He wasn't asking because he's an emerging health care policy buff. He was asking because he needs insulin and he's worried about whether he will continue to be able to get access to it. [16:56:00] He can't wait for us to act to ensure that there is no such thing as an unaffordable prescription in the United States of America. [16:56:13] When a 13 year old came to one of my events and let me know that she had asked for a Kevlar bulletproof backpack for Christmas. [16:56:22] I didn't even know there was such a thing. She can't wait because this should not even be her problem. We should worry about this sort of thing so she doesn't have to. [16:56:34] She can't wait for us to act so that the Second Amendment can no longer be twisted into an excuse to do nothing at all about gun violence in this country. [16:56:52] And when a 10 year old comes to one of my events and diplomatically points out that he's planning to be here in the year twenty one hundred and says that when he is, he will be looking back on the choices we made right now to see if we acted in time to create a climate that he and his future kids and grandkids could drive in. [16:57:14] They can wait for the stack to lead the world on doing something about climate change before it is too late. This is our chance and we have to do it together. And it all starts by creating a different kind of politics. One with the American experience is defined not by exclusion, but by belonging. Look around you. We are creating the community right now to show, not just tell, what America might look like if we had the powers of the presidency in the right hands. This is our chance. [16:57:53] These are the things that we can do with our American presidency. In other words, as I come here one more time to look you in the eye and ask you for your vote. The reason I'm doing it, the reason I decided to run for this office is not that I got it into my head one day that I would like to occupy it. It's that this office has a purpose. [16:58:14] And the purpose of the presidency is not the glorification of the president. It is the unification and the empowerment of the American people who do these big tax. [16:58:26] That's why I'm asking for your support. [16:58:33] So if you're ready for that understanding of the presidency, if you're ready for a politics that calls everybody in, or if you're just ready to turn on the news, look at your president and feel your blood pressure go down a little bit instead of up to this campaign is for you. [16:58:56] B, B, B, B, B, B, B, B. [16:59:03] So one thing we believe in is dialog. Our numbers have grown just a little bit since we started out a year ago with a campaign team of four people in an office about as big as this stage I'm on. But I figure, well, I've never done it with this many thousands of people. I feel there's no such thing as a audience so big we can't have some form of dialog. [16:59:25] So we gathered up questions. We got them in our famous fishbowl. And I'd like you to welcome to the stage. Brando, one of our best supporters who who's going to be your voice and guide this conversation. Come on up. [16:59:51] Bias, but don't we have the best, kindest organizers, volunteers and team members on this campaign? [17:00:01] What an amazing crowd. So I am, as he mentioned, as Pete mentioned, a volunteer and I'm delighted to be your voice this afternoon. So many of you submitted questions. I'll just start with this first one. What's been your most surreal moment of the last year? And this is from Suzanne. [17:00:20] All right. If it's your question, give a holler. I'll try to look in your direction. Oh, yeah. Oh, we're down pretty well. [17:00:31] Everything about this is surreal. [17:00:34] Look, a year and a half ago, I was an elected official, but I was also driving my Chevy to work every day. And when you wake up and you're trying to remember what state you're in or you try to make sure you have your your briefing in the back, your head on the latest foreign policy just before you go on morning news. And then Alyssa walks by. You're in a room with lÍza. You can't pay attention to anything after that. [17:00:58] It is the whole thing is unreal. But but the most remarkable thing in this kind of out of body experience is that you're in the whole country all at once. And well, you find out is that the different states and communities in this country are very different. But what people are looking for is pretty much the same people looking for a better life and a better politics. [17:01:17] We want to actually feel like politics is speaking to them, like the decisions that are made, especially in Washington, D.C., are done in a way that connects back to our everyday lives. [17:01:28] And as unreal as all of this is, it brings me right back down to earth, because it turns out that politics is just people and this is the most human process I've ever been part of. Thanks for being part of this. [17:01:48] Your next question. Wow, especially in Arlington, really resonates. How will your administration address housing discrimination and ensure access to safe, decent housing for low income and other vulnerable populations? And this one is from Kelin macbeth.. [17:02:03] All right. So this is so important. [17:02:08] I see you more or less. And this is one of those questions I'm hearing everywhere I go. The president says that the economy is fantastic because the Dow Jones is looking good. Right. There is not one county in the entire United States of America right now where somebody's working full time can afford a two bedroom apartment. [17:02:31] It is just one example of what we have got to change when it comes to access to housing. First of all, we got to make sure people have more income in the first place, which is why we've got to raise the minimum wage and power organized labor to make it possible for gig workers and domestic workers and farm workers to organize. But then we've got to deal with the cost side. And it's not going to get better without a real investment. [17:02:54] That means hundreds of billions of dollars that will be well worth it to ensure that there's no longer wait lists for housing choice vouchers for families with children and to increase by 2 million the number of affordable housing units being built here in the United States of America. And then you mentioned housing discrimination. This is so important because it continues to happen. [17:03:18] The value of a home in an identical neighborhood is forty thousand dollars lower. If that neighborhood is majority African-American, that is going on right now. Black homeownership is at the lowest level it's been at since the Fair Housing Act was passed. That's not going to get better until we put as much intention into dismantling the effective systemic racism on housing as went into it in the first place. [17:03:45] That means affirmatively enforcing fair housing rules. It means, in my view, a 21st century Homestead Act. This is go up, have the chance to build equity and build generational wealth. [17:04:04] Where they grew up. This can be a matter of life and death. [17:04:11] Black lives are at stake not only in reforming how policing works in the United States, but also housing, because every family deserves to be able to live in a safe neighborhood. Every family deserves to be able to live in a neighborhood free of contamination from environmental pollution, which we know disproportionately happens to black and Latino and native homeowners and houses. [17:04:37] We have to act with every bit of the intention that got us to this point to get us to a better point. And when I am president, we will have a Department of Housing and Urban Development that is actually committed to making sure that every American has access to that housing, regardless of their background. [17:05:00] Mashpee, how are you going to empower youth activism and this is from a 17 year old named Ellie. All right. [17:05:08] Here it is. So like I said, you don't even have to be old enough to vote to have an impact. [17:05:14] And youth activism is part of what is changing how the world works right now. Look, the longer you're planning to be here, the more you have at stake in those decisions that are about to be made. And I think it's really revealing, for example, that Time's Person of the year, if she were a U.S. citizen, would not even be old enough to vote. But the grid, the climate activism of Greg Timberg is helping change the conversation. [17:05:42] Same thing on gun violence when students marched for their lives. [17:05:47] It is changing things in a way that no politician could. And here's the really good news. This isn't the 60s where a young generation took to the streets to protest against their parents. [17:05:59] Right now what I'm seeing is young people marching for their lives when it comes to gun violence, demanding we do better on climate change. And I'm seeing their parents and their grandparents at their side cheering them on. [17:06:11] That's what we saw, the women's march. That is so powerful. [17:06:16] I know you don't yet have the power of a vote, although you're about to. But you have another kind of power, which is when you look in the eyes of anybody who is old enough to vote. Anybody who holds authority. And you raise these questions like, what are you doing to keep me safe? A voice rises up in the heart of any thinking person which says, do not let this young person down. [17:06:41] The power of that voice can do as much to change our politics as anything that any one person running for office can. And as president, I will be counting on youth activism to push our country forward and make sure these changes actually happen. [17:06:55] Great question. [17:07:02] The next question is from Terry. We need a president who believes in science. How will you support it? How will you support medical research for cures? [17:07:14] Remember when you could just assume that the president would believe in science? I'm sorry that this has become a politically controversial idea. But yes, the president and the administration should believe in science. [17:07:30] And should believe the recommendations of scientists and should make sure the people running agencies are committed to their mission. For example, someone in charge of environmental protection who believes in climate science. And as Terry's question suggests, a lot of this means making sure that we are funding basic research. This is part of our growth and development happens. [17:07:58] Maybe only a company could invent the iPhone, but only federal research could invent the Internet. The same thing is true in the medical space. I'm delighted to see people take basic research and run with it to create cures. But it's not all gonna happen for profit. We've got to fund the research that advances humanity and advances our ability to find cures for what literally ails us. [17:08:23] As an American people and as a human species in America, we restore its leadership role in the sciences under my administration. And we're going to need to call a lot of scientists into service to help us get that done. I bet there are some folks right here, right now who would be willing to be part of that mission. [17:08:44] This has been really inspiring. I'm told that we have time for just one last question. [17:08:50] I know. [17:08:53] How are you going to give hope to a generation of the homeless? This is from a spiritually a spiritual LGBTQ plus person, Justin. [17:09:05] Generation of the homeless are very good homeless. So. We draw hope from different sources, some draw hope from faith. Some draw hope from family. We can all draw hope from right around us. I'll tell you where mine comes from. People ascribe it to youth, but it's actually from experience. I think about the hope that my city represents our city was typical of the so-called Rust Belt a decade ago. [17:09:35] They said we were dying because all the factories closed and so many people had moved out. And as mayor, I was able to guide that city and join with neighbors as we picked ourselves up, defined what the press was saying about us, welcomed new residents into our community, formed a different future, and are now growing for the first time in a long time. If there a temptation to give up hope in our capacity for unity as a country, I think about it in terms of the experience I had overseas deployed with people completely different from me. [17:10:09] i've been really different politically. As well as regionally and racially, but you know what? We trusted each other with our lives because we had to. Somebody was getting into my vehicle in Afghanistan. They didn't care if I was going home to a boyfriend or girlfriend, didn't care if I was a Democrat or Republican. We trusted each other with our lives because we had to. [17:10:29] And having seen that happen, I believe you don't have to go to war in order to have that experience is part of why I believe in national service, creating a million voluntary paid national service opportunities a year. [17:10:44] And yes, I also draw a lot of my own hope from the LGBTQ experience. Look, we got a long way to go when it comes to equality. There's no question of that. And when I am president, we will beginning with the Equality Act and continuing with an end to the war on trans Americans and affirmatively building up everybody's sense of belonging in this country. [17:11:09] We do have a long way to go, but part of why I am hopeful is the fact that I'm standing in front of you as somebody who was raised at a moment when you thought you could either serve or you could be gay. You definitely could not be both of those things you need to be out or you could be involved in public service and politics. Where I came from now both. [17:11:32] You'll be married. Or you could be gay. Not both. [17:11:37] And I'm standing right in front of you as a veteran, happily married. [17:11:43] Running for president of the United States. That's where I get my. [17:11:50] Let's see one more. Said one word. [17:11:54] So the last question and just I happened to pull to. So this is the last one. How was meeting Ellen? And this is from Rachel mccluster. [17:12:03] Rachel her. Ellen is the best. [17:12:16] You know, we need we need more that we need a little more kindness in this world. [17:12:27] I understand that there are times when we've got no choice but to fight. And I'm ready for the fight of our lives in order to make sure that we make Donald Trump a one term president. I think we're all ready for that. [17:12:42] But again, this is where I view things a little differently than Senator Sanders. I don't believe we can allow ourselves to get to the point where it starts to feel like fighting is the point we're getting through like fightings all we got. [17:12:56] The point is not to fight. The point is one guys on the other side of the fight and what I see there is that experience of belonging in our country that we can build together, that we can only build together, that we cannot build by beating each other over the head. [17:13:16] Anyway, those are some of the things that go through my mind when I had the wonderful opportunity to spend time with Ellen. All right. Now, her time really as a woman would be taking her, Brenda, for being your voice. [17:13:33] And I want to ask you to soak up the sense of belonging that we are creating right here. [17:13:41] Politics will be fierce sometimes, but it is not just combat. [17:13:47] It can be about building community. It can be about lifting each other up. That's why I'm in this in the first place. And so the biggest thing that I'm asking of you besides, of course, your vote is to find people in your life who maybe did give into that temptation to walk away from it all, because it's so exhausting, because it's so crushing sometimes. [17:14:12] And to draw them back in, in the name of whatever hope propels you into this space, whatever hope made you think it was worth standing in a line a mile long. Just so we can spend some time together talking about the future of this country. [17:14:32] I know. [17:14:33] I hope as a word went out of style for a little bit. In American politics, because of the bleakness and the division of the moment we're in. But I would also argue you are here because some sense of hope tells you that our lives could be better depending on the decisions they make and those big white buildings over the river. [17:14:54] And whose hands are on the please and lovers of American government. That's why I'm here. There is a reason why. Have you ever noticed on the news they tip the word hopeful. And they turned it into a noun. And they use it as another word for candidates of a twenty twenty hopeful. That's what I'm doing here. [17:15:15] How fitting? Because running for office is an act of hope and say is helping. Somebody once says volunteering. So is voting. You are spreading that sense of hope that it does, in fact, matter who gets their hands on those polls and lives and what values guide those hands. So can I look to you to spread that sense of hope to everybody to, you know. [17:15:43] And are you ready for that sunrise when we put the Trump administration behind us and move forward into something better? Virginia, I think you are going to make me the next president of the United States, and when you do, I will do everything I can to make you proud. [17:16:03] Thank you for coming. Thank you for caring. [17:16:09] Let's go make history on March 3rd and let's win this thing in November. [17:16:13] Thank you.
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