1950s NEWSREELS
PERSON IN UGLY MASK AND BLACK COSTUME RUNS BACK AND FORTH INTO THE CROWD TRYING TO SCARE THEM. CU MAN WITH NO TEETH CLOSES HIS MOUTH TIGHTLY CREATING A GROTESQUE FACE.
Various Subjects
CROWDS RUN SCARED
8 p.m.: [December 31, 2022 program]
A2 / France 2
Allied troops enter Paris 8/25/1944
Allied troops enter Paris 8/25/1944. US GREYHOUND IN PARIS FRENCH SHERMAN IN PARIS WOW ALLIED SOLDIERS AND FRENCH CIVILIANS REPAIRING ROAD IN PARIS WOW FRENCH CIVILIANS REMOVING TREE OBSTACLE FOR ALLIED ADVANCE PARIS WOW PARIS LIBERATION FRENCH CIVILIANS WELCOME ALLIED SOLDIERS WOW FRENCH RESISTANCE CIVILIANS REMOVE PARIS BARRICADES FOR ALLIED VEHICLES PANORAMIC SHOT OF PARIS BARRICADES FRENCH CIVILIANS AND ALLIED SOLDIERS WOW PARIS LIBERATION FRENCH CIVILIAN CHEERS WOW PARIS LIBERATION RUNNING FRENCH CROWD WOW PARIS LIBERATION WAVING FRENCH CIVILIANS WOW GERMAN PRISONS IN PARIS HANDS UP WOW PARIS LIBERATED WAVING FRENCH CIVILIANS DRIVE-BY SHOT SURROUNDING GERMAN SOLDIERS IN PARIS WOW SURRENDERING GERMAN SOLDIERS IN PARIS COMING OUT OF BUILDING RUNNING GERMANS POW ON TRUCK BEING PARADED IN PARIS BY FRENCH RESISTANCE WOW ANGRY FRENCH RETALIATION ON GERMAN POW IN PARIS WOW HIGH ANGLE SHOT PARIS LIBERATED WAVING FRENCH CIVILIANS GERMAN POW ESCORTED IN FRENCH CROWD DRIVE BY OF FRENCH OFFICIALS IN PARIS FRENCH RESISTANCE ESCORTING GERMAN POW WOW FRENCH RESISTANCE ESCORTING GERMAN PRISONERS ANGLE SHOT GERMAN POW MASS MARCH TO FRENCH PRISON IN PARIS WOW CLOSE UP SHOT OF GERMAN POW MARCHING TO PRISON IN PARIS GERMAN POW ON TRUCK PARADE BY FRENCH RESISTANCE WOW FRENCH CROWD WAVING WOW GERMAN POW SCARED IN PARIS GERMAN POW ESCORTED BY FRENCH RESISTANCE MARCHING TO PRISON GERMAN POW ON TRUCK RETRIBUTION BY FRENCH CIVILIANS FRENCH CIVILIANS REMOVING BARRIES IN PARIS GERMAN POW IN PARIS WOW SCARED GERMAN POW IN PARIS GERMAN POWS IN PARIS FRENCH POLICE, FRENCH CIVILIANS, AND ALLIED SOLDIER WOW AMERICAN FLAG WAVED US SOLDIERS ON JEEP FRENCH CIVILIANS CHEER. WWII in HD
GRAND CENTRAL TERMI
00:02:17:26 [B-Roll outside Grand Central Terminal after the Twin Towers collapsed in a terrorist attack, includes shots of people running away in what looks to be a bomb scare]---VS crowd outside ...
RIOTS IN CHICAGO
Riots in Chicago. United States of America (USA).<br/><br/>Chicago police arrest alleged anarchists suspected of plotting to incite a riot; 1922. (Red Scare.) Policemen on horses and motorcycles riding down street in Chicago neighbourhood. Crowd (not a large mob- -if this is a riot it's a very small one) on sidewalk run as mounted police approach; many people standing on stoop. Closer shot outside small tavern: several people watch as a cop tries to grab someone at side of bldg. but the person slips away; cop chases. Mounted police ride down sidewalk. Police on foot start grabbing people. <br/><br/>Next; shot (w/ a cameraman staggering in FG) of cops running up steep front steps to porch where they start manhandling a woman. 2 cops drag the young woman down the steps; she struggles & tries to cling to the railing. It finally takes 4 cops to control her & drag her away. More arrests; cops chasing people down gangways between houses. 2 cops pass in FG holding the arms of a heavy woman who is shouting; in BG 2 others drag a man out of gangway. Shot of paddy wagon; w/ police stuffing the fat lady through the back door. Mobs; crime; brutality; violence; USA
GIGANTIC SPIDER ATTACKS SOFTBALL GAME
A crowd of people attending a softball game are chased by a gigantic spider.
GEORGE BUSH / 1988 CAMPAIGN
CUTAWAYS OF PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE VICE PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH CAMPAIGNING IN NEW HAMPSHIRE AFTER HIS IOWA CAUCUS DEFEAT. 14:32:20:00 VS of Bush followed by New Hampshire governor John Sununu shaking hands w/ crowds of shoppers inside a New Hampshire mall. Ms of Bush denying allegations that he warned Cuban leader Fidel Castro before the Grenada invasion. Good ftg of Bush mingling w/ shoppers, answering questions about his gun control position, signing autographs and chatting amicably when asked by a reporter if he's running scared after his Iowa defeat, Bush replies, running hard, running hard, I wouldn't say scared. 16:38:37:00 Carole Simpson Su. CI: PERSONALITIES: BUSH, GEORGE. PERSONALITIES: CASTRO, FIDEL (ABOUT). PERSONALITIES: SUNUNU, JOHN. POLITICS: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CAMPAIGN, 1988.
(FIGHTING ZE BULL)
No title. According to paper records this is filmed in Portugal. <br/> <br/>High angle shot of a procession. People in fancy dress. The procession leads to the local bull ring. M/S of crowd of spectators (looks like they are all men) sitting in a stadium. Some hold umbrellas above their heads to keep off the sun. "Now, let's introduce the gentleman who runs the roost - the "Intelligence", they call him, and he runs the entire show with the aid of a trumpeter." C/U of man in a boater ordering the trumpet to be blown. Man sitting beside him plays the trumpet. <br/> <br/>High angle shot of bull fighters entering the ring. Men on horseback follow them into the ring. The bull is let out but doesn't run into the ring - it jumps up at the spectators running around the edge. Lads of the local village enter the ring. A motley bunch - they look quite scared! "Ever been asked to interview a wild and woolly bull, hold on to its horns - and survive? They do it - in Portugal!" M/S of the bull then high angle shot of the bull fighters. One man seems to get gored - hard to see. Bull fighting sequence is short. <br/> <br/>Was an item in Pathe Pictorial issue number 696.
Interview with Israeli Army Commander
INTERVIEWER:,Can you give me your name first, and then spell it? WOMAN:,Renee Yakira. R-e-n-e-e, Y-a-k-I-r-a. INTERVIEWER:,What was your position? RENEE YAKIRA:,I was a platoon commander. INTERVIEWER:,What we are trying to understand, is how do you feel about the idea of serving in the army. In America we're often shown pictures of Israeli soldiers firing at Palestinians, chasing them, maybe hitting them. And I would like to know if this is difficult for you, or what is the problem, how do you feel about it? 02:02:12>>>> RENEE YAKIRA:,I am very proud that I have the opportunity to serve my country. I think that the Israeli Army is very unique in its morals that it teaches the soldiers. I know that in - these days on the news, there are lots of pictures of soldiers that are - that hit Palestinians that have to fight them, but we're in war. But besides that, besides what they show on the news, there's a huge part of the army that no one else sees, which is behind the screens, and that's specifically what I did in the Army, was to help soldiers that don't have a house, that don't have parents, that just did Aliyah and came to Israel - that don't have food at home. And, and, and help them join the army in order to - in order for them eventually join the Israeli society. And I don't think that any other army in the world does that. INTERVIEWER:,Well, but, when they're in the army they're in a society of its own. An army society. RENEE YAKIRA:,Right. INTERVIEWER:,And in that society, when they have to restrain someone, do they feel badly about it? I mean, the soldiers are human beings, they're people who are now serving their whole life. They go back to their families. They came from families. How do we understand that someone that suddenly one day, you're a man, you're a woman and you have to be tough. How do you get a person to - 02:03:44>>> RENEE YAKIRA:,[OVERLAP] Because you don't have a choice, you know? You have to understand, in Israel, in order to survive, you have to, you have to, you have to be strong. And if you want, if you want, if you - if I want to live in Jerusalem, if I want to keep living here, I have to, I have to protect my house. And if the Palestinians throw rocks on me, then I have to prevent them from throwing the rocks. I don't - it's very hard for soldiers, it's very hard for me, it's very hard for my friends, to hit an Arab person or to know that they killed someone. To go home and look in the mother's eyes and tell the mother, Ema, I just killed someone. How am I supposed to live with myself? But at the end of the day- first of all, you don't have the choice. And - INTERVIEWER:,Why? RENEE YAKIRA:,Because, if you want - because it's - if we want to stay in Israel we have to take care of ourselves. And the Palestinians aren't - it's not a situation that Arabs come and say, we want peace, they want to be nice to us. And even though they want to be nice, we're killing them and we're shooting them, and we're fighting against them. They are fighting against us, also. I can't go out on Saturday nights because I'm scared. My little brother can't take the bus to school. My mother has to take him so she can't work. So what kind of life are we living? So maybe, so maybe you see this eighteen year old kid that's going and shooting these Arab guys, but his little brother just died in a Piguah, because some Arab bombed himself and killed his little brother that was six years old. What did he do wrong? And it's much more complicated than that. I mean, if a father of a family gets killed, and because of this Arab guy that bombed himself, so a whole family doesn't have what to eat. So, what can you do? Do we have a choice? We don't have a choice. INTERVIEWER:,If a twelve year old child, or an eight year old child throws a rock at a soldier, does the soldier treat that rock as something that can kill me? 02:05:44>>> RENEE YAKIRA:,No. Obviously not. I mean, every, every human, every soldier is a human. I mean, the main thing - the army works in a certain way, where they teach soldiers only to listen to commands. You get an assignment and you have to do it. You don't think twice. And every single soldier, from the minute he starts the army til' the end that's what he does. That's what they teach him. If he doesn't do exactly what his officers tell him, he goes to jail. Now that is an order to take away the emotional part of, of what they're doing. Because if the soldier knows that he doesn't have a choice, his officer told him to shoot, so he shoots. And if he - if every soldier will start, will start thinking if it's right, and if it's wrong, and if it's human, if it's human or not human, or if it's -.they won't be able to do anything. But the thing is that the twelve year old Arab little boy that comes and throws a rock on a soldier, obviously, obviously the soldier knows that he's not going to kill them. But a few years ago, in Lebanon, there were twelve year old kids, seven year old kids, that came as if they were going to throw a rock, and they were under their clothes, they had an RPG, and they killed soldiers over and over again. And the soldiers didn't know what to do. What, I'm gonna shoot some six year old kid, a little beautiful girl? And then she - and they had RPG's under their clothes, and they killed soldiers, so what do you do? INTERVIEWER:,So maybe the hardest thing for Americans to understand - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] So, is it fair to say that a seven year old child can be a murderer, or it's capable of causing the death of someone else? Is that the case? RENEE YAKIRA:,I think that at a time of war, everyone becomes a suspect. Everyone; a woman that's pregnant, a little child, a girl, a boy, old people. Everyone becomes suspect. Everyone becomes - you look at everyone differently. Any person that walks down the road, you'll think twice, who he is, what's he wearing, what does he believe in, because you can't trust anybody. Even you can see that in Israel one of the more obvious things that you can say about Israelis, is that they are very suspected [SIC]. They don't really trust anybody. ,If you have to cross the road, on - in town, in Jerusalem and Israel, in the middle of the day, and the lights turns green, which means that you can cross the roads now, you won't cross the road. First of all, you'll look at the guy in the car that stopped. You'll make sure that he stops, and only then you'll cross the road. In other words, there are these laws and this whole big, laws that tell us what to do. But I mean, in a time of war everyone, everyone asks themselves the questions, and you don't really know who you can trust anymore. INTERVIEWER:,Thank you very much. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] At this point, if you were looking at a college student who will be looking at you, looking at this film, what do you think he needs to understand? Besides what you already said, is there anything else that he or she needs to understand about what it's like to live here? Because, you live in New Jersey. The worst they have to worry about is, are they gonna get their (Inaudible)? [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] 02:10:12>>> RENEE YAKIRA:,I think the main difference between living - between being twenty-two, which is my age, and living in Israel, and not living in America -where I was born, in LA, in Beverly Hills-, is that I know 100% for sure that if I was living today in LA, I would probably learn either in Harvard, or Princeton, or Yale. I would be probably be learning law. I would probably have a BMW, an apartment in New York, and have all the money I want because, Baruch Hashem, my parents have it. And I would be thinking about what clothes I should get, and where I should go out and eat, and who am I gonna marry, and where are we gonna have our wedding, and what house I want and in which area of America do I want to live, and how religious I am. And I think that living in Israel gave me something that you can't teach anyone in a classroom, and you can't really explain anyone. It gave me the perspective of what it is, at the age of twenty-two, worrying about the place you're gonna live in and if it's gonna be okay, and worrying about your neighbors, and worrying about the politics, and worrying about the State of Israel which is much bigger than me, and worrying about if tomorrow morning I will wake up and be alive or not. And I think that, that it actually gave me a great push to life. It gave me the opportunity to see things in a much more mature way. And it made me ready. It made me much more - it made me stronger. I'm a stronger person today because of that. INTERVIEWER:,And after that, what is important in life? Now that you're here, and now that you're not looking for a BMW and everything else, why is it that giving all that up is worth it to you? Why? 12:11:56>>> RENEE YAKIRA:, Because-.what Israel makes you do, whether you like it or not, is handle the truth. Is to look at the truth in the eye and say, listen, this is the truth, this is what's happening, don't start looking for new clothes or bigger houses, or nicer shoes, or nicer haircuts, and where am I gonna get a haircut? This is the truth, this is your life. What's important to you? Is, is, is your house important to you? Is your family important to you? Is your friend? What's important to you? Who are you? What do you believe in? And because your life here is in danger, you have to ask yourself those questions; who am I, what do I believe in, do I believe in god, why do I believe in god, am I religious, am I Jewish, what is it mean being Jewish, is being Jewish putting on a shtreimel and having peyus and going and davening every day , or is being Jewish going and fighting for your country because Israel is where Beit Hamikdash was? What is it? And because you don't have a choice, because life isn't easy. So you have to ask yourself those questions every single day. ,And, and, and I think that, that if, it makes you ready for life, that's life. Life is real. Life isn't a BMW. Life isn't McDonald's. Life isn't New York, Fifth Avenue. That's not life. That's bullshit. Life is really deciding what, what are your priorities. What is the most important thing to you. And that's what this whole situation brought - made me do. Whether I like it or not. But I think, at the end of the day, even though it's hard - and it is hard - because instead of being a lawyer and having my house, and being married already, I'm twenty-two, I don't have any money, I just finished the army and I have to start my life now. Which is much harder than starting it at the age of eighteen. But I'm starting my life now at the age of twenty-two, ready for everything, everything. ,If tomorrow morning I wake up in the middle of Africa, and someone will tell me, Renee, what are you gonna do now? I know exactly what I have to do. I'm ready. Just, I feel - I believe in myself. I know exactly who I am. I know what I'm good at. I know what I'm not good at. I know more or less what I believe in. And I think that's the biggest thing you get from living in Israel. [END OF INTERVIEW] INTERVIEWER:,[NEW INTERVIEW/OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] Please give us your name, your first and last name, and spell it. And your rank. YUVAL SHKLARSH:,My name is Yuval Shklarsh. The first name is Y-u-v-a-l. And the last name is S-h-k-l-a-r-s-h. My rank is First Lieutenant. INTERVIEWER:,Thank you. TRACY ADAMS:, I'm Tracy Adams. T-r-a-c-y A-d-a-m-s. And I'm a Corporal in infantry instructor. INTERVIEWER:,The Israeli Army is sometimes portrayed as a brutal army of occupation in the United States. Now, we know there's a human element to that. Could you explain how difficult it is. What is the challenge to retaining the humanity? I'll start with you Yubal. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] 02:16:26>>> YUVAL SHKLARSH:,Okay, first of all I'd like to say I don't serve in occupied territories. I serve back. So everything I hear or see, I get it only from television. It's not something I experience in, in a day-to-day basis. My friends used to serve in the occupied territories. I think the Israeli Army is trying to keep its humanness as best as it can. But we have to, we have to understand that our obligation is to protect and to serve the Israeli lives. So, we're trying as best as we can not to, not to, not to [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] - INTERVIEWER:,I'll start with you, Tracy, how do you feel, personally, about serving in the _____? [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] Yubal, why is it important to you to serve in the Israeli Army? 02:18:17>>> YUVAL SHKLARSH:,First of all I'm obligated to serve in the IDF, there is a law that says that I'm supposed to. But second of all, out of obligation I feel that I have to. I mean, for me that expresses the best in patriotism. And I think serving in the army, today, is to be a true Zionist. When I was born, when I was raised in my house, I was always - you have to go to the army. My father was an officer in the army. So I knew that I had to do it - I have to do this, and I have to do that. And I always wanted, because I feel it's my greatest contribution to the State of Israel. INTERVIEWER:,And how do you feel when you see the army criticized for the - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] Tracy, how do you feel when you see the ___, the soldiers described as being cruel to the Palestinians, unfair to them, brutal to them? How do you explain to someone who doesn't really know what's going on here, why it's sometimes necessary to be tough with them? TRACY ADAMS:,I don't want to answer that question. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] INTERVIEWER:,Is it sometimes necessary to be tough when dealing with the Palestinians? 02:20:02>>> TRACY ADAMS:,Okay. We're in a war, right? But it's not even a war. It's something that's much, much worse than a war. Okay? Because in a war it's really simple. You have soldiers on one side, and you have soldiers on the other side. And they fight each other. And, and it hurts and people die, but that's a war. But the thing is, what we have here, we have people who go and explode themselves, right, in buses. And they hurt just kids or people, and citizens that don't have anything to do with the army. And then after wards we have to go back and, you know, sort of pay it back. You know, so - go and blow up their houses or kill them, and stuff like that. ,And - the thing is, it's like - that's the way life is. You know, if they, if they kill twenty people on a bus, then what can we do? We can't just sit back and not do anything. Okay? And it's terrible. It's terrible to sit and, I don't know, sometimes I command my soldiers and I tell them what to do, and how to shoot, for example. And sometimes it feels like a game. It doesn't feel real, you know? Telling people to go in and shoot? What does that mean? I have no idea. But then they have to do it. It's terrible, but it's because we don't have anything else to do. It's like the only, it's like a no way situation. INTERVIEWER:,Is it something that bothers you, that you're in this kind of situation? TRACY ADAMS:,Of course it does. It's not living. It's not - I'm, I'm really happy that I'm in the army and I can, you know, give whatever I can to my country and to the state. On the other hand, it's not a life, you know? I can't go out and I don't drive on buses, anymore. And Friday night I stay at home because I'm just scared. It's not a life. And people my age, you know, they like going out. And my friends are in college in London and the United States, and I'm here. You know, what is that? It's - but that's the way things is - are. INTERVIEWER:,A person looking at this would say - a person who didn't know better would say, well, then why are you here? Why should you be here? You could say, in England, as you said, where it's comfortable. Explain to ,our audience why, despite these difficulties, and you're here, why it's important. 02:22:23>>> TRACY ADAMS:,Um, why it's important to be here? Because this is my country. This is my house. This is where I grew up in, you know, all my friends are here and everything. I can't go off and have a life or do anything I want and just say, well, you know, just let them deal with it. It doesn't work like that. It's my house, it's my place. And if I can't go out on a Friday nights or - and if I can't, you know, walk in the street and feel comfortable with it, well I have to do something about it. I have to make things right. And this is, this is the way I'm doing it; by being in the army and doing whatever I can to make things better, hopefully. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] INTERVIEWER:,Yubal, how do you feel about these issues? YUVAL SHKLARSH:, First of all, I think Israel is my home. I've been here for the third generation. And I think that I'll stay here, I hope my children will stay here also. For me there is no alternative. Israel is my home. I'm obligated to protect it. Protect it. And I think I'm doing it by serving in the Army. I think the IDF is doing the best he can, from one side to protect the civilian life of the Israeli people, and on the other hand not to-not to destroy, or - that's a harsh word - I mean not to, to put, put the Palestinian people down. I think he's obligated, also, to keep them in strict and humane way; to let them do their living, their life, their social life. INTERVIEWER:,Do you feel that you can get the respect of the Palestinians in the sense that they don't understand that you are just doing your job? 02:24:22>>> YUBAL SHKLARSH:,I think it's hard, because the media has- because the people gather information from the media, and sometimes the media portrayed the picture, and not being so objective, when something is very subjective. So, I think only when we get to true objectivity, and people will see the picture as they are - as it really is. And so it - we don't want to harm them. I believe everybody in this country just want to live in peace. It's our purpose, and I think their also. INTERVIEWER:,Is there ever a time when you go out and something that you have to do in the army, and you feel what happens when I don't come back? Maybe something bad will happen? Do you ever get a really bad feeling of a day when you will have to go out and do something difficult? Whatever it is? , TRACY ADAMS:,Okay, the thing is I don't go out to missions and stuff, but I teach my soldiers what they're going to do. And it's terrible thinking that someone I just talked to on the phone or told him what to do won't come back, or if something might happen to him? And it's only kids. It's people eighteen, nineteen, twenty maximum. It's really hard. On the other hand, sometimes I'm just, I'm just sitting on a bus, and I have this really - this terrible image in my mind that suddenly the bus will explode or something. I mean, even if you try to be a citizen, or you try to act normal and do everything the way you want to do it, you still have the pictures going into your mind. And it's, it's like everywhere around you. INTERVIEWER:, You grow up here and you, you play ball, you go to the movies, and then suddenly at eighteen they throw you out of the house and they tell you, okay, you're now a soldier, act like one. How do you make that change? TRACY ADAMS:, I don't know. It just happens. How do I become a soldier and leave my personal life behind? It just happens. I can just, I can just say that I've changed so much since I've gone into the arm. I was really - I was just a girlie girl, interested in boys and films, and everything. And suddenly I'm interested in my soldiers, and what they're gonna do, and where they're gonna be. And how they're gonna act. And suddenly I'm not with my mom. She stays at home and I see her once a week. And I see my friends only once a week. And I - it's hard. It's not easy. It's very hard. On the other hand, you get, you get so much satisfaction from, you know, just knowing that you're really doing something. I don't know. I just - I feel I'm doing the right thing by trying to help, or trying to make a difference. INTERVIEWER:,How did you end up coming here to Israel? What is the reason for coming here? , TRACY ADAMS:,I was born in Israel. INTERVIEWER:,Uh-huh. 02:27:40>>> TRACY ADAMS:,But I was two years in Cyprus, and then we came back. And basically, to tell you the truth, I want to be a dancer. You know, I said, at the age of eighteen, I'm going straight to London, start dancing, do my life and everything. And then, and then, I don't know, I just understood how much I have to be, and how much I have to give, and really do something with myself. So my dancing, it can wait. It doesn't matter, because this is real life. This is more important. You know, teaching my soldiers and being with them, and just, I don't know, giving- this real life. INTERVIEWER:,Yubal, how old are you? YUBAL SHKLARSH:,I'm twenty-three. Sometimes it seems like I'm holding back. And when I see my cousins in the U.S.A., at college, and have an aunt, and she's only twenty-five. And if I wanna be a doctor it's only gonna be about thirty. So, it's something that - they've evolved, and I've stayed behind. But I don't think that. I think that I was very much - I think I've matured a lot during my service. Because once I was a civilian, then I was drafted into the army, and suddenly I'm this young man in uniform. And the day after - when I finished the officer's course, I get these two pieces of metal on my shoulder, and that means I'm an officer. And then I have - and then I have soldiers under my command and I have to be responsible. Not only from a professional side, but also from their, their private life. And when I send them to a mission, I have to - I have [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] 02:29:40>>>,I have cousins in the - in the United States, and they graduated now from medical school. And for me, to grow - to graduate from medical school, it's gonna be like only seven years from now. And I don't think I'm holding back, I don't think I missed anything. Because, I think the best experience - I think I got a lot of experience from the army, and I think I've matured a lot. Because, once when I was drafted I was a - I was like this young boy, a soldier, and two days after I was with two pieces of metal on my shoulder, and then I became an officer and I got responsibility of soldiers of my own. And that's when I have to be responsible for the professional life, for the private life. If I send them to a mission, I have to make sure to do it properly - that they're okay. And I can't go to sleep at night, not knowing that they didn't eat well, or perform well, or have a roof - a place to stay in. ,So, I think it's, it's a lot of responsibility, and once you do it you get to realize that you have to do it. I think one of the best things that IDF contributed to me, is the mature - to be more mature, and more responsible. And that with the experience - I think, for me, like twenty-three, I don't think without any academic - without any academic training, I don't think in civil life I'd be able to do what I'm doing here, and to be dealing with the things I'm dealing in the IDF. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] 02:31:34>>> TRACY ADAMS:,I just wanted to say that I'm really proud to be able to defend my country. And anyone who is watching this, and thinking whatever they're thinking, just remember that sometimes in life you have to deal with things you didn't expect or you didn't think you'd have to. And the Israeli Army is trying to be as humane as it can, and as moral as it can. And we're just, we're just trying to live in peace. And I think that's what every - nearly every - I can't even say about everyone, but what every soldier wants. Just to be able to come home, and live his life, and do anything he wants to do, or she wants to do. INTERVIEWER:,Are you hopeful, in anyway? It's been a difficult time the last year and a half. Do you think there's a possibility that we'll be able to find a solution? TRACY ADAMS:,I really hope we'll be able to find the solution. I don't know if we will, but you have to have hope. So, yes I do. INTERVIEWER:,Yuval, do you have a message for your American counterparts? YUVAL SHKLARSH:,I think that, underneath this uniform, me and Tracy are just people. I think we both want what the rest of the soldiers want, and the rest of Israel. We just want to live in peace. I want to be able to go out, I want to come back on a Sunday evening, or on a Friday evening, and to go out, to go out with my friends, my girlfriend, and just have fun. Just because I'm twenty-three, doesn't mean I don't have a life, a social life, I do. And I'm hopeful. I think hope is what keeps us together. INTERVIEWER:,Well, it would be a different kind of war if it was you, in a uniform, and people in uniforms on the other side. But the difficulty that I see is that you're forced to fight against children, and it looks, sometimes, and it looks like such an unfair battle. It looks like you're picking on them. It looks like you're much bigger than them. We try to - we want to explain to people watching in other parts of the world, that it isn't the way that it looks, that it isn't this big, tough soldier looking at this little helpless child. And we wanted to explain to people what is the danger that they're constantly exposed to. Any reaction to that? Either of you? 02:34:14>>> TRACY ADAMS:,Can I? The thing is, it might seem like the Israeli soldiers are fighting little kids because they're just throwing rocks at them. But it's not. Because then the Arabs come, and then the Palestinians come and they, they blow themselves up and kill OUR kids. They kill OUR - you know, little children who are just on the way to school, or to a friend's house. And then, I think it's very - well it doesn't seem like that, maybe, but it's very, very obvious, to the Israeli Army, at least, that we're not supposed to hurt little children, and we're not fighting little children who throw rocks at us. And if someone will throw a rock at an Israeli soldier, he won't fight back, and he won't shoot, he won't. But, if a little kid will take a gun out, well, what can you do? INTERVIEWER:,Well one of the things that we have difficulty understanding, as we watch the television, maybe it's because of the way we look at riots, in America, that occurred in ____ and other places, is why it is necessary sometimes to fire a rubber bullet at a crowd that's demonstrating. It may be simplistic, but what people think is - why don't you just think a tear gas grenade, throw it, everybody will be blind, they won't be able to see temporarily, and they'll run away. Isn't that better than firing a bullet at someone? How do you explain to someone, within the limits of what you can say, why that isn't a possibility? We have situations of people demonstrating in America, so we blind them, they run away, and they can't do anything, they can't see, and it's over. But why is it sometimes necessary to actually use a more lethal type of weapon? TRACY ADAMS:,I think -[OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] I don't think I'll answer that. INTERVIEWER:,Okay, but we have a problem understanding it. It's, it's - I can only ask it because we don't understand why it needs to be that way. If you can just explain it to the person who is not a military person, why it isn't always possible to just throw tear gas? [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS]
Return of the Diagonal du Doubs
Centre Est
SILENT COMEDY SHORTS
BUNCH OF KIDS AT LEMONADE STAND. FARINA EYEING HOT DOGS. DOG GOES AFTER FARINA. KIDS RUN INTO RACETRACK. HORSES IN STABLE. BLACK BOY DELIVERS JOCKEY HATS. MAN BLOWS TRUMPET. CHILDREN RUN TO WATCH RACE. HORSE RACE. CU OF JOCKEYS. CU HORSE'S FEET GALLOPING. KIDS FALL OFF BOARD. THE OUR GANG RACES. PUT SADDLE ON COW, MULE, GOAT. FARINA OILS TRICYCLE. TICKET BOOTH. GRINDS TICKET IN MEAT GRINDER. KIDS PAY FOR TICKETS WITH BASEBALL, TURTLE. DOG ATTACKS GATE JUMPERS. TAKING BETS, GIRL WHISTLES. KID BAND. ALCOHOL. ANIMALS DRINK FROM ALCOHOL LACED WATER. FAT GIRL FLIRTS WITH CHUBBY. JUDGE STAND. BUTT HITTING SADDLE. CROWD CHEERS. FARINA RACES ON TRICYUCLE, FALLS OFF. DOG PULLING WAGON. KEEPS FALLING OFF. DOG BEING DRAGGED BEHIND ANIMAL. KIDS RUNNING TO WIN RACE. STUBBORN COW. HORSE. CAR FULL OF POLICEMEN SHOW UP, KIDS GET SCARED AND RUN AWAY, DUST. COPS LAUGH MISCHIEF MAKERS
Various Subjects
SCARED CROWDS RUN
07/00/74 C0047549 - COLOR CALIFORNIA DICK WILLIAMS FIRST DAY AS MCS OF THE ANGELS
07/00/74 C0047549 - COLOR CALIFORNIA DICK WILLIAMS FIRST DAY AS MCS OF THE ANGELS CUT STORY: "DICK WILLIAMS" SHOWS: SHOT OF DICK WILLIAMS RUNNING OUT TO HOME PLATE TO MEET WITH UMPIRES AND AS CAPTAIN BANDO: CROWD APPLAUDING: SHOT OF WILLIAMS RUNNING BACK TO THE DOGOUT: SHOT OF CROWD: SHTO OF WILLIAMS BEING INTERVEIWED: SHOT OF FRANK ROBINSON BEINT INT: SHOT OF SAL BANDO BEING INT: ONE ACTION SHOT OF THE GAME A HIT ONE RUN SCARE AND A PLAYER BEING TAGGED OUT AT THE PLATE: (SHOT XX 80FT) BASEBALL - 1974 CALIFORNIA ANGELS BBTEAM XX / 80 FT / 16 MM / COLRO / PRINT /
GENERAL CINEMA SHOOTING (3/28/2001)
THERE WAS SOME REAL-LIFE DRAMA AT A MOVIE THEATER IN THE BRONX TUESDAY, AFTER A GUNMAN OPENED FIRE AND WOUNDED ONE PERSON.
GIGANTIC SPIDER ATTACKS SMALL TOWN
A crowd of people in a small town flee from a giant spider. Several people fall injured and lie in the street.
07/00/74 C0047549 - COLOR CALIFORNIA DICK WILLIAMS FIRST DAY AS MCS OF THE ANGELS
07/00/74 C0047549 - COLOR CALIFORNIA DICK WILLIAMS FIRST DAY AS MCS OF THE ANGELS CUT STORY: "DICK WILLIAMS" SHOWS: SHOT OF DICK WILLIAMS RUNNING OUT TO HOME PLATE TO MEET WITH UMPIRES AND AS CAPTAIN BANDO: CROWD APPLAUDING: SHOT OF WILLIAMS RUNNING BACK TO THE DUGOUT: SHOT OF CROWD: SHOT OF WILLIAMS BEING INTERVIEWED: SHOT OF FRANK ROBINSON BEING INT: SHOT OF SAL BANDO BEING INT: ONE ACTION SHOT OF THE GAME A HIT ONE RUN SCARE AND A PLAYER BEING TAGGED OUT AT THE PLATE: (SHOT XX 80FT) BASEBALL - 1974 CALIFORNIA ANGELS BBTEAM XX / 80 FT / 16 MM / COLOR / PRINT /
HORROR/MONSTER/SCIENCE FICTION MOVIES
GREAT BRITAIN TITLE: LEND ME YOUR EAR. JAMES DUNN, JOAN WOODBURY, PAUL McVEY, VERA GORDON, NORMAN WILLIS, J. FARRELL MACDONALD, MINERVA URECAL, GEORGE ELDREDGE, JAN WILEY, EDNA JOHNSON, DANNY BECK, GUS GLASSMIRE, LAWRENCE GRANT, HOWARD BANKS, J. ARTHUR YOUNG, FRANCES RICHARDS, HARRY DEPP. HORROR FILM. A MAD SCIENTIST THINKS UP A RECIPE FOR ZOMBIES AND PROCEEDS TO PUT THE CAST TO SLEEP. HAMMY. HEADLINE OF A NEWSPAPER ABOUT A MISSING BANKER. ARTICLE. REPORTERS KNOCK ON DOOR. BUTLER ANSWERS DOOR. TELLS THEM TO GO AWAY. PEOPLE IN FANCY SITTING ROOM. WOMEN ARGUE. HIGH SHOT OF CROWDED CITY STREET. OFFICE LISTING. PEOPLE STAND AT OFFICE DOOR. WEIRD MAN TALKS TO INVISIBLE DOG. ECCENTRIC COMEDIC MAN. MEN IN WAITING ROOM TALK TO EACH OTHER. PEOPLE LOOK AT THEM STRANGELY. MAN DRESSED IN SOME SORT OF TRADITIONAL CLOTHING. EASTERN EUROPEAN. LEAVES ROOM TALKING TO WOMAN. COME RIGHT IN. MAN SITS ON THRONE. MAN AND WOMAN DRIVE IN CAR. THEY COME UP TO HOUSE AT NIGHT. INTRODUCE MAN TO PEOPLE IN HOUSE. CRANKY OLD LADY. MAN LIGHTS CIGARETTE. MAN YELLS AT WOMAN. SCARES HER. MAN SLEEPING IN BED. WOKEN UP BY WOMAN SCREAMING. EVERYBODY WAKES UP AND RUNS DOWN TO WOMAN. PASSED OUT. MAN IN CHAIR. THEY CARRY MAN UP TO BED. EYES OPEN. MAN RINGS DOORBELL AND LOOKS AT WATCH. CRAZY OLD LADY. SHE WARNED THEM. DOCTOR TELLS GROUP HOW MAN IS DOING. MEN TALK IN PRIVATE. MURDER MYSTERY. TONGUE-IN-CHEEK. MAN PACES IN STUDY, WOMAN COMES IN LOOKING FOR HIM. HE STARTLES HER. CU FOOTPRINTS OUTSIDE ODOR OF STUDY. FAKE SHELVES MOVE. SECRET PASSAGE. GERMAN SHEPHERD ON PORCH OF HOUSE, BARKS AT MAN AS HE TRIES TO OPEN GATE TO ENTER YARD. MAN LIGHTS CIGARETTE FOR ANOTHER MAN. SICK MAN IN BED. WOMAN RUNS INTO ROOM WITH MUDDY BOOTS. GRANDFATHER CLOCK CU. MAN GOES OUTSIDE DOOR AT NIGHT, WALKS AROUND GARDEN. LOOKING FOR CLUES. OLD MAN LYING ON GROUND. OLD MAN STANDING IN A TRANCE. MAN IN PAJAMAS. MEN IN BUSHES. POLICEMEN IN HOUSE. QUESTIONING YOUNG MAN. REFUSES TO SAY ANYMORE WITHOUT A LAWYER. QUESTIONS WOMAN. EXACERBATED COP. CORNY QUESTIONING. THAT DON'T SOUND KOSHER TO ME. NURSE AT DESK. MAN WHISPERS INTO NURSES EAR. MEN SHAKE HANDS. DOCTOR'S ANALYSIS OF MAN'S CONDITION. POINTS AND EXPLAINS WITH HUGE CHART OF THE HUMAN BRAIN. MAN WALKS FUNNY. WOMAN PLAYING PIANO. WOMAN LAUGHING. MAN IN TRANCE WEARING PAJAMAS WITH BIG KNIFE TRIES TO STAB MAN. WOMAN LOOKS SCARED, MOUTH WIDE OPEN. KNIFE STICKING OUT OF CHAIR. WOMAN ANSWERS PHONE. MAN RUNS UP STAIRS. CAR PULLS UP TO OLD HOUSE. THEY TRIP ON FOR SALE SIGN. TRYING TO GET INTO HOUSE. MAN FALLS ON LADDER. WINDOW SLAMS SHUT, WOMAN GASPS, PUTS HER HAND ON HER MOUTH, MAN SLIPS DOWN LADDER. MAN AND WOMAN CLIMB LADDER. HE OPENS WINDOW FROM THE OUTSIDE. THEY CRAWL IN. MAN WITH FLASHLIGHT LOOKS AROUND. WOMAN SCARED BY LIGHTNING. THEY TRY LIGHT SWITCH. ZOMBIE MAN WANDERING AROUND HOUSE. DOOR CLOSES BY ITSELF. WOMAN ACCIDENTALLY SCARES MAN. WHAT'S THAT. PEOPLE HEAR NOISES IN HOUSE. THEY HOLD EACH OTHER IN FRIGHT. HE GOES INTO CELLAR. CREEPY MAN SEES WOMAN. MAN YELLS TO BE LET OUT. MAN LIGHTS LAMP. ROMANTIC MOMENT, COUPLE KISS. WOMAN ANGRY. COUPLE ARGUE. WOMAN LOOKS UP SCARED. GUN FIRE. LIGHTS GO OUT. MAN SHOOTS LOCK OFF DOOR. RUNS OUT OF HOUSE. WOMAN SCREAMS. POINTS GUN AT OLD MAN. SHINGLE OUTSIDE HOUSE. ONE MAN MANY PROFESSIONS. OLD MAN IN NIGHTSHIRT ANSWERS DOOR. SHAKE HANDS. MAN HAS BIG CASE. BLOWS ODD HORN. YELLING HAPPY NEW YEAR. WAKES UP EVERYONE IN THE HOUSE. CLIMAX TO THE MURDER MYSTERY. EARLY TAPE RECORDER. RECORDING EVERYONE'S VOICE. YELLS AT PEOPLE AND TELLS THEM TO SIT DOWN. MAN TALKS INTO MICROPHONE. RECORD PLAYER RECORDER. GRANDFATHER CLOCK FACE. MAN CREEPING AROUND HALLS AT NIGHT. TRIES TO KILL SOMEONE IN BED. MAN TURNS ON LIGHT. POINTS GUN AT MAN HE THROWS A KNIFE. MAN PUNCHES HIM OUT.
Yukio Mishima, writing to death
Ina Productions
US Military In Somalia
Date unknown - 1990’s or 2000’s.
Various Subjects
CROWDS RUN SCARED (CONT.)
(VARIOUS SUFFRAGETTES MATERIAL)
Unused / unissued material - <br/> <br/>Title reads: "London. Factory Girls on Strike. The work-girls parading the streets of Camden Town". Group of women marching along road carrying banner 'National Federation of Women Workers'. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "The Suffragette Campaign". Policemen arresting suffragettes outside Buckingham Palace. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Trafalgar Square Riot. Some ugly rushes were made to secure the rescue of Miss Sylvia Pankhurst." Crowds in Whitehall and Trafalgar with police arresting suffragettes as the crowd cause traffic hold up in Whitehall. A young boy is very scared. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Mass Meeting of Suffragettes." Women carrying NUWSS banners pledging support for their cause. Crowds in Trafalgar Square. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "London. Suffragette Pageant. 66, 000 women take part in a procession through London. All the famous women in history are represented." Large procession of suffragettes. Women wear all manner of costumes and many carry banners and flags. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "'Law Abiding' Suffragists. Journeyed from all over the country to hold a gigantic demonstration in Hyde Park." Large crowd of women and many men. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Tattenham Corner". Horses come round the corner in the 1913 Derby. Title reads: "Suffragette Killed In Attempt To Pull Down The King's Horse." Suffragette Emily Davison runs out and throws herself under the King's horse. The race finishes. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Miss Davison's Funeral. The Funeral Procession of the Suffragette who was fatally injured at Epsom passing through London." Funeral procession through crowd lined street. Police struggle to hold crowd outside St. George's, Bloomsbury where the coffin is carried from church. Funeral procession to the parish church at Morpeth. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Scenes In The Record Demonstration of Suffragettes in London." Large procession of suffragettes led by band marches through London, many of the women carry banners in support of their cause and there are representatives of various professions, the suffragette 'General' poses in side street on horseback after the procession. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Trafalgar Square Meeting. Mrs Pankhurst and Mrs Dacre Fox (T/C covers rest). Women speak to crowds in Square. <br/> <br/>Title reads: "Womens' March Through London. Suffragettes march from Bow to the Portman Rooms to hold a joint demonstration (T/C covers rest)." Shots of parade.
1950s FEATURE FILMS
CRIME DRAMA CIRCUS, CARNIVAL. FEMALE LION TAMER WITH WHIP AND CHAIR. MAN WAVES AT HER FROM CROWD WATCHING. MAN LOOKS SCARED AND RUNS AWAY. COMICAL. WOMAN WRITING MIDWAY. EVANS CHILDERS CIRCUS. MAN FLIRTS. EATING. LUNCH. WOMANLOOKS SURPRISED. MAN WALKING AROUND JUNKYARD LOOKING AT CARS. WOMAN HAS DRINK WHILE IRONING. SNOOPING. MAN YELLS AT WOMAN. WE'RE IN THIS TOGETHER. KISS. DROWN YOUR SORROWS AT BAR. ALL MEN AT BAR TURN SIMULTANEOUSLY TO WATCH WOMAN WALK BY. WOMAN COMES ON TO MAN. SMILES. FIGURED OUT HOW BROTHER WAS KILLED. WHISPERS TO CASEY. LAUGH TURNS TO ANGER. EATING AT DINNER TABLE ALONE. DOG TIRED. HAS STORY ALL FIGURED OUT. WIPES BREAD CRUMBS FROM TABLE. MAN HAS UPSET STOMACH. SHE GIVES HIM SOME ALKA-SELTZER. MIXES BICARBONATE WITH SPOON. COUPLE CONFUSED. MAN YELLS OVER TO OTHER MAN. WOMAN HONKS HORN AT GAS STATION. FILL IT UP. PUMPS GAS. WOMAN LOOKS OUT WINDOW. MAN LOOKING AT PAPERS, VERY HAPPY. CELEBRATING. WOMAN DOWNS HER DRINK. NOBODY IS HAVING FUN. DRINK UP. SUSPICIOUS MAN PUTS HIS HEAD ON THE TABLE, DRANK TOO MUCH. TRIES TO WAKE UP MAN. PAROLE OFFICER. PUTS MAN IN CHAIR TO LIE DOWN. A TOAST. CURIOUS. SHE DRINKS TOO MUCH. A SET-UP. TRICKS THEM INTO ADMITTING TO MURDER. MAN MOANING. LEADS MAN OUT ONTO PORCH. YELLING AT WOMAN. TAKES OFF HIS COAT, REMOVES HIS TIE AND UNBUTTONS SHIRT. SHERIFF ARRIVES. SCAR ON MAN'S CHEST. SHE TRIES TO RUN. ARRESTED. WOMAN GIVES MAN TICKET.
Various Subjects
SCARED CROWDS RUN (CONT.)