COSTA RICA 2005 FIELD TAPE SD DUB
KEYWORDS: AMPHIBIANS; ANTS; BRIDGES; BUTTERFLIES; COSTA RICA; FROGS; FRUIT; GAMBLING; GLOBAL WARMING; INSECTS; PINEAPPLES; PLANTS; POPULATION; REPTILES; TERMITES; TOADS; TREES; WEATHER AND CLIMATE; WILDERNESS FTG FOR BILL BLAKEMORE CS VO ON EXTINCTION OF FROGS AND BUTTERFLIES / INTV W/ BIOLOGIST FEDERICO MUNOZ / SUSPENSION BRIDGE Munoz-Suspension Bridge Monteverde- Costa Rica- # 006 12/15/04 Wide Shot of 2 guys looking at foliage and trees. 06:00:23 M: Look at this is a bromeliad, it's a cousin of the pineapples that we eat. Q: The purple plant? M: The purple plant right here. Look at all the different mosses, ferns, and look up there, there is an Orchid in bloom. Q: That yellow orchid right there? M: That yellow orchid. You know there. Q: Each one of these is a different plant. M: Each on is a different plant. There are hundreds of plants in this one plant, the big tree. And it's, we're lucky to get this orchid in bloom. Q: So in other words, just in here, we probably have 30 or 40 species of plants, just right here. M: Easily. I bet we do. I bet we do. 6:01:06 M : Just. orchids, in Monteverde area, there are about 400 species of them. In one square mile you can find 400 species of orchids, probably more than you can find in a whole continent. (x-talk) Q: good heavens! M: In just a little spot of this particular unique forest. Q: wow. M: And this.This is a huge flower, the leaves are tiny, and. little behind the flowers. The whole plant is this tiny thing and it's blooming with this amazing flower that is going to attract probably an insect. So that it will carry the pollen to another flower of the same kind. 6:01:44 Q: And an insect, in other words, there is probably a specific insect evolved to pollinate that. M: Most orchids are species specific to pollinators. There's no two species, just one kind of an insect, that pollinates them. The most common pollinators are flies. Wide shot of 2 men on bridge. 6:03:44 CU of moss on trees and hands peeling away at the vegetation on branch. 6:04:00 M: The reason epiphytes (sp.) are epiphytes or the name is epiphytes is because they grow on top of the surface. Look at this mat of roots and plants, all interconnected. Recreating the hummus of the ground, of the forest floor. But up here, up in the canopy, look, look down, we are maybe 100 feet from the ground. And here's where the hummus been developed by all these tiny plants and their roots that are only getting support from the host, but not really growing the roots into the tissue of the host. That would be a parasite, like the mistletoe you have at home. but this are all epiphytes. 6:04:42 Q: So they don't take any nutrients from the tree. M: They don't. They just take. or use the tree as support. Their way to reach higher for light. That's the reason that they are here. Q: And this.this is also a separate plant? 6:04:57 M: This is one plant here, another plant here, another plant here. Just here, we may have 50 different individuals. Maybe some 10 species. Q: And these don't grow on the ground. M: They do not on the ground. They just grow on top of these giants of.of the trees, of the cloud forest. And so the other majority of the plants, small, but, two thirds of the species, which is pretty impressive. Q: It is. CU of soil and roots and leaves. 6:06:04 M: And that's why when we eat pineapple hurt.more talk about pineapple. 6:07:10 M: Federico Munoz, biologist, naturalist Q: you were telling me about this flower? 6:07:36 M: I wanted to point out that this tiny flower. I mean, that the tiny plant, that has this tiny flower, the orchid, they probably bloom for maybe 2 or 3 weeks in the whole year. 52 weeks has one year. So 3 weeks has a. and from the day 1 to the day 21, all the many individuals, hundred of individuals of this particular species start to bloom. What tells them to do that? Experts say well it may be tiny changes in the weather, there is already a changing weather here, but micro changes may be the mechanism that the plants have to know this is the time. Imagine that we change this whole thing. Imagine all the confusion, all the mis-information, all the confusion that all these plants and animals there are so many insects that only will release the fertile eggs to have their fertile babies to go out and fly. I'm thinking of termites, I'm thinking of ants and things like that. It's with particular tiny changes in the weather that they realize that this is the time and if this is changed. If the cold weather is changed. This tiny messages are not going to be there. So imagine all the confusion plants reading, Oh, this is time. 6:09:18 FM: Oh, maybe this is not time. And blooming at different times. This is not going to coincide. So the reproduction time will be completely ruined for so many species, so sometimes an orchid is not going to die because there is 3 days more of sunshine in Monteverde but it may die because it's not able to reproduce anymore. It's going to disappear and that is the disappearing that perhaps we are seeing today in Monteverde which is pretty sad and frustrating I would say. Q: just to complete one logical step, why is it important for them, the orchids, to all come out and blossom at the same time? 6:10:00 FM: they all have to blossom at the same time because it's the only time they would have to exchange genes. It's the only time, Plant A has to sent its pollen to Plant B and C and so on. So that is so important. Q: Tell us the changes you've seen since the first year you came here? What year was that? 6:10:34 FM: First time I came here with visitors from other country that were coming here for the first time was around 86, 87. Little did I know that in 2 years later there was not going to be the most common toad that used to be around here. The Golden Toad. That was one of the thing you could see any. Not anywhere, but it would be common. And one thing for. one of these few that you would say for sure we're going to see this. If this is the time of the year I'll show you Golden Toads. That changed in 88, 89 and this is one of the things that definitely you cannot show anymore. Q: When did you first see a golden toad? The first time I came here I was a student of biology in 81, again in 82 and so on. All these years, they were abundant. Q: Tell us about what was it like the first time you saw them? 06:11:38 I wasn't that impressed. It was good. I am a toad and reptile and amphibian lover. It was very special because imagine this is a population that live in one square mile in the whole world so wow here it is, something that is unique to this mountain and to the whole world. And they were abundant in all this ponds, breeding obsessively. So it was nice but after the first time, well if this is June or July or August, this is time to go and see the golden toad. And something that would be unique of this mountain, nowhere else you could see that. It wasn't that impressive after the first couple of times. But now that is no longer there wouldn't it be impressive just to find one around. But we know this is impossible. They are not here anymore. And we know that a good 20 other species of amphibians are gone from the area. So obvious that they are not here and it's, it's sad. Q: You know some stories about harlequin toads. Tell us about that
PA-2094 Beta SP
Journey to Banana Land
LE 20H: [show of 21 July 2018]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
DUSTY MILES reel 2
Leaving Fort Nelson the road enters wild and hilly country of the North Canadian Rockies to the top of Steamboat Mountain. Scenic vista's, streams and mountains, past Summit Lake. The Morris has to drive behind a bulldozer clearing rocks fron the road that have fallen from rock slides. Fast running Toad River. On past Lake Muncho with great mountains in the B G. Through the Laird River Valley and across the Liard Suspension Bridge. Lorries pass churning up dust. The rapids of Whirlpool Canyon. More driving to Contact Creek, where the road building crews from the North met those from the South completing 1500 miles of the Alaskan Highway in seven months. A large sign records the event. <br/> <br/>Continued,
Freshwater jungle: The secret life of gravel pits
Grand Est
AFP-3BI 35mm AFP-3BJ 35mm AFP-3BK 35mm AFP-3BL 35mm AFP-3BM 35mm VTM-3BI Beta SP VTM-3BJ Beta SP VTM-3BK Beta SP VTM-3BL Beta SP VTM-3BM Beta SP
LOUISIANA STORY
COSTA RICA 2005 FIELD TAPE SD DUB
KEYWORDS: AMPHIBIANS; BIRDS; BUTTERFLIES; CLIMATOLOGY; COSTA RICA; DIETS; DISEASES AND DISORDERS; DOGS; ECOLOGY; FROGS; GLOBAL WARMING; LIZARDS; MUSEUMS; PLANTS; POISONS; POPULATION; REPTILES; SQUIRRELS; SUN; TOADS; TREES; WILDERNESS FTG FOR BILL BLAKEMORE CS VO ON EXTINCTION OF FROGS AND BUTTERFLIES / INTV W/ ALAN POUNDS, MONTEVERDE CLOUD FOREST PRESERVE AND ACCOMPANYING B-ROLL DR. ALAN POUNDS' LECTURE ON EXTINCTION IN COSTA RICA INTERVIEWER 02;00;17 So, what are you looking for here and how does it fit into your overall study. POUNDS 02;00;20 (muffled) Most of the moisture that arrives here comes from the form of clouds and mist and we're interested in how large scale - . INTERVIEWER 02;00;28 You ready? So, what are you looking for here, how does it fit into your overall study? POUNDS 02;00;32 Well, most of the moisture that arrives here comes in the form of clouds and mist. So, during much of the year the forest is bathed in clouds and mist. We're looking at how those patterns are changing. We're looking at how the change (breaks off) . POUNDS 02;00;55 Okay, so most of the most of the moisture that comes here comes in the form of clouds and mist. So there's a big cloud bank which sits on top of the mountain during much of the year and keeps the forest wet under normal conditions, but with global warming we're looking at changes in that cloud behavior. We see trends in the frequency of mist in the forest for example. And a lot the biological changes are associated with the changes in mist inputs, including the disappearances of species like the golden toad and the Monteverde harlequin frog. INTERVIEWER 02;01;27 What are some of the exact - tell us about some of those examples where you've been able to match changes in one with changes in - POUNDS 02;01;33 Well we see that the warmest, driest years are associated with the downturn (breaks off) . POUNDS 02;01;48 'Cause there was a large population crash, or a large collapse of the entire amphibian fauna in the late 1980s. So, like 1987, 1988. And since then we've seen a number of downturns in surviving populations. They appear to be increasing for awhile and then we have another downturn. And if you look at a series of these events, they're associated with these warm, dry years. So years where there's relatively little mist reaching the forest. So it varies a lot from year to year. INTERVIEWER 02;02;31 Are you able to compare the mist measurements now with what they used to be here? POUNDS 02;02;36 Well, we don't have long term measurements for mist. So - now this is going to be hard to explain. . POUNDS 02;03;22 So, much of the moisture that the forest receives is in the form of clouds and mist. So, there's a big cloud bank which sits on top of the mountain during much of the year and helps keep the forest moist, even during the dry season, which runs from January to the end of April typically. But we're seeing changes in the amount of mist coming in, and associated with these changes in mist, we see changes in biology. We see changes in the distribution and abundance of birds, reptiles, and amphibians including (breaks off as wind picks up) . POUNDS 02;04;07 (picking up from before) So, associated with the changes in mist, we see changes in the distribution and the abundance of populations of birds, reptiles and amphibians. And we've seen the disappearance of whole species of amphibians like the golden toad and the harlequin frog. And these patterns are related to the changes in moisture inputs. . POUNDS 02;04;55 So, if you look at the data you see evidence that there's a change in the amount of mist that the forest is receiving over time. And associated with this change, we see changes in the distribution and abundance of populations of birds, reptiles and amphibians, including the extinctions of whole species, like the golden (shot ends) . POUNDS 02;05;24 So, much of the moisture inputs to the forest are in the form of clouds and mist. And we see changes in the patterns of that. We see a reduction in the amount of mist coming in (shot ends) . POUNDS 02;05;37 - birds, reptiles, amphibians. And, including the extinction of whole species of amphibians like the golden toad and the harlequin frog - (shot ends) . 02;05;45-02;08;40 Wind in the trees as the sun sets. Very pretty. 02;08;40-02;09;13 Shot of Dr. Pounds indoors through a rainy windowpane. Visually interesting shot. 02;09;13-02;10;17 Exterior pan of the research station, zooms in on window where Dr. Pounds sits inside. 02;10;17-02;10;37 Shot of Dr. Pounds at the computer. Dog peers through the window from outside. 02;10;37-02;19;01 Shots of Dr. Pounds at the computer. Includes medium shots, close-ups and extreme close-ups of Dr. Pounds, the computer screen. Also a few shots of other items around the office. 02;19;02-END Close-ups of Dr. Pounds' slides as he explains them. Quality of the shots is very good - many will not be noticeable as reproductions. . POUNDS 02;19;02 (off camera, describing slides) This is just a shot of the Caribbean slope, so you can see clouds forming up on the mountains. This is the location of Costa Rica, somewhere south of Florida. This is just a shot to tell people how the forest is bathed in clouds and mist. It's very rich in epiphytes - plants that grow on top of other plants, especially trees. So you can see a one-day orchid in this picture and a (SOUNDS LIKE: FORM MEAL LID). So this is the question that we've been attempting to address: Is global warming already contributing to the extinction of species. This was a thrilling sight to see back in the early 1980s: golden toads gathered at a breeding pool. Here's a group of males waiting for females to arrive. You can actually see one female up at the top there, I believe. POUNDS 02;20;52 (off camera, describing slides) So, typically the males would arrive first. So when the females would come in, you would have quite an orgy. So, if you're having trouble making things out, these are the female's legs right here. INTERVIEWER 02;21;15 That's a little risqué for late-night, obviously. POUNDS 02;21;20 (off camera, describing slides) (laughs.) Rough sex in the cloud forest. Shall we go on to another one? So this picture shows quite nicely the difference between males and females. So this picture shows quite nicely the difference in coloration between males and females. And because there were - let me try that again. There are always more males than females, as I was saying, so there was a lot of competition for access to mates. And the males would sometimes get rather desperate. You can see that the male on the upper left here has fallen over the tree root. But they get it right sometimes as you can see from the pair in the lower center. And then they would lay these nice strings of overly large eggs for a toad. . POUNDS 02;22;26 So the tadpoles that hatch from these eggs could develop all the way into a toad without eating if need be. That may be an adaptation for living in temporary pools that didn't contain a lot of food. Of course, the sad part of the story is that the golden toad hasn't been seen for a long time. In 1988 - Well, let me back up and say that in 1987 Marty Crump was trying to study the behavioral ecology of the species and she counted approximately one thousand five hundred golden toads at the principle known breeding site up on Brillante. And then in 1988 and again in 1989, only a single male appeared there and since then we haven't seen any at all. So throughout the 1990s and into the new millennium, the golden toad has been missing. So we're afraid that it's extinct. And the same is true of the Monteverde harlequin frog, last seen in 1988. This used to be a very common species in the cloud species in the cloud forest. So, it's a member of the Toad family. They breed in streams - mountain streams. The tadpoles have suckers that allow them to hold onto rocks. INTERVIEWER 02;23;48 And why do you think they went extinct? POUNDS 02;23;52 Same reason everything else did. INTERVIEWER 02;23;55 Whatever that reason is. This went extinct the same year, basically, you said it - POUNDS 02;24;01 This species and the golden toad both declined by about 99 percent the same year. Along with a lot of other populations. INTERVIEWER 02;24;18 Why those colors? POUNDS 02;24;20 This is warning coloration. Harlequin frogs contained tetrodotoxin, a very potent nerve poison, in their skin. So this was a warning that they weren't good to eat. INTERVIEWER 02;24;36 Are they found anywhere else? POUNDS 02;24;38 The genus is found throughout the highlands of - well, throughout much of Central and South America and up in the mountains. INTERVIEWER 02;24;47 But this species? POUNDS 02;24;49 This species was known only through Monteverde, so this is endemic to Monteverde. INTERVIEWER 02;24;56 Do you believe in your heart that it's extinct? POUNDS 02;25;02 Well, we haven't seen them since 1988 and they used to be very easy to see. So they were quite visible because they stayed out during the daytime. They're day-active and they're not at all skittish. Not at all afraid of people, so that you can walk right up to them and they don't hop away very quickly. So they were very easy to find during much of the year, so I think if they were out there, we'd be seeing them. There are some frogs that are very secretive, that stay hidden much of the time, but harlequin frogs were very easy to see. INTERVIEWER 02;25;34 Is that because they're poisonous? POUNDS 02;25;37 That's the kind of pattern of behavior you see in species that have defenses of that sort. They're not - they don't show a lot of fear of predators. POUNDS 02;26;06 This is the golden-eyed leaf frog, which also declined - disappeared from Monteverde. It still survives in other parts of Costa Rica, including in the Central Valley. INTERVIEWER 02;26;19 [unintelligible interruption]. POUNDS 02;26;19 .near - in San Jose. We haven't seen them here since the late 1980s, but you can still find them in some parts of Costa Rica. But this is a Costa Rican endemic. So it's found only in this country. INTERVIEWER 02;26;39 What would be your guess as to the age of the species? Golden toad and Monteverde harlequin? POUNDS 02;26;47 Those are tough question. You'll have to ask a geneticist or paleo-ecologist about that. I don't know how old the species was. I haven't been around long enough to give you a good answer. INTERVIEWER 02;27;04 Could be a million years? POUNDS 02;27;05 Um, I don't know. INTERVIEWER 02;27;09 Nobody knows? POUNDS 02;27;10 Well, there's - Yeah, most species of amphibians are quite old, but I would suggest you ask that question to someone who's been looking at the genetics of these and trying to get an idea of how long they've been around. But, yeah they could be a million years old. Museums have specimens - I don't know - I don't know. INTERVIEWER 02;27;37 Are they all in alcohol? Are some of them dry? POUNDS 02;27;41 They're in alcohol or in formalin. But you can extract DNA to do genetics. That's the reason we know the species of harlequin frog that occurred in Monteverde was different from other species - other populations that we though belonged to the same species. That's thanks to work by people in Panama. INTERVIEWER 02;28;14 [referring to the golden-eyed leaf frog, which is still on the screen] This one's endangered? POUNDS 02;28;16 Yes. You can still find them in pretty good numbers. In some populations where they've declined - dramatically at a lot of sites, including Monteverde. INTERVIEWER 02;28;28 I thought this was a preserve. It's funny that they're not found here anymore, they're found in San Jose. It's kind of ironic, isn't it? POUNDS 02;28;36 Well that's the kind of evidence that you see that it's not habitat loss that's causing these disappearances. You see populations disappear from protected areas, and yet survive in fragmented areas sometimes. So habitat loss - it doesn't explain the dramatic losses that we're seeing. So this is a section of skin showing the fungus that we were talking about before the - which is an important cause of mortality. INTERVIEWER 02;29;16 How does this one work on the skin? POUNDS 02;29;19 Well, it produces zoospores that infect frogs. Zoospores from the same individual can re-infect the same frog and so you can get a - you can build up a very severe infection, which can be lethal. INTERVIEWER 02;29;42 Does it kill the frog because it makes the skin incapable of breathing and drinking? POUNDS 02;29;47 Well, the fungus as I understand it, feeds on keratin in the skin and it can interfere with the process of taking up water. It's not terribly clear whether it also produces toxins that affect the frog. And again, I'm not an expert on this fungus, so there are people who could tell you much more about it than I can. INTERVIEWER 02;30;15 Chytrid fungus? POUNDS 02;30;16 Right. This is an example of a dead frog. This is a dead harlequin frog. INTERVIEWER 02;30;36 From what year? POUNDS 02;30;37 This was taken somewhere in South America, so this picture was given to me by a friend. So I don't have detailed information on it. INTERVIEWER 02;30;44 What killed it? POUNDS 02;30;46 Ahh, this was included in this talk to represent death by this chytridiomycosis, but I'm not sure if it was confirmed in this particular specimen. I think it - I think it may have been. So it's - the pattern is that biologists have gone into stream sites and have found numbers of dead and dying frogs. And then when they examine them it turns out that they have this chytrid fungus. But we think there's more to the story than just the fungus, because we've seen declines in other kinds of organisms, including reptiles,and it seems unlikely that a fungus that attacks the moist skin of amphibians would also attack reptile skin, so we think there's more to the story than a single disease. And, of course, we're also seeing these patterns that indicate that climate is also playing a role. INTERVIEWER 02;31;53 What kinds of reptiles are seeing a decline? POUNDS 02;31;56 Ahh, anole lizards - little forest-dwelling lizards. Like - something like this [a new slide pops up]. This isn't one of the species that has declined here. This is one that actually has been decreasing in abundance at this elevation. INTERVIEWER 02;32;18 Why do you think that is? POUNDS 02;32;20 Well, we think it's part of the same phenomenon - climate change. You see - you see some species that are declining and disappearing from this elevation and others that are moving in. INTERVIEWER 02;32;33 They're moving up from lower elevations? POUNDS 02;32;35 Right. So you see species that previously occurred in warmer, somewhat drier sides of the Pacific slope that are moving up. In this case, this is a species that occurred on both slopes at lower elevations, that's been increasing in abundance at this elevation. [a slide of a bird comes up]. And the main pattern we see with birds is an upslope movement of what we think of as Cloud Forest-intolerant species, like the keel-billed toucan, which ordinarily is found in lowlands and foothills. But since about the 1990s, we've had them breeding side-by-side with quetzals, with the resplendent quetzal. This is an adult male. INTERVIEWER 02;33;28 Tell us a little bit more about how this one has moved up into the Cloud Forest POUNDS 02;33;34 Well, you don't think of this - this kind of bird. Well, back in the - Let's see - how can I explain this? When Michael Fogden started collecting data, in the late 1970s, this bird didn't occur at this elevation. You could only find it further down the mountain slopes. So, it's a species which is characteristic of lowlands and foothills. But since around the mid-1990s, it's been in this area. So you'd have breeding pairs. You'd have them nesting side-by-side with resplendent quetzals, like this one. This is a bird that symbolizes Middle American cloud forests. INTERVIEWER 02;34;24 What is that? POUNDS 02;34;25 This is a resplendent quetzal. It's a free-eating bird, member of the Trogon family. INTERVIEWER 02;34;35 And this is normal up here in the Cloud Forest? POUNDS 02;34;37 Yes. So, this is part of the original Cloud Forest breeding fauna. So we worry about how they may be affected by these other things moving up. Obviously you can't just keep adding species to a habitat without having ecological repercussions. INTERVIEWER 02;35;56 Do they eat the same things as, like, toucans? POUNDS 02;34;59 There certainly is a lot of overlap in their diets. And they also nest in dead snags. We worry about resplendent quetzals because in Monteverde, they are occurring near their lower elevational limit. So they are a species that could very easily be affected by climate change. And we've seen a decline in their numbers over the years, so we're concerned about this one. We have seen mammals moving up the mountain as well, like this variegated squirrel. So that it shows the same kind of pattern that previously was found only in premountain life zones, but has been moving up to this elevation. Here's more clouds forming over the Caribbean slope. POUNDS 02;36;21 This is just a graph showing the trend in the number of dry days. These are data from standard rain gauges, which underestimate the kind of wind-blown mist and cloud water we've been talking about. But they do capture some. So, when a rain gauge contains nothing, you know that there was very little mist on that particular day, because it at least would ordinarily collect - at least show a signature of a mist event, even though it wouldn't give you an accurate measurement of the amount of moisture coming in. So here we're looking at the number of dry days over time. So what you can see is that there's a clear upward trend, though a lot of variability around that trend. And that variability is in large measure related to El Ninõ. So you can see different El Ninõ events. Like, you can see the '82-'83 El Ninõ here, the '86-'87 - you can see this long El Ninõ in the early to mid-'90s and then the one in the late '90s. INTERVIEWER 02;37;36 So if El Ninõ explains it, why global warming? POUNDS 02;37;40 Well, what you see though is that there's a - the effect of El Ninõ is superimposed on a longer-term trend. So here, if you put sea-surface temperature you can see - you can see the effect of El Ninõ. The blue graph - the blue line on the graph represents sea-surface temperature, looking at departures from a long-term mean for the equatorial Pacific. So this is measured - hundreds of, well something like 800 kilometers from here out in the middle of the equatorial Pacific. But these are just - this is just El Ninõ region temperatures. What you can see is the signal of El Ninõ and you can see that there's a correlation with the - INTERVIEWER 02;38;30 Spikes. POUNDS 02;38;31 Mm, hmm. But once you take this into account statistically, you're still left with a drying trend. So this graph - this graph shows this drying trend that's left over after you take into account El Ninõ. INTERVIEWER 02;38;49 In other words, over all it's - on average it's increasing. POUNDS 02;38;52 Right. So El Ninõ produces a lot of noise, but it's also very important noise because it's - you can get major extremes, especially when you have this superimposed on a changing baseline. So it's the overall pattern is moving towards a drier sort of conditions. Then when you get an El Ninõ event superimposed on that you can get unusual extremes. So, but if you ask what's causing this underlying long-term trend, you can get an idea by looking at the global warming signal. So here we're looking at temperature going back to the mid-1800s.
COSTA RICA 2005 FIELD TAPE SD DUB
KEYWORDS: AMPHIBIANS; BIRDS; BUTTERFLIES; CLIMATOLOGY; COSTA RICA; DIETS; DISEASES AND DISORDERS; DOGS; ECOLOGY; FROGS; GLOBAL WARMING; LIZARDS; MUSEUMS; PLANTS; POISONS; POPULATION; REPTILES; SQUIRRELS; SUN; TOADS; TREES; WILDERNESS FTG FOR BILL BLAKEMORE CS VO ON EXTINCTION OF FROGS AND BUTTERFLIES / INTV W/ ALAN POUNDS, MONTEVERDE CLOUD FOREST PRESERVE AND ACCOMPANYING B-ROLL DR. ALAN POUNDS' LECTURE ON EXTINCTION IN COSTA RICA INTERVIEWER 02;00;17 So, what are you looking for here and how does it fit into your overall study. POUNDS 02;00;20 (muffled) Most of the moisture that arrives here comes from the form of clouds and mist and we're interested in how large scale - . INTERVIEWER 02;00;28 You ready? So, what are you looking for here, how does it fit into your overall study? POUNDS 02;00;32 Well, most of the moisture that arrives here comes in the form of clouds and mist. So, during much of the year the forest is bathed in clouds and mist. We're looking at how those patterns are changing. We're looking at how the change (breaks off) . POUNDS 02;00;55 Okay, so most of the most of the moisture that comes here comes in the form of clouds and mist. So there's a big cloud bank which sits on top of the mountain during much of the year and keeps the forest wet under normal conditions, but with global warming we're looking at changes in that cloud behavior. We see trends in the frequency of mist in the forest for example. And a lot the biological changes are associated with the changes in mist inputs, including the disappearances of species like the golden toad and the Monteverde harlequin frog. INTERVIEWER 02;01;27 What are some of the exact - tell us about some of those examples where you've been able to match changes in one with changes in - POUNDS 02;01;33 Well we see that the warmest, driest years are associated with the downturn (breaks off) . POUNDS 02;01;48 'Cause there was a large population crash, or a large collapse of the entire amphibian fauna in the late 1980s. So, like 1987, 1988. And since then we've seen a number of downturns in surviving populations. They appear to be increasing for awhile and then we have another downturn. And if you look at a series of these events, they're associated with these warm, dry years. So years where there's relatively little mist reaching the forest. So it varies a lot from year to year. INTERVIEWER 02;02;31 Are you able to compare the mist measurements now with what they used to be here? POUNDS 02;02;36 Well, we don't have long term measurements for mist. So - now this is going to be hard to explain. . POUNDS 02;03;22 So, much of the moisture that the forest receives is in the form of clouds and mist. So, there's a big cloud bank which sits on top of the mountain during much of the year and helps keep the forest moist, even during the dry season, which runs from January to the end of April typically. But we're seeing changes in the amount of mist coming in, and associated with these changes in mist, we see changes in biology. We see changes in the distribution and abundance of birds, reptiles, and amphibians including (breaks off as wind picks up) . POUNDS 02;04;07 (picking up from before) So, associated with the changes in mist, we see changes in the distribution and the abundance of populations of birds, reptiles and amphibians. And we've seen the disappearance of whole species of amphibians like the golden toad and the harlequin frog. And these patterns are related to the changes in moisture inputs. . POUNDS 02;04;55 So, if you look at the data you see evidence that there's a change in the amount of mist that the forest is receiving over time. And associated with this change, we see changes in the distribution and abundance of populations of birds, reptiles and amphibians, including the extinctions of whole species, like the golden (shot ends) . POUNDS 02;05;24 So, much of the moisture inputs to the forest are in the form of clouds and mist. And we see changes in the patterns of that. We see a reduction in the amount of mist coming in (shot ends) . POUNDS 02;05;37 - birds, reptiles, amphibians. And, including the extinction of whole species of amphibians like the golden toad and the harlequin frog - (shot ends) . 02;05;45-02;08;40 Wind in the trees as the sun sets. Very pretty. 02;08;40-02;09;13 Shot of Dr. Pounds indoors through a rainy windowpane. Visually interesting shot. 02;09;13-02;10;17 Exterior pan of the research station, zooms in on window where Dr. Pounds sits inside. 02;10;17-02;10;37 Shot of Dr. Pounds at the computer. Dog peers through the window from outside. 02;10;37-02;19;01 Shots of Dr. Pounds at the computer. Includes medium shots, close-ups and extreme close-ups of Dr. Pounds, the computer screen. Also a few shots of other items around the office. 02;19;02-END Close-ups of Dr. Pounds' slides as he explains them. Quality of the shots is very good - many will not be noticeable as reproductions. . POUNDS 02;19;02 (off camera, describing slides) This is just a shot of the Caribbean slope, so you can see clouds forming up on the mountains. This is the location of Costa Rica, somewhere south of Florida. This is just a shot to tell people how the forest is bathed in clouds and mist. It's very rich in epiphytes - plants that grow on top of other plants, especially trees. So you can see a one-day orchid in this picture and a (SOUNDS LIKE: FORM MEAL LID). So this is the question that we've been attempting to address: Is global warming already contributing to the extinction of species. This was a thrilling sight to see back in the early 1980s: golden toads gathered at a breeding pool. Here's a group of males waiting for females to arrive. You can actually see one female up at the top there, I believe. POUNDS 02;20;52 (off camera, describing slides) So, typically the males would arrive first. So when the females would come in, you would have quite an orgy. So, if you're having trouble making things out, these are the female's legs right here. INTERVIEWER 02;21;15 That's a little risqué for late-night, obviously. POUNDS 02;21;20 (off camera, describing slides) (laughs.) Rough sex in the cloud forest. Shall we go on to another one? So this picture shows quite nicely the difference between males and females. So this picture shows quite nicely the difference in coloration between males and females. And because there were - let me try that again. There are always more males than females, as I was saying, so there was a lot of competition for access to mates. And the males would sometimes get rather desperate. You can see that the male on the upper left here has fallen over the tree root. But they get it right sometimes as you can see from the pair in the lower center. And then they would lay these nice strings of overly large eggs for a toad. . POUNDS 02;22;26 So the tadpoles that hatch from these eggs could develop all the way into a toad without eating if need be. That may be an adaptation for living in temporary pools that didn't contain a lot of food. Of course, the sad part of the story is that the golden toad hasn't been seen for a long time. In 1988 - Well, let me back up and say that in 1987 Marty Crump was trying to study the behavioral ecology of the species and she counted approximately one thousand five hundred golden toads at the principle known breeding site up on Brillante. And then in 1988 and again in 1989, only a single male appeared there and since then we haven't seen any at all. So throughout the 1990s and into the new millennium, the golden toad has been missing. So we're afraid that it's extinct. And the same is true of the Monteverde harlequin frog, last seen in 1988. This used to be a very common species in the cloud species in the cloud forest. So, it's a member of the Toad family. They breed in streams - mountain streams. The tadpoles have suckers that allow them to hold onto rocks. INTERVIEWER 02;23;48 And why do you think they went extinct? POUNDS 02;23;52 Same reason everything else did. INTERVIEWER 02;23;55 Whatever that reason is. This went extinct the same year, basically, you said it - POUNDS 02;24;01 This species and the golden toad both declined by about 99 percent the same year. Along with a lot of other populations. INTERVIEWER 02;24;18 Why those colors? POUNDS 02;24;20 This is warning coloration. Harlequin frogs contained tetrodotoxin, a very potent nerve poison, in their skin. So this was a warning that they weren't good to eat. INTERVIEWER 02;24;36 Are they found anywhere else? POUNDS 02;24;38 The genus is found throughout the highlands of - well, throughout much of Central and South America and up in the mountains. INTERVIEWER 02;24;47 But this species? POUNDS 02;24;49 This species was known only through Monteverde, so this is endemic to Monteverde. INTERVIEWER 02;24;56 Do you believe in your heart that it's extinct? POUNDS 02;25;02 Well, we haven't seen them since 1988 and they used to be very easy to see. So they were quite visible because they stayed out during the daytime. They're day-active and they're not at all skittish. Not at all afraid of people, so that you can walk right up to them and they don't hop away very quickly. So they were very easy to find during much of the year, so I think if they were out there, we'd be seeing them. There are some frogs that are very secretive, that stay hidden much of the time, but harlequin frogs were very easy to see. INTERVIEWER 02;25;34 Is that because they're poisonous? POUNDS 02;25;37 That's the kind of pattern of behavior you see in species that have defenses of that sort. They're not - they don't show a lot of fear of predators. POUNDS 02;26;06 This is the golden-eyed leaf frog, which also declined - disappeared from Monteverde. It still survives in other parts of Costa Rica, including in the Central Valley. INTERVIEWER 02;26;19 [unintelligible interruption]. POUNDS 02;26;19 .near - in San Jose. We haven't seen them here since the late 1980s, but you can still find them in some parts of Costa Rica. But this is a Costa Rican endemic. So it's found only in this country. INTERVIEWER 02;26;39 What would be your guess as to the age of the species? Golden toad and Monteverde harlequin? POUNDS 02;26;47 Those are tough question. You'll have to ask a geneticist or paleo-ecologist about that. I don't know how old the species was. I haven't been around long enough to give you a good answer. INTERVIEWER 02;27;04 Could be a million years? POUNDS 02;27;05 Um, I don't know. INTERVIEWER 02;27;09 Nobody knows? POUNDS 02;27;10 Well, there's - Yeah, most species of amphibians are quite old, but I would suggest you ask that question to someone who's been looking at the genetics of these and trying to get an idea of how long they've been around. But, yeah they could be a million years old. Museums have specimens - I don't know - I don't know. INTERVIEWER 02;27;37 Are they all in alcohol? Are some of them dry? POUNDS 02;27;41 They're in alcohol or in formalin. But you can extract DNA to do genetics. That's the reason we know the species of harlequin frog that occurred in Monteverde was different from other species - other populations that we though belonged to the same species. That's thanks to work by people in Panama. INTERVIEWER 02;28;14 [referring to the golden-eyed leaf frog, which is still on the screen] This one's endangered? POUNDS 02;28;16 Yes. You can still find them in pretty good numbers. In some populations where they've declined - dramatically at a lot of sites, including Monteverde. INTERVIEWER 02;28;28 I thought this was a preserve. It's funny that they're not found here anymore, they're found in San Jose. It's kind of ironic, isn't it? POUNDS 02;28;36 Well that's the kind of evidence that you see that it's not habitat loss that's causing these disappearances. You see populations disappear from protected areas, and yet survive in fragmented areas sometimes. So habitat loss - it doesn't explain the dramatic losses that we're seeing. So this is a section of skin showing the fungus that we were talking about before the - which is an important cause of mortality. INTERVIEWER 02;29;16 How does this one work on the skin? POUNDS 02;29;19 Well, it produces zoospores that infect frogs. Zoospores from the same individual can re-infect the same frog and so you can get a - you can build up a very severe infection, which can be lethal. INTERVIEWER 02;29;42 Does it kill the frog because it makes the skin incapable of breathing and drinking? POUNDS 02;29;47 Well, the fungus as I understand it, feeds on keratin in the skin and it can interfere with the process of taking up water. It's not terribly clear whether it also produces toxins that affect the frog. And again, I'm not an expert on this fungus, so there are people who could tell you much more about it than I can. INTERVIEWER 02;30;15 Chytrid fungus? POUNDS 02;30;16 Right. This is an example of a dead frog. This is a dead harlequin frog. INTERVIEWER 02;30;36 From what year? POUNDS 02;30;37 This was taken somewhere in South America, so this picture was given to me by a friend. So I don't have detailed information on it. INTERVIEWER 02;30;44 What killed it? POUNDS 02;30;46 Ahh, this was included in this talk to represent death by this chytridiomycosis, but I'm not sure if it was confirmed in this particular specimen. I think it - I think it may have been. So it's - the pattern is that biologists have gone into stream sites and have found numbers of dead and dying frogs. And then when they examine them it turns out that they have this chytrid fungus. But we think there's more to the story than just the fungus, because we've seen declines in other kinds of organisms, including reptiles,and it seems unlikely that a fungus that attacks the moist skin of amphibians would also attack reptile skin, so we think there's more to the story than a single disease. And, of course, we're also seeing these patterns that indicate that climate is also playing a role. INTERVIEWER 02;31;53 What kinds of reptiles are seeing a decline? POUNDS 02;31;56 Ahh, anole lizards - little forest-dwelling lizards. Like - something like this [a new slide pops up]. This isn't one of the species that has declined here. This is one that actually has been decreasing in abundance at this elevation. INTERVIEWER 02;32;18 Why do you think that is? POUNDS 02;32;20 Well, we think it's part of the same phenomenon - climate change. You see - you see some species that are declining and disappearing from this elevation and others that are moving in. INTERVIEWER 02;32;33 They're moving up from lower elevations? POUNDS 02;32;35 Right. So you see species that previously occurred in warmer, somewhat drier sides of the Pacific slope that are moving up. In this case, this is a species that occurred on both slopes at lower elevations, that's been increasing in abundance at this elevation. [a slide of a bird comes up]. And the main pattern we see with birds is an upslope movement of what we think of as Cloud Forest-intolerant species, like the keel-billed toucan, which ordinarily is found in lowlands and foothills. But since about the 1990s, we've had them breeding side-by-side with quetzals, with the resplendent quetzal. This is an adult male. INTERVIEWER 02;33;28 Tell us a little bit more about how this one has moved up into the Cloud Forest POUNDS 02;33;34 Well, you don't think of this - this kind of bird. Well, back in the - Let's see - how can I explain this? When Michael Fogden started collecting data, in the late 1970s, this bird didn't occur at this elevation. You could only find it further down the mountain slopes. So, it's a species which is characteristic of lowlands and foothills. But since around the mid-1990s, it's been in this area. So you'd have breeding pairs. You'd have them nesting side-by-side with resplendent quetzals, like this one. This is a bird that symbolizes Middle American cloud forests. INTERVIEWER 02;34;24 What is that? POUNDS 02;34;25 This is a resplendent quetzal. It's a free-eating bird, member of the Trogon family. INTERVIEWER 02;34;35 And this is normal up here in the Cloud Forest? POUNDS 02;34;37 Yes. So, this is part of the original Cloud Forest breeding fauna. So we worry about how they may be affected by these other things moving up. Obviously you can't just keep adding species to a habitat without having ecological repercussions. INTERVIEWER 02;35;56 Do they eat the same things as, like, toucans? POUNDS 02;34;59 There certainly is a lot of overlap in their diets. And they also nest in dead snags. We worry about resplendent quetzals because in Monteverde, they are occurring near their lower elevational limit. So they are a species that could very easily be affected by climate change. And we've seen a decline in their numbers over the years, so we're concerned about this one. We have seen mammals moving up the mountain as well, like this variegated squirrel. So that it shows the same kind of pattern that previously was found only in premountain life zones, but has been moving up to this elevation. Here's more clouds forming over the Caribbean slope. POUNDS 02;36;21 This is just a graph showing the trend in the number of dry days. These are data from standard rain gauges, which underestimate the kind of wind-blown mist and cloud water we've been talking about. But they do capture some. So, when a rain gauge contains nothing, you know that there was very little mist on that particular day, because it at least would ordinarily collect - at least show a signature of a mist event, even though it wouldn't give you an accurate measurement of the amount of moisture coming in. So here we're looking at the number of dry days over time. So what you can see is that there's a clear upward trend, though a lot of variability around that trend. And that variability is in large measure related to El Ninõ. So you can see different El Ninõ events. Like, you can see the '82-'83 El Ninõ here, the '86-'87 - you can see this long El Ninõ in the early to mid-'90s and then the one in the late '90s. INTERVIEWER 02;37;36 So if El Ninõ explains it, why global warming? POUNDS 02;37;40 Well, what you see though is that there's a - the effect of El Ninõ is superimposed on a longer-term trend. So here, if you put sea-surface temperature you can see - you can see the effect of El Ninõ. The blue graph - the blue line on the graph represents sea-surface temperature, looking at departures from a long-term mean for the equatorial Pacific. So this is measured - hundreds of, well something like 800 kilometers from here out in the middle of the equatorial Pacific. But these are just - this is just El Ninõ region temperatures. What you can see is the signal of El Ninõ and you can see that there's a correlation with the - INTERVIEWER 02;38;30 Spikes. POUNDS 02;38;31 Mm, hmm. But once you take this into account statistically, you're still left with a drying trend. So this graph - this graph shows this drying trend that's left over after you take into account El Ninõ. INTERVIEWER 02;38;49 In other words, over all it's - on average it's increasing. POUNDS 02;38;52 Right. So El Ninõ produces a lot of noise, but it's also very important noise because it's - you can get major extremes, especially when you have this superimposed on a changing baseline. So it's the overall pattern is moving towards a drier sort of conditions. Then when you get an El Ninõ event superimposed on that you can get unusual extremes. So, but if you ask what's causing this underlying long-term trend, you can get an idea by looking at the global warming signal. So here we're looking at temperature going back to the mid-1800s.
PRASVILLE - SHEEP REHABILITATION CARRIERE 28
Loire Bretagne
VIEWS ON LOIRE n°123: SUBJECT n°2 - XAVIER MATHIAS, LES LEGUMES OUBLIS
Loire Bretagne
KOSOVO CRISIS
KOSOVO CRISIS / NATO AIR STRIKES 14:30:13 MINISTRY OF DEFENSE (MOD)PRESS BRIEFING W/ BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY ROBIN COOK ABOUT YUGOSLAVIA ALLEGNING THAT A NATO MISSILE LANDED ON CIVILIAN CONVOY TRAVLEING ON A ROAD IN KOSOVO ON 99/04/14 14:30:22 SOT COOK: ON A COUNTRY TOAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE LOST THEIR LIVES 14:30:41 NATO CARRYING OUT FULL INVESTIGATION 14:30:51 IF NATO RESPONSIBLE CAUSE DEEP CONCERN 14:31:56 QUESTIONS FOR MILOSEVIC ABOUT REFUGEES IN CONVOY 14:32:06 WHY WERE THEY REFUGEES IN THE FIRST PLACE? 14:32:14 WHAT WERE THEY FLEEING FROM? 14:32:48 REFUGEES FORCED TO WALK ALONG ANTI AIR CRAFT SIDE / USED AS A HUMAN SHIELD 14:33:05 MWS COOK LEAVING PRESSER W/ MILITARY OFFICIAL 14:33:58 RICHARD GIZBERT PACKAGE 14:44:32 LONDON FEED SLATE 14:56:26 WFAA DALLAS SLATE 14:57:40 WFAA PACKAGE IN TIRANA, ALBANIA ABOUT KOSOVO ALBANIAN MAN FROM THE US HENRY PAROLI (OH) HELPING KOSOVAR REFUGEES FIND SHELTER 15:01:38 WFAA SLATE 15:13:59 FTG SHOT AT NATO HEADQUATERS / STAKEOUT REPORTERS SWARMING AROUND NATO REPRESENTATIVES (NOT JAMIE SHEA) 15:15:30 MWS NATO SPOKESMAN JAMIE SHEA FOLLOWED BY SEA OF PRESS 15:15:56 CUTAWAY PRESSROOM / REPORTING TYPING OON NOTEBOOK COMPUTERS 15:16:19 VS REPORTERS WORKING 15:16:32 MCU REPORTER TALKING ON PHONE & SMOKING 15:16:45 MWS BEHIND REPORTERS IN PRESSROOM 15:19:12 MWS PRESS SWARMING AROUND SHEA AT END OF BRIEFING 15:20:16 MS REPORTERS GRABBING COPIES OF AUDIO CASSETTES 15:21:34 LONDON FEED SLATE 15:27:21 SERB TV FTG W/ VO IN SERBO CROATIAN (NO TRANSLATION) 15:28:00 MOS INTV W/ PEOPLE IN SERBO CROATATION(NO TRANSLATION) 15:28:48 VS RED CROSS VECHILE / RED MILK CRATE FULL OF BREAD / MAN DISTRIBUTING LOAVES OF BREAD 15:29:48 SERB TV FTG W/ VO IN SERBO CROATIAN (NO TRANSLATION) / DAY FTG / VS DESERTED BORDER CHECKPOINT 15:30:20 MWS CARAVAN OF VEHICLES DRIVING ON ROAD 15:30:31 NIGHT FTG / VS CARAVAN OF VEHICLES DRIVING ON ROAD 15:32:09 SERB TV NEWS W. ENGLISH LANGUAGE VO / VS ABOUT SERB PRESIDENT SLOBODAN MILOSEVIC MEETING W/ RUSSIAN ENVOY 15:33:00 VS BOMBED FACTORY 15:33:11 VS FIRE FIGHTERS FIGHTING BLAZE 15:33:28 MS DEMOLISHED RAILWAY BRIDGE 15:33:46 VS BROKEN GLASS 15:33:53 GRAINY NIGHT FTG / VS BOMBS FAILING 15:34:31 NEWS SLATE 15:34:42 MORE NEWS W/ ENGLISH VO / VS BOMB DAMAGED HOSPITAL IN BELGRADE / BROKEN GLASS / PATIENTS IN HOSPITAL BEDS / CHILDREN'S WARD 15:35:52 VS CAR / BOMBED FACTORY / BOMBED POWER STATTION 15:36:46 NIGHT FTG / VS FIRE RAGING OVER ALLEGEDLY BOMBED OIL REFINERY 15:37:15 DAT FTG / VS BOMBED BRIDGES 15:38:05 VS BOMB DAMAGED HOUSED / DEMOLISHED MOUNTAIN VILLAGE 15:38:39 B&W FTG / VS TRAIN & BRIDGE DAMAGED BY NATO MISSILE 15:39:42 LONDON FEED SLATE 16:01:08 END OF TAPE
[National Conservation Guards]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
Entertainment Europe: Big Trouble - Surreal comedy in Big Trouble
TAPE: EF02/0291 IN_TIME: 14:09:06 DURATION: 6:24 SOURCES: APTN/Buenavista inl RESTRICTIONS: No re-use/re-sale of film clips without clearance DATELINE: Los Angeles Recent SHOTLIST 1.Clip ' Big Trouble 2. sot Barry Sonnenfeld:' Tim is the funny guy but I don't want him to act funny, I surround him with actors that are not comedians like Heavy D and Jason Lee and Tom Sizemore and Dennis Farina, and I want them to be the comedy, but I don't want them to act as comedians I just want them to be you know as real as possible given the surreal situation. so that was my philosophy I think it kind of worked and then we had Renee Russo basically playing Marilyn Monoe,we gave her blond wig and tight Versace pants and let her be a blonde woman, and I think she really liked doing that . 3 Clip ' Big Trouble '4. sot Zooey Deschanel: The Sonnefeld formula which is drier plus faster equals funnier, you can always pull that out, you know at a moments notice. Ok it's not funny enough OK drier plus faster, equals funnier, you know, Barry Sonnefeld is a genius at comedy so I totally trust his vision. 5. Clip 6. sot Jason Lee: As soon as I got my stance down and my behaviour and my eyes and stuff and my little smile it really started coming out and I did not really need dialogue so it felt kind of cool. 7. Clip 8. Sofia Vergara: t'his was great because this was not something that I was planning on and I think when things come to you likethat like surprises is the ones that you really enjoy more, because it comes like a gift to you, so I think I will always remember this even if I don't do any more movies or even if I do, I always remember Big Trouble. 9. sot Barry Sonnenfelt: ' because It is an ensemble piece none of the actors feel that they are the one carrying the movie, none of them feel they are the lead therefore none of them pay any attention to the rules of being profesional like, if you have a week off you don't lay in the sun because then you come back and you go, well Jeanine.. yesterday, I mean I know you have been off for a week but in the fiction in the movie it is the next scene, you can't now look like you belong at red lobster why do you, well I had a week off and no one seems to care about me anyway, no Jeanine that is not true.. so there is a lot of that happens, so that is the dark side of ensembles is that no one feels that they are in the lead therefore no one is particularly responsible. 10. Clip 11. Sot Dennis Farina: It's a farce, it's really a farce, there is a lot of stories going on, you know a story about couples, astory about killings. and airports and everything, there is a lot going on. 12. Sot Heavy D: I am content with music carreer but I also have tremendous passion for my acting, and it is like you know this is like a new life for me and I am loving it, it is like starting all over again including the hard work, the hussle trying to prove to people that you can do it, like all that starts all over again, but I realise now that I enjoy that process. 13. Clip ENSEMBLE HOLLYWOOD CAST GET INTO BIG TROUBLE 'Men In Black' director Barry Sonnenfeld has pulled together an ensemble cast for a tale of intertwining lives in 'BIG TROUBLE'. Tim Allen, Janeane Garofalo, Rene Russo, Stanley Tucci, Jason Lee and Tom Sizemore are among the stars of the comedy, adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning humourist Dave Barry's best-selling novel of the same name. The story unfolds as a mysterious suitcase brings together an unhappy housewife, a divorced father, 2 hitmen, a pair of street thugs, 2 FBI officers, a lovestruck teen couple and a psychedelic toad. APTN met the director and some of the film's stars, Dennis Farina, Heavy D and Sofia Vergara among others. Farina ('Sidewalks of New York', 'Snatch') plays Henry Algott, who has been a hit man ('Elimination Executive') for twenty years. Henry lives in New Jersey and is a fan of punctuality, efficiency, and how electronic seat belt mechanisms work. Now considered an enduring icon of the rap and hip-hop world, the three-time Grammy nominee Heavy D has sold over four million albums. Expanding his artistic world, Heavy D has appeared in the Oscar-nominated feature "The Cider House Rules," and in "Life," "Who's The Man?," and "New Jersey Drive." He plays Greer in 'Big Trouble' Colombian Sof?a Vergara (Nina) is the vivacious host of A que no te atreves ("I Dare You"), the top-rated one hour weekly show on the country's leading Spanish language network, Univision. ergara began her career with a commercial for Pepsi, followed by a hugely successful modeling career. She went on to host Persiana Americana ("View on America"), a music video program, and Personajes ("Personalities"), a daily newsmagazine show. Univision then brought Sof?a to Miami to host the Univision travel show, Fuera de Serie. "Big Trouble' is her first film. Sonnenfeld's other director credits include 'Get Shorty', 'The Addams Family' and 'Wild, Wild West.' For 'Big Trouble' he has cast Tim Allen ('Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear) as Eliot, a disolusioned journalist turned ad man; Janeane Garofalo ('The Truth About Cats and Dogs') as police officer Monica Romero; Rene Russo ('The Thomas Crown Affair') as housewife Anna Herk; Stanley Tucci ('America's Sweethearts') as her husband, corporate employee Arthur Herk; Jason Lee ('Vanilla Sky') as Puggy a 'semi-professional vagrant' with unusual strength; and Tom Sizemore ('Black Hawk Down') as dodgy businessman Snake Supree. Another notable cast member is Mr Frog, who plays a toad called Bufo Maribus. He lives in the Herk's back garden, and when threatened, secretes a toxic venum called bufotoxin - a hallucinogen the Herk family dog, Roger, has become addicted to. 'Big Trouble' is released in N America this weekend. CLEARANCE DETAILS Buena Vista Intl.
HIGH SCHOOL RODEO STAR COMPETES FOR COLLEGE AID
COVERAGE IN SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS FOR A BILL REDEKER CS VO ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL COWBOY BEN MILLER WHO IS ALSO PURSUING A COLLEGE CAREER BY COMPETING FOR A RODEO SCHOLARSHIP. 06:00:25 SU REDEKER. 06:08:09 TC JUMP. INT FTG IN SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM. MS BEHIND TEACHER STANDING AT PODIUM STUDENTS TAKING THEIR SEATS WAITING FOR CLASS TO START. 06:09:01 CU TEACHER ADDRESSING CLASS ABOUT THE RODEO CLUB. 06:09:47 CU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER. 06:10:04 ECU BEN SMILING. 06:10:16 MWS CLASS W/ BEN SITTING IN FRONT ROW. 06:11:01 MCU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER DISCUSS A CLASSMATE INJURED IN A SERIOUS CAR CRASH. 06:11:52 CU TEACHER. 06:12:17 MS BEN DISCUSSING CLASSMATE'S MULTIPLE INJURIES. 06:12:43 VS STUDENTS LISTENING TO BEN. 06:13:05 LOW ANGLE MCU BEN. 06:13:14 VS STUDENTS PREPARING TO TAKE THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:13:39 CU BEN'S RODEO TEE SHIRT. 06:13:54 VS STUDENTS WORKING ON THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:14:33 EXT FTG. WS LUSH GREEN HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS LAWN IN FG W/ YELLOW SCHOOL BUSES PARKED IN BG. 06:15:14 CU SCHOOL BUS. 06:15:20 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:15:32 LOW ANGLE SIDE CU SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL SIGN. 06:15:39 PULL OUT TO WS W/ SCHOOL BUS IN BG. 06:16:10 LS PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING DOWN RURAL TOAD PAST CAMERA. 06:16:30 PAN ACROSS RURAL ROAD TO MODEST WOOD FRAME HOMES. 06:17:11 MLS BAGS OF TRASH PILED NEAR MAIL BOXES WAITING TO BE PICKED UP. 06:17:39 LS DOWN ROAD AS STRAY CAT WALKS TOWARD CAMERA. 06:18:06 PULL OUT TO WS ANOTHER PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING PAST. 06:18:35 MWS LARGE UPSCALE COLONIAL STYLE MANSION. 06:18:49 PAN ACROSS CAR TOWING BOAT DRIVING PAST MANSION. 06:19:21 LOW ANGLE COMPRESSION WS VEHICLES DRIVING UP AND DOWN HILL. 06:20:00 PULL OUT FROM MS TO WS THROUGH OLD STYLE FILLING STATION W/ USED CAR LOT IN BG. 06:21:01 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 06:21:15 MLS SHOP ON SMALL TOWN STREET FLYING TEXAS AND AMERICAN FLAGS OUT FRONT. 06:22:00 MS FLAGS. 06:22:06 COMPRESSION MWS BEHIND ELDERLY WOMAN WALKING W/ ANOTHER OLDER WOMAN AND TODDLER. 06:22:31 MS OLDER WOMAN CARRYING ENVELOPE WALKING W/ AMERICAN AND TEXAN STATE FLAGS FLYING IN BG. 06:23:04 MWS BEHIND WOMAN W/ SLUMPING SHOULDERS LUMBERING DOWN STREET. 06:23:33 HEADON MWS COUPLE WALKING TOGETHER. 06:23:45 WS CATTLE GRAZING ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE AND. 06:23:50 PUSH INTO MWS SMALL HOUSE ON HILL. 06:24:08 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:24:19 MWS ORNERY HOUND BARKING ANS SCRATCHING. 06:24:42 MWS CATTLE GRAZING IN FIELD. 06:24:57 CU CHICKEN STRUTTING. 06:25:01 PULL OUT TO MWS RUSTY OLD TRUCK AND OTHER JUNK IN FIELD. 06:25:17 MS COWS LYING DOWN WHILE OTHERS STAND, ALL CHEWING. 06:25:32 PULL OUT TO WS OVER BARBED WIRE FENCE. 06:26:04 COMPRESSION MS HEN WALKING W/ FOUR CHICKS FOLLOWING. 06:26:52 MWS SMALL HOUSE W/ RUSTY TRUCK. 06:27:08 MWS HERD GRAZING AS DOG PEEKS THROUGH FENCE. 06:27:14 CU SAN AUGUSTINE SIGN. 06:27:29 PULL OUT TO LS DOWN TWO LANE COUNTRY ROAD. 06:27:48 MWS RED TRACTOR. 06:27:56 WS SMALL RAMSHACKLE WOOD FRAME HOUSE. 06:28:22 MS HOME'S DILAPIDATED PORCH. 06:28:34 PULL OUT TO WS THROUGH THICK TALL WEEDS. 06:28:51 PUSH INTO MWS. 06:29:38 COMPRESSION WS TWO LANE ROAD 06:31:21 SAME SHOT PICKUP TRUCKS DRIVING DOWN HILL PAST CAMERA. 06:31:44 WS MODEST RANCH STYLE HOUSE BUILT ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE LAND. 06:31:56 PUSH INTO MWS AND PULL OUT TO WS.
[Inauguration of the new section of the A89]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
The love migration of amphibians with the return of spring
FR3 / France 3
HIGH SCHOOL RODEO STAR COMPETES FOR COLLEGE AID
COVERAGE IN SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS FOR A BILL REDEKER CS VO ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL COWBOY BEN MILLER WHO IS ALSO PURSUING A COLLEGE CAREER BY COMPETING FOR A RODEO SCHOLARSHIP. 06:00:25 SU REDEKER. 06:08:09 TC JUMP. INT FTG IN SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM. MS BEHIND TEACHER STANDING AT PODIUM STUDENTS TAKING THEIR SEATS WAITING FOR CLASS TO START. 06:09:01 CU TEACHER ADDRESSING CLASS ABOUT THE RODEO CLUB. 06:09:47 CU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER. 06:10:04 ECU BEN SMILING. 06:10:16 MWS CLASS W/ BEN SITTING IN FRONT ROW. 06:11:01 MCU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER DISCUSS A CLASSMATE INJURED IN A SERIOUS CAR CRASH. 06:11:52 CU TEACHER. 06:12:17 MS BEN DISCUSSING CLASSMATE'S MULTIPLE INJURIES. 06:12:43 VS STUDENTS LISTENING TO BEN. 06:13:05 LOW ANGLE MCU BEN. 06:13:14 VS STUDENTS PREPARING TO TAKE THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:13:39 CU BEN'S RODEO TEE SHIRT. 06:13:54 VS STUDENTS WORKING ON THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:14:33 EXT FTG. WS LUSH GREEN HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS LAWN IN FG W/ YELLOW SCHOOL BUSES PARKED IN BG. 06:15:14 CU SCHOOL BUS. 06:15:20 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:15:32 LOW ANGLE SIDE CU SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL SIGN. 06:15:39 PULL OUT TO WS W/ SCHOOL BUS IN BG. 06:16:10 LS PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING DOWN RURAL TOAD PAST CAMERA. 06:16:30 PAN ACROSS RURAL ROAD TO MODEST WOOD FRAME HOMES. 06:17:11 MLS BAGS OF TRASH PILED NEAR MAIL BOXES WAITING TO BE PICKED UP. 06:17:39 LS DOWN ROAD AS STRAY CAT WALKS TOWARD CAMERA. 06:18:06 PULL OUT TO WS ANOTHER PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING PAST. 06:18:35 MWS LARGE UPSCALE COLONIAL STYLE MANSION. 06:18:49 PAN ACROSS CAR TOWING BOAT DRIVING PAST MANSION. 06:19:21 LOW ANGLE COMPRESSION WS VEHICLES DRIVING UP AND DOWN HILL. 06:20:00 PULL OUT FROM MS TO WS THROUGH OLD STYLE FILLING STATION W/ USED CAR LOT IN BG. 06:21:01 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 06:21:15 MLS SHOP ON SMALL TOWN STREET FLYING TEXAS AND AMERICAN FLAGS OUT FRONT. 06:22:00 MS FLAGS. 06:22:06 COMPRESSION MWS BEHIND ELDERLY WOMAN WALKING W/ ANOTHER OLDER WOMAN AND TODDLER. 06:22:31 MS OLDER WOMAN CARRYING ENVELOPE WALKING W/ AMERICAN AND TEXAN STATE FLAGS FLYING IN BG. 06:23:04 MWS BEHIND WOMAN W/ SLUMPING SHOULDERS LUMBERING DOWN STREET. 06:23:33 HEADON MWS COUPLE WALKING TOGETHER. 06:23:45 WS CATTLE GRAZING ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE AND. 06:23:50 PUSH INTO MWS SMALL HOUSE ON HILL. 06:24:08 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:24:19 MWS ORNERY HOUND BARKING ANS SCRATCHING. 06:24:42 MWS CATTLE GRAZING IN FIELD. 06:24:57 CU CHICKEN STRUTTING. 06:25:01 PULL OUT TO MWS RUSTY OLD TRUCK AND OTHER JUNK IN FIELD. 06:25:17 MS COWS LYING DOWN WHILE OTHERS STAND, ALL CHEWING. 06:25:32 PULL OUT TO WS OVER BARBED WIRE FENCE. 06:26:04 COMPRESSION MS HEN WALKING W/ FOUR CHICKS FOLLOWING. 06:26:52 MWS SMALL HOUSE W/ RUSTY TRUCK. 06:27:08 MWS HERD GRAZING AS DOG PEEKS THROUGH FENCE. 06:27:14 CU SAN AUGUSTINE SIGN. 06:27:29 PULL OUT TO LS DOWN TWO LANE COUNTRY ROAD. 06:27:48 MWS RED TRACTOR. 06:27:56 WS SMALL RAMSHACKLE WOOD FRAME HOUSE. 06:28:22 MS HOME'S DILAPIDATED PORCH. 06:28:34 PULL OUT TO WS THROUGH THICK TALL WEEDS. 06:28:51 PUSH INTO MWS. 06:29:38 COMPRESSION WS TWO LANE ROAD 06:31:21 SAME SHOT PICKUP TRUCKS DRIVING DOWN HILL PAST CAMERA. 06:31:44 WS MODEST RANCH STYLE HOUSE BUILT ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE LAND. 06:31:56 PUSH INTO MWS AND PULL OUT TO WS.
HIGH SCHOOL RODEO STAR COMPETES FOR COLLEGE AID
COVERAGE IN SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS FOR A BILL REDEKER CS VO ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL COWBOY BEN MILLER WHO IS ALSO PURSUING A COLLEGE CAREER BY COMPETING FOR A RODEO SCHOLARSHIP. 06:00:25 SU REDEKER. 06:08:09 TC JUMP. INT FTG IN SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM. MS BEHIND TEACHER STANDING AT PODIUM STUDENTS TAKING THEIR SEATS WAITING FOR CLASS TO START. 06:09:01 CU TEACHER ADDRESSING CLASS ABOUT THE RODEO CLUB. 06:09:47 CU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER. 06:10:04 ECU BEN SMILING. 06:10:16 MWS CLASS W/ BEN SITTING IN FRONT ROW. 06:11:01 MCU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER DISCUSS A CLASSMATE INJURED IN A SERIOUS CAR CRASH. 06:11:52 CU TEACHER. 06:12:17 MS BEN DISCUSSING CLASSMATE'S MULTIPLE INJURIES. 06:12:43 VS STUDENTS LISTENING TO BEN. 06:13:05 LOW ANGLE MCU BEN. 06:13:14 VS STUDENTS PREPARING TO TAKE THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:13:39 CU BEN'S RODEO TEE SHIRT. 06:13:54 VS STUDENTS WORKING ON THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:14:33 EXT FTG. WS LUSH GREEN HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS LAWN IN FG W/ YELLOW SCHOOL BUSES PARKED IN BG. 06:15:14 CU SCHOOL BUS. 06:15:20 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:15:32 LOW ANGLE SIDE CU SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL SIGN. 06:15:39 PULL OUT TO WS W/ SCHOOL BUS IN BG. 06:16:10 LS PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING DOWN RURAL TOAD PAST CAMERA. 06:16:30 PAN ACROSS RURAL ROAD TO MODEST WOOD FRAME HOMES. 06:17:11 MLS BAGS OF TRASH PILED NEAR MAIL BOXES WAITING TO BE PICKED UP. 06:17:39 LS DOWN ROAD AS STRAY CAT WALKS TOWARD CAMERA. 06:18:06 PULL OUT TO WS ANOTHER PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING PAST. 06:18:35 MWS LARGE UPSCALE COLONIAL STYLE MANSION. 06:18:49 PAN ACROSS CAR TOWING BOAT DRIVING PAST MANSION. 06:19:21 LOW ANGLE COMPRESSION WS VEHICLES DRIVING UP AND DOWN HILL. 06:20:00 PULL OUT FROM MS TO WS THROUGH OLD STYLE FILLING STATION W/ USED CAR LOT IN BG. 06:21:01 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 06:21:15 MLS SHOP ON SMALL TOWN STREET FLYING TEXAS AND AMERICAN FLAGS OUT FRONT. 06:22:00 MS FLAGS. 06:22:06 COMPRESSION MWS BEHIND ELDERLY WOMAN WALKING W/ ANOTHER OLDER WOMAN AND TODDLER. 06:22:31 MS OLDER WOMAN CARRYING ENVELOPE WALKING W/ AMERICAN AND TEXAN STATE FLAGS FLYING IN BG. 06:23:04 MWS BEHIND WOMAN W/ SLUMPING SHOULDERS LUMBERING DOWN STREET. 06:23:33 HEADON MWS COUPLE WALKING TOGETHER. 06:23:45 WS CATTLE GRAZING ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE AND. 06:23:50 PUSH INTO MWS SMALL HOUSE ON HILL. 06:24:08 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:24:19 MWS ORNERY HOUND BARKING ANS SCRATCHING. 06:24:42 MWS CATTLE GRAZING IN FIELD. 06:24:57 CU CHICKEN STRUTTING. 06:25:01 PULL OUT TO MWS RUSTY OLD TRUCK AND OTHER JUNK IN FIELD. 06:25:17 MS COWS LYING DOWN WHILE OTHERS STAND, ALL CHEWING. 06:25:32 PULL OUT TO WS OVER BARBED WIRE FENCE. 06:26:04 COMPRESSION MS HEN WALKING W/ FOUR CHICKS FOLLOWING. 06:26:52 MWS SMALL HOUSE W/ RUSTY TRUCK. 06:27:08 MWS HERD GRAZING AS DOG PEEKS THROUGH FENCE. 06:27:14 CU SAN AUGUSTINE SIGN. 06:27:29 PULL OUT TO LS DOWN TWO LANE COUNTRY ROAD. 06:27:48 MWS RED TRACTOR. 06:27:56 WS SMALL RAMSHACKLE WOOD FRAME HOUSE. 06:28:22 MS HOME'S DILAPIDATED PORCH. 06:28:34 PULL OUT TO WS THROUGH THICK TALL WEEDS. 06:28:51 PUSH INTO MWS. 06:29:38 COMPRESSION WS TWO LANE ROAD 06:31:21 SAME SHOT PICKUP TRUCKS DRIVING DOWN HILL PAST CAMERA. 06:31:44 WS MODEST RANCH STYLE HOUSE BUILT ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE LAND. 06:31:56 PUSH INTO MWS AND PULL OUT TO WS.
Images in Alsace N°144 - The four seasons of the Green Brigade
Grand Est
Finland Passport
AP-APTN-1930: Finland Passport Thursday, 28 March 2013 STORY:Finland Passport- Quirky security features on Finland's passport become surprise internet hit LENGTH: 01:46 FIRST RUN: 1330 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 885271 DATELINE: Helsinki - 28 Mar 2013 LENGTH: 01:46 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Close up of animated moose on pages of passport as pages are turned 2. Zoom in on different Finnish passports 3. Focus change on front of passport 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Hanna Piipponen, Finnish National Police Board: "We got this new design in August 2012 and we were a bit surprised that we didn't get any calls about the moose then. But then suddenly someone put it on YouTube, this video, and now everyone is interested in it." 5. Mid of various different Finnish passports thrown on table 6. Close up of animated moose as pages are slowly turned 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Hanna Piipponen, Finnish National Police Board: "It's primarily a security feature but of course it gives a nice input to the passport." 8. Mid of passport, showing animal designs on each page 9. Close up of toad detail on one page 10. Close up of moose as pages are turned 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Hanna Piipponen, Finnish National Police Board: "Well our goal was that the colours and the new design represents the Finnish nature, and the theme of Finnish nature." 12. Mid of passport pages being flicked twice, showing animated moose STORYLINE: Quirky security features on Finland's new passport have become a surprise internet hit. When users flick through the travel document, a moose appears to walk across the page. Although the new design was first issued six months ago, the moose has only now attracted global attention after a video of it was uploaded onto YouTube. "We got this new design in August 2012 and we were a bit surprised that we didn't get any calls about the moose then," said Hanna Piipponen of the Finnish National Police Board. "Then suddenly someone put it on YouTube this video and now everyone is interested in it," Piipponen, a lawyer who was on the working group tasked with coming up with new designs and new security features for the new passport, added. One YouTube account which hosts the video has been viewed more than 300-thousand times since it was uploaded. This week, the sleeper hit video has been featured on travel and design blogs, sparking yet more internet attention. The walking moose is featured on all of Finland's passport documents, from standard passports which most travellers are likely to carry, to documents for diplomats and government officials as well as emergency passports which can be issued at Finnish embassies overseas. The moose is "primarily a security feature" said Piipponen "but of course it gives a nice input to the passport." Other new security features include different colour strips on pages to denote different types of passports; pages and covers that are luminescent under ultra-violet light; and intricate embossed snowflake designs on the back cover of the passports. All of the design flourishes are put in place to deter counterfeiters. "Our goal was that the colours and the new design represents the Finnish nature, and the theme of Finnish nature," explained Piipponen, as she showed off the various Finnish animals depicted on the left hand page of each passport - with the animated moose on the right hand page. The moose - or "hirvi" as it's known in Finnish - is the country's largest deer. There are estimated to be more than 100-thousand of the herbivores in Finland, and they can grow as large as 2 metres tall. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-03-28-13 1933GMT
Wittenheim: wildlife conservation association
Grand Est
Discovering the edges of Alsace: the Alsatian Jura
Grand Est
HIGH SCHOOL RODEO STAR COMPETES FOR COLLEGE AID
COVERAGE IN SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS FOR A BILL REDEKER CS VO ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL COWBOY BEN MILLER WHO IS ALSO PURSUING A COLLEGE CAREER BY COMPETING FOR A RODEO SCHOLARSHIP. 06:00:25 SU REDEKER. 06:08:09 TC JUMP. INT FTG IN SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM. MS BEHIND TEACHER STANDING AT PODIUM STUDENTS TAKING THEIR SEATS WAITING FOR CLASS TO START. 06:09:01 CU TEACHER ADDRESSING CLASS ABOUT THE RODEO CLUB. 06:09:47 CU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER. 06:10:04 ECU BEN SMILING. 06:10:16 MWS CLASS W/ BEN SITTING IN FRONT ROW. 06:11:01 MCU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER DISCUSS A CLASSMATE INJURED IN A SERIOUS CAR CRASH. 06:11:52 CU TEACHER. 06:12:17 MS BEN DISCUSSING CLASSMATE'S MULTIPLE INJURIES. 06:12:43 VS STUDENTS LISTENING TO BEN. 06:13:05 LOW ANGLE MCU BEN. 06:13:14 VS STUDENTS PREPARING TO TAKE THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:13:39 CU BEN'S RODEO TEE SHIRT. 06:13:54 VS STUDENTS WORKING ON THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:14:33 EXT FTG. WS LUSH GREEN HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS LAWN IN FG W/ YELLOW SCHOOL BUSES PARKED IN BG. 06:15:14 CU SCHOOL BUS. 06:15:20 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:15:32 LOW ANGLE SIDE CU SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL SIGN. 06:15:39 PULL OUT TO WS W/ SCHOOL BUS IN BG. 06:16:10 LS PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING DOWN RURAL TOAD PAST CAMERA. 06:16:30 PAN ACROSS RURAL ROAD TO MODEST WOOD FRAME HOMES. 06:17:11 MLS BAGS OF TRASH PILED NEAR MAIL BOXES WAITING TO BE PICKED UP. 06:17:39 LS DOWN ROAD AS STRAY CAT WALKS TOWARD CAMERA. 06:18:06 PULL OUT TO WS ANOTHER PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING PAST. 06:18:35 MWS LARGE UPSCALE COLONIAL STYLE MANSION. 06:18:49 PAN ACROSS CAR TOWING BOAT DRIVING PAST MANSION. 06:19:21 LOW ANGLE COMPRESSION WS VEHICLES DRIVING UP AND DOWN HILL. 06:20:00 PULL OUT FROM MS TO WS THROUGH OLD STYLE FILLING STATION W/ USED CAR LOT IN BG. 06:21:01 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 06:21:15 MLS SHOP ON SMALL TOWN STREET FLYING TEXAS AND AMERICAN FLAGS OUT FRONT. 06:22:00 MS FLAGS. 06:22:06 COMPRESSION MWS BEHIND ELDERLY WOMAN WALKING W/ ANOTHER OLDER WOMAN AND TODDLER. 06:22:31 MS OLDER WOMAN CARRYING ENVELOPE WALKING W/ AMERICAN AND TEXAN STATE FLAGS FLYING IN BG. 06:23:04 MWS BEHIND WOMAN W/ SLUMPING SHOULDERS LUMBERING DOWN STREET. 06:23:33 HEADON MWS COUPLE WALKING TOGETHER. 06:23:45 WS CATTLE GRAZING ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE AND. 06:23:50 PUSH INTO MWS SMALL HOUSE ON HILL. 06:24:08 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:24:19 MWS ORNERY HOUND BARKING ANS SCRATCHING. 06:24:42 MWS CATTLE GRAZING IN FIELD. 06:24:57 CU CHICKEN STRUTTING. 06:25:01 PULL OUT TO MWS RUSTY OLD TRUCK AND OTHER JUNK IN FIELD. 06:25:17 MS COWS LYING DOWN WHILE OTHERS STAND, ALL CHEWING. 06:25:32 PULL OUT TO WS OVER BARBED WIRE FENCE. 06:26:04 COMPRESSION MS HEN WALKING W/ FOUR CHICKS FOLLOWING. 06:26:52 MWS SMALL HOUSE W/ RUSTY TRUCK. 06:27:08 MWS HERD GRAZING AS DOG PEEKS THROUGH FENCE. 06:27:14 CU SAN AUGUSTINE SIGN. 06:27:29 PULL OUT TO LS DOWN TWO LANE COUNTRY ROAD. 06:27:48 MWS RED TRACTOR. 06:27:56 WS SMALL RAMSHACKLE WOOD FRAME HOUSE. 06:28:22 MS HOME'S DILAPIDATED PORCH. 06:28:34 PULL OUT TO WS THROUGH THICK TALL WEEDS. 06:28:51 PUSH INTO MWS. 06:29:38 COMPRESSION WS TWO LANE ROAD 06:31:21 SAME SHOT PICKUP TRUCKS DRIVING DOWN HILL PAST CAMERA. 06:31:44 WS MODEST RANCH STYLE HOUSE BUILT ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE LAND. 06:31:56 PUSH INTO MWS AND PULL OUT TO WS.
HIGH SCHOOL RODEO STAR COMPETES FOR COLLEGE AID
COVERAGE IN SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS FOR A BILL REDEKER CS VO ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL COWBOY BEN MILLER WHO IS ALSO PURSUING A COLLEGE CAREER BY COMPETING FOR A RODEO SCHOLARSHIP. 06:00:25 SU REDEKER. 06:08:09 TC JUMP. INT FTG IN SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM. MS BEHIND TEACHER STANDING AT PODIUM STUDENTS TAKING THEIR SEATS WAITING FOR CLASS TO START. 06:09:01 CU TEACHER ADDRESSING CLASS ABOUT THE RODEO CLUB. 06:09:47 CU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER. 06:10:04 ECU BEN SMILING. 06:10:16 MWS CLASS W/ BEN SITTING IN FRONT ROW. 06:11:01 MCU BEN LISTENING TO TEACHER DISCUSS A CLASSMATE INJURED IN A SERIOUS CAR CRASH. 06:11:52 CU TEACHER. 06:12:17 MS BEN DISCUSSING CLASSMATE'S MULTIPLE INJURIES. 06:12:43 VS STUDENTS LISTENING TO BEN. 06:13:05 LOW ANGLE MCU BEN. 06:13:14 VS STUDENTS PREPARING TO TAKE THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:13:39 CU BEN'S RODEO TEE SHIRT. 06:13:54 VS STUDENTS WORKING ON THEIR FINAL EXAM REVIEW. 06:14:33 EXT FTG. WS LUSH GREEN HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS LAWN IN FG W/ YELLOW SCHOOL BUSES PARKED IN BG. 06:15:14 CU SCHOOL BUS. 06:15:20 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:15:32 LOW ANGLE SIDE CU SAN AUGUSTINE HIGH SCHOOL SIGN. 06:15:39 PULL OUT TO WS W/ SCHOOL BUS IN BG. 06:16:10 LS PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING DOWN RURAL TOAD PAST CAMERA. 06:16:30 PAN ACROSS RURAL ROAD TO MODEST WOOD FRAME HOMES. 06:17:11 MLS BAGS OF TRASH PILED NEAR MAIL BOXES WAITING TO BE PICKED UP. 06:17:39 LS DOWN ROAD AS STRAY CAT WALKS TOWARD CAMERA. 06:18:06 PULL OUT TO WS ANOTHER PICKUP TRUCK DRIVING PAST. 06:18:35 MWS LARGE UPSCALE COLONIAL STYLE MANSION. 06:18:49 PAN ACROSS CAR TOWING BOAT DRIVING PAST MANSION. 06:19:21 LOW ANGLE COMPRESSION WS VEHICLES DRIVING UP AND DOWN HILL. 06:20:00 PULL OUT FROM MS TO WS THROUGH OLD STYLE FILLING STATION W/ USED CAR LOT IN BG. 06:21:01 SAME SHOT AGAIN. 06:21:15 MLS SHOP ON SMALL TOWN STREET FLYING TEXAS AND AMERICAN FLAGS OUT FRONT. 06:22:00 MS FLAGS. 06:22:06 COMPRESSION MWS BEHIND ELDERLY WOMAN WALKING W/ ANOTHER OLDER WOMAN AND TODDLER. 06:22:31 MS OLDER WOMAN CARRYING ENVELOPE WALKING W/ AMERICAN AND TEXAN STATE FLAGS FLYING IN BG. 06:23:04 MWS BEHIND WOMAN W/ SLUMPING SHOULDERS LUMBERING DOWN STREET. 06:23:33 HEADON MWS COUPLE WALKING TOGETHER. 06:23:45 WS CATTLE GRAZING ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE AND. 06:23:50 PUSH INTO MWS SMALL HOUSE ON HILL. 06:24:08 PULL OUT TO WS. 06:24:19 MWS ORNERY HOUND BARKING ANS SCRATCHING. 06:24:42 MWS CATTLE GRAZING IN FIELD. 06:24:57 CU CHICKEN STRUTTING. 06:25:01 PULL OUT TO MWS RUSTY OLD TRUCK AND OTHER JUNK IN FIELD. 06:25:17 MS COWS LYING DOWN WHILE OTHERS STAND, ALL CHEWING. 06:25:32 PULL OUT TO WS OVER BARBED WIRE FENCE. 06:26:04 COMPRESSION MS HEN WALKING W/ FOUR CHICKS FOLLOWING. 06:26:52 MWS SMALL HOUSE W/ RUSTY TRUCK. 06:27:08 MWS HERD GRAZING AS DOG PEEKS THROUGH FENCE. 06:27:14 CU SAN AUGUSTINE SIGN. 06:27:29 PULL OUT TO LS DOWN TWO LANE COUNTRY ROAD. 06:27:48 MWS RED TRACTOR. 06:27:56 WS SMALL RAMSHACKLE WOOD FRAME HOUSE. 06:28:22 MS HOME'S DILAPIDATED PORCH. 06:28:34 PULL OUT TO WS THROUGH THICK TALL WEEDS. 06:28:51 PUSH INTO MWS. 06:29:38 COMPRESSION WS TWO LANE ROAD 06:31:21 SAME SHOT PICKUP TRUCKS DRIVING DOWN HILL PAST CAMERA. 06:31:44 WS MODEST RANCH STYLE HOUSE BUILT ON LUSH GREEN PASTURE LAND. 06:31:56 PUSH INTO MWS AND PULL OUT TO WS.