US Campaign 3 - Bush, Clinton campaign on eve of elections, more campaigns
NAME: US CAMPAIGN3 20061107Ix TAPE: EF06/1055 IN_TIME: 10:49:26:08 DURATION: 00:02:46:06 SOURCES: AP/ABC DATELINE: Various, 6 Nov 2006 RESTRICTIONS: See Script SHOTLIST ABC - No Access North America/Internet Dallas, Texas 1. US President George W. Bush and Laura Bush walk on stage UPSOUND: music 2. Wide of auditorium zoom in to George W. Bush 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, President - United States: "We're going to succeed unless we leave before the job is done. And this is an important issue for our citizens around the country to think about. We've got a plan for victory. But if you listen to the debate about Iraq from the Democrats, I don't hear their plan for victory. On this vital issue, they don't have a plan." 4. Zoom out from Bush at podium AP Television Alexandria, Virginia 5. Wide of campaign rally for Jim Webb, Democrat Candidate for Senator in Virginia with supporters holding banners saying "Webb" , UPSOUND: music 6. Tilt down from buildings to Webb speaking to supporters 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jim Webb, Democrat Candidate for Senator in Virginia: (beginning overlaid with zoom in to Webb) "We're going to succeed (inaudible) having gone down that road. We've got a positive message. I've been saying every day since February the 8th that there are three major themes that we need to focus on in order to bring this country back on the right track. The first is we must reorder our national defence and our foreign policy after this debacle in Iraq." 8. Wide of supporters clapping 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bill Clinton, Former US President: "You know what that means they're saying to these people, 'It's "ok" with us if you have a job, and then you have to pay taxes. It's ok with us if your kids put on a uniform and go to Iraq or Afghanistan and fight, maybe get wounded, maybe get killed. But if you're not going to vote the way we tell you well we're going to try to keep you home no matter what we took from you, no matter what you gave to this country, that is wrong." 10. Wide of Clinton at podium ++VIDEO QUALITY AS INCOMING++ ABC - No Access North America/Internet Vienna, Virginia 11. Virginia Republican Senator George Allen walking down corridor being interviewed by reporters, surrounded by supporters as well as anti-war campaigners AP Television Memphis, Tennessee - 6 November 2006 12. Democrat Senate Candidate Harold Ford campaigning 13. Republican Senate Candidate Bob Corker campaigning 14. Supporters of Corker applauding 15. Ford speaking to supporters 16. Close-up of Ford banner, pull out of supporters applauding STORYLINE Polling stations opened across the United States on Tuesday in fiercely-contested mid-term elections, which many predicted would see a big defection from Republican to Democrat. Republican control of Congress was on the line in an election coloured by voters' dismay over the Iraq war and scandal in Washington. At stake in the election were all 435 House seats, 33 in the Senate, 36 races for governor, ballot measures on gay marriage, embryonic stem cell research, the minimum wage and more. Above all it will be seen as a judgement on President Bush's agenda in the last two years of his presidency. Running out of time and influence, President George W. Bush appeared to have a rough road ahead in the twilight of his presidency with the once-unshakable loyalty of congressional Republicans appearing to weaken. Republicans are in a sour mood, scarred by corruption scandals, held in low esteem by voters and divided over issues from budget deficits to immigration policy. Many of the party's candidates shunned Bush in their campaigns for Tuesday's elections, fearing the association would hurt rather than help them. But Bush came out fighting in the last day of campaigning on Monday, rallying support in Dallas, Texas on the eve of the midterm elections and reminding voters that, from his perspective, the Democrats still did not have a plan for victory in Iraq. "We've going to succeed unless we leave before the job is done. And this is an important issue for our citizens around the country to think about. We've got a plan for victory," added Bush who said the same could not be said for the Democrats. Bush has maintained a rigorous campaign schedule over the past several days appearing in states where Republicans are strong and he brushed off an election eve no-show from Republican Charlie Crist who he backed as Florida's governor. Crist had decided to campaign elsewhere in the state. Meanwhile, back in suburban Washington DC, the Democrats brought out their heavy gun in the shape of former US president Bill Clinton. Democratic Senate candidate Jim Webb is in a neck and neck race with Republican Senator George Allen. Webb has focused much of his campaign on opposition to the war in Iraq, and he continued to hit that target in the final hours. "The first (thing) is we must reorder our national defence and our foreign policy after this debacle in Iraq," Webb told supporters. Former President Bill Clinton weighed in over the issue of voter intimidation that Democrats are accusing Republicans of waging in Virginia and other states. And Clinton reminded the faithful that minorities should not be denied their say at the ballot box. Earlier in the morning, Republican Senate incumbent George Allen greeted voters at the Vienna, Virginia metro stop. And, in Tennessee, where there is no incumbent, the two candidates, Republican Bob Corker and Democrat Harold Ford Junior, campaigned frenetically in the final hours. In recent days Ford and Corker have both spent most of their time in Tennessee's larger cities, but Ford planned an event on Monday in Centerville, a rural town 45 miles (72 kilometres) southwest of Nashville. Reaching out to residents of rural Tennessee has been a theme of the Ford campaign. Corker ended his day at the Shelby County Republican Party campaign headquarters in a mall in Memphis.
US LGBTQ Voter Voices
US LGBTQ Voter Voices
US FL Scott Christie
Florida Governor Rick Scott had a high-profile partner on the campaign trail Wednesday. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie made two stops with Scott in South Florida Wednesday where they talked about this week's Supreme Court gay marriage ruling. (Oct. 8