Car Driving Through Rural Area, 1940s
1940S: CAR ENTERS BORDER TOWN. ROAD SIGN FOR ROUTE 83 IN TEXAS. CAR DRIVES DOWN DESERT RURAL HIGHWAY. LOOKOUT WITH GRAFFITI. CAR TURNS ON TO ROAD. POV.
Bridgeman Images Details
++Cuba Hotel
AP-APTN-1830: ++Cuba Hotel Thursday, 30 December 2010 STORY:++Cuba Hotel- NEW Hotel Nacional, once a favourite of Hollywood stars, celebrates 80th year LENGTH: 02:44 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Spanish/Nats SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 670108 DATELINE: Havana - 29 Dec 2010 LENGTH: 02:44 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of bus driving towards front entrance of Hotel Nacional 2. Various exteriors 3. Tilt down from porch ceiling detail to stairs and tourists 4. Various lobby interiors 5. Tilt down from tourists to large floor tile reading "Hotel Nacional - 1930" 6. Pull out of Morro Castle to family in hotel gardens 7. Various exteriors of hotel and gardens 8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Pepa Gutierrez Ortega, Tourist from Seville, Spain "It's as if we shared a bit of history with the people who were here before. It's as if I've been in the same place as 'Tarzan', 'Gilda', those characters and Humphrey Bogart. We share the same space and I think it's worth it. All you have to do is look around and you realise that being here is worth it." 9. Picture of late US actor Johnny Weissmuller in hotel "Hall of Fame" 10. Picture of 1940's hotel guests including US actor and dancer Fred Astaire, US actress Rita Hayworth, former British prime minister Winston Churchill and late Mexican actor Cantinflas 11. Close of picture with guests including early US organised crime figures Meyer Lansky and Charles "Lucky" Luciano 12. Tilt up picture of US film director Steven Spielberg 13. Zoom out from picture of Australian-American actor Errol Flynn to tourists drinking 14. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Antonio Martinez Rodriguez, Hotel general manager "Here history is present, it has been maintained and is also documented. It is also still very much alive. This is the greatest enchantment we can offer. We are very proud that within that enchantment is our Cuban heritage." 15. Tilt down exterior of hotel to gardens with fountain 16. Top shot of hotel swimming pool 17. Wide exterior of hotel STORYLINE Havana's iconic Hotel Nacional marks its 80th birthday on Thursday, wearing its slightly shabby elegance with pride. The hotel has welcomed movie stars and mobsters, but today's visitors are mostly tourists from Britain and Spain hoping to get a taste of the past at the apricot-coloured monolith on Havana's seaside Malecon boulevard. The hotel's story reads like a parable of recent Cuban history, chronicling the island's evolution from naughty tropical playground to communism's Caribbean enclave. "Here history is present, it has been maintained and is also documented. It is also still very much alive," said general manager Antonio Martinez Rodriguez. "That is the greatest enchantment we can offer. We are very proud that within that enchantment is our Cuban heritage." Opened in 1930 as a rum-soaked getaway for Mafia dons and Hollywood starlets, the Nacional became a training centre for illiterate peasant women after Fidel Castro's 1959 revolution. It shuttered around the time of the collapse of the island's Soviet protectorate and was reborn following a major overhaul as a source of much-needed foreign currency. The past has left its scars on the stone-and-concrete building, in the bullet holes that once pockmarked the facade, leftovers from a 1933 rebellion, and in the network of Cuban Missile Crisis-era tunnels and anti-aircraft positions still carved into the garden. Its register reads like a "Who's Who" of the 20th century. Luminaries like Winston Churchill and Jean-Paul Sartre, Ernest Hemingway and Gabriel Garcia Marquez rubbed shoulders with mobsters like Lucky Luciano. Stars including Errol Flynn and Rita Hayworth slept under the same roof as Mickey Mantle and Fred Astaire. Today, VIPs like Steven Spielberg, Kate Moss, Javier Bardem and Sean Penn occasionally light the place up. During the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, the five-star hotel served as backdrop for some of the brinksmanship that brought the world to close to nuclear war. As the standoff neared the boiling point, Cuban soldiers dug a web of invisible tunnels beneath the verdant lawns and installed three Soviet anti-aircraft guns. The Nacional was also the scene of a bombing by an anti-Castro group. In July, 1997, an explosive planted in the lobby went off, wounding a guest and several hotel employees. The blast, part of a campaign that also targeted other Havana hotels, was aimed at destabilising Cuba's fragile economy as the country turned to tourism to substitute Soviet largesse after the fall of communism in Eastern Europe. Plans for the hotel were hatched in the late 1920s under President Gerardo Machado. Though the Cuban government was ostensibly behind the lion's share of 7 (M) million USD investment, general manager Martinez said much of the impetuous for the project came from the mob, which was flush with Prohibition-era cash. The Nacional was designed and built by US firms. It took the crew of 8-thousand workers 14 months to finish the building, an architectural Frankenstein that combines elements of Art Deco, Baroque, Spanish colonial and Latin American criollo styles. Marketed as a tropical paradise, the casino and cabaret delivered no-holds-barred fun to the Nacional's then-largely American clientele, and the mafia pocketed the profits, Martinez said. In December of 1946, about 500 mafiosos descended on the hotel for a mob summit, an event immortalised in fictional form in "The Godfather Part II." During the six-day-long gathering, the dons divided up the spoils of Cuba's lucrative gambling, drug and prostitution rackets, said historian and sometimes tour guide Estela Rivas. Her visits include a stop in the second-floor suite where Lucky Luciano and Meyer Lansky held their talks. Rivas' tours also visit the hotel's cabaret, where showgirls in marabou feathers and strategically placed sequins continue to enthrall, and the Churchill Bar, where Britain's wartime prime minister liked to relax with a Romeo y Julieta brand cigar during his 1946 stay. The Nacional's decades of high-wattage glamour and anything-goes decadence came to an abrupt end in 1959 with the triumph of Castro's revolution. The hotel was nationalised, its walls hung with pro-communist banners. Hundreds of rural women learned to read and sew there, and the hotel later lodged Soviet engineers and honeymooners from across the island. Nowadays, some 86-thousand tourists pass through the Nacional's 426 rooms each year, Martinez said. With standard rooms priced at the modest rate of 120 convertible pesos (129 USD) per night, the hotel attracts mostly middle class Europeans and also some Americans, who defy the nearly half-century-long US embargo against the island. "It's as if we shared a bit of history with the people who were here before," gushed Pepa Gutierrez Ortega, a guest from Seville, Spain. "All you have to do is look around and you realise that being here is worth it." Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-12-30-10 1341EST
HISTORIC ILLINOIS FOOTAGE (EST 1947)
HISTORIC 16MM FILM FOOTAGE OF ILLINOIS CIRCA 1947 AND TRANSFERRED TO DIGITAL FILE. SHOWS PEOPLE AND PLACES IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS.
Paramount
American Red Cross nurses make house calls in snowy conditions in the 1940s
Various Subjects
NEWS, CONTEMP. AND VINTAGE FOOTAGE: WORKERS IN UNIFORM, MINNESOTA PRE-1970S, WWII SOLDIERS AND WOMEN VOLUNTEERS, ESPECIALLY DOING LAUNDRY News footage: Workers in uniform: Airline workers, flight stewardesses, counter workers, baggage handlers/UPS man/workers in diner and construction workers/airport security workers and baggage handlers/auto mechanic in uniform/doctor examines children, lab technician at work/doctors and nurses with babies and small children/doctors and nurses at work in emergency room, scrubbing in, nurses taking blood, doctors and nurses at work, @ the Centers for Disease Control, in hospital/Shea ticket takers and vendors/workers in diner/airport workers: at counter and pilots in cockpit, flight attendants, air traffic controllers on ground/baggage handlers on airport tarmac/fast food workers at McDonald's in Moscow/supermarket checkout workers, fast food workers/auto workers on assembly line/doctors with baby, doctors in surgery/fast food workers, chinese food workers, cafeteria workers/taco bell workers at drive through/auto plant workers/Vintage footage: Archival Minneapolis and Minnesota: skyline of Minneapolis 1950s, University of Minnesota in 1940s/map of Minnesota (70s)/Minneapolis in the 40s/ice storm in Duluth 1935/aerial of Minneapolis (1930s)/various Minnesota/various Minnesota (early 1950s)/U. of Minnesota (1970s)-brief/opening of bridge in Ft. Smelling, MN (1926)/Duluth in the 1940s/Twin Cities, MN (parade and golfing) in 1940s/small-town Minnesota (WWII)/Depression footage, also MN teamster strike and riot/classic Depression images, FDR/classic Depression images, soup lines, unemployed men, for rent signs, etc./more classic depression images, selling apples, dramatic woman with three coins/more classic depression images (MOS), smokestacks, unemployed men, soup kitchen, rural poor, urban poor/depression montage with sound from COMP A-04/WWII soldiers stationed in major US cities, on leave, recreating, etc., in Hawaii also, USO shows/soldiers from all over the US on leave, in New York/WWII soldiers in Hollywood, making a movie, at USO clubs, entertained by celebs/WWII soldiers recreating, writing letters, at a bar, eating doughnuts, women WWII volunteers, making doughnuts, lots of doughnuts; also a WWI segment of women making doughnuts for troops, WWII soldiers at the USO club, with girls, at the library, playing board games, shaving, woman volunteer out of a Salvation Army canteen wagon, soldiers in chapel/WWII men stationed in US/Canada, women volunteers/WWII soldiers stationed in US, soldiers doing laundry/WWII soldiers R&R, including doing laundry/WWII soldier laundry service
AFP-147X 16mm; NET-279 DigiBeta (at 01:00:00:00); Beta SP
JONES BEACH, NIAGARA FALLS
HOLLYWOOD FILMMAKING
MATTE SHOT - REAR SCREEN FOOTAGE SHOT FROM SIDE WINDOW OF MOVING VEHICLE - POV SIDE OF ROAD PASSES IN RURAL AREA, LONG FENCES, TREE LINED ROAD, RAOD CURVES, SIDE OF ROAD ONLY SEEN, MOVING MATTE SHOT - ESTABLISHES RURAL ROAD CIRCA 1940'S EARLY 1950'S. FARM LANDS, FARM HOUSES PASS ALONG SIDE OF ROAD, DRIVING THROUGH THE COUNTRY TREES,
Driving on Highways
1940s style cars and trucks drive down roads and highways, through deserts and more developed wooded areas.
Highland Doctor
Highland Doctor. Country doctor visiting patients in rural Scotland in the 1940s. 1940s, Scotland, Highlands, farm, man leaning against ship deck railing, ship approaching dock, man disembarking ship via gangway and asking for directions, man walking on country road, man opening gate and ringing doorbell, doctor talking to specialist about patient's condition, doctors driving on country road to see patient, doctors getting out of car and walking towards house, doctors talking to nurse about patient's condition, doctor washing hands and examining patient lying in bed, doctors talking about patient's condition and talking about transporting patient to Glasgow hospital, doctors stopping car and entering Telegraph Office, man's hand writing Telegraph, utility poles
ITALIAN FARMERS DRIVE LIVESTOCK.- 1940s
In Italy, farmers drive livestock against a pictureque view of a village circa 1940s.
AMERICAN ROAD - HISTORIC FILE PT. 2 (1953)
BLACK AND WHITE HISTORICAL DOCUMENTARY FILM ‘THE AMERICAN ROAD’, WHICH DOCUMENTS THE RISE OF THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ASSEMBLY LINE. IMAGES INCLUDE RE-CREATION IMAGES MIXED WITH ORIGINAL HISTORIC FILM FOOTAGE FROM EARLY 1900’S THROUGH 1953. NARRATION TRACK IS NOT LICENSABLE.
Europe, 1940s: bombs hit coast of Britain
Europe 1940s: bombs hit coast of Britain. Bus drives along rural road. Bus driver spots German plane in air. Driver tells passengers to take cover. Lady looks out of bus window. Close up of pilot face. Hand presses trigger for gun. Bullets hit side of bus.
Bridgeman Images Details
South Africa Entrepreneur - Soweto millionaire a role model for black business people
NAME: SAF ENTREPREN 20081003Iflat TAPE: EF08/1009 IN_TIME: 11:08:52:22 DURATION: 00:02:58:02 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Jo'burg/Soweto - 18/23 Sep 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: AP Television Johannesburg, South Africa, 23 September 2008 1. Wide set up Richard Maponya, South African businessman, standing in garden with his family 2. Various of Maponya talking to his daughter 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Maponya, South African businessman: "I got an offer from an industrialist who wanted an educated black man to look after a departmental store, the stocks of a departmental store, and I went for an interview and I found that they are actually paying me four times if not more, more than what teaching was paying me." 4. Various of Maponya looking at a painting 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Maponya, South African businessman: "I thought a was I going to start the first retail clothing store in Soweto, but when I made an application the powers that be, they said to me 'you are dreaming, there is no black man who is supposed to be in business here, you are all here to serve industry.' And I then went to (Nelson) Mandela (Oliver) Tambo attorneys and asked them to assist me getting a license." AP Television FILE: Soweto, South Africa, 18 September 2007 6. Wide of Nelson Mandela, former President South Africa, and Maponya cutting a ribbon at the official opening of the Maponya Mall, the largest mall in Soweto 7. Cutaway media 8. UPSOUND: (English) Nelson Mandela, former President of South Africa: "With this action we declare this Mall open." 9. Wide Mandela and Maponya shaking hands AP Television Johannesburg, South Africa, 23 September 2008 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Maponya, South African businessman: "We need more business people to create more job opportunities. There is lot of poverty in our country and the only way we could address this poverty is by us creating a middle class. And as this middle class grows, it pulls other people who are down the ground to the level where they could have a subsistence type of a living." AP Television FILE: Soweto, South Africa, 18 September 2007 11. Wide exterior Maponya Mall, bulldozer driving past 12. Close up wall sign reading "Maponya Mall" 13. Exterior of Maponya Mall 14. Wide of Soweto township, with cooling tower 15. Wide of Soweto township STORYLINE: When Richard Maponya did well as a clothes salesman, his white boss could not promote him under the rules of apartheid. So the boss offered instead to sell Maponya damaged clothes for cheap. Maponya resold the clothes after work and on weekends, and earned enough to go into business himself. Today, the 81-year-old owns supermarkets and car dealerships, as well as the biggest mall in Soweto. Maponya is the most prominent in a small club of early black business people who have proved what an important role black entrepreneurship can play in building post-Apartheid South Africa. Yet his success also stands out for how rare it is in a country where a quarter of the workforce, most of it black, is unemployed, and most blacks still struggle in poverty 14 years after white rule ended. Maponya showed early signs of entrepreneurial instincts. As a boy, he dammed a stream in the northern South African hills where his family raised dairy cattle, drew water from his pool for a vegetable plot, then sold the cabbages and tomatoes to earn extra money. Yet he did not at first consider a career in business. He studied to be a teacher, about as high an aspiration as a black South African could have had in the 1940s. He arrived in Johannesburg a 24-year-old graduate of a teaching college in 1950, a year after the white government adopted a series of laws to keep the races apart and blacks in servitude. Maponya had a contract to teach in Alexandra, a neighbourhood of middle-class black homeowners, until the government began stripping them of their property rights in the 1960s. Maponya never made it to the school. Soon after reaching Johannesburg, he heard by chance of a white business looking for a sales assistant and offering four times a teacher's pay. He went for an interview and got the job, helping choose stock for a line of clothing sold to poor blacks at stores in rural areas and near mines. With Maponya advising on what customers wanted, sales rose so quickly his white boss was given a promotion. That's when his boss took him aside to apologise that he could not be promoted as well, because that would mean putting a black man in charge of white workers. The boss offered Maponya damaged clothes to sell to customers on a "pay as you buy" basis - the term he coined for what's known today as layaway. The practice helped his business spread by word of mouth. By the time jealous colleagues cut off his supply of factory seconds two years later, he had saved 50,000 South African pounds, the currency in use at the time. "I thought I was going to start the first retail clothing store in Soweto," Maponya said in an interview near the pool in the garden of his grand home. White bureaucrats thought differently. He was told blacks should only think of themselves as "temporary sojourners" in the 87 percent of the country reserved for whites. Maponya went to a young Soweto lawyer named Nelson Mandela for help. Mandela was not able to get Maponya a business license, but was able to get him a small-scale trader's permit. Mandela went on to become South Africa's first democratically elected, black president. Maponya's sure touch for suits suddenly didn't mean much. He drew on his days on his family's dairy farm. Within six months, his business had grown from 10 employees to 50. Maponya invested his milk profits in land and other businesses, and now is the patriarch of a family enterprise with wide interests. His Maponya Mall is a case in point. He bought land with plans to build a mall, but it took 28 years before he could find banks and partners willing to take what they saw as the risk of building in Soweto, even though Maponya knew many of its 1.5 million people - a third of Johannesburg's population - regularly trekked to white neighbourhoods for upscale shopping. The deal finally closed in 2001-02. Maponya Mall was inaugurated in 2007 by the very lawyer who helped Maponya get his trader's permit - Nelson Mandela who in 1994 became South Africa's first democratically elected state president.
DN-LB-681 Beta SP
INVASION OF MALAYA AND BORNEO
Rhode Island
Rhode Island. A tour of the state of Rhode Island in the late 1940s. 1940s, boy looking at United States map, Providence, Rhode Island, Roger Williams Statue, Roger Williams Park, car driving on rural road near woods, Kingston Inn sign and building, Gilbert Stuart birthplace sign and home, General Nathanael Greene Homestead sign and home, Old Colony House, Newport, Providence cityscape, freight train, Rhode Island State House, textile mill, Brown University campus, Van Wickle Gates, Carrie Tower, John Nicholas Brown Gate, Woonsocket, street scenes, French signs, Westerly, street scenes, granite quarry, fishermen repairing net, commercial fishing, lobsters, Newport, summer estates, old city street scenes, Newport Historic District, General Richard Prescott headquarters, Washington Square, Oliver Perry Monument, Newport Tower, Old Stone Mill, farmers tilling soil, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, hands putting potatoes into basket, man examining blueberry bush, people picking blueberries, farmers pitching oats, cattle in pasture, chickens grazing, Rhode Island Red chicken, coast, Rhode Island Yacht Club, docked boats, boating, sailboats, regatta, cityscape, Roger Williams Statue, Roger Williams Park, people seated on park benches near Old Colony house, Rhode Island State House, mill, Brown University campus, John Nicholas Brown Gate, students on campus, street scene, farmer operating tilling machine, people seated on rocks on coast looking at water, regatta
ANDREW YANG LEBANON NH NEW YEARS DAY EVENT ABC 2020
TVU 20 ANDREW YANG LEBANON NH NEW YEARS DAY EVENT ABC UNI 010120 2020 Yang's staff planned for around 60 people in Lebanon today, but over 100 arrived, so they had the event outside in 30 degree temperatures, in a park blanketed by thick snow. Supporters didn't seem to mind, and dozens lined up for selfies with Yang. TVU 20 ANDREW YANG LEBANON NH NEW YEARS DAY EVENT ABC UNI 01012020 [15:11:59] There you go. Happy new. [15:12:05] Oh, my gosh. Thank you for being here. I was last night thinking, really laughing. You did? What did happen last night? It's a thrill to be back here in New Hampshire. [15:12:17] I love campaigning here because you are among the most powerful people in our country today. I know it doesn't feel like it, but that's why I'm here. That's why the other candidates are here. I went to high school right here in New Hampshire. Many of you know that. [15:12:33] Well, mostly like really? [15:12:36] I graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1992. [15:12:41] I went back and Spokane next year. A few months ago, they invited me back and I said I hadn't been back since graduation because I didn't really enjoy my time at the school. [15:12:52] And then the student body erupted in applause. And I was like, oh, no. [15:12:57] Oh, I felt really bad. [15:12:59] So after I saw I went to college in Rhode Island, then I went to New York City and became an unhappy lawyer for five months and then left to start a company. How many of you started a business or mailing list or organization? No. Her hand up. You know, two things. There were one. It's much harder than anyone lets on. And number two, when someone asks you how it's going. What do you say? [15:13:23] Great. We want to answer that question. Really? [15:13:27] So my business went great until it failed. My parents told people I was still a lawyer because they're my parents and they're Asian. [15:13:38] Well, I've been bitten by the bug and I said, I want to try to get better at this. So I joined another company and then another. And then I became the CEO of an education company. [15:13:46] I grew to become number one in the United States and was bought by a big company in 2009. So 2009 was a very tough time in much of the country was the financial crisis. How was that time here? First of all, how many of you were here in New Hampshire 10 years ago? How was the financial crisis here in your community? [15:14:05] Terrible. Scary. You know, yesterday I was in Derry and I asked a similar question. And then this 14 year old raised his hand and said, terrible. And I was like, how do you remember? You were like four at the time? [15:14:17] And he said, my family had to sell their house at the time. And I was like, oh, that's right. You remember. It was a really hard time. And so much of the country and I thought I had some insight as to why our economy had crashed. It was because so many of the wannabe whiz kids I'd go into Exeter and Brown and Columbia with it headed straight to Wall Street and come up with mortgage backed securities and financial derivatives and the rest of it that had crashed the economy. And I thought, what a train wreck that is. I can't believe that's what we're actually doing with our people. [15:14:45] So I thought, well, what's the best thing someone could do with that degree of energy and ambition? And Ed, the vision I came up with was to head to communities like Detroit, Providence, Birmingham, Baltimore and New Orleans and help businesses grow, create jobs, become entrepreneurs. [15:15:06] How many how many of you work at a nonprofit now? How many of you volunteer at a nonprofit? [15:15:12] You should all just raise your hand on that one. That's right. That's pretty much like I'm a good person. Question. [15:15:20] So and this is where I get my wife full credit, because when we dated and met, I was a pretty normal guy. And then at that point, I was like, Hey, how about I quit my job and start a nonprofit and we're going to trade hundreds of engineers and create jobs around the country. So how do you start a nonprofit? Well, what I did is I put up somebody and then I started calling rich friends with this question, Do you love America? [15:15:42] And then as part of all of them said, what does it mean if I say yes to this question? And then I said, at least ten thousand dollars. And I told them that I love America for that much. And only I thought you did. [15:15:53] So it started with about a quarter of a million and grew and grew to the millions, helped create thousands of jobs around the country in 15 cities. So what? So that my work was celebrated by the Obama White House. I got to meet the president a number of times. I even got to introduce my wife to him. So my in-laws were very excited about me that week. [15:16:15] Like, oh, she did. All right. [15:16:19] But unfortunately, during this time, I got this sinking feeling where I was being celebrated for helping create these jobs. And I felt like I was pouring water into a bathtub that had a giant hole ripped in the bottom. Then many of the places I was working in felt like they were trending the wrong direction. How many of you are from New England? I'm guessing most of you know, from mostly New York. So mid-Atlantic. [15:16:43] How about Midwest? [15:16:46] South West coasts or mountain west. Oh, so I had never been to Missouri, Missouri or Birmingham or Louisiana or Ohio or any of these regions before venture for America. And I felt like when you flew between Michigan and Manhattan or St. Louis and San Francisco, I was staggered by the Gulf between regions in our country where you felt like you were crossing dimensions or decades or ways of life instead of just a few time zones. But I was still stunned when Donald Trump became our president in 2016. How did you all react when that happened? You all remember that night? [15:17:25] Well, I'm sure it felt like a sea change for the country. Many of you were shocked and saddened. Though we all have family members and friends and neighbors who celebrated his victory. To me, this was a giant red flag where tens of millions of our fellow Americans decided to take a bet on the narcissist reality TV star as our president. That's not business as usual. And so I turned. [15:17:57] To look for an explanation. If you turn out cable news, why would you think that Donald Trump won? Why would you think he's our president today? Democrats, the only three white working class? [15:18:10] Oh, I don't think that's what the cable networks are betraying. So that's what you've been saying. I happen to agree with you. [15:18:18] I call the Tea Party. [15:18:23] So if you want to talk about cable news, one of the factors that they present to us as a reason for Trump's success. Russia. Racism. Hostility towards immigration. Fear. Hillary Clinton emails Facebook. [15:18:42] Well, I'm a numbers guy. And the numbers tell a very, very clear story where we automated away 4 million manufacturing jobs in this country over the last number of years. And where were those jobs? Primarily in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Missouri, Iowa. And if that list of state sounds familiar, those are all the swing states that Donald Trump needed to win ended with. That's where those jobs were. The same thing happened here in New Hampshire a bit earlier in the northern part of the state. You all lost more than twelve thousand manufacturing jobs. I have been to those towns. [15:19:18] I'm sure you have. Too many of those towns have never recovered. Where the plant closed and then the shopping districts closed and then people started leaving into the school shrink. And they're just trying to control the the population from essentially just declining towards zero. That's the same pattern that's played out in Michigan, Ohio, western Pennsylvania. And unfortunately, what happened to those manufacturing jobs is not stopping there. How many of you have noticed stores closing around where you live here in New Hampshire? Yeah, yeah. [15:19:53] And why are the stores closing? Amazon on Amazon is opening up 20 billion dollars in business every year, causing 30 percent of our stores in malls to close forever homes. The Amazon pay in federal taxes last year. That is your math. New Hampshire. Twenty billion out. Zero back. Thirty percent of our store is closed. [15:20:13] Most common job in the country is retail clerk, 39 year old woman who makes between nine and ten dollars an hour when her store closes. What is her next opportunity going to be? [15:20:24] What do you all call the customer service line of a big company? And you get the software. [15:20:29] You do the same thing I do, which is you count 0 0 0. So when you read it to get someone on the line. [15:20:34] All right. Good plays out of it. Representative. Representative. [15:20:38] Well, the two or three short years, the software is going to sound like this. Hey, Andrew, how's it going? What can I do for you? It'll be fast, seamless, delightful. A little bit seductive, perhaps. What is that going to mean for the two and a half million Americans who work in call centers right now making 14 bucks an hour? We've seen the seltzer kiosks in the fast food restaurants and CBS did the grocery stores where the rubber really hits the road, where the robot trucks hit our highways. [15:21:07] How many of you all know a truck driver here in New Hampshire? It's the most common job in 29 states. Three and a half million truckers and autonomous truck just transported 20 tons of butter from California to Pennsylvania two weeks ago with no human intervention. Why bother? I have no idea. Twenty tons of butter. But if you Google robot butter truck, you will see my friends in California. And it's really quite analogous to what I said about Wall Street. It's like where all of the brainy engineers heading, they're heading to Silicon Valley. [15:21:42] And then what is Silicon Valley investing in? A whole lot of stuff, including robot trucks. They tell me that 98 percent of the way there, when they get to 100 percent, what is this going to mean for the three and a half billion truck drivers or the 7 million Americans who work at truck stops, motels and diners that rely upon the truckers getting out and having a meal every day? [15:22:02] This is the fourth industrial revolution. Now, we're now in the midst of what's the last time you heard a politician say the words fourth industrial revolution just now. [15:22:12] Ten seconds ago. And I'm barely a politician in New Hampshire. [15:22:18] And you were here before. It was reason. I love you all. [15:22:23] So these are the changes that helped get Donald Trump into the White House? Well, my first move was not to run for president. [15:22:29] I went to our leaders in Washington, D.C. and I asked them, what are we going to do to help our people manage this transition? What do you think the folks in D.C. said to me when I asked them, what are we going to do about the figures? [15:22:45] Well, it's like, God, we're number one. Andrew, we cannot talk about this. Number two, we should study this further. And number three, we must educate and retrain all the. [15:22:56] Americans with the jobs of the future. How many of you heard someone say something like that? [15:22:59] Yes. Oh, my God. Oh, no, that's not wrong. [15:23:09] So when someone said, hey, we're going to retrain all Americans, I said to them, look, I looked at the studies. [15:23:16] You don't want to guess how effectively government funded retraining programs order for the manufacturing workers who lost their jobs. [15:23:24] Zero to 15 percent. They were total duds. You saw it here in New Hampshire, too. Half of the workers who worked in manufacturing and lost those jobs never worked again. And then of that group have filed for disability. You then saw surges in drug overdoses and suicides in those populations to the point where now America's life expectancy has declined for the last three years in a row. The last time America's life expectancy declined for three years in a row was the Spanish flu of 1918, a global pandemic that killed millions of people. [15:23:54] That's where America is today. Three years in a row is highly unusual in a developed country for life expectancy to every decline did or did. It just keeps on going up. But here in the USA, it's been down, down and down. So what I said is that the folks in D.C. that were like, well, I guess we'll get better at it. And one person said, you laugh, but this is what passes for leadership now because the fact is D.C. succeeds whether we succeed or fail. The feedback mechanism is broken. And that's a main reason why Donald Trump's our president. Reasonable Americans looked up and said, hey, this government is now responding to me. So I will take a bet on anything that's going to change the game. [15:24:34] No one person in DC who sets up thing that brought me here to you all today. New Hampshire. [15:24:39] And it was the truth. He said, Andrew, you're in the wrong town. No one here will do anything about this, because fundamentally this is a town of followers, not leaders. And the only way we will do something about it is if you were to create a wave in other parts of the country and bring that William crashing down on our heads. [15:24:56] That was two years ago, I said. Challenge accepted. And you are the wave. New Hampshire. [15:25:05] I stand before you today. Fifth in the polls to become the Democratic nominee. [15:25:11] We raise ten million dollars last quarter in increments of only 30 bucks each. The white vans are almost as cheap as Bernie's. [15:25:19] No corporate PAC, but a pure grassroots funded. [15:25:25] And I love campaigning here because you all have the future of the country in your hands. I did the math. Do you know how many Californians each of you is worth? [15:25:38] 1000 California. [15:25:42] So you look here at this impromptu New Year's Day gathering in this field. I see about 160 of you. I could use a trumpet. No. There are 600 of you. Duncan. [15:25:56] But 160 of you would be for football stadiums full of the power in this field right now. And the question is, what are you going to do with this power? What direction will you take the country? If you heard anything about me, you heard that there's a man running for president who wants to give everyone 1000 dollars a month. The first time you heard that, I know it sounded like a gimmick, like a joke. It will never happen. But this is not my idea. It's not a new idea. Thomas Paine was born at the founding of our country. Call it the citizen's dividend. Martin Luther King, whose son I had the privilege of meeting with in Atlanta, bought Ford in the 60s. [15:26:38] And it is what he was fighting for when he was killed in 1968. Guaranteed minimum income for all Americans in the 80s. [15:26:45] A state actually passed a dividend. [15:26:47] You'll love this. Simpsons fans will love. [15:26:49] This was a positive dividend. Now everyone in that state gets between one and two thousand dollars a year. No questions asked right now. [15:26:58] And what state is that and how does Alaska pay for it? [15:27:02] And what is the oil of the 21st century? [15:27:06] Technology. Data, software, a self-driving cars and trucks. How many of you saw the study that said that our data is now worth more than oil? In on that. How many of you got your data check in the mail last month? [15:27:22] Now you laugh. But if our data is worth tens of billions of dollars that it's getting sold and resold in these ways, where are the checks going, if not to us? [15:27:31] They're going to Facebook, Amazon, Google and the big tech companies that are paying zero or near-zero in taxes. We are being sucked dry in New Hampshire. It is particularly bad for rural areas because of the rural areas of Main Street's close. Kids look up and feel like they have to leave their community or even their state to have the kind of opportunities they need. This is just going to get more extreme. [15:27:54] And in this context, this dividend of thousand dollars a month, you take our tiny fair share of every Amazon sale, every Google search, every Facebook and eventually every robot truck model. Put it into your hands. Build a trickle up economy from our people, our families, our communities up. [15:28:11] And this thousand dollars a month on your hands. Where will you actually spend it in real life? How much of it would stay right here in New Hampshire? Most of it. Not all of it. You might get your own Netflix password instead of passing. They weren't around, but most of it, I would say, right here in your community. [15:28:37] It would go to local businesses to car repair as you would putting off to little league sign ups, to daycare expenses. It would make our communities stronger. It would go to local nonprofits and religious organizations. But this is the economy that you can make a reality just like that. It is up to you, New Hampshire and you alone to rewrite the rules of the 21st century economy, to work for us, to work for our people. Because right now, corporate profits are at record highs, but also at record highs in this country. [15:29:07] And, you know, this stress, anxiety, financial insecurity, student loan debt, mental illness, even suicides and drug overdoses. It's what's good for the companies is no longer good for us. And it's up to you to line it up. And I know on a personal level how wrong the measurements are, because at home right now, my wife Evelyn is with our two boys, one of whom is autistic. [15:29:32] How much is her work included out in our economic measurements every day? Zero. And we all know that's the opposite of the truth, that that work is the most important and challenging work that anyone is doing. [15:29:46] It's not just evil and its caregivers and your communities and around the country, its volunteers, its coaches, its mentors, its artists. Very often it's increasingly journalists. Two thousand newspapers have gone out of business because there's not a market to support local journalism. The things that we're supposed to value most dearly are getting zeroed out by the market. And we have collectively as a country, confused economic value and human value thought they're the same thing. They are not. It is up to you to send a message to the country that we have intrinsic value as human beings and as Americans. [15:30:31] That is your mission, It's up to you to get Amazon to pay taxes. It's up to you to rewrite the rules so that we can look our kids in the eyes and say we're going to leave them a country we're still proud of. [15:30:42] If you're born in the 1940s in this country, first, congratulations, because it's a pretty good. [15:30:48] But if you're born in the 1940s in the United States of America, there's a 93 percent chance that you're gonna be better off than your parents. That's the American dream. That's what brought my family here. If you were born in the 1990s, which I census, many of you, you're down to a 50 50 shot. And the number is trending down very quickly. [15:31:07] That is why Donald Trump is our president. And that is what you almost change. Donald Trump became president on a very simple message. He said he was going to make America great again. What did Hillary Clinton say in response? [15:31:20] America's already great. Remember that? I know it's been a long three years, but it's about to end. [15:31:29] That response did not work because it did not acknowledge the reality and depth of our problems. [15:31:35] The problems are real. But Donald Trump's solutions were what? We're going to build a wall. We're going to turn the clock back. We're going to bring the old jobs back. [15:31:44] New Hampshire, you know, we had to do the opposite of these things. [15:31:47] We have to turn the clock forward. We have to accelerate our economy and society to rise to the real challenges of this time. And we have to evolve in the way we think about ourselves and our work and our value. And I am the ideal candidate for that job, because the opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math. [15:32:09] Wash your hands. You may have noticed my that is an acronym. [15:32:15] And what does it stand for? Make America think harder. That's right. That is your job. New Hampshire. It is your job to move this country. Not left, not right, but forward in 2020. This year. [15:32:34] After got no homework or no.
Roads and Highways
Scenes of rural and snowy mountain roads accompany a vintage films depiction of progress in engineering and construction that enable people to travel.
Historic Hollywood and Los Angeles
00 -:30 - B/W 1920s, ‘Hollywood Today Reel One’ slate. Man operates camera, fade into montage of 1920s Hollywood scene :30 - 1:01 - B/W, 1930s Aerials of Los Angeles 1:02-1:16 - B/W, 1920s-slate reading Hollywood's main thorofares. CU shot of Hollywood Boulevard. HA shot of Hollywood Blvd with traffic, building with sign reading Hollywood Branch, Security Trust & Savings Bank 1:16 - 1:27 - B/W, 1920s POV driving down the street with traffic 1:27 - 1:35 - B/W, 1920s Sunset Blvd street sign. WS Sunset Boulevard, with traffic 1:35 – 2:06 – B/W, 1920s, Slate: “Famous Studios, the homes of modern magic”. EXT. Warner Brothers office building. HA shot of Warner Bros. studio lot with roadway in foreground 2:06 – 2:29 - B/W, 1920s, Mack Sennett Studios EXT. Pathe Studios office 2:29 - 2:33 – B/W,1920s CU of traffic signal with displaying “Stop”, Hollywood Blvd. and Vine Street signs above signal. Signal then changes to go 2:33 – 2:56 - B/W, 1930s EXT of Hollywood Brown Derby restaurant 2:57 – 5:29 – COLOR, 1940s - Rearward POV of car driving in Los Angeles driving down Hollywood Boulevard heading West and stopping at Grauman’s Chinese Theater. Traffic, trolley cars, yellow and white buses, pedestrians crossing. Hotel Drake can be seen. Shot of Grauman’s Chinese Theater from across Hollywood Boulevard as traffic passes, red trolley cars wait on street 5:29 – 6:22 - B/W, 1930s, Shot of Hollywood Blvd. sign in foreground with traffic in background. EXT of Sardi’s restaurant, various shots. HA shot of Sardi’s, car pulling up to curb 6:23 – 7:01 - B/W, 1930s. HA shot looking down on Hollywood Boulevard facing east. Grauman’s Chinese Theater to left. Banner across Hollywood Boulevard advertising “Shirley Temple”. Traffic moves below 7:01 – 7:49 - B/W, 1930s, Shot of Hollywood Hotel sign, PAN to well-dressed couples passing under sign and to street. PAN down of still of Hollywood Hotel 7:49 – 8:48 - COLOR, 1930s, WS, PAN of area around Grauman’s Chinese Theater, PAN down to theater. WS, HA, Hollywood Bowl 8:49 – 14:03 - B/W, 1930s, HA shot of heavy traffic on freeway. Aerial shot following traffic down freeway. Aerial shots of Hollywood Bowl and area nearby. Aerial shots of traffic, shots of buildings Hollywood area. PAN across to Hollywood Bowl 13:54 – 14:38 - 1940s, COLOR EXT. Original Brown Derby on Wilshire. EXT. 1950s Schwabs Pharmacy. WS of the Ambassador Hotel 14:39 – 16:04 - B/W, 1930s – HA shot over Wilshire Boulevard with Wilshire Boulevard Temple. PAN to opposite side of Wilshire Boulevard. POV driving down Wilshire Boulevard towards Pellissier Building and Wiltern Theatre (Warner Bros. Western Theater). Double decker bus waits a traffic light. EXT locked off shot of Warner Bros. Western Theater. PAN up to top of Theater 16:05 – 16:09 - COLOR – EXT sign reading “Hollywood, Welcome Winter Bowlers” 16:10 – 16:59 - B/W, Night, 1930s – Hollywood Boulevard, heavy traffic, Hotel Christie sign. PAN across Hollywood Boulevard to Hotel Christie sign, heavy traffic on Hollywood Boulevard. Robert’s Drive-In, art deco style drive in 17:00 – 18:49 - B/W, 1910s, Steam train approaches small town station, CU of train wheels moving on tracks, shots of steam training passing. HA shot of steam train passing large lake. MCU various shots of train wheels. B/W, 1920s train approaches station, shot of train moving down rural area. Train approaching rural station 18:49 – 19:17 - B/W, 1920s – EXT WS of Mascot Studios lot. Still images of Mack Sennett Studios lot. Pickford-Fairbanks Studios still of putting up sign. 19:17 – 20:00 - COLOR, Shot looking up from railroad tracks as steam train passes over camera 20:02 – 22:09 - B/W, 1910s – Steam trains pulling in to station, several takes. Train station during heavy rainfall as steam train pulls in to station, passengers quickly get out of train. CU lettering reading “Los Angeles” 22:09 -22:21 – COLOR, 1940s EXT. Union Station CU of entrance. WS of outside of station 22:22 – 23:10 - B/W, 1920s - Man winds old film camera and turns, chyron read “Hollywood” across frame. Stills of ‘Hollywoodland’ sign and ‘Hollywood’ sign. (1930s) Pedestrians sit on bench and wait for bus to arrive, traffic on street. People climb stairs of Los Angeles City Hall 23:12 – 25:06 - B/W, 1910s, Various scenes of actors, Hoot Gibons, Blanche Mehaffy, Fred Gilman, Laura La Plante, Reginald Denny, Dorothy Gulliver, George Lewis (with dog) 25:08 – 27:34 - B/W, 1910s, Slate reads “Tom Mix and his horse “Tony”, EXT of West Coast Studios. Tom Mix shakes hands with man and walks into building. “Shirley Mason and Francis Mac Donald” slate. Bar scene shoot. “Bessie Love and Harold Goodwin” slate. Various scenes shot. “Charles (Buck) Jones with his director and Charles French” slate 27:34 – 29:52 - B/W, 1920s - Man turns film camera, fade in Hollywood montage of various locations and studios around Hollywood. Aerial over Los Angeles. Repeat of Hollywood thoroughfares footage 29:53 – COLOR, 1960s, EXT. Bradbury building, ZI to Bradbury building exterior signage. Various EXT shots of Bradbury building. ZI Million Dollar Theater building, PAN to top of Metropolitan Water District Building 30:47 – 31:07 - B/W, 1930s Man walks in MacArthur Park Lake 31:07 – 32:27 - COLOR, Shot of CU shot of front of old radio, hand turns on radio and tunes radio. MCU of old radio on table. Side angle shot, CU of old radio on table, various angles 32:27 – 32:48 - COLOR, 1940s, Greyhound bus with Hollywood sign on destination board, drives toward camera and stops. Bus approaches depot with ‘Los Angeles’ on destination board on front of bus. Bus turns in and enters depot 32:49 – 33:49 - COLOR, 1940s WS and PAN of Los Angeles from high angles, various shots. Shots of back area of house on hill with swimming pool and small pagoda 33:50 – 34;40 - B/W, 1930s, WS of Hollywoodland sign and Hollywood Tower. PAN to nearby buildings. PANs across Hollywood Blvd. stopping and starting with shot of Pantages Theater 34:41 – 34:53 - COLOR, 1940s, CU traffic signal with Hollywood Blvd, and Vine Street. Signal changes from stop to go 34:53 – 37:55 - COLOR, 1950s, CU of roof of Grauman’s Chinese Theater, slow PAN down to tourists at theater entrance. Side angle shot of ornate roof of theater. Various shots of theater and PANs down. Tourist look at handprints of celebrities including Sofia Loren. MCU of lion statue at theater entrance, tourists in the background. Tourists at entrance of theater, man cleans near entrance. Various shots of two women in high heels walking over celebrity names at entrance of theater 37:56 – 38:31 - B/W, 1940s, EXT Grauman’s Theater, ‘Stagecoach’ banner across Hollywood Boulevard. Sign for map to stars’ homes 38:32 – 39:29 - COLOR, 1970s, EXT of theater with signs for Chaplin, and other vintage films. ‘Betty Boop’ character sign reading ‘Open’ on street. EXT. ‘Walter Allen Studio Plant Rentals’ 39:26 – 40:34 - COLOR, 1930s, EXT of large Los Angeles hotel, various angles. ZI shot from street sign reading “Seacrest Landing, Private, Keep Out”. Shot of people sitting and swimming in large hotel swimming pool 40:35 – 40:58 - B/W, 1930s Still of the Mocambo nightclub in West Hollywood. Early still of Griffith Observatory. Night shot, 1940s, CU traffic signal with Hollywood Blvd, and Vine Street. Signal changes from stop to go 40:58 – 41:03 - COLOR, Sign reading “Clark Gable, Manhattan, Melodrama” 41:07 – 44:25 - COLOR, Movie studio lot made up to look like early 1900s town, snow on ground. Horse and carriages, old cars go down street. ZI to Nickelodeon theatre. Shot of man outside Nickelodeon theater talking people walking by. EXT, night shot of Nickelodeon theater with car 1920s parked outside. CU exterior sign reading ‘Matinee Today’, ZI to man on street trying to get people into theater. CU sign reading ‘Prizes for the Lucky’, EXT night shot of theater. INT of theater, actors wearing period 1910s / 1920 clothing. Audiences applause during movie. Lights come on and crowd looks towards projectionist with anger. Various tracking shots of interior of cinema with people watching films. CU shot of film projector from front angle with light flickering. EXT of Nickelodeon theater at night with neon sign illuminated 44:27 – 45:19 – 1920s, B/W, Slate reading ‘Gentlemen, will please refrain from Smoking, Spitting, or using Profane Language During Performance’ and various other informative and advertising slates before films starts 45:19 - 46:22 - B/W, 1900s, Stills of Melrose Station, WS of small orchard, stills of development and construction 46:23 – 47:35 - COLOR, 1950s, Two men walk into studio lot and walk around while films are being shot, various actors walking around in costume 47:36 – 47:42 - COLOR, Interior shots of audience watching a film 1910s, 1920s period dress 47:53 – 48:33 - B/W, 1920s, Dog standing on tree stump with sheep in the background on a hill. Dog then jumps off high cliff into water below and swims away. Ad for ‘Krausemeyer’s 5 cent beer and free lunch’. Slate reading ‘Francis X Bushman’ then several shots of man on a ship in a suit 48:34 – 56:29 - B/W, 1920s, ‘A Busted Johnny’ film by Mack Sennett.
HISTORIC WASHINGTON STATE FOOTAGE (EST 1947)
HISTORIC FILM OF WASHINGTON STATE SHOT CIRCA 1947 ON 16MM FILM AND TRANSFERRED TO DIGITAL FILE. PLACES AND INDUSTRIES IN WASHINGTON IN THE LATE 1940s.
PET-21 1 inch
PETRIFIED MATERIAL
Immigration Hearing 0900-1000
HOUSE JUDICIARY SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING Immigration and Agriculture Subcommittee hearing with Arturo Rodriguez, United Farm Workers, Steven Colbert and others 09:38:33 THIS HEARING OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION, 09:38:37 CITIZENSHIP, REFUGEES, BORDER SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL LAW 09:38:40 WILL COME TO ORDER. WE REVISE THERE IS GREAT PLIGHT 09:38:48 OF MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN AMERICA. 09:38:50 WE ASK THE PRESS ACTUALLY PULL BACK FROM THE TABLE SO THAT WE 09:38:56 CAN OBSERVE ALL FOUR OF OUR WITNESSES. 09:39:00 AND IF THE PRESS CANNOT DO SO, THEY'LL BE ASKED TO LEAVE THE 09:39:07 ROOM. I WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME OUR 09:39:10 WITNESSES. MEMBERS OF THE IMMIGRATION 09:39:13 SUBCOMMITTEE AND OTHERS WHO JOINED US TODAY TO THE 09:39:16 SUBCOMMITTEE'S HEARING ON PROTECTING AMERICA'S HARVEST. 09:39:19 THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL SECTOR HAS LONG SUFFERED FROM A LACK OF 09:39:24 AVAILABLE U.S. WORKERS TO GROW AND PICK AMERICA'S FRUITS AND 09:39:30 V VEGETABLES. 09:39:31 EVEN IN TODAY'S TOP ECONOMIC CLIMATE, WHETHER WE LIKE IT OR 09:39:34 NOT, INSUFFICIENT AND CONTINUAL NUMBER OF U.S. WORKERS ARE 09:39:40 WILLING TO FILL MANUAL AGRICULTURE JOBS. 09:39:42 AMERICA'S FARMS ARE DEPENDENT ON A RELIABLE WORKFORCE TO PRODUCE 09:39:45 OUR DOMESTIC FOOD SUPPLY AND TODAY'S FARMS ARE STRUGGLING TO 09:39:51 STAY IN BUSINESS AS A RESULT OF CURRENT LABOR CHALLENGES. 09:39:54 TODAY'S HEARING, THE LABOR NEEDS OF OUR AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, 09:40:00 ATTEMPT TO RECRUIT WORKERS FOR AGRICULTURAL LABOR, VISA PROGRAM 09:40:05 FOR AGRICULTURAL WORKERS AND POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS. 09:40:08 ONE EXPLANATION FOR WHY AMERICAN WORKERS MAY BE UNWILLING TO 09:40:13 ENGAGE IN MANUAL FARM WORKER WHEN THEY WERE WILLING TO SO 09:40:17 YEARS AGO MAY LIE IN OUR AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM. 09:40:20 IN THE 1940s AND '50s THE NATIVE-BORN WORKFORCE DIDN'T 09:40:26 HAVE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA. LAST YEAR THAT NUMBER WAS 5.7%. 09:40:29 IN ANY EVENT, THE DIFFICULT TO OF RECRUITING NATIVE-BORN 09:40:33 WORKERS TO WORK ON FARMS HAS BEEN HIGHLIGHTED BY THE UNITED 09:40:36 FORM WORKERS TAKE OUR JOBS PLEASE CAMPAIGN. 09:40:38 THE CAMPAIGN INVITES UNEMPLOYED AMERICANS TO USE THE UFW'S 09:40:45 ASSISTANCE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT AS FARM WORKERS. 09:40:49 YET, ACCORDING TO UFW, EVEN IN THE PERIOD OF HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT 09:40:52 ACROSS ALL EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIOECONOMIC SECTORS OF OUR 09:40:57 SOCIETY, ONLY SEVEN U.S. WORKERS HAVE AGREED TO ACTUALLY WORK IN 09:41:01 THE FIELDS AS OF TODAY. I HAVE BEEN A LONGTIME ADVOCATE 09:41:04 FOR FARM WORKERS AND GROWERS. WHEN I WAS ON THE SANTA CLARA 09:41:09 COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS IN THE 1980s I WORKED CLOSELY WITH 09:41:13 THE UNITED FARM WORKERS AND FARM BUREAU. 09:41:16 I SPENT TIME AT MANY FARMS. RECENTLY I SPENT THE DAY PICKING 09:41:22 STRAWBERRIES AT A FARM NEAR MY DISTRICT. 09:41:25 UFW INVITED ME TO SPEND A DAY PICKING VEGETABLES AT A FARM IN 09:41:29 NEW YORK WITH STEPHEN COLBERT. I WANT TO THANK ARTURO RODRIGUEZ 09:41:35 FOR BRINGING US TOGETHER ON THIS IMPORTANT ISSUE, AND I WOULD 09:41:37 LIKE TO ADMONISH THE AUDIENCE BEFORE I CONTINUE MY STATEMENT, 09:41:42 THAT WE NEED TO MAINTAIN ORDER AND DECORUM THROUGHOUT THESE 09:41:46 PROCEEDINGS AND TO THAT END, I WOULD LIKE TO REMIND ALL OF THE 09:41:49 VISITORS IN THE AUDIENCE THAT THEY SHOULD REFRAIN FROM ANY 09:41:53 MANIFESTATION OF APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF THESE PROCEEDINGS 09:41:57 OR ANY OTHER DISRUPTIVE ACTIONS. IF NECESSARY, THE CAPITOL POLICE 09:42:02 ARE HERE TO REMOVE ANYONE WHO DISRUPTS THE HEARING. 09:42:06 WE CERTAINLY HOPE THAT WON'T BE NECESSARY. 09:42:08 PART OF WHAT I'VE LEARNED OVER THE YEARS IS WITHOUT A 09:42:11 SUFFICIENT U.S. LABOR FORCE U.S. FARMERS HAVE INCREASINGLY RELIED 09:42:15 ON UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS. ACCORDING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF 09:42:18 LABOR, OVER 50% OF ALL SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ARE 09:42:24 UNDOCUMENTED. EXPERTS BELIEVE DUE TO 09:42:27 UNDERREPORTING THAT NUMBER MAY ACTUALLY BE CLOSER TO 75%. 09:42:30 CRITICS ARGUE THAT THE SHORTAGE OF U.S. AGRICULTURAL WORKERS 09:42:33 COULD BE SOLVED BY SIMPLY INCREASING WAGES AND WORKING 09:42:37 CONDITIONS. AS A LONGTIME AND ARDENT 09:42:40 SUPPORTER OF FARM WORKERS I WOULD LIKE NOTHING BETTER. 09:42:43 WE MUST ALSO FACE THE REALITY THE NATION'S GROWERS COMPETE 09:42:46 WITH FARMERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD IN THIS INCREASINGLY 09:42:49 GLOBALIZED WORLD. INCREASING WAGES AND BENEFITS IN 09:42:53 AN AMOUNT NECESSARY TO ATTRACT BILLIONS OF EDUCATED U.S. 09:42:58 WORKERS TO THE FIELDS WOULD MEAN INCREASED PRODUCTION COST THAT 09:43:02 COULD RENDER U.S. FOOD PRODUCTS UNCOMPETITIVE WITH IMPORTED 09:43:06 PRODUCTS. AMERICAN FARMS WOULD THEN CLOSE 09:43:08 IN TURN RESULTING IN THE MASS OFFSHORING OF TENS OF MILLIONS 09:43:12 OF AGRICULTURE AND RELATED JOBS. INDEED, THIS IS ALREADY 09:43:17 HAPPENING. BETWEEN 2007 AND 2008, 1.56 09:43:22 MILLION ACRES OF U.S. FARMLAND WERE SHUT DOWN. 09:43:27 MANY OF THESE FARMS MOVED TO MEXICO. 09:43:31 WHEN FARMS CLOSE OUR COUNTRY SUFFERS. 09:43:33 NOT ONLY DO WE LOSE THE JOBS FILLED BY THOSE WHO WORK IN THE 09:43:38 FIELDS BUT LOSE THE MILLIONS OF UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM JOBS 09:43:41 CONNECTED TO THOSE JOBS WHETHER IT'S PROCESSING, PACKAGING, 09:43:44 TRANSPORTATION, SEED TRUX, MANUFACTURING, ACCOUNTING, 09:43:47 ADVERTISING. THESE JOBS ARE OVERWHELMINGLY 09:43:49 FILLED BY U.S. WORKERS. YET THESE JOBS DISAPPEAR, TOO, 09:43:53 WHEN FARMS ARE CLOSED. ECONOMISTS BELIEVE THAT FOR 09:43:56 EVERY FARM JOB LOST, THE U.S. LOSES ANOTHER 3.1 COMPLEMENTARY 09:44:05 JOBS. ASIDE FROM THE LOSS OF 09:44:11 MILLIONS -- THE TRUTH IS OUR NATIONAL SECURITY DEPENDS ON OUR 09:44:12 ABILITY TO PRODUCE A STABLE DOMESTIC FOOD SUPPLY. 09:44:15 LIKE OIL, THE MORE WE RELY ON OTHER COUNTRIES FOR OUR FOOD 09:44:21 SUPPLY, THE MORE WE FALL VICTIM TO AN INCREASED TRADE DEBT, 09:44:25 SCARCITY IN TIMES OF DROUGHT, FLUCTUATING EXTERNAL MARKET 09:44:29 PRICES AND POLITICAL PRESSURE. WE WOULD ALSO INCREASE THE 09:44:32 POSSIBILITY OF FOOD-BORN ILLNESSES AND TERRORIST ATTACKS 09:44:34 THROUGH OUR NATION'S FOOD SUPPLY. 09:44:35 THE PLAIN TRUTH IS FOOD SECURITY IS NATIONAL SECURITY. 09:44:39 AMERICA CANNOT AFFORD TO STOP PRODUCING ITS OWN FOOD SUPPLY 09:44:42 ANDBY NEED THE LABOR FORCE TO DO SO. 09:44:45 TODAY WE WILL HEAR FROM OUR PANEL OF WITNESSES TO BETTER 09:44:49 UNDERSTAND THIS COMPLEX AND VERY IMPORTANT ISSUE FOR AMERICANS. 09:44:52 AMERICAN JOBS, OUR ECONOMY, AND OUR NATIONAL SECURITY. 09:44:56 PEOPLE IN THE MEDIA SPOTLIGHT HAVE A SPECIAL ABILITY TO FOCUS 09:45:00 PUBLIC OPINION ON AN ISSUE. WHETHER IT'S BONO TALKING ABOUT 09:45:05 THIRD WORLD POVERTY OR ANGELINA JOLIE ADVOCATING FOR PROTECTING 09:45:09 CHILDREN AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING, THE POWER OF MEDIA 09:45:13 FIGURES TO USE THEIR CELEBRITY TO FOCUS ATTENTION ON A CENTRAL 09:45:17 PUBLIC ISSUES IS WELL KNOWN AND WELL REGARDED. 09:45:20 I'M HAPPY THAT STEPHEN COLBERT OF THE "COLBERT REPORT" HAS 09:45:25 JOINED THAT GROUP OF CELEBRITIES WHO WILL USE THEIR MEDIA 09:45:28 POSITION TO BENEFIT OTHERS. AS YOU CAN SEE FROM MR. 09:45:32 COLBERT'S WRITTEN TESTIMONY, HE'S TAKEN THE TIME TO WALK IN 09:45:35 THE SHOES OF MIGRANT FARM WORKERS AND URGES REFORM OF OUR 09:45:40 IMMIGRATION LAWS. HAPPY THE UNITED FARM WORKERS 09:45:44 HELPED INTRODUCE ME TO MR. COLBERT WHO I HAD NOT MET BEFORE 09:45:48 SO WE COULD SPEND A DAY ON THE FARM TOGETHER. 09:45:50 HIS ACTIONS ARE GOOD EXAMPLE OF HOW USING LEVITY AND FAME HE CAN 09:45:57 BRING ATTENTION TO THE GOOD OF THE NATION. 09:46:00 I APPRECIATE ALL OF OUR WITNESS'ESTS TO BE WITH US TODAY 09:46:05 AND THEIR LEADERSHIP IN THIS AREA. 09:46:06 I HOPE TOGETHER WE CAN FIND SOLUTIONS TO THESE PRESSING 09:46:09 PROBLEMS. I WOULD RECOGNIZE OUR 09:46:11 DISTINGUISHED RANKING MEMBER STEVE KING FOR HIS OPENING 09:46:15 STATEMENT. THANK YOU, MADAME CHAIR. 09:46:17 I APPRECIATE BEING RECOGNIZED. A THOUGHT THAT COMES TO MIND, 09:46:21 I'M WONDERING HOW THE ESKIMOS GOT ALONG WITHOUT FRESH FRUITS 09:46:27 AND VEGETABLES IF IT'S A NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUE. 09:46:29 BEFORE WE START THE TESTIMONY FROM THE PANEL, I'D LIKE TO 09:46:32 FOCUS MY REMARKS ON PROTECTING AMERICAN WORKERS. 09:46:35 ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, THE LACK OF ENFORCEMENT OF OUR IMMIGRATION 09:46:39 LAWS IN TODAY'S JOBS, DEPRESSION, HAVE FORMED A 09:46:42 PERFECT STORM FOR HURTING AMERICANS. 09:46:44 THE MOST IMPORTANT DUTY OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE IS WE ENSURE OUR 09:46:46 NATION'S IMMIGRATION POLICY LIFTS UP AMERICANS AND NOT HOLDS 09:46:50 THEM DOWN. I FIND IT HARD TO UNDERSTAND WHY 09:46:52 SOME PEOPLE CARELESSLY CLAIM THAT AMERICANS WON'T DO HARD 09:46:56 WORK. I FIND THIS CLAIM INSULTING AS I 09:46:58 AM SURE MOST HARDWORKING AMERICANS DO. 09:47:01 IT'S MOST INSULTING TO THOSE BRAVE AMERICAN SOLDIERS WHO 09:47:04 VOLUNTARILY RISK THEIR LIVES TO DEFEND OUR FREEDOM AND WAY OF 09:47:07 LIFE EVERY DAY. THE MEN AND WOMEN THAT TAKE ON 09:47:10 TERRORISTS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN. 09:47:11 TREK FOR MILES ACROSS THE DESERT WITH 70 OR MORE POUNDS OF GEAR 09:47:15 IN 100-PLUS DEGREE TEMPERATURES FOR ABOUT $8.09 AN HOUR. 09:47:20 THAT INCLUDES THE MARINES. MAYBE WE SHOULD BE SPENDING LESS 09:47:25 TIME WATCHING "COMEDY CENTRAL" AND MORE TIME CONSIDERING THE 09:47:27 REAL JOBS OUT THERE, ONES THAT REQUIRE REAL HARD LABOR AND 09:47:32 DON'T INVOLVE SITTING BEHIND A DESK. 09:47:33 WE WOULD REALIZE EVERY DAY AMERICAN WORKERS PERFORM THE 09:47:36 DIRTIEST, MOST DIFFICULT, MOST DANGEROUS JOBS THAT CAN BE 09:47:39 THROWN AT THEM. FROM CRAB FISHERMEN TO VENTURE 09:47:41 INTO THE ROUGHEST AND MOST DANGEROUS WATERS IN THE WORLD TO 09:47:44 THE JOE THE PLUMBERS OF THE WORLD WHO MANY DAYS WOULD PREFER 09:47:49 THE AROMA OF FRESH DIRT TO THAT OF THE SEWAGE FROM AMERICAN 09:47:54 ELITISTS WHO DISPARAGE THEM EVEN AS THEY FLUSH. 09:47:57 THESE ARE REAL AMERICANS DOING REAL JOBS, TASKS THAT SIMPLY 09:48:02 MUST GET DONE. WHEN AMERICAN WORKERS ARE 09:48:05 TREATED WITH RESPECT AND PAID FOR THE LABOR THEY'LL DO ANY JOB 09:48:08 AND OUTWORK ANYONE ON EARTH. AMERICA'S SPIRIT IS HARD WORKING 09:48:13 AND SO ARE THE PEOPLE WHO COMPRISE THIS NATION. 09:48:16 I REPRESENT A RURAL DISTRICT MADE UP OF FARMERS IN FARM 09:48:19 COMMUNITIES AND THE PEOPLE OF IOWA KNOW WHAT IT TAKES TO 09:48:22 MANAGE AND EFFECTIVELY ONE A FARM. 09:48:24 ONE ISSUE WITH ATTRACTING MORE AMERICAN WORKERS TO SEASONAL 09:48:28 AGRICULTURAL LABOR IS MOST MIGRANT FARMERS -- THE 09:48:38 DEVASTATING IMPACT ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION HAS ON AMERICAN FARM 09:48:41 WORKERS. OF COURSE IT IS ARGUED BY TOM 09:48:44 VILSACK, PRESIDENT OBAMA'S SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE, THAT 09:48:46 FOOD PRICES WOULD BE THREE, FOUR OR FIVE TIMES MORE IF IT WERE 09:48:50 NOT FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT WORKERS. 09:48:53 THIS IS BLATANTLY FALSE AND CAN'T BE SUPPORTED BY ANY DATA. 09:48:58 DOESN'T EVEN BOTHER TO DEFEND HIMSELF. 09:48:59 DATE TO FROM THE SECRETARY'S OWN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SHOWS 09:49:03 LABOR COSTS ONLY REPRESENT 6% OF THE PRICE CONSUMERS PAY FOR 09:49:07 FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. DOUBLE THE PAY OF WORKERS AND 09:49:10 SEE ONLY A 6% INCREASE IN CONSUMER PRICES. 09:49:14 HIGHLY RESPECTED AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIST PHILLIP MARTIN OF THE 09:49:17 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA NOTES IF THERE WAS A 40% INCREASE IN 09:49:20 FARM WAGES THE AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD WOULD ONLY SPEND $8 MORE A YEAR 09:49:25 ON FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, LESS THAN THE PRICE OF A MOVIE 09:49:30 TICKET. MOST AMERICANS WOULD PAY $8 MORE 09:49:32 A YEAR IN ORDER TO ENSURE A LEGAL WORKFORCE. 09:49:34 CHEAP LABOR IS NOT WORTH ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION'S COST TO AMERICANS 09:49:37 AS WORKERS OR TAXPAYERS. THE REALITY IS, EMPLOYERS HIRE 09:49:42 DESPERATE ALIENS WHO WILL WORK FOR MUCH LESS THAN AMERICANS, 09:49:45 DRIVING WAGES DOWN AND MAKING IT IMPOSSIBLE FOR AMERICAN WORKERS 09:49:49 TO COMPETE. AS RANKING MEMBER SMITH HAS 09:49:51 POINTED OUT, MANY TIMES IN THE PAST THERE ARE 8 MILLION ILLEGAL 09:49:55 IMMIGRANTS IN THE WORKFORCE COMPETING AGAINST THE 15.4 09:50:00 MILLION AMERICANS WHO ARE OFFICIALLY COUNTED AS 09:50:04 UNEMPLOYED, WHICH INCLUDES THE 80 MILLION WHO ARE SIMPLY NOT IN 09:50:09 THE WORKFORCE BECAUSE THEY'VE DROPPED OUT AND ARE NO 09:50:11 LOOKING FOR JOBS AND THEY ARE OF WORKING AGE. 09:50:13 AMERICANS HAVE GIVEN UP LOOKING FOR THOSE JOBS BECAUSE WAGES 09:50:17 HAVE BEEN DEPRESSED AND JOB OPPORTUNITIES ELIMINATED BY LOW 09:50:20 SKILLED AND VERY MOBILE IMMIGRATION. 09:50:22 THE PERCENT OF TEENAGERS WHO WORK HAS NEVER BEEN LOWER. 09:50:26 PROFESSOR CAROL SWAIN WILL TESTIFY TODAY ABOUT THE TOLL 09:50:29 MASS IMMIGRATION HAS TAKEN ON MINORITY COMMUNITIES. 09:50:32 WHAT'S IMPORTANT TO POINT OUT IS THAT ALL OF THIS STARTED LAPPING 09:50:35 WELL BEFORE THE RECESSION. PROFESSOR GEORGE BORHAUS DID 09:50:41 GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH ON THE IMPACT OF IMMIGRATION IN THE 09:50:44 1980s AND '90s ON LOW SKILLED AMERICAN WORKERS. 09:50:48 PROFESSORS ANDREW SUM AND PAUL HARRINGTON AND OTHER RESEARCHERS 09:50:51 AT THE LABOR MARKET STUDIES AT NORTHEASTERN FOUND IN 2005 THAT 09:50:55 GIVEN AND I QUOTE GIVEN LARGE JOB LOSSES AMONG THE NATION'S 09:51:00 TEENS, 20 TO 24-YEAR-OLDS WITH NO FOUR-YEAR DEGREES AND NATIVE 09:51:05 BORN MEN IT IS CLEAR THAT NATIVE BORN WORKERS HAVE BEEN DISPLACED 09:51:09 IN RECENT YEARS BECAUSE OF IMMIGRATION." 09:51:12 IT'S AMAZING TO ME THAT AMNESTY ADVOCATES SIMPLY IGNORE THE 80 09:51:17 MILLION LABOR POOL. WE CAN EITHER FEED, CHOET AND 09:51:20 HOUSE THEM OR PUT THEM TO WORK TO FEED AND CLOTHE THE WORLD. 09:51:24 THE CURRENT ECONOMIC CRISIS ONLY MAGNIFIES THE IMPACT ON AMERICAN 09:51:28 FAMILIES BUT UNLESS OUR POLICIES ARE CHANGED AMERICAN WORKERS AND 09:51:31 FAMILIES WILL CONTINUE TO BE UNDERMINED EVEN AFTER THE 09:51:34 ECONOMY TURNS THE CORNER. THE HERITAGE FOUNDATION FOUND 09:51:38 THAT THE AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD HEADED BY AN IMMIGRANT HOUSEHOLD 09:51:42 WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DEGREE RECEIVES OVER $19,000 IN TOTAL 09:51:46 GOVERNMENT BENEFITS MORE THAN THEY PAY IN TAXES FROM FEDERAL, 09:51:49 STATE AND LOCAL. CHEAP LABOR? 09:51:52 AND I THINK ABOUT THE DAY THAT I HAD TO SWIM OUT INTO A SEWER 09:51:57 LAGOON AND DIVE INTO NINE FEET OF FLUID TO RETRIEVE A PUMP AND 09:52:01 WHEN I THINK ABOUT THE DAY THAT IT WAS 20 BELOW AND I'M IN THE 09:52:04 WATER FIXING A WATER LINE IN THE WARMEST PLACE THERE WAS IN THE 09:52:09 WATER, THE WORK THAT I'VE DONE IN MY LIFE IN THE CONSTRUCTION 09:52:12 BUSINESS AND WORK WE'VE PUT OUR WORKERS THROUGH IN THE PRIDE 09:52:15 WITH WHICH THEY TAKE, IT MEANS THAT IT'S AN INSULT TO ME TO 09:52:18 HEAR THAT AMERICANS WON'T DO THIS WORK. 09:52:19 I CAN'T THINK OF A JOB THAT I HAVE NOT BEEN WILLING TO DO AND 09:52:22 I CAN'T THINK OF AN EMPLOYEE THAT I'VE HAD OVER THE 28 YEARS 09:52:25 IN THE CONSTRUCTION BUSINESS THAT REFUSED TO DO THE WORK THAT 09:52:28 WAS NECESSARY. AMERICANS WILL DO THAT WORK BUT 09:52:30 THEY WANT TO BE PAID A RESPECTABLE WAGE FOR IT. 09:52:32 I LOOK FORWARD TO THE TESTIMONY, MADAM CHAIR AND YIELD BACK THE 09:52:36 BALANCE OF MY TIME. WITH THE AGREEMENT OF THE 09:52:43 MINORITY, WE ARE RECOGNIZING THE AUTHOR OF THE AG JOBS BILL, 09:52:47 MR. BERMAN FOR HIS STATEMENT AND THEN MR. SMITH AND MR. CONNERS 09:52:52 WILL GIVE THEIR OPENING STATEMENTS. 09:52:54 MR. BERMAN. THANK YOU VERY MUCH, MADAM 09:52:57 CHAIR AND THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR HOLDING A HEARING WHICH 09:53:01 PERHAPS LIKE FEW OTHERS WILL HIGHLIGHT THE CONDITIONS OF 09:53:07 MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN THIS COUNTRY AND TURN ATTENTION TO 09:53:12 THIS CRITICAL ISSUE. I THANK BOTH THE CHAIR AND 09:53:16 RANKING MEMBER AND FULL COMMITTEE FOR ALLOWING TO GO. 09:53:19 THIS IS AN ISSUE THAT I HAVE BEEN FOCUSED ON FOR 40 YEARS AND 09:53:27 IN THE LAST 10 YEARS HAVE EACH SESSION INTRODUCED BIPARTISAN 09:53:32 LEGISLATION TO TRY AND DEAL WITH THIS ISSUE. 09:53:38 UNFORTUNATELY, BECAUSE I CHAIR ANOTHER COMMITTEE, I HAVE A 09:53:41 HEARING AT 10:00 AND SO I APPRECIATE THE COURTESIES 09:53:46 EXTENDED TO LET ME JUMP IN LINE HERE. 09:53:49 I'M GOING TO FORGO MY PREPARED OPENING STATEMENT BUT I SIMPLY 09:53:55 MUST RESPOND TO THE COMMENTS OF THE RANKING MEMBER, MY FRIEND 09:53:59 THE RANKING MEMBER ON THIS PARTICULAR ISSUE. 09:54:04 THERE IS NOTHING THAT THE CHAIR SAID -- THERE IS NOTHING 09:54:08 IMPLICIT IN THE TAKE OUR JOBS CAMPAIGN EXPLICIT OR IMPLICIT 09:54:14 THAT SAID AMERICANS AREN'T DOING HARD WORK AND IF THE GENTLEMAN 09:54:20 FROM IOWA WERE DEEPLY CONCERNED ABOUT THE CONDITIONS ON THE 09:54:28 FARMS AND THE WAGES, I WOULD HAVE NOTICED MORE ACTIVITY TO 09:54:33 ENSURE THAT A NUMBER OF THE LAWS THAT APPLY TO ALL OTHER WORKERS 09:54:36 IN AMERICA APPLY WITH EQUAL FORCE TO THE PEOPLE WHO PICK OUR 09:54:42 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN THIS COUNTRY. 09:54:44 I WOULD SEE AN EFFORT TO PUSH GREATER APPROPRIATIONS AND 09:54:48 GREATER FUNDING FOR PEOPLE TO MONITOR THE WORKING CONDITIONS 09:54:51 ON OUR FARMS. I'D SEE AN EFFORT TO TRY AND GET 09:54:54 THE RIGHTS THAT ALL OTHER WORKERS HAVE TO COLLECTIVE 09:54:58 BARGAINING EXTENDED TO FARM WORKERS WHO ARE EXCLUDED FROM 09:55:01 OUR NATIONAL COLLECTIVE BARGAINING LEGISLATION. 09:55:04 THE FACT IS THAT WHILE AMERICANS OVER AND OVER AGAIN HAVE 09:55:10 PRODUCED BOTH THEIR -- HAVE SHOWN BOTH THEIR COURAGE AND 09:55:13 THEIR WILLINGNESS TO UNDERTAKE TERRIBLY DIFFICULT JOBS, JOBS 09:55:17 THAT I WOULD DARE TO SAY THE PEOPLE ON THIS PODIUM INCLUDING 09:55:22 MYSELF WOULD BE VERY RELUCTANT TO TAKE STUDY AFTER STUDY 09:55:28 INCLUDING STUDIES AT THE TIME OF WELFARE REFORM WHERE HUGE 09:55:32 NUMBERS OF PEOPLE WERE GOING TO BE FORCED OFF OF THE WELFARE 09:55:37 R ROLLS AND COUNTIES WHERE 09:55:39 UNEMPLOYMENT WAS TWO OR THREE TIMES THE AVERAGE OF THE COUNTRY 09:55:46 GENERALLY, PEOPLE WOULD RATHER HAVE NO INCOME AND NO WELFARE 09:55:51 THAN TAKE THE BACK-BREAKING JOBS THAT THE MIGRANT FARM WORKER HAS 09:55:58 TO DO EVERY SINGLE DAY. THERE IS A PROBLEM HERE. 09:56:02 YOU CAN TRY AND CHEAP SEAT IT ALL YOU WANT, BUT WE KNOW THAT 09:56:08 WERE IT NOT FOR IMMIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN THIS COUNTRY THERE 09:56:14 WOULD BE NO SEASONAL FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY AND I 09:56:19 JOIN THE GENTLEMAN WANTING BETTER WAGES AND BETTER WORKING 09:56:23 CONDITIONS AND WE SHOULD DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO TRY AND 09:56:26 IMPROVE THOSE CONDITIONS, BUT THE FACTS ARE THE FACTS, STUDY 09:56:29 AFTER STUDY HAS DEMONSTRATED THAT THESE JOBS ARE NOT TAKEN BY 09:56:35 U.S. WORKERS EVEN WHEN UNEMPLOYED, EVEN WHEN HAVING NO 09:56:39 OTHER SIGNIFICANT MEANS OF SUPPORT. 09:56:41 AND NOTHING THAT -- NO RHETORICAL FLOURISHES CAN HIDE 09:56:46 THAT FACT. I COMMEND THE GENTLE LADY FOR 09:56:50 HOLDING THIS HEARING. I WANT TO PAY A SPECIAL 09:56:52 RECOGNITION FOR MY DEAR FRIEND, THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED FARM 09:56:56 WORKERS UNION, ARTURO RODRIGUEZ AND THE OTHER WITNESSES, AS WELL 09:57:00 AND APOLOGIZE FOR -- I HOPE TO COME BACK WHEN MY HEARING IS 09:57:04 OVER BUT NOT TO BE HERE FOR THE ENTIRE HEARING. 09:57:07 I YIELD BACK. THANK YOU, MR. BERMAN. 09:57:09 WE WOULD NOW RECOGNIZE THE RANKING MEMBER OF THE FULL 09:57:11 COMMITTEE MR. SMITH FOR HIS OPENING STATEMENT AND HE WILL BE 09:57:16 FOLLOWED BY MR. CONYERS AND THEN JUST TO KEEP IT EVEN WE'LL 09:57:21 INVITE MR. LUNDGREN TO HAVE AN OPENING STATEMENT AND OTHERS 09:57:25 WILL BE INVITED TO SUBMIT OPENING STATEMENTS. 09:57:28 THANK YOU, MADAM CHAIR. AMERICAN WORKERS FACE TOUGH 09:57:32 ECONOMIC TIMES. WITH UNEMPLOYMENT ALMOST 10% FOR 09:57:35 THE FIRST TIME IN A GENERATION, JOBS HAVE BECOME SCARCE AND 09:57:39 MILLIONS OF FAMILIES ARE HURTING. 09:57:42 THE PEW HISPANIC CENTER ESTIMATES THERE ARE MORE THAN 7 09:57:46 MILLION ILLEGAL WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 09:57:50 ALEXANDER ALANAKOFF, I.N.S. OFFICIAL AND HIGH COMMISSIONER 09:57:55 FOR REFUGEES CALLS IT A MYTH THAT THERE ARE LITTLE OR NO 09:58:00 COMPETITION BETWEEN UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS AND AMERICAN WORKERS. 09:58:04 THIS COMPETITION HAS HAD DEVASTATING EFFECTS ON THE MOST 09:58:07 VULNERABLE OF AMERICANS. OVER 32% OF NATIVE-BORN WORKERS 09:58:12 WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DEGREE ARE EITHER UNEMPLOYED, FORCED TO 09:58:15 WORK PART TIME OR TOO DISCOURAGED TO EVEN LOOK FOR 09:58:19 WORK. FOR NATIVE BORN HISPANICS 09:58:21 WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DEGREE, THE RATE IS 35%. 09:58:25 FOR NATIVE BORN AFRICAN-AMERICANS WITHOUT A HIGH 09:58:27 SCHOOL DEGREE, THE RATE IS 43%. WE COULD MAKE MILLIONS OF JOBS 09:58:34 AVAILABLE TO AMERICAN CITIZENS AND LEGAL IMMIGRANTS IF THE 09:58:37 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SIMPLY ENFORCED OUR IMMIGRATION LAWS. 09:58:41 ABOUT HALF OF AGRICULTURE WORKERS ARE ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS. 09:58:46 SO THAT MEANS THAT A SUBSTANTIAL NUMBER OF LEGAL WORKERS, LABOR 09:58:51 IN THE FIELDS, PERHAPS AS MANY AS HALF. 09:58:54 CERTAINLY EVEN MORE WOULD TAKE THESE JOBS IF THE WAGES AND 09:58:57 WORKING CONDITIONS WERE BETTER. THE MOST EFFECTIVE MEANS WE HAVE 09:59:01 TO SAVE JOBS FOR AMERICANS ARE
ILLINOIS HISTORICAL FILM (1947)
COLOR FILM. AUDIO FROM FOOTAGE IS NOT LICENSABLE. THIS IS HISTORICAL TRAVEL LOG FILM TAKEN IN AND AROUND THE STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE LATE 1940’S OR EARLY 1950’S. EXACT DATE IS UNKNOWN.
Rural Postal Transaction
A mailman makes his rounds on a rural route. POV shot from inside a car shows him slowing in front of a mailbox with its flag up. Two women walk towards the car. Mailman hands one of the women her mail and she gives him a package, which he weighs, leaning through the car's window. She hands him money from a purse and he drives off, transaction completed. She waves.
The Story of Oil
The Story of Oil. The oil fields in Turner Valley, Alberta, Canada. 1940s, gas pump attendant filling tank, car driver pov driving down street, Alberta, Canada, Turner Valley, foothills, oil fields, Rocky Mountains, small town, herd of wild horses, road sign pointing in different directions, rural, oil derrick towers, children entering school, cattleman herding cattle, truck pulling house, truck pulling oil tank, oil well, trailers, oil riggers, truck erecting derrick, digging well, rigging dynamite, dynamite exploding, seismograph truck, geologist, the petroleum and natural gas conservation board, geologists analyzing samples, geology map of Turner Valley, animation of oil well being sunk, oil riggers digging hole, oil rig, derrick tower being constructed, riggers tightening pipe with wrench, mixing cement, pipes, draw-works, rotary drill, diamond drill bit, depth and pressure monitoring gauge, driller, mud plaster, changing drill bit, roughnecks, oil riggers drinking water, unstacking pipes, acidifying well, burning oil well, smoke, fire, workman returning home to wife and baby, oil well without derrick, pumping jack, pump jack, oil being loaded into tanks and transported on trucks, receiving pit, pipeline, pipes, welder, scrubbing and absorption plant, oil refinery, cracker plant, oil train, boy oiling bicycle wheel bearing, woman oiling sewing machine, oil cleaning supplies, oil stove, paraffin