India SLanka - Foreign ministers in photo-op
NAME: IND S LANKA 260805Nxx TAPE: EF05/0761 IN_TIME: 10:48:35:07 DURATION: 00:00:40:06 SOURCES: APTN DATELINE: New Delhi - 26 Aug 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST 1. Indian External Affairs Minister (Foreign Minister) Natwar Singh (in white) walking in with Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Anura Bandarnaike (in grey) and then shaking hands 2. Cutaway photographer 3. Close up of Bandarnaike; tilt down to handshake; zoom out to the two ministers leaving 4. Wide shot of exterior of Hyderabad House where the ministers are meeting STORYLINE Sri Lanka''s new Foreign Minister on Friday asked leaders in neighbouring India to help keep his country''s increasingly shaky peace process with the Tamil Tiger rebels from total collapse. Foreign Minister Anura Bandarnaike was meeting with India''s External Affairs Minister Natwar Singh in New Delhi on his first foreign visit since assuming office. The two men discussed how India could help with dialogue between Sri Lanka''s government and the Tamil Tigers, said an Indian official. Bandarnaike''s visit came ahead of crucial peace talks between his government and the Tamil Tigers to review their cease-fire, which has become increasingly fragile after the August 12 assassination of Foreign Minister Lakshman Kadirgamar, Bandarnaike''s predecessor. Bandarnaike is scheduled to meet Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh later in the evening before leaving for Colombo. Sri Lanka''s government and the Tigers signed a cease-fire in February 2002, but subsequent peace talks to end the two-decade separatist war broke down a year later. A recent spate of violent incidents in the country has raised fears that the truce is on the brink of collapse. Many of Sri Lanka''s minority ethnic Tamils, whose ancestors were brought to the island from nearby India as indentured labourers by British colonial planters in the 18th century, have family ties with Tamils living in southern India. India has previously been involved in efforts to end the civil war. In 1987, New Delhi sent peacekeeping troops to Sri Lanka, but withdrew them three years later after more than 1,100 Indian soldiers died in clashes with the Tigers.
++World Population
AP-APTN-0930: ++World Population Monday, 31 October 2011 STORY:++World Population- NEW Countries around the world mark world's population reaching 7 billion LENGTH: 03:32 FIRST RUN: 0930 RESTRICTIONS: Part No Access Philippines TYPE: Tagalog/Eng/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/ABS-CBN STORY NUMBER: 712415 DATELINE: Various - 31 Oct 2011/Recent LENGTH: 03:32 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABS-CBN - NO ACCESS PHILIPPINES SHOTLIST ABS-CBN - NO ACCESS PHILIPPINES Manila, Philippines - 31 October 2011 1. Medical team and Camille Galura at delivery room 2. New born Danica May Camacho on weighing scale 3. Nurse carrying Danica and placing her on her mother's chest 4. Camille and daughter Danica 5. United Nations representative Jacqui Badcock carrying birthday cake to new born baby and her mother 6. Close of Danica 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Enrique Ona, Department of Health Secretary: ++AUDIO AS INCOMING++ "I hope that the coming or the reaching of this number would give us the opportunity to think that the global environment will be able to take care of the number of people that are alive today." 8. Pan from gifts to mother and baby 9. SOUNDBITE (Tagalog) Camille Galura, Mother: ++AUDIO AS INCOMING++ "I was not expecting this, I am surprised." 10. Wide of hospital room with mother and baby on bed, banner on wall, reading (English) "Welcoming the Philippines Symbolic 7 Billionth Baby" 11. Danica and her mother Camille AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Jakarta, Indonesia - 30 October 2011 12. Jakarta's main road filled with people on "car free day" 13. Various of people walking in park 14. Close of banner, reading (English) "Youth & World at 7 Billion" 15. Various of people signing banner to mark the day that earth population reaches 7 (b) billion 16. Various of toddler in park with family 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Jose Ferraris, Indonesia representative of United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA): "The country was able to reduce the population growth to a sustainable level, however because again of population momentum, population continues to grow. It is not as alarming as in other countries where you do have very high rate of population growth and very high rate of fertility. However, we must continue to pay particular attention to the rights of every individual Indonesian woman and man, in order to access family planning and reproductive health information and services." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Jakarta, Indonesia - 31 October 2011 18. Various of traffic on Jakarta road AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY RECENT: Beijing, China - 11 October 2011 19. Mid of people getting off bus 20. Various of people walking in street AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY RECENT: New Delhi, India - 11 October 2011 21. Various of people in market AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY RECENT: New Delhi, India - 12 October 2011 22. Various of people walking in street STORYLINE She came into the world at two minutes before midnight, born into a struggling Manila family. On Monday, she became a symbol of the world's population reaching 7 (b) billion people and all the worries that entails for the planet's future. Danica May Camacho, born in a crowded public hospital, was welcomed with a chocolate cake marked "7B Philippines" and a gift certificate for free shoes. There were bursts of photographers' flashes, and speeches by local officials. The celebrations, though, reflected symbolism more than demography. Amid the (m) millions of births and deaths around the world each day, it is impossible to pinpoint the arrival of the globe's 7 (b) billionth occupant. But the UN chose on Monday to mark the day with a string of festivities worldwide, and a series of symbolic 7 (b) billionth babies being born. Danica was the first, arriving at Manila's Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital at two minutes before midnight on Sunday, but doctors say that was close enough to count for a Monday birthday. "I was not expecting this, I am surprised," the mother, Camille Galura, whispered as she cradled the 2.5-kilo (5.5-pound) baby, who was born about a month premature. The baby was the second for Galura and her partner, Florante Camacho, a struggling driver who supports the family on a tiny salary. In the Philippines, much of the population question revolves around birth control and the government backs a programme that includes artificial birth control. The powerful Roman Catholic church, though, vehemently opposes contraception. Demographers say it took until 1804 for the world to reach its first (b) billion people, and a century more until it hit 2 (b) billion in 1927. The twentieth century, though, saw things begin to cascade: 3 (b) billion in 1959; 4 (b) billion in 1974; 5 (b) billion in 1987; 6 (b) billion in 1998. The UN estimates the world's population will reach 8 (b) billion by 2025 and 10 (b) billion by 2083. But the numbers could vary widely, depending on everything from life expectancy to access to birth control to infant mortality rates. Other countries around the world also marked world's population reaching 7 (b) billion on Monday. In Indonesia, some residents attended a ceremony arranged by United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), where they signed a banner, marking the day. The UNFPA in Indonesia has launched a campaign to address challenges the world is facing with population growth. "We must continue to pay particular attention to the rights of every individual Indonesian woman and man, in order to access family planning and reproductive health information and services," Jose Ferraris, Indonesia representative of UNFPA said. With approximately 240 (m) million people, Indonesia is the fourth largest in the world population. The country's population growth is 1.9 percent with most of the population living in Java island. Monday's milestone has refreshed debate about the global need for population control and whether China, still the world's most populous country, serves as model. China is home to 1.34 (b) billion people, but the number of babies being born is now on decline. A Chinese claim that without its government's severe family planning limits world population would have hit the 7 (b) billion mark years earlier is drawing fire from demographers who call it baseless and unscientific. A report by the official Xinhua News Agency that was carried on news websites and in newspapers said China is responsible for preventing 400 (m) million births with its one-child policy, a set of restrictions that were launched three decades ago limiting most urban families to one child and most rural families to two. The scholars say that China's biggest drop in fertility came from 1970-79 before the one-child policy was introduced and that the reductions since then have been largely due to economic and social reforms that make small families more attractive. Behind the debate over the 400 (m) million figure is larger campaign about whether and when the government should relax the family-planning limits. Elsewhere, in Uttar Pradesh, India, the most populous state in the world's second-most populous country, officials said on Monday they would be choosing 7 girls born on Monday to symbolise the 7 (b) billion. India, which struggles with a deeply held preference for sons and a skewed sex ratio because of (m) millions of aborted female foetuses, is using the day to highlight that issue. According to US government estimates, India has 893 girls for every 1,000 boys at birth, compared with 955 girls per 1,000 boys in the United States. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-10-31-11 0715EDT
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
London Feed / Global Warming Elements
LONDON: GLOBAL WARMING ITEMS NY2/X76/Slugged: 1105 GLOBAL WARMING X76 11:05:37 070201 Name: 070201 Title: ANTARCTICA WORLD CLIMATE ap0430g Type: APTN FEED In point: 04:30:32.03 Out point: 04:35:40.01 Duration: 00:05:07.28 Tape ID ----- Source APTN+ Notes Glaciers carving Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++World ClimateThursday, 1 February 2007 Preview of Friday's report on Climate change SOURCE: AP/VNR/EBS DATELINE: Various, 31 Jan 2007/File, recent ++RESTRICTIONS: GREENPEACE VNR CAN BE USED WITHIN ONE MONTH OF RELEASE. FURTHER USAGE MUST BE NEGOTIATED BY CLIENT WITH GREENPEACE +++ SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date Unknown 1. Wide of broken ice sheet and sea 2. Zoom into ice blocks falling into water GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Patagonia, South America - 2004 3. Various of glacier breaking up and falling into water 4. Aerial of ice sheet GREENPEACE VNR - AP Clients Only Arctic - Date Unknown 5. Polar bear stranded on ice in the middle of the water AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 29, 2007 6. Wide of opening ceremony of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 7. Set up of Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "This is totally unprecedented. I don't think there has been any field in recent years or in known human history where people have wanted knowledge, have wanted facts on an issue which of course affects all of humanity and all living species. So there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest, so I hope this report and the three other products that have to follow the working group two and working group three reports and the synthesis report will be able to satisfy that urge and that need for knowledge." AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE Germany 2005 9. Various of pollution from heavy industry AP Television - AP Clients Only Paris, France - January 30, 2007 10. Wide of boat moored on the Seine River that is being used for a Greenpeace conference 11. Sign on boat reading "It's not too late." 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Teske, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace International: "We are looking at a major catastrophe basically. We are looking at a huge risk for the economy, we are looking at huge changes in our lifestyle from climate change in the next decade or so. So we have to change, we just can't ignore the facts they are there and we need to react to the facts." AP Television - AP Clients Only Manila, Philippines - January 31, 2007 13. Wide shot of city skyline with layer of smog visible in the air 14. Tight shot of factory chimney belching out smoke 15. Various of congested city roads, veiled in fumes EBS - AP Clients Only Antarctica - Date unknown 16. Graphic showing ice break up on the Larson B Ice sheet in Antarctica taken by Europe's Environmental Satellite Envisat AP Television - AP Clients Only Kiribati, South Pacific - Date Unknown 17. Various shots of coastline illustrating rising sea level AP Television - AP Clients Only New Orleans, US - August/ September 2005 18. Aerial of flooded homes in aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 19. Wide of truck trapped in tree by flood waters 20. Wreckage behind sign saying in English "Dead End" 21. Wide of boats wrecked by Hurricane Katrina AP Television - AP Clients Only Amazon, Brazil - Date Unknown 22. Various of forest burning and logging AP Television - AP Clients Only Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - January 31, 2007 23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Carlos Minc, Rio de Janeiro Environment Secretary and President of the Brazilian Global Warming Research Group: "Unfortunately, Brazil's forest fires have been the country's largest contributor to global warming. We need to fight this and we have an objective proposal so that there could be a larger reduction of emissions. That is not required by the Kyoto treaty for developed countries and that is defended by Minister Marina Silva (Brazil's Environment Minister)." AP Television - AP Clients Only Mexico City, Mexico - January 30, 2007 24. Wide shot buildings and pollution 25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Carlos Gay, director of Atmosphere Centre of the National University, Mexico City: "If we have political refugees, and environmental refugees, we will have climate refugees. I don't want speak about that, because it shows a bad future, but (we will see) all the problems about hunger, illnesses multiplied" 26. Traffic belching out smoke 11:10:57 070107#110 Tape ID Source RTBF Notes MELTING GLACIER Dopesheet Glacier Greenland EVN 1 Date Shot: Location: GLACIER APUJAK Country: GREENLAND e: Source: BERTBF Dopesheet: Belgium television RTBF report on the world's shrinking glaciers due to global warming, this one in Greenland. French scientist Jean Marc bouvier inspects the Apujak glacier at the end of a fjord in Greenland. A glacier is formed from layers of snow that accummulate over thousands of years. By their own weight the snow eliminates air and is "welded together in compact ice. 11:12:31 051027#002 Name: 051027#002 Title: TANZANIA KILIMANJARO ap0430g Type: Rwanda Burundi & Tanzania In point: 05:30:40.01 Out point: 05:33:38.00 Duration: 00:02:57.27 Clip Locations 108-200 Tape ID ---- Source SKY Notes on DVC-PRO 108-200 Mount Kilimanjaro glacier melting global warming Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Tanzania Kilimanjaro Ice cap melts on Mount Kilimanjaro, global warming blamed SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania SHOTLIST: 1. Mount Kilimanjaro 2. People trekking up the mountain 3. Mount Kilimanjaro bathed in sunlight 4. People walking up mountain 5. People walking through rainforest on mountain's lower climbs 6. Monkey in tree 7. View of the mountain from rainforest 8. People hiking through more barren area of mountain 9. Kilimanjaro's glacier 10. Small waterfall with glacier in background 11. People hiking at sunrise 12. Sunrise on Mount Kilimanjaro 13. glacier 14. glacier ice melting (UPSOUND: water trickling) 15. glacier ice 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chombo Fausdine, mountain guide: "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." 17. Men walking up final reaches of the mountain 18. Climbers celebrating at sign at the summit of Kilimanjaro 19. Local hikers singing in praise of Kilimanjaro 20. Icy glacier at top of Kilimanjaro STORYLINE: Tanzanian locals blame both global warming and local environmental impacts for the melting of the ice cap on Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, according to a news report by British television Sky News. The mountain has become synonymous with global warming, as according to a United Nations report, the icecap will be completely gone in 15 years time. It's thought nearby illegal logging, charcoal production, forest fires and quarrying are contributing to the melting of Kilimanjaro's glacier. Water can be heard trickling down the ice and forming small waterfalls and streams. The mountain has a unique variety of vegetation due to its proximity to the equator and many are worried the melting of the ice cap will destroy the Mountain's existing ecosystems. Chombo Fausdine, a mountain guide, told Sky News the mountain had changed a lot since he had been climbing it. "When I started to climb Kilimanjaro there was a lot of snow. But nowadays snow is in danger. I think this is because of global warming. Not only because of Global warming but also this could be because of deforestation. I think those who live surrounding this mountain, maybe they do deforestation." The peak is over 19 thousand feet (5895 metres) high and is known as the summit of Africa. Locals are worried that no-one will want to climb the mountain once the glacier and snows are gone. Experts fear the great white mountain is acting as a global barometer and might never recover. 11:16:40 050629#106 Name: 050629#106 Title: HIMALAYA HARRABIN bbc1800 Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 18:39:32.29 Out point: 18:42:35.11 Duration: 00:03:02.14 Clip Locations 099-204 Tape ID Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 099-204 GANGES RIVER HIMALAYA MOUNTAINS GLACIER GLOBAL WARMING/ CLIMATE CHANGE/ ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: SPECIAL REPORT / HARRABIN INTRO: Some of the world's top scientists on global warming say world temperatures are likely to be much higher than previously predicted. Though they've been looking decades ahead the effects of climate change are already obvious in the Himalayas. For tonights special report our correspondent Roger Harrabin joined Hindu pilgrims on a trek to the roof of the world where the mountain glaciers are melting faster than ever before. DATE SHOT: 29/06/2005 LOCATIONS: Himalayas IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...in the Himalayas." DURATION: 3'02'' ASTONS: 1'13'' Dr RAJESH KUMAR / Glaciologist SOURCES: BBC various of Hindu pilgrims in the Himalayas, men preparing to enter sacred river, various shots of glacier, SOT Kumar, graphics, various of glacier, glacier melting, PTC, SOT Kumar, 11:20:55 050314#095 Name: 050314#095 Title: TIBET GLACIERS ap1630g Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 16:46:07.02 Out point: 16:48:20.10 Duration: 00:02:13.08 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 2318 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melitng ice glaciers global warming climate change TIBET Dopesheet AP-APTN-1630: ++China Glaciers WWF says Water crisis looms as Himalayan glaciers retreat SOURCE: APTN DATELINE: Various - 14 March 2005/File SHOTLIST: Tibet - July, 2003 1. Wide pan of snow-capped mountain range with glacier 2. Various of glacier Beijing - 14 March, 2005 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The Qinhai-Tibet Plateau is the origin of all of Asia's major rivers and has great impact on the industrial and agricultural life of the surrounding areas. Once the glaciers change, the life and security of hundreds of millions or even billions of people will be affected." Tibet - July 2003 4. Various of ice and snow from glacier falling down mountainside 5. Ice and snow falling over entrance to cave Beijing - 14 March, 2005 6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The retreat of glaciers in the past twenty to thirty years equals that of two to three hundred years before, which means changes which were slow before are now rapid. And the sharp change to the water supply to the rivers will mean a major crisis for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas." Tibet - July, 2003 7. Wide shot of stream in valley 8. Water flowing over rocks 9. Various of mountain stream Beijing - 14 March, 2005 10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Shen Yongping, professor: "The melting of glaciers and the disappearance of frozen earth will cause rapid changes in water supply and ecological environment in the downstream areas. These changes will cause either floods or droughts in these areas." Tibet - September 1996 14. Wide pan from Tibet mountains in distance to glacial lake 15. Lake in foreground, snow capped mountain behind STORYLINE: The shrinking of Himalayan glaciers could cause widespread flooding in China, India and Nepal, before creating water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the region, a leading environmental group warned on Monday. The Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) said that the rate of retreat of the Asian mountain nge's glaciers is accelerating because of global warming, and has now reached 10-15 metres (33-49 feet) a year. WWF said the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers initially would cause flooding but would subsequently lead to lower water levels in rivers, creating "massive economic and environmental problems" in Western China, Nepal and Northern India. In China, the report said, the Qinhai Plateau's wetlands have seen declining lake water levels, lake shrinkage, and the degradation of swampland. Professor Shen Yongping said glacier retreat in the past 20 to 30 years equalled that of the previous 200-300 years. Shen warned that a sharp change in the amount of water flowing into rivers would cause a "major crisis" for agricultural irrigation and hydropower projects in the downstream areas. Himalayan glaciers feed into seven of Asia's biggest rivers: the Ganges; Indus; Brahmaputra; Mekong; Thanlwin, formerly known as the Salween; Yangtze and Yellow. WWF noted that this ensures a year-round water supply to hundreds of millions of people in China and the Indian subcontinent. 11:23:42 050215#129 Name: 050215#129 Title: PERU GLACIERS APTN 2030G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 20:35:30.19 Out point: 20:38:01.04 Duration: 00:02:30.13 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID 1293 Source VNR Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 melting glaciers Dopesheet AP-APTN-2030: ++Peru Glaciers Tuesday, 15 February 2005 Report on global warming effect on glaciers pre Kyoto protocol implementation SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Lima - 15 Feb 2005 SHOTLIST: VNR - Clients Only Cordillera Blanca - Recent 1. Mountain peaks near Pastouri in Cordillera Blanca 2. Various of water from retreating glaciers 3. Various of snow and glaciers 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources:"The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost (since 1970). For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent." 5. Glaciers 6. Various of cars on road 7. Various of factories with smoking / traffic and gas emission New Delhi, India - Recent 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: "The result is that the concentration of these gases in the earth's atmosphere has reached a point where it is causing climate change. I think the evidence on that is now fairly clear." Cordillera Blanca region - Recent 8. Various of the town of Yungay 9. Various of water falls 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Benjamin Morales-Arnao, Glaciologist and Director, National Institution of Culture: "I think the principal thing is we lost water, and the water will in the future, be more important than oil because water is life." 14. Yanamarey glacier and glacial lake STORYLINE: The snow-top peaks of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range attract thousands of visitors each year, but scientists say glaciers in the Peruvian Andes could disappear within a decade. Peruvian scientists warn that the glaciers have melted dramatically in the last 30 years as the average global temperature sores. "The data shows that almost 22 percent of the country's glacial area is lost. For Cordillera Blanca from 1970 to 1997, the area lost in this mountain range is 15.5 percent," Marco Zapato, National Institute of Natural Resources said. In just 7 years, this glacier as melted significantly. The world's top scientists from the UN-sponsored climate study group are blaming burning of fossil fuels for the warming up of the atmosphere. Scientists say Peru will face a water crisis in the near future due to rapidly melting ice. During the dry season, freshwater for Peru's desert coast and capitol city Lima comes exclusively from the glaciers. But the glaciers are melting faster than they can replenish in the wet season. Many new mountain lakes are emerging as the glaciers thaw. Glacial lakes are bulging from the melting snow, and threatening to break their banks. The town of Yungay is no stranger to natural disasters, and earthquake triggered an avalanche causing glacial lakes to overflow. The floods wiped out the whole town of Yungay, killing 18,000 people. It is a reminder of what could happen when today's fragile glaciers collapse. Peru is particularly vulnerable to climate change because the melting water is the main source of hydroelectric generation. About 70 percent of the country's energy comes from hydroelectric power plants. 11:26:33 050214#005 Name: 050214#005 Title: KIRIBATI KYOTO APTN 0430G Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 04:30:39.04 Out point: 04:34:23.10 Duration: 00:03:44.04 Clip Locations 235-203 Tape ID --- Source vnr Notes ON DVC PRO 235-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0430: ++Kiribati Kyoto Monday, 14 February 2005 STORY: Greenpeace report on rising sea level as Kyoto protocol comes into force SOURCE: VNR DATELINE: Kiribati, recent SHOTLIST: GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 1. Waves crashing onto beach in front of houses 2. Waves crashing under house, uprooted trees 3. Man trying to prevent waves from crashing inside 4. Pigs inside cage with waves crashing over them 5. Two men carrying table out of remains of house as waves crash around feet 6. Women standing on beach, water splashing over camera 7. Huts surrounded by water 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Beiataake Orea, Neighbour's home destroyed by waves: "It is worrying us a lot, yes we are worrying. I am afraid of the future. I don't know what will happen to Kiribati." NTNK - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - Recent 9. Waves crashing over causeway 10. Waves running down side of causeway GREENPEACE - APTN Clients Only Tarawa, Kiribati - February 2005 11. Flooded village 12. Various man at well 13. Waves crashing on sea wall 14. Various house protected by sand bags 15. Various tree protruding from water where Maungatabu Island used to be 16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reverend Bureieta Karaiti, General Secretary, Kiribati Protestant Church: "Climate change is a real problem. Something has to be done for it, otherwise the only strategy I can find for Kiribati to survive the climate change problem is to either go somewhere, which is also a problem as they have to be removed from their culture and identity. Or else they have to stay here and die here." 17. Waves crashing over causeway 18. Various children swimming in front of houses 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "For most developed countries this is not a matter of high priority as they don't live on small atolls so they don't have this problem. So their priority will always be to their own people so they go for economic growth at the cost, at the ultimate cost of perhaps small islands like ours maybe disappearing one day." 20. Water flooding over sandbags 21. Children playing on sandbag sea wall 32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anote Tong, President of Kiribati: "The International community was shocked by the effect of the Tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean. We are very much like that except it is more gradual, at least the victims of the tsunami had the luxury of having it happen in one very fast instant. We are facing a gradual dieing process and I do think that they need to come in and provide opportunities and options for us." 33. Island at a distance, water in foreground STORYLINE: Just days before the Kyoto agreement comes into force, the tiny Pacific-atoll nation of Kiribati (Keer-ree-bas ) has suffered a taste of what may lie ahead for many small pacific nations, according to the NGO Greenpeace. Waves swept onto the low-lying atoll sending locals scrambling to save their belongings as their homes were being destroyed. Beiataake Orea, has seen many of her neighbours' houses destroyed by rising sea levels and wonders how long before she too will be forced to flee. Recent tidal occurrences have also threatened causeways linking the low lying atolls as well as flooding Tarawa, Kiribati's capital. The threat is not only from the obvious damage of flooding, swamped houses, roads, sea walls and gardens, but also contamination of fresh water reserves vital for islanders' survival. Salt water is also seeping into the soil making it increasingly difficult to grow crops. Kiribati, is a nation of 90 thousand people spread over 33 coral atolls which at their highest point rise to only 4 metres (12 ft) above sea level, making it particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels caused through global warming. The country is at risk of disappearing beneath the waves as a result of dramatic climate change. Some smaller islets have already disappeared into a watery grave, and it may be only a matter of time before the rest of Kiribati is doomed to a similar fate. For local church leaders the stark choice facing Kiribati is one of either cultural or physical extinction. President Anote Tong believes the process of global warming is irreversible and blames industrialised countries selfishness for their indifference to his nations fate. Other states in the region affected by rising sea levels include the Marshall Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Nauru. 11:31:34 041004#120 Name: 041004#120 Title: MALDIVES MYNOTT BBC 1800 Type: Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean Isles In point: 18:40:31.09 Out point: 18:42:51.07 Duration: 00:02:19.28 Clip Locations 190-200 Tape ID 6331 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 190-200 Dopesheet Maldives - Adam Mynott - Duration:2:15 Slowly, very slowly the waters are rising. And in less than 50 years some of the Maldives may have disappeared. The 1200 coral atolls barely poke above the surface of the Indian Ocean. 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager We are very worried about the sea-level rise but we cannot do much. There is nothing much we can do about it. The islands are hardly two meters above sea level. So this is one of the biggest concerns for us. The coral and the abundant life in the warm blue waters that lap around the Maldives are its lifeblood. Fishing is it's biggest industry, tourism comes a close second. The sea is both a friend and a foe Adam Mynott, BBC News, A struggle for survival is going on. Even the tiniest rise in sea-level threatens the very existence of these coral islands. And there are constant attempts with sea walls like this, to try to hold those waters back. Its only token resistance. The Maldivians are powerless. The seas are coming in and pleas to the industrial west to cut man's effect on global warming are largely ignored. In the mean time they are scrambling to keep hold of what they've got. They're reclaiming land lost to the sea and even building a brand new island. MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office This was all under water. This land mass was one meter below sea-level. We have reclaimed, dredged the lagoon to get the two meter height. There is nothing much we can do about the geography of our island, so we do need to keep ourselves protected. Experts differ about how much the seas will rise and when. But any rise spells disaster for the Maldives. The people here fear they will simply be washed away. Adam Mynott, BBC News, The Maldives Duration: 2:15 SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALDIVES / ADAM MYNOTT Now, they're some of the most beautiful islands in the world, but the Maldives are facing a very uncertain future. Many scientists say a rise in sea level - caused by climate change - is threatening their very existence. Eighty per cent of the land is just a metre above sea level. The oceans are thought to be rising by up to 9mm per year. At that rate the entire population may have to abandon the islands before the century is out. For tonight's six special report, Adam Mynott reports from the paradise islands which could be lost beneath the waves. DATE SHOT: 04/10/04 LOCATIONS: MALDIVES IN WORDS: Slowly, very slowly OUT WORDS: BBC News, the Maldives. DURATION: 2'16" ASTONS: 0'21": MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager 1'48": MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office SOURCES: BBC SHOTLIST: Various of islands and water splashing against rocks / MAHMUD SUJAH, Resort Manager sync / coral and sea life in Maldives / vs of sea and weaves lashing with Adam Mynott PTC / sea walls trying to hold water back / more of sea lashing / rocks being picked up in crane and put in truck / vs building work taking place / MOHAMMED SHAHID, Hulhumale Island Development Office speaking to Mynott / more of waves / people sitting near the waves 11:34:12 070131#031 Name: 070131#031 Title: AUSTRALIA CLIMATE rtv/aptn EVNY Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:32:46.13 Out point: 09:35:29.17 Duration: 00:02:43.02 Tape ID 8409 Source rtv/aptn Notes WEATHER / DROUGHT Dopesheet Australia climate EVNY Country: AUSTRALIA Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: IVANH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 1. BONES OF A LIVESTOCK ON CRACKED EARTH 2. A DEAD KANGAROO 3. DECOMPOSED BODY OF A DEAD LAMB 4. CRACKED EARTH CONDOBLIN, NEW ZOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 5. WIDE SHOT OF THE DRY LAKE 6. THE SIGN READING "GUM BEND LAKE IS CLOSED TO ALL BOATS DUE TO LOW WATER LEVEL" NEAR ALICE SPRINGS, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 7. VARIOUS AERIALS OF LARGE RIVER FULL OF WATER 8. VARIOUS OF RIVER FLOWING 9. PEOPLE WADING IN FLOODWATER NEAR PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO ACCESS AUSTRALIA / .COM.AU INTERNETSITES / ANY INTERNET SITE OF ANY AUSTRALIAN BASED MEDIA ORGANISATIONS / AUSTRALIAN NVO CLIENTS) 10. VARIOUS OF BUSHFIRES BURNING BUSHLAND AT NIGHT 11. AERIALS OF BUSHFIRES IN THE DAY HILLSTON, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 12. SHEEPS ON DRY LAND DENILIQUIN, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (RECENT) (NO LIBRARY USE) 13. FARMERS AUCTIONING SHEEP 14. FARMER RICHARD WALKER FEEDING SHEEPS 15. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FARMER RICHARD WALKER SAYING: "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones" 16. MORE DRY LAND Dopesheet: Australia has always been known as the driest inhabited continent with a highly variable climate across it's large landscape. For example, between 1942 and 1945 some thirty million sheep are believed to have died due to dry conditions. Between 1991 and 1995 the rural industry average production fell about ten percent, which cost the country AUS of Meteorology. But everyone agrees that this year is the worst drought ever on record. Australia appears to be suffering an accelerated Greenhouse effect, with the pace of global warming increasing faster across the country than in other parts of the world, climatologists said in Australia's Bureau of Meterology 2006 yearly climate report. Fifteen of the twenty hottest years in Australia have occured since 1980 according to Neil Plummer, a senior climatologist in bureau of meteorology.In 2006, half the country was desperate for water and the other half was awash with a year's rainfall for the entire continent. As the first cyclone of the summer bore down on Australia's northwest coast, bringing more rain and potentially destructive winds, the report revealed extraordinary climatic contrasts. The nation received above average rains in 2006, with 490 mm of rain falling against the 472 mm in average, however, key water catchments and rivers shrivelled Southeast of the country where most of the population is concentrated. Some areas experienced rare summer snow falls over Christmas which dampened bushfires, but the drought was still important and major cities imposed tough restrictions on water usage. Australia's average temperature for 2006 was 0.47 Celsius (1 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, but it was only the eleventh warmest year since 1910, the bureau report said. And despite record daily temperatures in the southeast, last year was cooler than 2005 due to a very active tropical wet season early in the year. An El Nino weather event in the Pacific Ocean bringing severe drought to eastern Australia was responsible for much of the variation, but that was beginning to weaken. Australia's wool market, the world's largest and a main source for the global flood of Chinese textile exports, was also badly hit by this years drought, shrinking major supplies and alarming buyers. Prices have been rising since sales resumed three weeks ago after a year-end recess, taking the main price guide, the Eastern Market Indicator, up 30 percent in the past three months. "I guess largely, drought or semi-drought is the fairly constant part of life out here, has been, perhaps geting worse it seems anyhow, in more recent years, last twenty years I suppose we have seen more tougher years than better ones," says sheep farmer, Richard Walker. Shortages are seen emerging in the current January to July selling period, and continuing into 2008, even if the drought breaks soon, which will keep prices high. The 1990s saw formal Government acknowledgement that drought is part of the natural variability of the Australian climate, with drought relief for farmers and agricultural communities being restricted to times of so-called "exceptional circumstances". 11:37:11 060402 Name: 060402 Title: SOMALIA DROUGHT ap0030g Type: Ethiopia Eritrea Somalia DJIBOU In point: 01:30:34.22 Out point: 01:32:53.23 Duration: 00:02:19.01 Clip Locations 133-201 Tape ID ---- Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 133-201 DROUGHT / FAMINE Dopesheet APTN-0030: ++Somalia Drought Sunday, 2 April 2006 Drought threatens millions SOURCE: SKY DATELINE: Wajid - Recent SHOTLIST 1. Dead cattle, Somali people trekking past 2. Somalis carrying sacks of grain 3. Somalis arguing for food 4. Close up of two Somali women fighting for food 5. Somali women dragging sacks 6. Armed local 7. Close up of old woman 8. Two women carrying water 9. Water pulled up from well 10 animals drinking 11. Close up of child 12. Interior of clinic and Somali patients seated 13. Close up of child drinking 14. Close up of sick child 15.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Hassan Aden Farah, Aid worker: "In the last 30 years, this is the first time it happens in Wajid and I have never come across such a problem, such a long drought affecting Wajid." 16. Displacement camps 17. Medium shot of a girl 18. Close up of child and mother 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Savariaud, Aid worker: "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months." 20. Children running through the camp 21. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Adnan Ibrahim, Voxpop ++NON VERBATIM TRANSLATION++ "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handouts." 22. Local takes lid off pot 23. Close up of donkey ears being cooked 24. Truck with armed mans on top 25. Close up of silhouette rifle and armed guard STORYLINE The hunger crisis in drought-stricken Somalia is worsening. If the rains, due to start this month, fail again, the United Nations World Food Programme has warned the country faces a humanitarian catastrophe. According to the UN, one point seven (M) million people, 710-thousand of them experiencing an acute food shortage, need food assistance of some kind, in addition to the 410-thousand refugees who depend on food aid. The British broadcaster Sky News recently travelled to Somalia's Wajid district, near the Ethiopian border, to assess the situation. Locals told Sky that wells dug into the desert are running dry and that soon, they won't have enough to feed the little cattle they have left. The Somalis, already suffering from malnutrition, rely exclusively on international aid, according to Sky. "Conditions are hard, we don't get enough to eat, even with the UN handout," said one man living at a displacement camps. Each day, long lines of women and children walk for hours to the distribution centre in Wajid where they wait in order to get a sack of supplies - enough to feed an entire family for a month. But drought and famine have brought desperation and people now fight over the precious food distributed by international aid agencies. According to Sky, guards at the food distribution centre have had to fire bullets to keep the crowd away from the supplies. "I would say the situation is critical now, but I'm not sure everybody realises how critical it can become only in the next few months," one aid worker told the British broadcaster at a displacement champ in the outskirts of Wajid. The Sky report suggests that the lack of security is the main problem for aid agencies trying to tackle the crisis. Fighting between rival warlords has made it impossible to fly in shipments of food by plane from the capital, Mogadishu. Also, pirates are operating all along the coast of Somalia, stopping the shipments by boat. As a result, the aid supplies have to be brought in by road. But as they are transported through different warlords' territories, each clan takes its own cut out of the shipment. 11:39:55 060327#001 Name: 060327#001 Title: ETHIOPIA AFRICA DROUGHT IFRC EVN-M Type: EVN FEED In point: 04:36:05.12 Out point: 04:39:22.00 Duration: 00:03:16.18 Tape ID 7184 Source IFRC Notes drought / weather Dopesheet Africa drought EVNM Date Shot: Location: Country: ETHIOPIA Source: CHIFRC Shotlist: ** PLS NOTE: Embargoed until Monday, March 27, 0800 GMT ** RECENT East Africa drought The situation in the Moyale area, in Southern Ethiopia March 2006 Filming: Ethiopia Red Cross Society -dead cows -cow dying from exhaustion and lack of water -Villagers trying to lift the cow - Close-up on villagers trying to save the cow by giving water - Water pomp near the last remaining water reservoir in the Moyale area. - Landscape near the reservoir - Weak animals running to the reservoirs - Cows drinking water - More cows running to the reservoir -Tap water - Cows drinking water -villagers working near the reservoir -More cows drinking water -Red Cross office in the Moyale district- -Jerrycans with water waiting to be taken by people coming from the whole area - Woman coming to pick up a jerrycan - People coming from villages around to get water -water reservoir and animals. - More cows coming to drink -Cattle breeder -Very weak cows drinking -Local villagers standing in front of the water reservoir Dopesheet: As millions of people in Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa fight a daily battle against starvation,the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its members are working around the clock to prevent an evolving food insecurity situation in pockets around the region turning into a general famine with horrific consequences. The International Federation has now issued five emergency appeals totaling 20 million Swiss francs ( 12.7 million/US ). All the East African countries, to varying degrees, find themselves in a similar critical situation due to insufficient rains and subsequent crop failures. "The food insecurity in these countries constitutes a humanitarian crisis that is jeopardizing the well-being of millions of people," says the International Federation's Disaster Management Coordinator for East Africa, Steve Penny. "The drought is exacerbating an already precarious situation in many of the countries due to pre-existing poverty, conflict and inadequate health and sanitation services," he adds. While Kenya has had some rain in the last 2-3 weeks at the onset of the main rainy season, it's still not enough to guarantee the harvest needed in June-July leaving farmers, pastoralists and other vulnerable groups in a precarious situation. The drought has already begun to have a regional impact as people move across national borders in search of food, water, work or health services. In Burundi, for instance, where more than two million people are affected, lack of rain is only one part of the problem. A large number of refugees from conflicts are expected to return home from camps in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the coming months. The International Federation is appealing for funds to support these returnees with shelter, health services, water and sanitation and food. In neighboring Tanzania the situation is only just beginning to be recognized as a catastrophe on a similar scale. A recent International Federation assessment concluded that the food shortage is acute and widespread, affecting all assessed districts, accounting for nearly 85% of all districts in the country. It identified some 3.7 million people (nearly 11% of the mainland population) who are currently food insecure. The crisis has affected the agricultural market, making maize prices 85% higher, whilst cattle prices have plunged to levels where a single cow would cost 20 kilos of grain, creating a severe cost ratio imbalance. The International Federation, working with its member National Societies in the region, estimates that more than 11 million people are in desperate need for assistance. In line with the capacity of the Red Cross/Red Crescent in East Africa, and considering the operations already underway by other national and international agencies, the International Federation plans to provide direct support to more than 800,000 vulnerable people over the next 6-12 months. To help tackle the enormous task already underway by the National Societies and the Federation, the Regional delegation in Nairobi has set up a regional Food Security Unit which will oversee the operations in cooperation with the National Societies in the region. 11:43:19 060727#039 Name: 060727#039 Title: FRANCE PARIS STORM FT2 EVNY Type: Environment In point: 09:37:13.17 Out point: 09:37:41.00 Duration: 00:00:27.13 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 2259 Source FT2 Notes ON DVC PRO 235-204 night rain / weather LIGHTNING Dopesheet Paris storm EVNY Date Shot: 27-JUL-2006 Location: PARIS Country: FRANCE Source: FRFT2 Shotlist: people in the rain lightning as car drives vs of Eiffel Tower and lightning more of rain-soaked street during lightning storm firefighters fallen tree branches a woman runs in the drizzle Dopesheet: Some 70 departments in France are under "orange alert" -- some due to the ongoing heatwave and others due to major thunderstorms sweeping the country. 11:45:19 050620#086 Name: 050620#086 Title: UK FLOODS SIMPSON BBC 1300B Type: Ecology Environment & Pollution In point: 13:55:36.01 Out point: 13:58:18.05 Duration: 00:02:42.02 Clip Locations 235-204 Tape ID 6030 Source BBC Notes ecFLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: FLOODS / SIMPSON INTRO: Good afternoon. A massive clear up operation is underway in North Yorkshire after flash floods cut off villages and forced hundreds from their homes. The freak weather caused landslides, washing away roads and vehicles. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. RAF helicopters were scrambled to help with the rescue effort. and at its worst, 27 millimetres descended in just 15 minutes. North Yorkshire took the brunt of the downfall, suffering millions of pounds of damage, with the market town of Helmsley one of the worst hit. Overnight the village of Hawnby was completely cut off, and in Sutton under Whitestonecliff, residents say they simply watched as their houses were washed away. Our correspondent Mark Simpson is there now. DATE SHOT: 20/06/2005 LOCATIONS: UK IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: "...there was damage." DURATION: 1'26'' ASTONS: 0'17'' Amateur video 1'16'' RAF video 1'59'' RACHEL LAMONDE / Local resident SOURCES: BBC caravan being carried away by water, amateur video of flooded streets, sinking car, people being pulled out of a sinking car, various of flooded streets, night shots of rain falling, flooded living room, damaged furniture and houses, SOT Lamonde, clean up operation, aerial shots of affected village 11:48:57 040817#134 Name: 040817#134 Title: UK FLOODING BBC NATS Type: Environment In point: 16:36:26.20 Out point: 16:40:59.11 Duration: 00:04:32.23 Clip Locations 235-202 Tape ID -- Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 235-202 FLOODS / WEATHER Dopesheet CORNWALL FLOODS WALL OF WATER + MUD PUSHING CARS ALONG 11:53:54 070128#015 Name: 070128#015 Title: CHINA ENVIRONMENT ORF EVN-Y Type: EVN FEED In point: 09:38:31.18 Out point: 09:40:46.03 Duration: 00:02:14.17 Tape ID Source ORF Notes COAL MINE , traffic pollution Dopesheet China environment EVN Date Shot: 28-JAN-2007 Location: BEIJING Country: CHINA Source: ATORF Shotlist: -wide shots coal industry, chimney smoking -coal beeing distributed on railway carriage -area of coal industry, production of coal -smoke over the coal area -office of Global environment insitute in Beijing, meeting of the activists -soundbite by the director of GLOBAL saying I mean the contacts betwee the central and local government is not good,the laws from Beijong are idealistic but they did not reach the province.the local government are busy with their own local plans , they dont care on environment problem. CCTV FILE -dry fields in the province Sechuan -residents of Sechuan feeling buckets with foul water -ships on a river in the Sechaum province -floods in the South of China -landslide in the south of China -evacuation after floods in the Soputh of China ORF -car traffic in Beijing -power poles in Beijing -bridge over a street -smoke coming from a chimney -electric utility Dopesheet: China's gradual transition to a market economy, which has been proceeding for two decades, has put China among the world's fastest growing economies. While economic grows, China is faced with environment problem, environmental pollution from coal combustion and enterprises are damaging human health, air, water guality and agriculutre. In 3 years China will be the 3rd greatest producer of coal dioxide all over the world ahead of America. The economic development and its industralization is much important for the chinese government than environemnt. The non-government organisation "Global" in Beijing make efforts to bring the representatives from administration, industry and investors together in order to have talks on the reduction of air pollution. The change of the climate affects the chinese agriculture. The drought in Sechuan shows dramatic pictures, people getting thirsty, rivers drying. And the South of China is hit by heavy rains, people are killed by landslide, other people have to be evacuated. The car industry is happy to watch million of cars moving the streets of Beijing - without catalyser - smoke in Beijing occurence nearly every day. The municipal government and the party chief appeal to the people to make efforts in order to protect the environment 11:56:29 061104#118 Name: 061104#118 Title: INDIA CLIMATE PREVIEW APTN 0630G Type: India & Bangladesh In point: 00:00:00.00 Out point: 00:01:15.24 Duration: 00:01:15.24 Clip Locations 099-205 Tape ID Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 099-205 POLLUTION / ENVIRONMENT Dopesheet AP-APTN-0630: ++India Climate Preview Saturday, 4 November 2006 Preview ahead of the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi SOURCE: AP TELEVISION SHOTLIST: Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 1. Wide port 2. bridge construction site 3. Pan from smoke coming out from factory to industrial waste in the open 4. Close-up of smoke 5. Rooftops with smoke coming from factory chimneys 6. Wide smoke rising from burning waste 7. waste burning in the open FILE Mumbai - July 2005 12. Stormy seafront as rain storm hits 13. People wading through flood water 14. Flood water gushing out of closed shop Mumbai - 2 November, 2006 15. crowd and traffic STORYLINE: A British report on climate change said that fast-industrialising economies like India and China will have to control their greenhouse emissions if the earth is to be saved from a calamity on the scale of the World Wars and the Great Depression. The report by Sir Nicholas Stern, a senior government economist, said that unchecked global warming would devastate the world economy unless urgent action was taken. Rising sea levels, heavier floods and more intense droughts could displace 200 million people by the middle of the century if the problem is ignored, said the report, which was released on 30 October. Stern is scheduled to discuss his report next week at the annual UN Climate Change Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. While the report argues that environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand in the battle against global warming, developing countries are finding it difficult to balance climate change and energy security. The United States with Australia, China, India, Japan and South Korea produce of half the world's greenhouse gases, and the six countries say they have endorsed 98 collaborative projects meant to find new technologies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases believed to be warming Earth's atmosphere. Countries like India are already seeing signs of climate disruptions - monsoons are more erratic and there are perennial floods and droughts. "India definitely is causing a lot of pollution primarily because the use of fossil fuels, (the) automobile industry is also rising," said Anish Andheria, an environmentalist. "We should not close our eyes against issues of pollution and global warming, but at the same time it is unfair, definitely, that fingers are pointed at third world countries," Andheria said adding that the average American consumes 30-40 times more energy than the average Indian. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday criticised a treaty aimed at reducing damage to the ozone layer, provisions for international sanctions in the pact would damage the economic growth of developing nations. Speaking to delegates from 189 countries at a meeting in New Delhi to review the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Singh said trade restriction would hamper efforts to fight poverty. "Such restrictions may adversely impact economic growth and poverty alleviation efforts. We need to be more creative and less adversarial in our approach to compliance," he said. The protocol was adopted in 1987 following the 1985 discovery of the growing hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Thinning in the ozone layer, largely due to the chemical compounds chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, leaked from refrigerators, air conditioners and other devices, exposes Earth to harmful solar rays. The protocol calls for the reduction of the production and consumption of CFCs. Lately, Asian countries have had trouble meeting their CFC reduction targets due to high economic growth rates. Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. Dopesheet: Scientists credit the protocol with reducing the potential damage to the ozone layer. While this year's Antarctic ozone hole is said to be the biggest ever, it is expected to recover. While there are year-to-year variations, scientists expect a slow recovery of the ozone layer by the year 2065. Andheria suggested alternative paths India could explore in order to generate electricity, namely by developing solar and wind energy systems. Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam recently became the first customer of a vaccine refrigerator run by solar power. 11:58:50 051204#115 Name: 051204#115 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:32:43.21 Out point: 22:35:05.20 Duration: 00:02:21.27 Clip Locations 031-207 Tape ID 2291 Source BBC Notes ON DVC PRO 031-207 energy, power, pollution Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA / RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:As delegates from more than 200 countries continue their climate change conference in Montreal, one of the biggest questions is what to do about China. It's now the world's second largest polluter - although China's government has recently committed itself to a more sustainable path to development. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Beijing. DATE SHOT: 04.12.05 LOCATIONS: BEIJING IN WORDS: OUT WORDS: BBC NEWS BEIJING DURATION: 2'15 ASTONS: NO ASTONS SOURCES: ALL BBC woman collecting fuel putting fuel in boiler man lighting gas dumplings being cooked SOT woman man checking cucumbers in greenhouse Sot Man pollution Gvs PTC switches in home middle class home, washing machine sot man - everyone should be equal industrial pollution 12:02:35 050705#148 Name: 050705#148 Title: CHINA WINGFIELD HAYES BBC 2200 Type: China Taiwan & Hong Kong In point: 22:49:22.02 Out point: 22:52:08.16 Duration: 00:02:46.14 Clip Locations 031-206 Tape ID 6612 Source BBC Notes on DVC-PRO 031-206 CHINA ENERGY / ECONOMY/ POLLUTION air conditioners coal mining factory chimneys Lanjo city hospital Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: CHINA/RUPERT WINGFIELD-HAYES INTRO:President Bush has come in for more criticism -- after insisting that he'll not sign a deal on climate change -- if it harms America's economy. The United States burns more fossil fuels than any other country --and produces nearly a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide.Britain and the rest of the EU account for about half that.But China is rapidly catching up -- with economic activity that now accounts for 12 per cent of the world's CO-2.From China -- Rupert Wingfield-Hayes sent this report DATE SHOT: 05/07/2005 LOCATIONS: CHINA IN WORDS:"Big, fat, sweet.. OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Lanjo, North West China" DURATION: 2'41" ASTONS: 0'33" Hu Hui Retired factory worker 2'14" Dr Yu Qing SOURCES: BBC Melon being cut/ man installing an air conditioner/SYNC HU HUI/various of AC units/coal mountains being quarried/trucks with coal/ PTC/various of trucks/various of factory chimneys/various of hospital/various of patient being examined/SYNC Dr Yu Qing/various of patient 12:07:51 050704#019 Name: 050704#019 Title: KENYA MALARIA BBC 0800 MYNOTT Type: Kenya & Uganda In point: 09:17:39.22 Out point: 09:20:33.03 Duration: 00:02:53.11 Clip Locations 003-201 Tape ID 6537B Source BBC + Notes ON DVC-PRO 003-201 MALARIA - mosquitos Artemisia/Wormwood plants Dopesheet SLUG/CORRESPONDENT: MALARIA/ADAM MYNOTT INTRO:In Africa every 30 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria. It's HIV/AIDS which gets all the attention, but malaria is by far the biggest killer on this continent. Yet with the right preventative measures and treatment it's a crisis that can be put right. The UN has made reversing the spread of the disease one of its targets but one of the world's leading experts, working here in Kenya has told Breakfast that if anything the number of deaths is growing. The BBC's East Africa correspondent Adam Mynott, who is based in Nairobi, has been to Kisi in western Kenya for us, to find out more about what's being done to fight the disease. DATE SHOT: 03/07/2005 LOCATIONS: KENYA IN WORDS: "Early evening in... OUT WORDS: ..BBC News, Kisi in Western Kenya" DURATION: 2'56" ASTONS: 1'40" Professor Bob Snow, Kenya Medical Research Institute. SOURCES: BBC sunset rooftop night - people on streets bednet , boy covered by bednet mosquitoes mosquitoe on posteradvert for insecticide huts and puddle on ground three boys walking town school pupils being shown medication and how to treat bednets bed nets on ground SYNC Professor Bob Snow PTC women chopping down Artemisia (Wormwood) plants boys singing children 12:17:38 050523#007 Clip Locations 225-202 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes on DVC-PRO 225-202 Dehgue fever spraying chemicals, funeral, hospital patients, mosquito laboratory Dopesheet Dengue fever EVN-M Date Shot: 23-MAY-2005 Location: BANGKOK Country: THAILAND Source: GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. Public health workers spray chemical clouds in suburban area of Bangkok 2. Close up of chemical spray 3. Health worker spraying room 4. Girl watches spraying 5. Health worker spraying street 6. Close up health worker 7. Mid shot health worker 8. Close up street with chemical spray 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) : Dr Chaiporn Rojanawatsirivet, Department of Disease Control. "Eradication of the larvae every seven days is very good, very simple. Everyone in the school, the children, and in the public, the volunteers can do." 10. Still photo of Pumpan Pornsumbun, 13 year old boy who died of dengue fever 11. Wide shot showing floral tributes to Pumpan, with his photo on top of coffin 12. Wide shot of mourners at funeral, on outskirts of Bangkok 13. Mourners place flowers around coffin 14. Wide shot of mourners including dead boy's mother 15. Close up young girl with her mother, in ward of hospital in Bangkok; she has dengue fever 16. Wide of girl and mother 17. Close up girl with dengue fever 18. Close up drip 19. Rachika Chareonasawasuk, with her mother Tassanee, in hospital ward; she is a dengue patient 20. Close up rash on her arm 21. Close up Rachika Chareonasawasuk 22. SOUNDBITE (Thai): Tassanee Chareonasawasuk, mother of Dengue patient. "When I saw my daughter's symptoms I felt very worried. Considering the condition of her illness, I knew it was dangerous." 23. Close-up shot of two Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes 24. Various of larvae of the mosquito 25. Sign on door of research laboratory 26. Various shots of researcher at Mahidol University, Bangkok, working on vaccine project 27. Close up bottles 28. Close up mosquito 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Aldis, World Health Organisation, Thailand. "One of the problems with dengue is there are four different strains. so even a few had one strain and have some resistance, that infection would not protect you against the other three strains. It also creates problems for development of the vaccine because you would have to have four components in any vaccine that would be developed. This is being worked on but it's not a simple undertaking." 30. Health worker sprays chemicals in Bangkok suburb Dopesheet: Thai authorities fear the country could be facing an epidemic of the potentially fatal disease,dengue fever. The mosquito-borne illness has already killed 15 people since January; three times as many as in the same period last year, and suspected cases are up by almost 45%. And the peak season hasn't even begun yet. This week a nationwide campaign will urge Thais to help stop the epidemic before it starts. The drive is on in Bangkok to cleanse every neighbourhood of the "aedes aegypti" mosquito; the pest that carries dengue fever. It's an uphill task; it breeds prolifically in urban areas, where sanitation is often poor, and spraying alone has little impact. The government's main thrust will be an intensive media offensive in very province, aimed at disrupting the breeding cycle. The message is simple; get rid of all standing water where the larvae live, and hatch every seven days. For Pumpan Pornsumbun, it's too late. The thirteen year-old schoolboy died from the most virulent strain of dengue, at the start of the month. His struggle for life became a national focus, and his death has done more than anything to underline the impending danger. This Bangkok hospital alone has seen a 20% rise in cases of dengue fever this year. The good news though is that the chances of recovery are good. According to the World Health Organisation, even the most dangerous form of dengue will kill less than 1% of its victims, given modern, intensive treatment. When Rachika Chareonasawasuk started showing the classic flu-like symptoms and the distinctive rash, her mother, Tassanee, wasted no time getting her to hospital. She's now well on the mend. The aedes aegypti mosquito has spread its global range alarmingly in the last few decades. Dengue's now endemic in more than 100 countries, including the Americas. An estimated 40% of the world's population is at risk. Nowhere's had more experience with dengue fever than Thailand and Thai scientists are at the forefront of trying to find a vaccine. Researchers at Bangkok's Mahidol University hope to start final human trials very soon. They hope a vaccine could be ready within five years. But it's a complex disease and the challenge is still formidable. Until protection is available through a vaccine, the simple approach like this week's campaign in Thailand will remain the most effective way of keeping dengue at bay. 12:20:36 070110#047 Name: 070110#047 Title: GERMANY WARM WINTER ARD EVF 1146G Type: FEED-LINES In point: 11:46:47.27 Out point: 11:48:26.09 Duration: 00:01:38.10 Tape ID 7930 Source ARD Notes WARM WEATHER Dopesheet Germany warm winter EVF Date Shot: 10-JAN-2007 Country: GERMANY Source: DEARD Shotlist: various of flowers and trees blooming in the middle of winter, pictures shot in Bensheim an der Bergstraße, an idyllic wine village between Darmstadt and Wiesbaden in the southest of Germany Dopesheet: Germany has been hit by record high temperatues this January, and in most places there is no sign of winter. Instead many trees and flowers have started to blossom. Temperatures reached the 15 degree celsius level yesterday, and forecasts predict even higher temperatures especially in the Southeast of Germany where readings are expected to go up as high as 16 or 17 degrees today and tomorrow. Biologists and climate researchers are worried that nature will suffer from too high temeperatures. Already now, the winter break for many animals has been disrupted, and in the Baltic Sea jellyfish population grows to record numbers because the water is so warm.
ABC SPLIT SCREEN HOUSE INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE PUBLIC IMPEACHMENT HEARINGS SESSION 7 - 12:00-14:00/ DR. FIONA HILL AND DAVID HOLMES P3
DMG RTR 4 HOUSE INTEL IMPEACHMENT HEARING HILL AND HOLMES SPLIT SCREEN 112019 090633 SCHIFF Good morning, everyone. This is the seventh in a series of public hearings the committee will be holding as part of the house of representatives' impeachment inquiry. Without objection, the chair is authorized to declare a recess of the committee at any time. There is a quorum present. We will proceed today in the same fashion as our other hearings. I'll make an opening statement, then ranking member Nunes will have an opportunity to make a statement. Then we will turn to our witnesses for their opening statements and then to questions. 090700 For audience members, we welcome you and respect your interest in being here. In turn, we ask for your respect as we proceed with today's hearing. It is the intention of the committee to proceed without disruptions. As chairman, I'll take all necessary and appropriate steps to maintain order and ensure that the committee is run in accordance with house rules and house resolution 660. With that, I now recognize myself to give an opening statement on the impeachment inquiry into Donald J. Trump, the 45th president of the United States. 090727 Yesterday morning, the committee heard from ambassador Gordon sondland. The American ambassador to the European union, the de facto leader of the three amigos who had regular access to president Donald trump and pressed the new Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky for two investigations trump believed would help his re-election campaign. The first investigation was of a discredited conspiracy theory that Ukraine and not Russia was responsible for interfering in our 2016 election. 090759 The second investigation was into the political rival Trump apparently feared most, Joe Biden. Trump sought to weaken Biden and to refute the fact that his own election had been helped by a Russian hacking and dumping operation and Russian social media campaign directed by Vladimir Putin. Trump's scheme stood in contrast to the longstanding bipartisan foreign policy of the United States, by undermining military and diplomatic support for a key ally and set back U.S. Anti-corruption efforts in Ukraine. 090830 In conditioning a meeting with Zelensky and then military aid on securing an investigation of his rival, Trump put his personal and political interests above the United States. As Ambassador Sondland would later tell career Foreign Service Officer David Holmes immediately after speaking to the President, Trump "did not give a [expletive]" about Ukraine. He cares about "'big stuff'" that benefits him "like the 'Biden investigation' that Giuliani was pushing." 090900 David Holmes is here with us today. He is a Foreign Service Officer currently serving as the Political Counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv. Also with us is Dr. Fiona Hill, whose job as the National Security Council's Senior Director for European and Russian Affairs encompassed the coordination of U.S. policy towards Ukraine. Dr. Hill left the NSC in July, after more than two years in that position. Dr. Hill and Mr. Holmes each provide a unique perspective on issues relating to Ukraine-Dr. Hill from Washington, D.C., and Mr. Holmes from on the ground in Kyiv. 090933 In early 2019, Dr. Hill became concerned by the increasing prominence of Rudy Giuliani, the President's personal lawyer, who was, as she has testified, "asserting quite frequently on television in public appearances that he had been given some authority over matters related to Ukraine." Hill was not alone in her concerns. Her boss, National Security Advisor John Bolton, was also paying attention, as were other NSC and State Department officials, including Holmes at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv. Bolton viewed Giuliani as "a hand grenade that is going to blow everybody up," and was powerless to prevent the former mayor from engineering former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch's firing in late April or her recall. 091020 Holmes, was stunned by "the intensity and consistency of the media attacks" on Yovanovitch "by name as a U.S. Ambassador and the scope of the allegations that were leveled against her." Yovanovitch's dismissal, as a result of Giuliani's smear campaign, was one of several things that unsettled Dr. Hill. Another was the role of Gordon Sondland, who emerged as a key player in Ukraine policy in May when he was named as part of the U.S. delegation led by Secretary Rick Perry to President Zelensky's inauguration. 091054 Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman also attended the inauguration and, as Holmes recalls, during a meeting with President Zelensky, took the opportunity to advise the new Ukraine leader to stay out of U.S. domestic politics. Another concern that arose for Dr. Hill around this time was her discovery of a potential NSC back channel on Ukraine. Hill learned that an NSC staff member who did not work on Ukraine and for her, may have been providing Ukraine-related information to President Trump that Dr. Hill was not made aware of. 091128 According to Holmes, following the Zelensky inauguration, Sondland and Perry took "a very active and unconventional role in formulating our priorities for the new Zelensky administration and personally reaching out to President Zelensky and his senior team." Sondland's newfound assertiveness also concerned Dr. Hill, who previously had enjoyed a cordial working relationship with the ambassador. On June 18, 2019, Hill "had a blow-up" with Sondland when he told her that he was in charge of Ukraine policy. 091159 Dr. Hill testified that Sondland "got testy with me. And I said, 'who has put you in charge of it?'. He said: 'The President.'" On July 10th, Dr. Hill was part of a meeting at the White House with a group of U.S. and Ukrainian officials, including Bolton, Sondland, and Energy Secretary Perry, another of the Three Amigos. The meeting was intended, among other things, to give the Ukrainians an opportunity to convey that they "were anxious to set up a meeting, a first meeting" between their new president and President Trump. 091231 Sondland interjected to inform the group that, according to acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, the White House meeting sought by the Ukrainian president with Trump would happen if Ukraine undertook certain investigations. Hearing this, Bolton abruptly ended the meeting. Undeterred, Sondland brought the Ukrainian delegation and the NSC Director for Ukraine, Lt. Colonel Alexander Vindman, downstairs to another part of the White House, where they were later joined by Dr. Hill. In this second meeting, Sondland was more explicit: Ukraine needed to conduct investigations if they were to get a meeting at all. 091308 Bolton directed Dr. Hill to report this to NSC legal advisor, John Eisenberg, telling her, "You go and tell Eisenberg that I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up on this, and you go ahead and tell him what you've heard and what I've said." Dr. Hill did so, as did Lt. Col. Vindman, who separately approached the same lawyers with his concerns. 091331 On July 18, the day before Dr. Hill left her post at the NSC, Holmes participated in a secure interagency video conference on Ukraine. Towards the end of the meeting, a representative from the Office of Management and Budget announced that the flow of nearly $400 million in security assistance for Ukraine was being held up. "The order had come from the President and had been conveyed to OMB by" Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney "without further explanation." 091402 Holmes, unaware of the hold prior to the call, was "shocked." He thought the suspension of aid was "extremely significant," undermining what he had understood to be longstanding U.S. national security goals in Ukraine. One week later, on July 25th, President Trump spoke with President Zelensky by phone. When President Zelensky brought up U.S. military support and noted that Ukraine would like to buy more Javelin anti-tank missiles from the United States, Trump responded by saying, "I would like you to do us a favor, though." 091435 Trump then requested that Zelensky investigate the discredited conspiracy theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 U.S. election. Even more ominously, Trump asked Zelensky to look into the Bidens. Neither request had been included the official talking points for the call prepared by the NSC staff, but both were in Donald Trump's personal interest, and in the interests of his 2020 re-election campaign. And the Ukrainian president knew about both in advance, in part because of efforts by Ambassadors Sondland and Volker to make him aware of President Trump's demands. 091511 The next day, July 26, in Kyiv, Holmes served as a note-taker during a meeting between acting Ambassador Bill Taylor, Volker, and Sondland with President Zelensky and other senior Ukrainian officials. Zelensky said on the previous day's call--- said that on the previous day's call President Trump "had 'three times raised' some very sensitive issues and that he would have to follow up on those issues when they met 'in person." Although he did not realize it at the times---at the time, Holmes came to understand that the "sensitive issues" were the investigations that President Trump demanded on the July 25th call. 091557 Following the meeting with Zelensky, Holmes accompanied Sondland to a separate meeting with one of the Ukrainian president's top advisors, Andriy Yermak. But Holmes was not allowed into the meeting and waited for thirty minutes while Sondland and the Ukrainian met alone - without any note-takers to record what was said. After the meeting, Sondland, Holmes and two other State Department staff went to lunch at a nearby restaurant and sat on an outdoor terrace. At some point during the meal, Sondland pulled out his cell phone, placed a call to the White House, and asked to be connected to the President. 091634 When Trump came on the line, Holmes could hear the President's voice clearly. Holmes recalled that "the President's voice was very loud and recognizable, and Ambassador Sondland held the phone away from his ear for a period of time, presumably because of the loud volume." Sondland said he was calling from Kyiv. He told the President "that President Zelensky 'loves your ass.'" Holmes then heard President Trump ask, 'So he's going to do the investigation?' Ambassador Sondland replied that 'he's going to do it,' adding that President Zelensky will, 'do anything you ask him.' " 091712 After the call ended, Holmes "took the opportunity to ask Sondland for his candid impression of the President's views on Ukraine." It was at this point that Sondland revealed that the president, President Trump "doesn't give a [expletive] about Ukraine". "The President only cares about 'big stuff' . that benefits the President, like the 'Biden investigation' that Mr. Giuliani was pushing." 091737 A month later, National Security Advisor Bolton travelled to Kyiv. Between meetings with Ukrainian government officials, Holmes heard Bolton express to Ambassador Bill Taylor "his frustration about Mr. Giuliani's influence with the President." Bolton made clear, however, "there was nothing he could do about it." Bolton further stated that "the hold on security assistance would not be lifted" prior to the upcoming meeting between Trump and Zelensky in Warsaw, where it "would hang on whether President Zelensky was able to 'favorably impress' President Trump." 091808 Trump canceled his trip to Warsaw, but Sondland, Volker and others continued to press for a public announcement of the opening of investigations by Zelensky. On September 8, Taylor told Holmes that "'now they're insisting Zelensky commit to the investigation in an interview with CNN." Holmes was "surprised the requirement was so specific and concrete," since it amounted to nothing less than a "demand that President Zelensky personally commit to a specific investigation of President Trump's political rival on a cable news channel." 091845 On September 9, this Committee - along with the Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees - launched our investigation of this corrupt scheme. President Trump released the hold on aid two days later. As CNN's Fareed Zakaria has revealed, the Ukrainians cancelled the CNN interview shortly thereafter. Two weeks later, on September 25, the transcript of the July 25th call was released by the White House, and the details of the President's scheme started coming into view. 091914 In the coming days, Congress will determine what response is appropriate. If the President abused his power and invited foreign interference in our elections, if he sought to condition, coerce, extort, or bribe a vulnerable ally into conducting investigations to aid his reelection campaign and did so by withholding official acts - a White House meeting or hundreds of millions of dollars of needed military aid - it will be up---it will be for us to decide, whether those acts are compatible with the office of the Presidency. I now recognize ranking member nunes for any remarks he would like to make. 091952 NUNES>> Thank you. Throughout these bizarre hearings, the Democrats have struggled to make the case that president trump committed some impeachable offense on his phone call with Ukrainian president zelensky. The offense itself changes depending on the day ranging from quid pro quo to extortion to bribery, to obstruction of justice, then back to quid pro quo. It's clear why the Democrats have been forced onto this carousel of accusations. President trump had good reason to be worried of Ukrainian election meddling against his campaign and of widespread corruption in that country. 092032 President zelensky, who didn't even know aid to Ukraine had been paused at the time of the call, has repeatedly said there was nothing wrong with the conversation. The aid was resumed without the Ukrainians taking the actions they were supposedly being coerced into doing. Aid to Ukraine under president Trump has been much more robust than it was under President Obama. Thanks to the provision of javelin anti-tank weapons. 092105 As numerous witnesses have testified, temporary holds on foreign aid occur fairly frequently for many different reasons, so how do we have an impeachable offense here when there's no actual misdeed and no one even claiming to be a victim. The Democrats have tried to solve this dilemma with a simple slogan. He got caught. President trump, we are to believe, was just about to do something wrong and getting caught was the only reason he backed down from whatever nefarious thought crime the Democrats are accusing him of almost committing. I once again urge Americans to continue to consider the credibility of the Democrats on this committee who are now hurling these charges. 092159 For the last three years, it's not President trump who got caught, it's the Democrats who got caught. They got caught falsely claiming they had more than circumstantial evidence that Trump colluded with Russians to hack the 2016 election. They got caught orchestrating this entire farce with the whistle-blower and lying about their secret meetings with him. They got caught defending the false allegations of the Steele dossier which was paid for by them. 092241 They got caught breaking their promise that impeachment would only go forward with bipartisan support because of how damaging it is to the American people. They got caught running a sham impeachment process featuring secret depositions, hidden transcripts and an unending flood of Democrat leaks to the media. 092311 They got caught trying to obtain nude photos of President Trump from Russian pranksters pretending to be Ukrainians. And they got caught covering up for Alexandra Chalupa, a Democratic national committee operative who colluded with Ukranian officials to smear the campaign by improperly redacting her name from deposition transcripts and refusing to let Americans hear her testimony as a witness in these proceedings. 092347 That is the Democrats' pitiful legacy in recent years. They got caught. Meanwhile, their supposed star witness testified that he was guessing that president trump was trying -- tying Ukrainian aid to investigations despite no one telling him that was true and the President himself explicitly telling him the opposite-that he wanted nothing from Ukraine. 092417 Ladies and gentlemen, unless the Democrats once again scramble their kangaroo court rules, today's hearing marks the merciful end of this spectacle in the Impeachment Committee, formerly known as the Intelligence Committee. Whether the Democrats reap the political benefit they want from this impeachment remains to be seen. But the damage they have done to this country will be long-lasting. 092448 With this wrenching attempt to overthrow the President, they have pitted Americans against one another and poisoned the minds of fanatics who actually believe the entire galaxy of bizarre accusations they have leveled against the President since the day the American people elected him. I sincerely hope the Democrats end this affair as quickly as possible so our nation can begin to heal the many wounds it has inflicted on us. 092520 The people's faith in government, and their belief that their vote counts for something has been shaken. From the Russia hoax to this shoddy Ukrainian sequel, the Democrats got caught. Let's hope they finally learn a lesson, give their conspiracy theories a rest, and focus on governing for a change. In addition, Mr. Chairman, pursuant to House Rule 11, clause 2-J1, the Republican members transmit our request to convene a minority day of hearings. 092558 To date, you have blocked key witnesses that we have requested from testifying in this partisan impeachment inquiry. This rule was not displaced by H-Res 660 and, therefore, under House Rule 11, clause 1a, it applies to the Democrats' impeachment inquiry. We look forward to the chair promptly scheduling an agreed upon time for the minority day of hearings so that we can hear from key witnesses that you have continually blocked from testifying. 092628 I'd also like to take a quick moment on an assertion Ms. Hill made in the statement that she submitted to this committee. In which she claimed that some committee members deny that Russia meddled in the 2016 election. As I noted in my opening statement, on Wednesday, that in March 2018, intelligence committee Republicans published the results of a year-long investigation into Russian meddling. 092704 The 240-page report analyzed 2016 Russian meddling campaign, the U.S. government reaction to it, Russian campaigns and other countries, and provided specific recommendations to improve American election security. I would ask my staff to hand these reports to our two witnesses today just so they can have a recollection of their memory. 092736 As America may or may not know, Democrats refuse to sign on to the Republican report. Instead, they decided to adopt minority views filled with collusion conspiracy theories. Needless to say, it's entirely possible for two separate nations to engage in election meddling at the same time, and Republicans believe we should take meddling seriously by all foreign countries. Regardless of which campaign is the target. I'd like to submit for the record a copy of our report titled "Report on Russian active measures." I yield back. 092827 SCHIFF>> Today we are joined by Dr. Fiona Hill and David Holmes. Dr. Fiona Hill is a former deputy assistant to the president and senior director for Europe and Russia on the national security council. Before returning to government, she was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution where she directed the center on the United States and Europe. She previously worked at the national intelligence council, the Eurasia foundation and John F. Kennedy school of government. 092854 David Holmes is the political counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv where he serves as the senior policy and political adviser to ambassador Taylor who testified earlier in these hearings. He is a career foreign service officer. He has previously served in Moscow, New Delhi, Kabul, Bogota and Pristina. He's also served on the staff of the national security council as his special assistant -- as special assistant to the United States secretary of state. 092923 Two final points before our witnesses are sworn. First, witness depositions as part of this inquiry were unclassified in nature. And all open hearings will also be held at the unclassified level. Any information that may touch on classified information will be addressed separately. Second, congress will not tolerate any reprisal, threat of reprisal or attempt to retaliate against any U.S. Government official who are testifying before congress, including you or any of your colleagues. 092952 If you would please rise, raise your right hand, I will begin by swearing you in. Do you swear or affirm that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth so help you god? Let the record show that the witnesses answered in the affirmative. Thank you, and you may be seated. The microphones are sensitive. So you'll need to speak directly into them. Without objection, your written statements will be made part of the record. With that, Mr. Holmes, you a now recognized for your opening statement. And when you conclude, Dr. Hill, you'll be immediately recognized thereafter for your opening statement. 093039 HOLMES>> Thank you. Good morning Mr. Chairman, Ranking Member Nunes, and Members of the Committee. My name is David Holmes, and I am a career Foreign Service Officer with the Department of State. Since August 2017, I have been the Political Counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine. While it is an honor to appear before you, I want to make clear that I did not seek this opportunity to testify today. 093103 Since you determined that I may have something of value to these proceedings and issued a subpoena, it is my obligation to appear and to tell you what I know. Indeed, as Secretary Pompeo has stated, "I hope everyone who testifies will do so truthfully and accurately. What---when they do, the oversight role will have been performed, and I think America will come to see what took place here." That is my only goal: to testify truthfully