Plitvice Lakes National Park. Exceptional natural beauty in the heart of Croatia
Underwater shots in flowing water in Plitvice Lakes. With air bubbles and water swirls
FIRST RESPONDERS TRAIN FOR SCHOOL BUS ACCIDENT (2015)
Every day first responders put their lives on the line to try to save their communities. They find themselves in all different types of situations, and Thursday, emergency personnel from 11 different agencies trained for an absolute worst-case scenario. The Metro Area Water Rescue Group simulated the response to a school bus filled with children plunging into a lake. They say the exercise is meant to provide important, hands-on training for rescue swimmers and boat operators. Overall the U.S. Department of Transportation says events like this are rare, but they do happen. They agencies most recent available statistics show that between 2004 and 2013 there were more than 1,200 school-transportation-related crashes nationwide. More than 1,300 people died in those crashes, an average of 134 deaths every year. "We train day in and day out for extrication, hazmat, fires, things like that," explained South Metro Fire Department Captain Adam Schewe. "This is an opportunity once a year for us to come out and train for something we don't often see, but is a high risk to our community and a high risk to our firefighters and EMS personnel." The annual training started after the 35W Bridge collapse in 2007. The group responds to a different simulated incident each year.
US Floods - Flooding in Philadelphia overnight
TAPE: EF01/0473 IN_TIME: 22:42:56 DURATION: 1:17 SOURCES: ABC RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Philladelphia, USA - 16 June, 2001 SHOTLIST: 1. Car stranded in flooded street 2. Rescue workers near flooded street 3. Rescue workers in zodiac boat 4. Cars stranded in flooded street STORYLINE: The remnants of Tropical Storm Allison are still raining down on Pennsylvania, dumping up to 9 inches (23 centimetres) of rain in suburban Philadelphia placing two counties under flash flood warnings. Homes were evacuated, motorists rescued from their cars, and power cut to thousands of houses because of heavy downpours. Since most flash flood deaths occur in automobiles authorities advised motorists not to drive into areas where water covers the road. They've been told to abandon vehicles caught in rising water. Up to 55-thousand people were without power at the peak of the storm, up to 10-thousand of them remained without electricity until late on Saturday night. The weather service said the Tar River at Tarboro is expected to peak at 20 feet (6 meters) on Monday, 1 foot (0.3 metres) above the 19-foot (6-meter) flood level.
Gens d'Abitibi
LAMS of Montagnais hunters in motorized canoe, on George River, at nightfall.
Onlookers Watch Search Effort For Survivors
In Pakistan, onlookers watch rescuers in a zodiac boat search for survivors of an accident in which a bus plunged into a fast-moving river. PLEASE NOTE News anchor and reporter image and audio, along with any commercial production excerpts, are for reference purposes only and are not clearable and cannot be used within your project.
Salt Water People
MLSs of marine traffic on lower Fraser River, sailboat, sea doo, motorboats and tugboats.
CANADA: COUSTEAU SOCIETY'S REPUTATION THREATENED
TAPE_NUMBER: EF99/1014 IN_TIME: 15:23:07 // 20:28:01 - 21:39:37 LENGTH: 01:02 SOURCES: CBC/CTV RESTRICTIONS: No Access Canada/ Internet FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: French/Nat The untainted reputation of the environmentally conscious Cousteau Society is under threat. Canadian officials have ordered a Cousteau Society research vessel off the St. Lawrence River following allegations it harassed and harmed fin whales while they were filming. Amateur video shot Thursday clearly shows the film crew in the midst of the fin whales and they appear to ride over the back of at least one whale. The Paris-based group - named after Jacques Cousteau, the famous ocean explorer - deny they behaved inappropriately. The incident happened Thursday near Tadoussac, about 200 km east of Quebec City. The resort is popular with European tourists and attracts about 250-thousand whale watchers each year. Cousteau Society President Francine Cousteau, Jacques' widow, vehemently denied the allegations of wrongdoing and accused the Quebec tourist industry of making money on the back of the whales. But tourists who witnessed the incident think otherwise. SOUNDBITE: (French) "Making a documentary is no reason to hurt them." SUPER CAPTION: Tourist Other witnesses on tourist trips say they saw expedition members rush towards whales with their zodiac-type boats and even hit and injure some of the sea mammals. The crew and captain of the vessel deny those allegations, saying the whales were not disturbed during the filming and did not show any signs of stress. SOUNDBITE: (French) "We did not run over the whales backs." SUPER CAPTION: Crew member The Fisheries and Oceans Department has since revoked the Cousteau Expedition's whale observing license. SHOTLIST: XFA Tadoussac, Quebec, Canada, September 9 1999 CBC 1. Amateur video of film crew in boat riding over whales CTV 2. SOUNDBITE: (French) Tourist 3. Pullback view of boat 4. Close-up view of crew on boat 5. SOUNDBITE: (French) Crew member 6. Pan view of boat leaving CBC 7. Repeat of amateur video of film crew?
Catching fish with fishing net - hands of fisherman holding caught flatfish in salt sea water
Catching fish with fishing net - hands of fisherman holding caught flatfish in salt sea water. Close up. Fishing industry. Fresh flounder
La grande traversée
BOATING MS from zodiac following polar bear with two cubs, swimming between ice floes at mouth of inlet, cubs disturbed by zodiac.
Brazil Greenpeace - Activists arrested following action against US grain giant
NAME: BRA GREENPEACE 20060520I TAPE: EF06/0433 IN_TIME: 10:15:38:03 DURATION: 00:02:37:04 SOURCES: AP/GREENPEACE DATELINE: Various - 19 May 2006 RESTRICTIONS: See Script SHOTLIST Greenpeace - No re-use/re-sale without clearance Santarem, Brazil - 19 May 2006 1. Greenpeace protesters on boat being arrested at gun point by Brazilian officials 2. Police escorting arrested people off boat 3. Arrested Greenpeace protesters on police boat AP TELEVISION Washington, DC - 19 May 2006 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Scott Paul, Greenpeace forest campaign coordinator "Twelve activists were arrested, there were several minor injuries. One Brazilian photographer had his hand broken, one of the American climbers has hurt her ankle in a fall and there was one of the Greenpeace activists who was driving a zodiac that was rammed by a tug or barge of some sort and I am told he would have been killed if he had not jumped off the boat and into the water." Greenpeace - No re-use/re-sale without clearance Santarem, Brazil - 19 May 2006 5. Protester in water with rope, tilt up to workers pushing other protesters UPSOUND (Portuguese) People yelling "Don't hit him!" 6. Wide of activist struggling with worker and being drenched by high power hose as she attempts to mount sign AP TELEVISION Washington, DC - 19 May 2006 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Scott Paul, Greenpeace forest campaign coordinator "There was definitely an organised response, the farmers' groups knew we were in the region and we had been interfacing with them for several days as the ship came into the mouth of the Amazon and made its way towards Santarem. We've had several protests, not in Santarem, but down in the soy fields leading up to today's activities. But the opposition was definitely organised." Greenpeace - No re-use/re-sale without clearance Santarem, Brazil - 19 May 2006 8. Wide view of police ship blocking Greenpeace's "Arctic Sunrise" ship 9. Brazilian farmers and officials invading Greenpeace "Arctic Sunrise" ship 10. Zoom in showing protesters and soy famers tugging at sign AP TELEVISION Washington, DC - 19 May 2006 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Scott Paul, Greenpeace forest campaign coordinator "This campaign is not against Cargill, it's not about soy, it's about the protection of the Brazilian rain forest and the people that depend on that forest for their survival." Greenpeace - No re-use/re-sale without clearance Santarem, Brazil - 19 May 2006 12. Wide shot of Greenpeace protester trying to fix banner on bridge while police ship approaches 13. Wide of "Arctic Sunrise" next to rig in Santarem Port STORYLINE Police in Brazil detained 12 protesters from the environmental group Greenpeace after the activists invaded an Amazon River port owned by the US grain giant Cargill. Eight activists invaded the port at Santarem by boat and draped a large banner reading "Cargill Out" over the grain loaders before being seized by police. Police said they were questioning the activists and had not decided whether to charge them. Santarem has been a flashpoint of controversy in recent years, with federal prosecutors accusing Minnetonka-based Cargill of building the facility without filing a proper environmental impact review. The company has denied any wrongdoing and the case is still pending in Brazilian courts. Greenpeace forest campaign coordinator Scott Paul told AP Television in Washington DC that the protesters suffered "several minor injuries". According to Paul, the seizing of the Greenpeace protesters was "an organised response". "The farmers' groups knew we were in the region and we had been interfacing with them for several days as the ship came into the mouth of the Amazon and made its way to Santarem," he said, adding that "the opposition was definitely organised". The port sits at the end of an unpaved road that leads through nearly pristine rain forest to soybean fields in the central-western state of Mato Grosso. Soy producers are lobbying the government to pave the road, which is impassable for much of the year. Environmentalists say paving the road would open up the heart of the rain forest to logging and ranchers. Greenpeace said it would continue to pursue its campaign "as long as the rain forest and the communities that depend on it are in jeopardy". Brazil's rain forest is the size of Western Europe and covers 60 percent of the country. Experts say as much as 20 percent of its 1.6 (m) million square miles has been destroyed.
Climate Change In India
GUWAHATI, INDIA - JANUARY 04: A dead cow floating in the Brahmaputra River as fishermen prepare their boats to fish on January 04, 2022 in Guwahati, India. Climate change continues to pose an existential threat for humans and animals as well as the traditional means of obtaining food. Air and water pollution remain a major problem in India and around the world. (Footage by David Talukdar/Getty Images)
Mission Antarctique - DVD/Antarctic Mission - DVD
BOATING SHOT from zodiac approaching a large group of cormorants in middle of channel diving to feed, edge of huge glacier on coast in background.
China NKorea Floods
AP-APTN-0930: China NKorea Floods Tuesday, 31 July 2012 STORY:China NKorea Floods- Red Cross official comment on seriousness of flooding in NKorea LENGTH: 02:07 FIRST RUN: 0730 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nats SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/AP PHOTOS STORY NUMBER: 852571 DATELINE: Various - 31/30 July 2012 LENGTH: 02:07 SHOTLIST: AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Onchon County, North Korea - 30 July 2012 1. STILL of bridge supporting railway lines destroyed after heavy rain 2. STILL of man walking over damaged bridge after heavy rain AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Beijing, China - 31 July 2012 3. Wide of East Asia Communications Delegate for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Francis Markus 4. Mid of Markus looking at photographs on computer 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Francis Markus, East Asia Communications Delegate for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent: "Our assessment teams on the ground have reported back that the most serious needs are shelter and also food security with so many crops having been damaged. Drinking water is a critical issue with the water systems having been taken out of action and there's obviously a danger of water-born diseases if things are not done to improve the situation." AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Anju City, South Phyongan Province, North Korea - 30 July 2012 6. STILL of residents waiting on the roof of a flooded house 7. Various STILLS of zodiac boats with rescue personnel going by flooded building 8. STILL of man and pig standing on dry top of building above flood waters AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Beijing, China - 31 July 2012 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Francis Markus, East Asia Communications Delegate for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent: "In DPRK, the humanitarian situation has not really shown any clear signs of improvement over recent years. In fact, there's been a gradual deterioration, and communities' coping mechanisms and their resilience is stretched to the limit. Then obviously you are going to see a potential aggravation of an already difficult situation in terms of food security, in terms of health and in terms of other indicators of communities' well-being." AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Anju City, South Phyongan Province, North Korea - 30 July 2012 10. STILL of residents waiting on roof of a shop 11. STILL of residents waiting on the roof of a flooded house STORYLINE North Korea has been pounded by two days of heavy rain, cutting off power and leaving buildings submerged and rice paddies flooded. On Tuesday, United Nations staff visited the hard-hit South Phyongan and Kangwon provinces to see what help the United Nations team in the country might provide. The rain on Sunday and Monday followed downpours earlier this month that killed nearly 90 people and left more than 60-thousand homeless, officials said. The floods also come on the heels of a severe drought, fuelling renewed food worries about a country that already struggles to feed its people. Two-thirds of North Korea's 24 (m) million people face chronic food shortages, a UN report said last month. "Our assessment teams on the ground have reported back that the most serious needs are shelter and also food security with so many crops having been damaged," said Red Cross representative Francis Markus in Beijing. "Drinking water is a critical issue with the water systems having been taken out of action and there's obviously a danger of water-born diseases if things are not done to improve the situation," he added. On Sunday and Monday, rain hit the capital, Pyongyang, and other regions, with western coastal areas reporting heavy damage. In Anju city in South Phyongan, officials reported 1-thousand houses and buildings were destroyed and 2,300 hectares (5,680 acres) of farmland were completely covered. The Chongchon River in Anju city flooded on Monday, cutting communication lines and submerging rice paddies and other fields, according to local officials. Boats made their way through the muddy water that covered the city's streets on Monday. Many residents sat on their homes' roofs and walls, watching the rising water. A young man wearing only underwear stood on a building's roof with two pigs; four women sat on another rooftop with two dogs. Markus said that for many in North Korea, the recent flooding would exacerbate an already desperate predicament. "The humanitarian situation has not really shown any clear signs of improvement over recent years. In fact, there's been a gradual deterioration, and communities' coping mechanisms and their resilience is stretched to the limit," he said. State media reported that helicopters had flown to various areas to rescue flood victims, but casualties from the latest rains were not immediately reported. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 07-31-12 0539EDT
Climate Change In India
GUWAHATI, INDIA - JANUARY 04: A dead cow floating in the Brahmaputra River as fishermen prepare their boats to fish on January 04, 2022 in Guwahati, India. Climate change continues to pose an existential threat for humans and animals as well as the traditional means of obtaining food. Air and water pollution remain a major problem in India and around the world. (Footage by David Talukdar/Getty Images)
Climate Change In India
GUWAHATI, INDIA - JANUARY 04: A dead cow floating in the Brahmaputra River as fishermen prepare their boats to fish on January 04, 2022 in Guwahati, India. Climate change continues to pose an existential threat for humans and animals as well as the traditional means of obtaining food. Air and water pollution remain a major problem in India and around the world. (Footage by David Talukdar/Getty Images)
The Biosphere
MS of Amazonian riverboat towing a zodiac, slowly moving on river. MCS back view of riverboat. TRAVELLING SHOT along flooded river bank of the Amazon River including shots of half-submerged trees and houses on stilts, shot from boat.
Mission Baleine Franche/Whale Mission
MLS of silhouette of team of biologists in zodiac pacing, taking photos of humpback whales blowing in dead calm Gulf of Saint Lawrence, whales are moving from left to right.
Climate Change In India
GUWAHATI, INDIA - JANUARY 04: A dead cow floating in the Brahmaputra River as fishermen prepare their boats to fish on January 04, 2022 in Guwahati, India. Climate change continues to pose an existential threat for humans and animals as well as the traditional means of obtaining food. Air and water pollution remain a major problem in India and around the world. (Footage by David Talukdar/Getty Images)
Mission Baleine Franche/Whale Mission
MLS of silhouette of team of biologists in zodiac pacing, taking photos of humpback whales blowing in dead calm Gulf of Saint Lawrence, whales are moving from left to right.
English coastal landfill sites at risk of being breached by erosion and flooding
English coastal landfill sites at risk of being breached by erosion and flooding; ENGLAND: Cumbria: Barrow-in-Furness: EXT Various of Frank Cassidy (Cumbria County Council) chatting with reporter as along on beach (not heard) Frank Cassidy (Cumbria County Council) interview SOT CUTAWAYS Bank with waste poking out Cassidy and reporter chatting (not heard) Bank with waste poking out Rubbish on beach Wide shot of sea with kayaks and wind turbines in the distance Essex: Thames Estuary: Two Tree Island Nature Reserve: Various of cow parsley, trees, grass and bushes in field Various of marsh and birds on islands Dave Smart (Essex Wildlife Trust) interview SOT Plants TILT DOWN waste poking out of bank Unidentified rubbish, grass and river in background
Harrison's Yukon
FOLLOW SHOT of river tour boat leaving dock on Tagish River (0:49). LS of boat moving upstream, ZOOM IN to MS (0:21).
Bushmen remove fish from nets
Bushmen remove fish from nets (Core Number: NBSL948P)
Small boats pass through the ocean entrance to the Murik Lakes