Views of the Philippines including streets, slums, housing, produce, and flooding
A film about social customs and culture of the Philippines. View of an upscale house in exclusive gated community in Makati City. Slum dwellings near a creek in Manila. Filipino men gather in a slum community. A rooster tied at the foot. Two Filipino children on window. Construction of a house in the Philippines. Remains of a house destroyed by fire. Flooding in the streets during a typhoon. Filipino man sleeping on top of sacks of rice. Coconut trees and pineapples growing in a farm. View of a mountain with Bougainvillea tree in the foreground. Bananas at a market stand. Aerial view of flooding in the Philippines. Polling place during an election in the Philippines with flag in front. A poll watcher lets Filipino voters inside the polling precinct. Campaign posters include 'Puyat for Senator' and 'Vote Attorney Ruben Feliciano for Councilor'. A Filipino man cleaning a park. Man working in the fields and carrying cans strung onto stick carried on his shoulders. View of rural highway and traffic. Bananas hanging at market stall. Man cutting young coconut with machete. Durian hanging at food stand. White man eating with Filipino man. Television director looking at clock as production director counts down behind camera for live television. Close up of clock. Filipino man putting watch on. Close up of watch. American officer at desk greeting Filipino man and pointing to his wrist to indicate that man is late for meeting. Location: Philippines. Date: 1971.
(SLUMS OF SPAIN)
Unused / unissued material - Colour material. <br/> <br/>Spain. <br/> <br/>Close-up shots of typical shanty town slums of unknown town, children play amongst rubbish dump, woman at standpipes, women hanging out washing, a man herds sheep near rubbish, a priest walking with a man in a suit amongst filth and talking to inhabitants. Pan across blocks of modern looking flats - zoom in to show shanty dwellings in the background. VS of women fetching water in buckets from standpipe.
Focus: [issue of July 13, 2021]
PA-1055 Beta SP; PA-0596 Digibeta; DN-S-044 1 inch
Wastage of Human Resources
chicago 1961
Stock Footage Chicago 1960's. Shows a green line train of the Chicago L (elevated public railway system). Chicago traffic and street scenes. Chicago skyline. Building demolition and construction scenes. Various street scenes of people and traffic. Parade with äóìkeep Chicago cleanäó float. Buildings being torn down. Shows high rise housing project for the poor in the inner-city. Shows the unemployed. Various scenes of housing, the people, and living conditions in the intercity (inter-city) and Chicago ghettos. Children playing in the ghettos of the intercity. Poverty in the slum area of Chicago. Night scenes of the bars, clubs, and burlesque section of Chicago. Various scenes of people, children at play. Shot List of Stock Footage (start web movie at time code shown for each clip) 00:00:01:14 Chicago Rapid Transit, The Green Line, the Chicago L. 00:01:03:09 Aerial view Chicago Skyline. 00:02:33;13 Close-up view of jackhammer pounding, sound of jackhammer being used. 00:04:03:10 Homeless man pushing a buggy. 00:04:31:10 Homeless man with sack over his shoulder. 00:07:14:04 African-American man and woman sitting on äóìstoopäó or porch, Chicago intercity ghetto. 00:07:41:07 High-rise apartment building, public housing for the poor. 00:09:23:13 Shows hand äóìrubber stampingäó forms. 00:09:44:04 Several unemployed people sitting on äóìstoopäó of walk-up apartment building, ghetto area. Various scenes of the idle, unskilled workers, Chicago slums or ghetto. 00:11:03:0. Exterior view of 2-story walk-up in the intercity, shows dilapidated interior of flat" or apartment.
Bridgeman Images Details
1978 Urban Blight
New York City - NYC - urban blight / decay - close on stripped beat up automobile abandoned in alley - slum - graffiti on wall - car - poverty
N.E.G.R.O.
ORIG. COLOR 200 SOF. MAG. CUT STORY-BLACK MEN BOARD BUS IN QUEENS (GYPSY BUS-LINE OPERATED BY N.E.G.R.O.). CU DOORS CLOSE. POV ROOFTOP- TENEMENT BUILDINGS - FACTORY SMOKE IN BACKGROUND. VS BLACK PEOPLE WORKING IN VARIOUS BUSINESSES SET UP BY THE SELF-HELP ORGANIZATION N.E.G.R.O. VS FOUNDER DR. THOMAS MATTHEW, SPEAKS TO GROUP IN HIS OFFICE. INTER- VIE WITH MATTHEW - HE EXPLAINS HIS OPPOSITION TO THE POVERTY PROGRAM CONCEPT. CI: ORGANIZATIONS - N. E. G. R. O. BUILDINGS - SLUMS- N. Y. C. PERSONALITIES - MATTHEW, THOMAS. TRANSPORTATION - VEHICULAR- BUS.
(V) India Slum Dancer - VOICE US-based Indian classical dancer teaches slum children traditional dancing
TAPE: EF02/1087 IN_TIME: 00:14:02 DURATION: 1:41 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Kolkata, West Bengal State - Recent VOICED BY RICHARD VAUGHAN SHOTLIST: 00:00 Wide shot slum 00:04 Mid shot of slum children 00:09 Various of dancer Chitresh Das conducting dance workshop for slum children 00:20 Child dancing 00:24 Wide of children dancing 00:29 Close-up of children's feel as they dance 00:33 SOUNDBITE: (English) Chitresh Das, Indian dance teacher: "They are coming from such humble background, when you are talking to them then you feel that they have a different life and yet they are full of life, so full of life." 00:45 Various of Bhola Sheikh, a child worker living in the slum, with his family 00:53 Wide of Bhola working at printing press 00:58 Close-up of his face as he works 01:01 SOUNDBITE: (Bengali) Bhola Sheikh, slum child: "There (at the workplace) I don't like it so much - but I like it here very much." 01:07 Various of Celine Das, wife of Chitresh Das, at workshop with slum children 01:14 SOUNDBITE: (English) Celine Das, dancer and wife of Chitresh Das: "For these children to know that there is hope, that there is something that relates to them as human beings, not just animals but as humans, as a community, as a people, it is so important." 01:27 Various of slum children on stage, performing a play 01:41 Vision ends STORYLINE A dance teacher and his wife who are based in America have travelled to Kolkata in India's West Bengal State to introduce the city's slum children to traditional dance. Chitresh Das is an Indian classical dancer who has been living in San Francisco for the last three decades teaching the Indian dance form "Kathak" at his school for performing arts. At a recent workshop, Chitresh taught the basic skills of this north Indian dance form to underprivileged children from Kolkota's shanty towns. VOICE-OVER: 00:02 There is real poverty in these slums. 00:05 Most children living here don't have much to look forward to. 00:08 But an Indian classical dancer who has been living in America has returned to bring a little joy into some of their lives. 00:16 For the last three decades Chitresh Das has been teaching the traditional dance form "Kathak" (Katak) at his school for performing arts in San Francisco. 00:24 But now he's returned to teach this north Indian dance form to underprivileged children. Watching them transform has made it all worthwhile for Chitresh. 00:33 SOUNDBITE: Chitresh Das, Indian dance teacher "They are coming from such humble background, when you are talking to them then you feel that they have a different life and yet they are full of life, so full of life." 00:44 Ten-year-old Bhola Sheikh lives in the slums with his family, it's a very different life to the dance world. He's so young, but already he has to work for a living. Cleaning the machines at a printing press. But he knows where he'd rather be. 01:01 SOUNDBITE: (Bengali) Bhola Sheikh, slum child: "I don't like it so much at the printing press - but I like it here very much," he says. 01:07 Chitresh's wife is Californian. She's found working with the slum children an uplifting experience. SOUNDBITE: (English) Celine Das, dancer and wife of Chitresh Das: "For these children to know that there is hope, that there is something that relates to them as human beings, not just animals but as humans, as a community, as a people, it is so important." 01:27 With the skills learnt from Chitresh and his wife the children have helped put together a theatre performance based on their life in the slums. The audience was left spellbound and Chitresh has promised to return.
[Reconfinement in Mayotte]
DN-LB-684 Beta SP
DACHAU (and other titles)
[India: French people stuck in a country under arrest]
DN-LB-533 Beta SP
Universal Newsreels
KENYA: ILLEGAL BREW KILLS SIXTY EIGHT (V)
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/1286 IN_TIME: 21:01:19 LENGTH: 01:05 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: Voice and effects XFA VOICED BY TARA OGDEN An illegal, home brew popular among poor Kenyans is being blamed for at least 68 deaths and sent another 245 to hospital in Nairobi. All the victims died in two slums where a consignment of the illicit brew was believed to have been brought in from the west of the country. Police said the death toll would probably rise much higher and warned many people might lose their sight. The illegal brew claimed its victims in Sinai and Mukuru, two of Nairobi's many sprawling, desolate slums. Home brew is popular among poor Kenyans because it is cheap. But its ingredients can range from high-octane fuel to metholated spirits. A glass of "changaa," as it is known costs about a quarter of the price of a beer. And it's lethal For more than half of the Kenyan population, it's the only escape from a life made miserable by poverty. These people are the victims of the latest batch of changaa. They've come or have been brought to the Kenyatta National Hospital, many semi-comatose or dying. These men came for a check up after they'd drunk the brew. But with no symptoms they can count thimselves among the lucky ones. The others will die or go blind. The authorities are now arresting those they believe responsible. But so long as half the population continues to earn less than a dollar a day, it's unlikely to stop the drinking of changaa. SHOTLIST: Nairobi, Kenya - November 16, 2000 **ALL TOKO MATERIAL** Mukuru (Slum in Nairobi) 0000-0005 Street scene in slum 0005-0009 Man at barber and second man reading newspaper 0009-0012 Newspaper reading 34 dead 0012-0018 Man pouring drinks out 0018-0024 Two man (not relatives) and pan down to dead man on floor 0024-0031 Wide shot of street slum Nairobi 0031-0042 Various shots of people on stretchers being carried into hospital 0042-0045 Man having red sticker placed on forehead 0045-0050 Two men in hospital 0050-0052 Medical attendants with victim 0052-0057 Close up of attendants with victim 0057-0059 Close up man on trolley 0059-0105 Medical workers in hospital 0105 ends?
8 pm: [show on October 26, 2019]
World Poverty 2 - WRAP Poverty in Afghan, kites, pope, Kenya, Philippines, Pakistan
NAME: WORLD POVERTY2 20071017I TAPE: EF07/1249 IN_TIME: 11:03:21:21 DURATION: 00:04:59:14 SOURCES: AP Television/CTV DATELINE: Various - 17 Oct 2007 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST AP Television Nairobi, Kenya 1. Wide of crowd swaying to music 2. Mid of children clapping to music 3. Various of the Kenya National Coordinator of Global Call to Action Against Poverty, Mwangi Waituru addressing crowd 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mwangi Waituru, Kenya National Coordinator, Global Call to Action Against Poverty: "We are gathering together, we have mobilised this huge number of people to make a call to our government to address the issues of slum dwellers, to give them access to water, to give them access to sanitation and better living conditions." 5. Wide of Kenya prison band, with crowd behind 6. Close-up of musicians 7. Mid of children swaying to music 8. Wide shot of crowd singing in English "We shall overcome", man holding up tee-shirt reading (English) 'Stand up, Speak out' AP Television Manila, Philippines 9. Woman painting on banner 10. Tight shot of hand painting banner 11. SOUNDBITE: (Tagalog) Claudine Claridad, Youth Against Poverty activist: "By participating in this project we can show everybody that we are not just keeping silent and we are not just accepting what is happening in our society." ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 12. Various of photographic exhibit illustrating poverty in the Philippines 13. Wide shot of event concert 14. Various of crowd holding banners and making noise at 1200 GMT, to mark the country's participation in the global event 15. Pan of crowd AP Television Bahawalpur, Pakistan 16. Top shot of people holding 10 kilometre long banner denouncing violence against women and calling for equal rights for women 17. Top shot of people dancing 18. Long shot of people holding banner 19. Tracking shot of people holding banner 20. Mid of women holding banner 21. Close-up of banner with signatures 22. Close-up of women 23. Mid of banner with signatures 24. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Muhammad Farooq, Director of Cholistan Development Council in Pakistan: "Countries such as ours signed a charter at the UN in 2000 that by 2015, education will reach every home, health and clean drinking water will be available to everyone, and that environmental pollution will come to an end. Eighteen countries in the world signed this charter." 25. Long shot of people holding banner in front of Farid gate AP Television Kabul, Afghanistan 26. Tilt down from damaged building to women walking towards their house which is located in a destroyed old governmental building 27. Mid shot of women entering house 28. Long shot of local resident Hayatullah Khan and children sitting in courtyard 29. Mid shot of Khan and children 30. SOUNDBITE: (Dari) Hayatullah Khan, father struggling with poverty: "This is a day of mourning for us, it's a sad day because we have a big economic problem. If we had good lives, every day would be a happy day for us. But the way we are living right now, every moment is sad." 31. Various of Khan's children drinking tea 32. Various of Afghan civil society representatives, government officials and Afghan parliament members gathering to mark anti-poverty day 33. Wide of people flying kites to mark poverty day 34. Various of woman preparing kite 35. Wide of kites flying in the sky AP Television - AP Clients Only Vatican City 36. Wide of St Peter's Square 37. Various of Pope Benedict XVI arriving and greeting crowd 38. Crowd gathered for speech CTV Vatican City 39. SOUNDBITE: (Italian) Pope Benedict XVI: "I urge therefore the increase of efforts to eliminate the causes of poverty and the tragic consequences that result from it." AP Television Vatican City, Italy 40. Wide of St. Peter's square STORYLINE People across the globe on Wednesday gathered to join an international campaign to end global poverty. The "Stand Up, Speak Out" campaign is part of U.N. efforts to promote the Millennium Development Goals that include eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, achieving universal primary education and ensuring a sustainable environment by 2015. Hundreds of events were being staged to heighten awareness and pressure governments to act in the interests of their poorest citizens. In schools, stadiums, streets and offices from Asia to Africa, thousands of people sang songs, listened to speeches and rose briefly to their feet in moment of solidarity and protest. Schoolchildren in a Kenyan slum belted out a Bob Marley ballad as they joined a continent-spanning effort to draw attention to the crushing poverty that campaigners say contributes to tens of thousands of needless deaths each day. "We have mobilised this huge number of people to make a call to our government to address the issues of slum dwellers, to give them access to water, to give them access to sanitation and better living conditions," said Mwangi Waituru, the Kenya National Coordinator of the Global Call to Action Against Poverty. In the impoverished Korogocho neighbourhood of the Kenyan capital, about one thousand pupils and a smattering of adults gathered in an outdoor amphitheatre next to a garbage dump, listening to music and watching traditional dancers stomp their feet to the beat of skin-covered drums. The children sang "We Shall Overcome", then rose to their feet and held hands while wailing the refrain from Marley's "One Love." Around the world, an estimated 1 (b) billion people live on less than 1 US dollar per day, according to UN figures. In sub-Saharan Africa, nearly one-third of the region's 750 (m) million people live in extreme poverty, frequently without access to clean water, decent schools, health care facilities or flushing toilets. Meanwhile in Manila, the Philippine capital, about two thousand government officials, teachers, students, soldiers and ordinary citizens, many of them wearing white wristbands with sketches of multicoloured human figures, assembled early on Wednesday at the seaside Rizal Park to call for an end to poverty. Agnes Aleman of the U.N. Information Centre said the Philippines was targeting 3 (m) million to stand up and make the pledge - in parks, government and private offices, schools, hospitals, restaurants. More than 640 (m) million people in the Asia Pacific region live on less than 1 US dollar a day. In the Pakistani city of Bahawalpur, around five thousand people participated in a rally organised by Cholistan Development Council and other volunteers. Participants carried a 10 kilometre long banner bearing names of those who support the cause, as well as slogans such as "Violence on women should end" and "Poverty should finish". The Director of Cholistan Development Council, Muhammad Farooq, who participated in the event, drew attention to upholding the international commitment to the Millennium Development Goals. "Countries such as ours had signed a charter at the UN in 2000 that by 2015, education will reach every home, health and clean drinking water will be available to everyone, and that environmental pollution will come to an end, Eighteen countries in the world had signed this charter," said Farooq. In neighbouring Afghanistan, many families also cope daily with the difficulties of poverty. Hayatullah Khan is the head of a family who knows the struggle to make ends meet, and one of many Afghans to have come to bear the consequences of decades of deadly conflict. "This is a day of mourning for us," Khan told AP Television. "The way we are living right now, every moment is sad." Despite the aid which Afghanistan receives from the International Community, Afghanistan provides a big human development challenge. Poverty affects large numbers of families who lost their houses in the conflict. More than 2 (m) million people have been displaced from their homes, according to the United Nations Development Programme. Civil society representatives, government officials and members of the Afghan parliament held a meeting in Kabul to discuss the issue, and ordinary citizens also marked the occasion. Hundreds of Afghan women and men participated in a kite flying event to call on the Afghan government for more transparency in how foreign aid is spent, and to focus on job creation to end poverty. Meanwhile in Vatican City, Pope Benedict XVI urged the international community to work to eliminate poverty. "I urge therefore the increase of efforts to eliminate the causes of poverty and the tragic consequences that result from it," Benedict told the crowds that had come to hear him speak. Last year, 24 (m) million people from 87 countries around the world stood up against poverty, with India leading Asians with 9 (m) million people, followed by Nepal with 3 (m) million and the Philippines with 2.4 (m) million. Organisers hoped to exceed those numbers Wednesday. Organisers say that 50-thousand people die each day from preventable causes linked to poverty and they called on participants to help fight the underlying causes.
DN-LB-562 Beta SP
Universal International Newsreel
Peru OAS - OAS Secretary-General meets delegates to analyse aid to Haiti
NAME: PER OAS 20070213I TAPE: EF07/0179 IN_TIME: 10:17:05:01 DURATION: 00:02:00:24 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Lima, 12 Feb 2007 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: Lima, Peru - 12 February, 2007 1. Wide of Peruvian Foreign Ministry 2. Wide of Organisation of American States (OAS) meeting 3. Pan of meeting 4. Mid of OAS Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza 5. Pan of Insulza arriving at Peruvian foreign ministry 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Miguel Insulza, OAS Secretary General: "The meeting has discussed in depth these problems regarding international cooperation and the aid to Haiti, problems regarding development, and poverty. We found some conclusions but I would say that we have to remain there until the Haitian state is strongly established to conduct the country's business." 7. Wide of photographers 8. Close-up of sign Cite Soleil, Haiti - 9 February, 2007 9. Pan United Nations (UN) vehicle passes by 10. People carrying injured person on stretcher 12. Wide of UN soldiers, UPSOUND: gunfire 13. Mid of Major General Carlos Alberto Dos Santos Cruz, UN Mission in Haiti at planning meeting 14. UN convoy driving through streets STORYLINE: The Secretary General of the Organisation of American States (OAS) met with delegates on Monday to analyse the challenges of providing aid to Haiti. Jose Miguel Insulza said that the Caribbean country presents three major challenges to the international community: strengthening of the state apparatus; progress in security and economic development; and the coordination of efforts by organisations working to strengthen the Haitian state in ways that will be effective. Insulza spoke in the Peruvian capital during a meeting of the nine Latin American countries that make up the United Nations Mission for the Stabilisation of Haiti (MINUSTAH), as well as representatives of the United Nations (UN) and the OAS. "The meeting has discussed in depth these problems regarding international cooperation and the aid to Haiti, problems regarding development, and poverty,'' Insulza said. ''We found some conclusions but I would say that we have to remain there until the Haitian state is strongly established to conduct the country's business," added Insulza. The Secretary General recognised that since the February 2006 elections, the Haitian government has shown the political will to change the living conditions of the Haitian people. However, he noted that as long as 66 percent of the national budget relies on international financing, Haiti is forced to depend on external support. On Friday, hundreds of United Nations peacekeepers raided Haiti's largest and most violent slum, seizing a portion of it in a six-hour gunbattle that wounded two soldiers and killed a suspected gang member. More than 700 heavily armed blue-helmeted troops from seven countries participated in the pre-dawn raid on Port-au-Prince's sprawling Cite Soleil slum, entering the mazelike shantytown in armoured vehicles and on foot as UN helicopters circled above. The raid sparked an intense firefight within the densely populated slum of 300-thousand people.
Argentina: the crisis in the background of the presidential election
Mayotte: reaching Europe via the Indian Ocean
USA: WORLD BANK'S POVERTY REDUCTION COMPETITION
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/0159 IN_TIME: 04:25:54 - 07:30:26 LENGTH: 02:11 SOURCES: All APTN except shots 8-9 = WHO, shot 10 = World Bank RESTRICTIONS: FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: English/Nat Hoping to inject new life into schemes designed to aid the world's poor, the World Bank will be announcing Wednesday winners of the first ever global competition in poverty reduction programmes. The first annual Development Marketplace will allocate more than three million dollars in start-up funds to the various winners. And almost more importantly, organisers hope that by getting members of the development community together, they'll be able to push back poverty levels in new ways. More than 300 finalists in the Development Marketplace competition presented their plans for fighting poverty in Washington this week. Ideas range from improving care for H-I-V and AIDS orphans in Africa, a number of different types of sustainable agriculture to cultural sensitivity training for judges in Guatemala. World Bank Chairman, James Wolfensohn, was delighted at the large response to the competition. More than 700 organizations and institutions from 60 countries are represented just in the finals. Looking at the various exhibits Wolfensohn says he was struck in particular by one thing. SOUNDBITE: (English) "The major thing that I felt in all of them, is the passionate involvement of just about everybody in their project. It almost doesn't matter what the project is, it is that the people that are here aren't getting paid to come here. It is not a commercial business for them, its a chance to make the planet different." SUPER CAPTION: James Wolfensohn, World Bank Chairman Teams will be judged on the impact their plan will have to reducing poverty, originality, value for money and sustainability. Mexican organisers of an joint government-citizen's group pushing for better quality education in the state of Neuvo Leon hope that, if successful in the World Bank competition, they will be able to turn themselves into an non-government organisation. SOUNDBITE: (English) "One of the most important things that we need is to provide equipment for technology, because most of the schools of Nuevo Leon don't have any computers in their schools and we think that if they dont have it that they are not going to increase their development." SUPER CAPTION: Nancy Onofre Castillo, Comparte organiser The competition featured a number of anti-AIDS and HIV programmes. One based in Myanmar planned to use a specially refitted boat to travel the impoverished communities on the waterways to spread the message of how to prevent the spread of the HIV virus. SOUNDBITE: (English) "When it docks at a village it is going to look like a spectacle, I mean it has brightly coloured painted ... Apaw is the name of our condom brand. It is going to have condom promotion messages painted right on the outside and then as it docks we are going to fold out a big A-V (audio-visual) set up with a stage and a large screen and TV ... its going to be a spectacle." SUPER CAPTION: Amy Romano, Special Projects Assistant, Population Services International SHOTLIST: XFA Washington, DC, USA February 8, 2000 & FILE APTN Washington, DC, USA February 8, 2000 1. Mid view, pan of displays 2. Close-up of Peru display 3. Close-up of African display 4. Close-up of locust 5. Close-up of Brazilian display 6. Close-up of anti tobacco poster for China 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) James Wolfensohn, World Bank Chairman World Health Organization - File Bangladesh 8. Mid view of children in slums 9. Closer view of children World Bank - File India 10. Woman hanging clothes on line Washington, DC, USA February 8, 2000 APTN Washington, DC, USA February 8, 2000 11. Pan down of Mexican entrant 12. Close-up views of pictures 13. SOUNDBITE: (English)Nancy Onofre Castillo, Comparte organizer 14. Close-up of AIDS prevention booth 15. SOUNDBITE: (English)Amy Romano, Special Projects Assistant, Population Services International 16. Close-up views of booth?
Mongolian nomads leave steppes in the face of climate change
Nicaragua Economy - Voters hopeful change of gov'ment will bring relief to needy
NAME: NIC ECONOMY 20061103I TAPE: EF06/1041 IN_TIME: 10:24:57:01 DURATION: 00:02:35:05 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: 27 October 2006 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST 1. Various of man rummaging through empty plastic bottles 2. Wide of children playing in slum area 3. Various close ups of children faces 4. Pan over street in shantytown 5. Close-up of Maria Isabel Gonzalez's feet as she clears wood 6. Medium Maria Isabel Gonzalez clearing wood 7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Maria Isabel Gonzalez, Unemployed: "Sometimes, we simply cannot handle this situation. Sometimes all we have to eat is some rice, beans and that is simply not a normal diet. But, what can we do? This is how we live, this is what we have to do to survive. We cannot do anything else. We could go steal, but we won't because that is a sin." 8. Medium of seamstress Ana Maria Castillo with her sewing machine while her son Elvio Montoya Castillo helps her thread the sewing machine wheel 9. Close-up of hands threading the machine's wheel 10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ana Maria Castillo, Seamstress: "We are waiting. The only thing we are waiting for is change of government." 11. Medium of Castillo sewing 12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Elvio Montoya Castillo, Ana Maria Castillo's son: "They used to say that we could not receive any benefits because there was a lack of resources under the economic sanctions, but now we simply don't earn enough money to eat. The country seems to have everything and yet we don't have any money." 13. Wide of buses in Managua 14. Wide of Managua 15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Nestor Avendano, Economist: "Blatantly speaking, human poverty has increased with an annual growth of 3 percent of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). During Bolanos (current President of Nicaragua Enrique Bolanos) five year term, I think the economy instead of focusing on social needs by concentrating on the needs of a small group of people, has caused an expansion of the country's poverty." 16. Wide of shantytown 17. Medium of elderly woman washing dishes 18. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Vox Pop, Elderly retired woman: "(Q: What do you need?) A: We need jobs, in order to not be lacking anything and scholarships for the students." 19. Wide of people walking down busy Managua street 20. Close up of pineapples on fruit stand 21. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Vox Pop, Young woman: "I want to make something out of my life." 22. Wide of Managua 23. Wide of people on horses cart in shantytown STORYLINE As voters in Nicaragua prepare to go to the polls on Sunday, there are calls for more to be done to battle widespread poverty. While shopping malls have gone up in the capital Managua, large sections of the city remain covered in shacks. Maria Isabel Gonzalez, an unemployed young woman, has two children who live with his father. She has not visited them for the last three months because she feels so embarrassed she has nothing to give them, not even food. "Sometimes, we simply cannot handle this situation. Sometimes all we have to eat is some rice, beans and that is simply not a normal diet but what can we do? This is how we live, this is what we have to do to survive," she told AP Television. Barefoot children beg on main thoroughfares, where new cars speed alongside people in horse-drawn carts. Sprawling, abandoned lots haven't been developed since being levelled by the 1972 earthquake and many of Managua's streets are still just packed dirt, laced with raw sewage. Recent rolling blackouts have sometimes forced incoming planes to circle over the darkened capital, waiting for electricity to return so they can land. At his closing election rally on Wednesday night, tens of thousands of supporters, many from the capital's slums, came out to cheer Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega, lured by his promises of better education, more hospitals and reconciliation. "We are waiting. The only thing we are waiting for is change of government," seamstress Ana Maria Castillo said. Her son Elvio Montoya Castillo, who works as a bagger at a local grocery store, agrees. "They used to say that we could not receive any benefits because there was a lack of resources under the economic sanctions, but now we simply don't earn enough money to eat. The country seems to have everything and yet we don't have any money," he said. But many find it hard to forget that it was Ortega who seized land and allowed the cordoba, Nicaragua's currency, to devalue by 33-thousand percent. Ortega's main opponent, Harvard-educated economist Eduardo Montealegre, has capitalised on those fears, saying Nicaragua would return to the "dark days of Sandinista rule" if Ortega won on Sunday. He needs 35 percent of the vote, while beating his closest opponent by five percentage points to avoid a December runoff. "The only thing he has done is make Nicaraguans poorer," Montealegre said this week. "The poverty we have today is because of Daniel Ortega." Economist Nestor Avendano argues that the country's poverty level rose during current president Enrique Bolanos' presidency. "Blatantly speaking, human poverty has increased with an annual growth of 3 percent of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). During Bolanos five year term, I think the economy instead of focusing on social needs by concentrating on the needs of a small group of people, has caused an expansion of the country's poverty," Avendano said. Nicaragua is the Western Hemisphere's second-poorest country, after Haiti. Its distribution of income is one of the most unequal in the world, with more than half the population living on less than one US dollar a day. While the country has progressed toward economic stability in the past few years, slow growth has forced it to rely on international assistance to finance its budget and debts. The United States is its number one market for exports, principally coffee and bananas. Experts say high levels of unemployment and migration, both internal and external, mainly to Costa Rica and the US have repercussions, for family development, health and access to services.
Angola: the "raptivists" invest the political field
Kenya AIDS - Feature on HIV/AIDS problem in Kenya ahead of G8 summit
NAME: KENYA G8 280605N TAPE: EF05/0572 IN_TIME: 10:00:09:00 DURATION: 00:02:18:22 SOURCES: APTN DATELINE: Kibera, Recent RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST 1. GVs of Kibera (the biggest slum in Sub Saharan Africa. Home to 1.5 Million Kenyans, with 60% of them infected with HIV. The average per capita income totals only US $ 0.2 per day) 2. Exterior of Health Centre (community based project funded by AMREF to cater for the residents of Kibera or anyone else who cannot afford medical care) 3. Sign of the Health Centre (Kibera Community Health Centre) 4. Wide Shot inside the hospital 5. Medium shot inside the hospital 6. Close up of poster inside the hospital 7. Medium shot of doctor attending to patient 8. Close up of doctor checking patients blood pressure 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr. Regina Mbayaki, Health Worker "We have clinical officers who are also seeing other clients...and from this around ten are referred to the VCT Centre, because of the condition they are presenting with. And from the ten maybe for the 4 or the 3 may be found to be HIV positive." 10. Close up of medicine 11. Wide shot inside pharmacy 12. Medium shot of waiting room 13. Pan of George Olali in the slum 14. Medium shot in alley walking towards his house 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) George Olali, HIV Positive "I am HIV positive. I have been positive for the last 15 years. I used to work with Kenya Railways. My wife is positive as I am. We are living positively. Actually, currently she is sick...she has been up country. She came back on Saturday and she is suffering from Meningitis." 16. Medium shot of George with his wife Hilda in the bedroom lying on the bed 17. Close up of Hilda STORYLINE: As the G8 countries prepare to meet in Scotland next week, top of their agenda will be Africa and one of the continent's main battles- the fight against HIV/AIDS. Globally about 40 million people are living with the AIDS virus, 25.4 million of them in sub-Saharan Africa, according to U.N. figures. Kibera is one of the slums at the outskirts of the capital Nairobi where more than 600,000 people live. The average income is only 2 US cents per day, which is not enough for survival. Besides poverty and poor hygiene, widespread tuberculosis and AIDS/HIV infections constitute a particular hazard to human life. An estimated 60 per cent of the population in Kibera is infected with AIDS/HIV alone. Hardest hit is sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV/AIDS has slashed life expectancy rates, orphaned 13 million children, and now threatens to reverse decades of socio-economic progress. To make matters worse, research suggests that the AIDS pandemic is only in the early stages of its development. More than 1.5 million Kenyans have died from the disease, while an estimated 2.5 million of its 31.6 million citizens are currently HIV infected. As life expectancy has dropped by 18 years to 45, an estimated 1.2 million Kenyan children have lost at least one parent. One fifth of the estimated 2.5 million Kenyans living with HIV reside in Kibera, where at least 50,000 AIDS orphans roam the streets. Educating boys and young men about HIV and AIDS presents one of the biggest challenges across Africa, home to 70 percent of the people in the world living with HIV. About 200,000 people die of AIDS every year in Kenya . Kibera is home to 1.5 million Kenyans representing half the population of Nairobi. HIV/AIDS is rife, affecting up to 5 per cent of the population with very limited facilities for provision of healthcare. George 44, and his wife Hilda 28, are HIV positive. They have two sons but they do not know their status as they have not shown any signs of disease. George has been living with the disease for 15 years and started on the drug ARV only last year. At the moment George works as a volunteer counsellor for AMREF (African Medical and Research Foundation),counselling people living with HIV and giving advice. There are millions of people suffering like George and Hilda across Africa and decisions made at the G8 summit in Gleneagles could be their only chance of survival.