A CLOSER LOOK / LIFE SAVER
NED POTTER CS VO ON THE ADVANTAGES OF ROBOTIC HEART SURGERY, WHERE DOCTORS WOULD NO LONGER HAVE TO BREAK OPEN A PATIENT'S BREAST BONES IN ORDER TO OPERATE ON THE HEART / INSTEAD THEY INSERT A TINY SET OF ROBOTIC FORCEPS KNOWN AS DA VINCI / SOME PEOPLE HAVE THEIR DOUBTS, BUT DA VINCI SEEMS TO PROVING ITS ADVANTAGES
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Remotely controlled arms of a Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The patient is partially visible at left, with the laparoscopes inserted through incisions in his abdomen. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.
ROBOTIC SURGERY AT SCIENCE CENTER
A surgeon performs a surgery with a four armed Da Vinci robot at the London Health Science Center.
AFP-68E 16mm; NET-284 Beta SP (at 01:00:00:00); DigiBeta
THE QUESTION TREE - FLASH BEEP
Series 1/ Medical robotics Surgery
Nord
ROBOT SURGERY FIRST (5/9/2001)
A FIRST FOR THE WEST COAST - ROBOT HAS PERFORMED OPEN HEART SURGERY.
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Remotely controlled arms of a Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The patient is partially visible at centre, with the laparoscopes inserted through incisions in his abdomen. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon (seen at the end of this clip) operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.
ROBOTIC CARDIAC SURGERY (7/23/2000)
DOCTORS AT NEW YORK'S BETH ISRAEL HOSPITAL PERFORM A NEW TYPE OF SURGERY... USING A ROBOT TO DO THE DELICATE WORK.
Italy Da Vinci - Museum reveals models of motorised vehicles designed by Da Vinci
NAME: TA DA VINCI 230404N TAPE: EF04/0438 IN_TIME: 10:02:38:20 DURATION: 00:03:30:24 SOURCES: APTN DATELINE: Florence, 23 April 2004 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Various of traffic passing Duomo Cathedral 2. Tourist kiosk 3. Leonardo Da Vinci''s perfect man drawing on calendar 4. Ponte Vecchio 5. Man reading newspaper 6. Exterior Museum of History of Science of Florence 7. Various sections of model of Leonardo Da Vinci''s "automobile" 8. Full model standing in room 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Paolo Galluzzi, Director of the Museum of History and Science of Florence: "The piece of paper where he sketched these drawings, have not have even one single word. This is typical of Leonardo. He sketches his ideas through drawings. So we do not have any evidence of what he intended to do, but it is pretty sure that this is not something to transport goods or persons. It is rather a special effect machine to produce big surprise in a festival in a court, a renaissance court, it is going to provide energy for 10, 20, 25 meters." 10. Various of computerised images of the vehicle, UPSOUND (English) Digital Designer Mario Taddei: "So here we have the introduction of the CD rom, we have same drawings of the car, and this is the spring engine, the main component of the car." 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Digital Designer Mario Taddei: "The way to... it is possible to make the car work. For example, let''s pull the rope and here we can see how the machine works." 12. Computerised car leaving screen 13. Various of the model of the vehicle 14. Carlo Pedretti, Director of the Armand Hammer Centre for Leonardo Studies looking at model 15. Sections of the model 16. SOUNDBITE (English) Carlo Pedretti, Director of the Armand Hammer Centre for Leonardo Studies: "So, immediately it dawned on me that there must have been a motor power somewhere else in the car, and I thought that the only possibility would have been coiled springs underneath the two major wheels. Sure enough in the Leonardo drawings there is a little trace in each one of these things corresponding to what would be the place for the coils, the coiled springs." 17. Various of museum officials winding up model 18. Model of smaller vehicle travelling across floor DA VINCI CARS FINALLY BUILT. Thousands of cars pass in front of Florence''s famed Duomo Cathedral every day, being the most common form of transport nowadays. But back in the days when people walked or rode in horse-drawn carriages, one brilliant man thought of a way to make a vehicle. Five centuries before motorised cars were invented, artist Leonardo Da Vinci drew up designs for the first self-propelling wagon in history. It also had what museum officials say is programmable steering, consisting of placing wooden blocks in between the gears to turn the wagon left or right. In the 1970s, art historian Carlo Pedretti came across some useful Da Vinci documents in Florence''s Degli Uffizi Gallery. Whilst studying the designs he became inspired by two lightly drawn lines, a bit like two snail shells. Pedretti thought perhaps Leonardo had intended for the vehicle to be propelled by springs. Working together with an American robotics expert the two men were able to come up with a design to make the vehicle work. To take the idea on paper into a 3-dimensional vehicle, the two men sought out help from the Jet Propulsion Lab in California, where experts were working on "Spirit" the vehicle designed to walk on Mars. There they found engineers who could help them understand the drawings of Da Vinci. On Friday, the Museum of the History of Science in Florence revealed three models of the vehicle originally designed by Leonardo Da Vinci. Museum officials explained that Leonardo probably designed the vehicle not to carry people or objects but to impress people at Renaissance festivals. The vehicle would be wound up, then someone hiding behind a curtain would pull a string to release the spring and the vehicle would shoot forward up to 25 meters, turning either left of right depending on how some wooden blocks were arranged between the gears. Who knows which Leonardo designs will be created next? Among surviving Leonardo Da Vinci manuscripts are designs for a helicopters, a submarine, an airplane, a steam engine, a tank and a bicycle.
Clinique Pasteur de Royan information on diseases
Midi Atlantique
ROBOTIC SURGEONS - 2
Robotic arms on the Da Vinci machine make minimally invasive heart surgery possible. The doctors use computers to view the patient and work the robotic arms for more precise surgical maneuvers.
Sunday in politics: [issue of October 09, 2022]
Midi Atlantique
Robotic - Heart - Surgery VNR
WHEN 48-YEAR-OLD CHRIS BOLLES...WNDERWEENT HEART SURGERY...IT MADE NEWS...BOLLES BECAME THE FIRST AMERICAN EVER TO UNDERGO HEART SURGERY WITH THE HELP OF A "ROBOT" NAMED DA VINCI....
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Surgeon at the console of a Da Vinci robot surgeon, controlling laparoscopic arms (right) to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The surgery itself is shown on the screen at left, with a surgical monitoring device at lower left. The patient (not seen) is off screen at lower right. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.
USA: NEW YORK: ROBOT ASSISTED HEART SURGERY
TAPE_NUMBER: EF00/0810 IN_TIME: 20:37:12 LENGTH: 02:07 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: English/Nat XFA A sixty-seven year old man will be one of the first to undergo robot assisted heart surgery next Monday at a hospital in New York. On Thursday, he met the robot that will operate on him -- as well as the doctors who will direct the groundbreaking, closed chest heart surgery. The use of the robot surgeon is proven to have better precision than a surgeon's hands, and can shorten recovery times by five sixths. While over 250 such procedures have already been performed in Europe, the procedure is just getting off the ground in the U-S. Hundreds of people come each year to New York's Beth Israel Medical Centre to undergo open-heart surgery -- a medical procedure not without risks and a prolonged recovery time. But one lucky patient -- the second one in the New York area -- will probably go home a mere 24 hours after surgery, thanks to a new closed-chest operating procedure performed on him by a robot surgeon. Today Mr. Eugene Bem met his artificial surgeon -- a 6 foot 5 inch, one million dollar robot named Morton. It is one of three such robots performing closed heart surgery in the U-S. The Da Vinci system, manufactured by Intuitive Surgical, Inc., is the first surgical robot to win food and drug administration approval. The robot, however, is not a thinking machine and will not be in charge of the operation -- it is what is known as a 'slave robot' - that is controlled by two primary surgeons -- Dr. Hanni Shennib and Dr. Robert Tranbaugh. SOUNDBITE: (English) "With this robot, with, you know, an instrument that is the size of a beetle-head, that you put in there and manipulate from the outside, you're able to access and leverage things as if you own hand was inside." SUPER CAPTION: Dr. Hanni Shennib, Director of Center for Innovative Cardiovascular Therapy, Beth Israel Hospital The robotic surgical system consists of two primary components: the surgeon's viewing and control console and the surgical arm unit that positions and manoeuvres detachable surgical instruments. The pencil sized instruments -- with tiny, computer-enhanced mechanical wrists -- are designed to provide the dexterity of the surgeon's forearm and wrist at the operative site through entry ports less than 1 centimetre wide. This enables the surgeon to enter the chest through keyhole incisions and perform closed-chest heart and lung surgery. One port allows access for the endoscope, a tiny camera that is attached to a fibre-optic cable. The other two ports provide access for surgical tools. Instead of the surgeon holding the tools, the robot's wrists do -- providing greater range of motion than would be humanly possible. SOUNDBITE: (English) "This is safer for the patient, there's shorter recovery time, cosmetically it's minimal scars. When they go home they have Bandaids over the areas that the instruments were in the patient's chest." SUPER CAPTION: Joel Kirschner, Project Manager, Da Vinci Systems Beth Israel's Heart Institute successfully performed the first robotic assisted bypass surgery in New York on June 28th, using the Da Vinci system. The 39-year old male patient was released from the hospital in less than 24 hours -- an unprecedented fast period. Mr. Bem is confident that his operation will be successful as well. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I read something about this robot, and I had a long talk, not quite long talk, with the doctor and I'm quite convinced that it would be OK with me. I know that everything will be all right." SUPER CAPTION: Eugene Bem, Pre-surgical patient The operation is scheduled for Monday, July 24th. SHOTLIST: New York City, New York, U-S - July 20, 2000 1. Wide shot, cardiac intensive care unit 2. Close-up, heart monitor 3. Wide shot patient and doctor with robot 4. Close-up pan down robot surgeon 5. Close-up robotic blade 6. Medium shot doctor showing patient the robot surgeon 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr. Hanni Shennib, Director of Center for Innovative Cardiovascular Therapy, Beth Israel Hospital 8. Medium shot, doctor's console 9. Doctor sits down at console 10. Close-up, doctor looking into lens 11. Close-up hands on controls 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joel Kirschner, Project Manager 13. Pan of robot surgeon 14. Pan from cameraman to doctor/patient 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eugene Bem, Pre-surgical patient 16. Medium shot, IV bags, pan to nurse tending heart patient 17. Close-up doctor on phone, pull-out to heart unit Keyword-medical?
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Screen showing laparoscopic surgical instruments being used to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The rest of the footage shows a surgeon at the console of the Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to control the laparoscopes, with the robotic arms themselves at right. A surgical monitoring device is at lower left. The patient (not seen) is off screen at lower right. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.
Robotic Surgery
ROBOTIC SURGERY DEMONSTRATION AT FARGO'S MERITCARE HOSPITAL.
Space: NASA: Spacewalk 2: international space station
TAPE_NUMBER: EF01/0266 IN_TIME: 00:40:04 LENGTH: 02:12 SOURCES: NASA RESTRICTIONS: FEED: LC SCRIPT: English/Nat xfa In what's being billed as NASA's longest space walk, two astronauts rearranged the outside of the international space station to make room for an Italian cargo carrier that was installed hours later. The module, called Leonardo, was raised from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay and slowly hoisted into place by the shuttle robot arm early on Monday. "Outstanding," Mission Control told the arm's operator, Andrew Thomas. The excursion by shuttle crew members Jim Voss and Susan Helms was just four minutes shy of nine hours and entailed slow, deliberate work with cables and connectors - "a jungle of wires" as Voss described it. NASA's lead flight director said he's happy with a job well done. The space walkers were "right on the edge" of what they could handle, he said, but performed admirably despite some initial miscues that put them an hour behind. A plastic bag containing a hydrazine-detection kit floated out Discovery's hatch as the space walk got under way. "Uh, oh," Helms uttered. Voss managed to catch the bag. Minutes later, Voss accidentally let go of a vice-like device needed for a work platform. The 10 to 15 pound (4.5 to 6.75 kilogram) chunk of metal, about the size of a thick dictionary, drifted away and joined the thousands of pieces of junk orbiting Earth. Because the part is considered critical, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration had a spare on board. The main event of the space walk was the relocation of a docking port on space station Alpha. The bulky cone had to be moved from one side of a module to another so the shuttle crew could plug the Italian-made cargo carrier into the vacated spot. The reusable 150 (m) million U-S dollars module, named Leonardo for Italy's Signor da Vinci, was packed with 5 tons of gear. It will be emptied and returned to the shuttle for the March 17 undocking. Voss and Helms disconnected all the cables on the docking port and removed an antenna to make room for Leonardo. The two also installed equipment in advance of next month's delivery of Alpha's massive robot arm. They did not have time to complete all the wire hookups and left the job for two other shuttle astronauts who will conduct a space walk late on Monday night. About six and a half hours after going outside, Voss and Helms retreated to Discovery's airlock, a space walk pressure chamber, and patiently waited as shuttle crane operator Thomas moved the docking port. The space walkers were ready to rush out if necessary, but their assistance was not required. After more than two hours in the cramped airlock, they were ordered back into the crew cabin and their space walk was officially over. Keith Johnson, lead space walk officer at Mission Control, said NASA considers it the longest space walk under the record-keeping rules now in place. The previous record was set in 1992 by three astronauts who went out to grab a wayward satellite. That space walk lasted eight hours and 29 minutes. Helms and Voss will spend the next four months living aboard the space station, along with their Russian commander, Yuri Usachev, who moved in on Saturday. Voss settled into the station Sunday night; Helms will follow on Tuesday night. They're replacing Alpha's first crew, led by American Bill Shepherd. By the time Shepherd and his two Russian shipmates return to Earth aboard Discovery on March 20, they will have spent 140 days in space. SOUNDBITE: (English) "We're happy to report another successful day. We pretty much accomplished everything we've set out to do this far.The crew is on the timeline. Just give you a quick status, as you're probably fully aware of, we've successfully berthed the MPLM to the nader port of the node, the station and they've completed all their leak checks and are actually already engrossed in getting things rolling." SUPER CAPTION: Rick La Brode, International Space Station Lead Flight Director SHOTLIST: Space, 12 March 2001 1. Various stills of exterior of space station 2. Graphic of space station 3. Various stills of hatch 4. Various graphics of arm picking up cargo carrier Houston, Texas 5. Set up shot presser 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Space 7. Expedition One commander Bill Shepherd outfitting vestibule to lead to cargo carrier Houston, Texas 8. Interior Mission Control Space 9. Astronauts in space station preparing vestibule to lead to container 10. Graphic showing position of station 11. Astronauts in space station preparing vestibule to lead to container 12. Cargo bay and arm 13. Cargo bay apparatus?
OFF DIMPOL d'illustr Robot Da Vinci
Midi Atlantique
Space: NASA: Spacewalk: international space station
TAPE_NUMBER: EF01/0266 IN_TIME: 00:29:28 LENGTH: 02:05 SOURCES: NASA RESTRICTIONS: FEED: LC SCRIPT: Natural Sound xfa In what's being billed as NASA's longest space walk, two astronauts rearranged the outside of the international space station to make room for an Italian cargo carrier that was installed hours later. The module, called Leonardo, was raised from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay and slowly hoisted into place by the shuttle robot arm early Monday. "Outstanding," Mission Control told the arm's operator, Andrew Thomas. The excursion by shuttle crew members Jim Voss and Susan Helms was just four minutes shy of nine hours and entailed slow, deliberate work with cables and connectors - "a jungle of wires" as Voss described it. After it was all over, NASA's lead flight director, John Shannon, said they knew it was going to be a tough walk. The space walkers were "right on the edge" of what they could handle, he said, but performed admirably despite some initial miscues that put them an hour behind. A plastic bag containing a hydrazine-detection kit floated out Discovery's hatch as the space walk got under way. "Uh, oh," Helms uttered. Voss managed to catch the bag. Minutes later, Voss accidentally let go of a vice-like device needed for a work platform. The 10 to 15 pound (4.5 to 6.75 kilogram) chunk of metal, about the size of a thick dictionary, drifted away and joined the thousands of pieces of junk orbiting Earth. Because the part is considered critical, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration had a spare on board. The main event of the space walk was the relocation of a docking port on space station Alpha. The bulky cone had to be moved from one side of a module to another so the shuttle crew could plug the Italian-made cargo carrier into the vacated spot. The reusable 150 (m) million U-S dollars module, named Leonardo for Italy's Signor da Vinci, was packed with 5 tons of gear. It will be emptied and returned to the shuttle for the March 17 undocking. Voss and Helms disconnected all the cables on the docking port and removed an antenna to make room for Leonardo. The two also installed equipment in advance of next month's delivery of Alpha's massive robot arm. They did not have time to complete all the wire hookups and left the job for two other shuttle astronauts who will conduct a space walk late on Monday night. About six and a half hours after going outside, Voss and Helms retreated to Discovery's airlock, a space walk pressure chamber, and patiently waited as shuttle crane operator Thomas moved the docking port. The space walkers were ready to rush out if necessary, but their assistance was not required. After more than two hours in the cramped airlock, they were ordered back into the crew cabin and their space walk was officially over. Keith Johnson, lead space walk officer at Mission Control, said NASA considers it the longest space walk under the record-keeping rules now in place. The previous record was set in 1992 by three astronauts who went out to grab a wayward satellite. That space walk lasted eight hours and 29 minutes. Helms and Voss will spend the next four months living aboard the space station, along with their Russian commander, Yuri Usachev, who moved in on Saturday. Voss settled into the station Sunday night; Helms will follow on Tuesday night. They're replacing Alpha's first crew, led by American Bill Shepherd. By the time Shepherd and his two Russian shipmates return to Earth aboard Discovery on March 20, they will have spent 140 days in space. SHOTLIST: Space, 12 March 2001 1. Various stills of exterior of space station 2. Graphic of space station 3. Various stills of hatch 4. Various graphics of am picking up cargo carrier 5. Astronauts in space station preparing vestibule to lead to container?
VNR: Robotic Surgery (1999)
FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER IN AMERICA, DOCTORS PERFORMED HEART SURGERY WITH THE HELP OF A ROBOT.
12 13 Edition Côte d'Azur: [issue of September 27, 2022]
Méditerranée
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Remotely controlled arms of a Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The patient is partially visible, with the laparoscopes inserted through incisions in his abdomen. The rest of the footage shows a surgeon at the console of the Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to control the laparoscopes. A surgical monitoring device appears, along with a screen showing the actual surgery taking place. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.
Robotic prostate cancer surgery
Robotic prostate cancer surgery. Remotely controlled arms of a Da Vinci robot surgeon being used to remove a carcinoma (cancer) from the prostate gland of a 70-year-old man. The patient is partially visible, with the laparoscopes inserted through incisions in his abdomen. The start of the footage briefly shows a surgeon at the console being used to control the laparoscopes. The removal of all or part of the prostate gland is called a prostatectomy. Da Vinci is a remote-controlled surgical system, developed and produced by the US company Intuitive Surgical. It has four robotic arms that carry tools specific to the operation and other more general surgical implements for procedures such as suturing (stitching) and clamping. A specially trained surgeon operates the system from an ergonomically designed console using remote joysticks with force-feedback. For footage from this operation, see clips K003/3338 to K003/3342 and K003/3343 to K003/3352.