Entertainment Americas: US Oscar Hopefuls - Film tipped for Oscar success
TAPE: EF02/0107 IN_TIME: 21:16:14 DURATION: 8:53 SOURCES: APTN/various film companies RESTRICTIONS: No re-use/re-sale of film/video/tv clips without clearance DATELINE: Various SHOTLIST: APTN file Los Angeles, USA March 2001 1. Tilt down from plane to Limo 2. Tilt up from worker to giant Oscar statue 3. Flowers arranged APTN File - Los Angeles, March 2001 4. WS Oscars arrivals 5. B-Roll Anthony Hopkins 6. B-Roll Angelina Jolie 7. B-Roll Michael Douglas (& partially obscured Catherine Zeta Jones) 8. B-Roll Laura Linney 9. B-Roll Goldie Horn and Kurt Russell AWARDS PT 1 10. Clip - "A Beautiful Mind" 11. SOT Kirk Honeycutt, film critic: "Well, I think the one that - if you're talking Oscars now - looks like a sure multiple Oscar nominee for the Academy would be 'Beautiful Mind' for many reasons but not the least of which is the work done by Ron Howard in directing the film and Russell Crowe in acting in a film which - despite a large cast of characters - is pretty much a one man show. - File - Los Angeles, 20th December 2001 12. BTS on set of "A Beautiful Mind" 13. Sot Ron Howard - (on Russell Crowe - from EPK) : " He is a real actors actor and he is committed to creating a character, not shoring up screen presence" APTN FILE - Back stage Golden Globe Awards, Los Angeles, USA, January 2002 14. Set-up shot Russell Crowe 15. SOT: (English) Russell Crowe, "I don't really know what it is about the way I get about it that is different from other people because I'm not sure, I'm not privy to that information. But I really like what I do and that means that I - when I know what the character is and I know who I'm working with then that's what takes over my life for that period of time." 16. Clip - "Gosford Park" - APTN File - Opening London Film festival, UK 8 November 2001 17 B-roll photocall Emily Watson and Maggie Smith 18. B-roll Robert Altman 19. B-roll Jeremy Northam 20. B-roll Sir Derek Jacobi 21. SOT ROBERT ALTMAN (on using British Cast) - "I decided to do this kind of film and I couldn't do it without a British cast, it couldn't be done anywhere else so it's a British film. I'm the only intruder." APTN file - New York, USA, 2002 22. B-Roll Helen Mirren 23. Clip - "Moulin Rouge" 24. B-Roll Nicole Kidman - APTN File 25. Sot Kirk Honeycutt, film critic - on 'Moulin Rouge': "There might be some interest in 'Moulin Rouge' because of the celebrity factor here, Nicole Kidman and Baz Luhrmann, the director. It'll be interesting to see how they finally vote on this. - File - Los Angeles, 20th December 2001 26. Sot Baz Luhrmann (with Nicole Kidman) "Aussie Aussie Aussie" - APTN File, Los Angeles, USA. January 2002 27. Film clip - 'In the Bedroom' APTN file - London Premiere, UK 25 January 2002 28. SOT Sissy Spacek - on the Oscars - "I don't think that there is anybody working in films today who could say they didn't want an Oscar. That is an award that is presented by your peers and it has great meaning both personally and professionally to all of us actors." 29. Line up Marisa Tomei/ Tom Wilkinson/ Sissy Spacek/Todd Field 30. Film clip - 'Monster's Ball' APTN file - NBR awards, New York, USA, 7 January 2002 31. SOT Halle Berry: "I felt more drained watching it the first time than I did doing it. The doing part of it for me was very cathartic, I get to purge and shed myself of a lot of stuff that I was holding in. It was like therapy for me every day so that felt good. But when I watched it I felt more drained then than when I shot it." APTN File - London Premiere, UK, 14 January 2002 32. Dame Judi Dench goes to greet fans 33. B-roll Kate Winslet 34. Clip - "Iris" 35 . B-roll Jim Broadbent and John Bayley 36. Sot Judi Dench on Golden Globe nomination for herself (and Kate and Jim) in film: "I've never known how you judge acting. I know how you judge dancing or singing but acting I think is difficult to judge." 37. Clip Trailer - "Training Day" APTN File Los Angeles, USA October 2001 38. Sot - Denzel Washington - On why the character is so mean - "The wages of sin is death and I wanted to make sure that he earned what he got. So once I made a decision to do the movie I wanted him to be as awful as he possibly could and I tried my best and had a good time. 39.Clip - "Mulholland Drive" 40. Clip - "The Man Who Wasn't There" 41. Clip - "Amelie" 42. Clip - "Lord Of The Rings" STORYLINE: "BEAUTIFUL MIND" TIPPED AS OSCAR FRONT RUNNER The announcement of the Oscar nominations on Tuesday (12FEB02) means the climax of the Hollywood year is nearly upon us. A couple of months ago the films and names likely to come up at those nominations was anybody's guess but, after weeks of pre-awards ceremonies, culminating in the Golden Globes, a consensus is emerging of who should be drafting acceptance speeches. Studios sometimes seem surprised that mega action summer blockbusters they pump hundreds of millions into don't do well at awards ceremonies. Instead it tends to be the smaller films with powerful characters and stories that walk off with all the most prestigious awards. APTN has been keeping track of the films tipped for the top at this year's Oscars. Mostly hotly tipped is "A Beautiful Mind", which see's Russell Crowe starring as a schizophrenic mathematician who overcomes his problems to eventually win a Nobel prize. And if you want to win a major acting award, playing a character with mental health problems is a good place to start. Dustin Hoffman walked off with an Oscar for his portrayal of the autistic Raymond Babbit in "Rainman", while Angelina Jolie's disturbed mental patient in "Girl, Interrupted" earned her a gong over Winona Ryder's distinctly sane role in the same film. Judi Dench could also cash in for her portrayal of novelist Iris Murdoch's descend into senility in the film Iris. But more of her later. Critics are saying the relatively heavyweight film will bring director Ron Howard the awards that have so far eluded him with his previous populist movies like "Apollo 13", "Ransom" and "ED:TV". Experts says his experience, and the fact that he is generally liked, will help as him, as will the film's up-beat ending, excellent acting and massive box office take. There is also the Russell Crowe factor: he's having what could be a career high, after winning an Oscar last year for being a husband-to-a-murdered-wife in "Gladiator" . He's already taken the Golden Globe for best actor and were he to win the Oscar , he would be the first actor since Tom Hanks to take home back-to-back Oscars. The Australian theme continues with the supercamp musical "Moulin Rouge" directed by Australian Baz Luhrmann and staring fellow Antipodean Nicole Kidman. Kidman is an outside possibility for a Best Actress nomination, while the years Baz Luhrmann spent on the film could well be rewarded with Best Director and Best Picture nominations. "Moulin Rouge" would be the first live-action musical nominated for best picture since "All That Jazz" in 1979. The animated musical "Beauty and the Beast" was nominated for best picture in 1991. The last musical to win was "Oliver!" in 1968. Robert Altman has been winning accolades, and a best director Golden Globe, for his British set murder mystery "Gosford Park", which takes a critical swipe at the British class system from the point of view of both aristocrats and servants. The film could well bag a Best Picture nomination, and another Best Director nod for Altman. The tiny independent film "In The Bedroom" is also hotly tipped to bring Sissy Spacek a Best Actress nomination, as well as possible recognition for Tom Wilkinson as Best Supporting actor. From first time feature director Todd Field, it's being hailed by critics as the best movie of the year thanks to packing "the biggest emotional punch". Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek provide achingly honest - read award worthy - portrayals of parents whose marriage nearly collapses under the strain of their son's murder. T But in the Best Actress award stakes, Spacek is up against Halle Berry, for the latter's moving performance in "Monster's Ball". Berry plays the wife of an executed criminal who falls in love with his racist prison guard, played by Billy Bob Thornton, and both have had rave reviews. Berry has already won Female Actor Of The Year award from the American Film Institute, the equivalent from the prestigious National Board of Review ceremony and a nomination from the Globes. Another, and possibly unlikely, Oscar contender is "Iris". Already in possession of an Oscar for her brief appearance in "Shakespeare In Love", Dame Judi Dench could add a second Oscar to her collection, for her portrayal of writer Iris Murdoch's final years during which her mind was succumbed to Alzheimers. The film has already earned a Best Supporting Actor Golden Globe for Jim Broadbent as her devoted husband. Denzel Washington's hard hitting police thriller "Training Day" picked him up a Best Actor Golden Globe nomination, and few gongs from the smaller awards, but is, crucially, being hailed as the performance of his career by many in Hollywood. The buzz in tinsel town is he will at least earn a Best Actor nomination. If he is nominated, and is joined by Will Smith for "Ali", the could become the first two black actors nominated for a lead role in the same year. And if Halle Berry is nominated for "Monsters Ball", she would be the first black lead actress to be in the running since Angela Bassett for "What's Love Got to Do With It" in 1993. If all three were nominated, it would be the first time that three black actors competed in the lead categories since 1972, when Paul Winfield and Cicely Tyson for "Sounder" and Diana Ross for "Lady Sings the Blues" were in the running. The artful "The Man Who Wasn't There" from the Coen brothers may have dropped from view a bit recently, but could still be an Oscar contender for best direction, actor (Billy Bob Thornton) and, most likely, best cinematography. Shot in black and white with a subtle performance from Billy Bob Thornton as a 1940s barber, even the trailer has been said to have "award winner" stamped all over it. Critics say the Coen brothers have always shown an extraordinary eye for detail, but here they create a rich sense of place, with the help of Roger Deakins' lush cinematography. The movie strays a bit toward the end, and is more self-conscious than the Coen's other work, but remains haunting. David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive" is turning out to be something of a comeback vehicle for the "Lost Highway" director and might well earn him a Best Director nod, but some experts think it now has only an outside change. The film is a love story set in the city of dreams and has been described as "a cinematic Rubik's Cube that maddens and confounds even as it entertains". Naomi Watts and Laura Elena Harring render breakthrough performances as persona-swapping friends, foes and lovers meandering through mysteries on the dark fringes of Hollywood. Amelie, the fantasy about a naive French girl who ensures strangers fall in love while neglecting herself, is very strong contender for a Best Foreign Language film nomination and, if it's popularity in Europe is anything to go by, but be odds on favourite to take the final prize. Academy voters rarely have taken such flights of fancy as "The Lord of the Rings" seriously. The sci-fi fantasies "Star Wars" and "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" earned best-picture nominations, as did "The Wizard of Oz" and such fanciful adventure flicks as "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "King Solomon's Mines." But none of these won. "Lord of the Rings," perhaps the most universally acclaimed film of last year, has a shot at being the first. It won top honors at the American Film Institute Awards last month. "I'm thrilled the film is sort of transcending the genre a little bit," the movie's director, Peter Jackson said. CLEARANCE DETAILS Moulin Rouge 20th Century Fox (20) 7437 7766 Lord Of The Rings New Line Cinema 1 310 834 5811 Gosford Park Entertainment Films 44 (0) 20 7930 7744 A Beautiful Mind Universal 1 818 777 1000 Iris Miramax 44 (20) 7535 8300 Amelie Miramax Films In The Bedroom MIRAMAX (20) 7535 8300 The Man Who Wasn't There USA FILMS 001 212 539 4000 Mulholland Drive BAC distribution (0) 1 53 53 52 Monsters Ball Lions Gate Films 1 212 966 4673 Training Day Warner Brothers 1 818 977 6278
EDR - Lorraine Pierrat only female head restaurateur in the Vosges cuisine of local products
Grand Est
Entertainment Daily: Preglobes piece-Globes - Movies tipped for an award at Sunday's Golden Globes
TAPE: EF02/0038 IN_TIME: 14:24:18 DURATION: 7:52 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: No re-use/re-sale of film/video/tv clips without clearance DATELINE: Recent SHOTLIST 1. WS Golden Globe Nominees - 20 December 2001, Los Angeles 2. Sot Hugh Jackman - 20 December 2001, Los Angeles: " Now I am definitely awake thank you." 3. Clip - A Beautiful Mind 4. Sot Ron Howard - (on Russell Crowe - from EPK) : " He is incredibly charismatic, he has got great screen presence, he has shown that , but he is a real actors actor and he is committed to creating a character, not showing up screen presence and he is incredibly courageous actor and this is a very, very challenging role." 5. Clip - Moulin Rouge 6. B-Roll - Nicole Kidman - Los Angeles, 2001 7. Sot Kirk Honeycutt, film critic - on 'Moulin Rouge': "There might be some interest in 'Moulin Rouge' because of the celebrity factor here, Nicole Kidman and Baz Lurhmann, the director. It'll be interesting to see how they finally vote on this because they have a lot of... a wealth of good films here that they have selected and they haven't really missed too many." 8. Clip - Iris 9. Kate Winslet and Judi Dench at premiere, New York 2nd December, 2001 10. Cutaway press 11. Sot Kate Winslet - New York 2nd December, 2001 - English "I sought of buried myself in John Bayley's novels that he had written about his life with Iris because they are so wonderful and it is a first hand account of what it was genuinely like day to day, that was the most useful thing to me. There was some amazing documentaries about Iris and some interviews that she had given when she was about 50, 60 years old that were incredibly useful to me in terms of how she spoke and her demeanor. 12. Clip Iris 13. Sot Judi Dench - New York 2nd December, 2001 - "She was a heroine of mine since the '60s, I saw a play that she had adapted with J B Priestly called 'A Severed Head' from one of her books. I saw that and then I started to read her books. So she was kind of a heroine of mine' 13. film clip 'Monsters Ball' 14. SOT Halle Berry - "So much of this movie was played by the non-verbal and so we had to decide what those non-verbal messages were going to be. So there was a lot of talk all the time about what was going on and how we felt and what was real and what was not real and what we had been taught through the media to be true and the discern that from what really is real and not what we read to be real and so there was always a dialogue going on and forcing us always to look from within." 15. Clip - The Shipping News 16. Clip - Ghost World 9. Sot - Thora Birch (EPK) on her character: " I think she doesn't really know what she wants she has just graduated from high school and she knows all the things that she doesn't really like and she knows what she doesn't want to be. The only problem is that she really does have no clue of what she does want to do and who she is really' 10. Clip - The Deep End 11. Sot - Tilda Swinton (Cannes France, May 2001) - (English) she's a very ordinary bourgious housewife, she's married to a naval aviator and she has 3 children and she lives in a very neat, nice, house in Lake Tahoe California and they are all very comfortable. 12. Sissy Spacek arrives at premiere - Toronto, Canada, September 9th 2001. 13. Clip - In The bedroom 14. Marisa Tomei interviewed - Toronto, Canada, September 9th 2001 15. Clip - In The Bedroom 16. Clip - The Man Who Wasn't There 17. Sot David Lynch - Los Angeles, USA, 19th September 2001 - English: " Once you fall in love with these ideas they tell you how they want to be translated to film, and even though it is a long process with many different elements you always can track back to the original ideas that you fell in love with. And I am a human being, there is some possibility that other human beings will be drawn to the same idea which is made up of many ideas but it is one idea." 18. clip Mulholland Drive HOLLYWOOD WAITS FOR GLOBES WITH BAITED BREATH The Golden Globe Awards, second only to the Oscar's, take place in Los Angeles on Sunday (20JAN02), and Hollywood's brightest and best will discover who is on the A-list for the year. As well as being a prestigious award in itself, winning a Golden Globe can give major hints on who will come out on top at the next and biggest contest in the Hollywood year - The Academy Awards, or Oscars. But who will win? Well, studios sometimes seem surprised that mega action summer blockbusters they pump hundreds of millions into don't do well at awards ceremonies. Instead it tends to be the smaller films with powerful characters and stories that walk off with all the most prestigious awards. APTN has been keeping track of the films tipped for the top at this year's Golden Globes. Topping the bill is "A Beautiful Mind" with six nominations, which see's Russell Crowe starring as a schizophrenic mathematician who overcomes his problems to eventually win a Nobel prize. And if you want to win a major acting award, playing a character with mental health problems is a good place to start. Dustin Hoffman walked off with an Oscar for his portrayal of the autistic Raymond Babbit in "Rainman", while Angelina Jolie's disturbed mental patient in "Girl, Interrupted" earned her a gong over Winona Ryder's distinctly sane role in the same film. Judi Dench could also cash in for her portrayal of novelist Iris Murdoch's descend into senility in the film Iris. But more of her later. Directed by Ron Howard, "A Beautiful Mind' is emerging as the hottest contenders for this year's Globes, with nominations including Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Actor (Drama) and Best Director. Critics are saying the relatively heavyweight film will bring Ron Howard the awards that have so far eluded him with his previous populist movies like "Apollo 13", "Ransom" and "ED:TV". Australian born Russell Crowe on the other hand, is having what could be a career high, after winning an Oscar last year for being a husband-to-a-murdered-wife in "Gladiator" . Now he's being hotly tipped to win the Golden globe for best actor and maybe even another Oscar. The Australian theme continues with the supercamp musical "Moulin Rouge", also nominated for six globe awards, directed by Australian Baz Luhrmann and staring fellow Antipodean Nicole Kidman. Continuing her post Tom Cruise divorce rise to prominence, Nicole Kidman is up for a Best Actress (musical/comedy) award, Ewan McGregor could bag a Best Actor (Musical/Comedy) gong while the years Baz Luhrman spent on the film could well be rewarded with a statue for Best Director. Kidman will have two bites of the cherry thanks to her stirring performance in ghost story 'The Others,' for which she is nominated for another Best Actress Award, this time in the drama category. Another, and possibly unlikely, heavyweight Globe contender is "Iris". Already in possession of an Oscar for her brief appearance in "Shakespeare In Love", Dame Judi Dench could add a Best Actress (Drama) Golden Globe to her collection, for her portrayal of writer Iris Murdoch in her last years, as her mind was succumbing to Alzheimers - to the point where she forgot she had once been writer. The film has also earned Golden Globe supporting role nominations for Kate Winslet as the younger Iris, and for Jim Broadbent as her devoted husband. But in the Best Actress (Drama) award stakes, Dench is up against Halle Berry, for the latter's moving performance in the latecomer (it's only had limited release so far) "Monster's Ball". The film, in which Berry plays the wife of an executed criminal who falls in love with his racist prison guard (played by Billy Bob Thornton), has had rave reviews and has already won Berry a Female Actor Of The Year award from the American Film Institute, and the equivalent from the prestigious National Board of Review ceremony. Despite having two Best Actor Oscar's to his name ("The Usual Suspects" 1996 and "American Beauty" 2002) Kevin Spacey has never won a Golden Globe. But that could change this year as he has received his third nomination for his role as Quoyle, a meek newspaper reporter who moves to Canada and eventually finds love, and a measure of professional satisfaction, in "The Shipping News". The film, based on the novel be E. Annie Proulx, is also nominated for Best Original Score (Motion Picture). "American Beauty" star Thora Birch, who has been busy picking up a cabinet's worth of awards from film festivals and critics circles for playing Enid in "Ghost World", is a nominee for the Golden Globes Best Actress (musical/comedy) award. In a world where young girls are rarely portrayed as anything deeper than cheerleaders, Birch's three dimensional portrayal of a troubled teen has been well received. Steve Buscemi's turn as the lonely album collector who Birch and Johansson first play a trick on, and then befriend, has earned him a Golden Globe nod for Best Supporting Actor, for which he has already won a gong from the New York Film Critics. Thriller "The Deep End" has earned Tilda Swinton a Best Actress (drama) nomination for her role as the neurotic mother desperately trying to cover up an accidental death which would reveal her teenage son's homosexuality. The film has been praised for managing to be unnerving without resorting to violent cliche, and meaningful without descending into schmaltz. A big Golden Globe contender this year is "In The Bedroom" which not only secured Sissy Spacek and Marisa Tomei nods in the best actress and supporting actress shortlists, but is also nominated for Best Picture. This tiny independent picture from first time feature director Todd Field is being hailed by critics as the best movie of the year because it packs "the biggest emotional punch". Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek provide achingly honest - and award worthy - portrayals of parents whose marriage nearly collapses under the strain of their son's murder. The film depicts how people grieve in different ways. It also is a fascinating exploration of the steps ordinary people take under extraordinary circumstances. The artful "The Man Who Wasn't There" from the Coen brothers is another big Globe contender, with nominations for Best Picture (Drama), Best Screenplay and Best Actor, for Billy Bob Thornton's supremely passive portrayal of bored Barber Ed Crane. Shot in black and white with a subtle performance from Billy Bob Thornton as a 1940s barber, even the trailer has been said to have "award winner" stamped all over it. Critics say the Coen brothers have always shown an extraordinary eye for detail, but here they create a rich sense of place, with the help of Roger Deakins' lush cinematography. The movie strays a bit toward the end, and is more self-conscious than the Coen's other work, but it's remains haunting. David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive" is turning out to be something of a comeback vehicle for the "Lost Highway" director and is nominated for 4 awards. Lynch could take home Best Director and Best Screenplay while the film overall is up for Best Picture (Drama), and composer Angelo Badalamenti is up for Best Original Score. The film is a love story set in the city of dreams and has been described as "a cinematic Rubik's Cube that maddens and confounds even as it entertains". Naomi Watts and Laura Elena Harring render breakthrough performances as persona-swapping friends, foes and lovers meandering through mysteries on the dark fringes of Hollywood. Unlike the Academy Awards, which are voted on by members of the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Scienes - i.e. those who work professionally in the film industry - the Golden Globe awards are voted on by the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press association. It was started in 1944 and has always been scheduled before the Oscar's so as to avoid being swayed by biggest awards of them all. CLEARANCE DETAILS Iris Miramax 44 (20) 7535 8300 Shipping News Miramax Ghost World CAPITOL FILMS (20) 7471 6000 The Deep End FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES In The Bedroom MIRAMAX (20) 7535 8300 The Man Who Wasn't There USA FILMS 001 212 539 4000 Mudholland Drive BAC distribution (0) 1 53 53 52 Moulin Rouge 20th Century Fox (20) 7437 7766 The Others Miramax 1 212 941 3800 Lord Of The Rings New Line Cinema 1 310 834 5811 A Beautiful Mind Universal 1 818 777 1000
[Stéphane CARISTAN]
FR3 / France 3
London Feed / Europe File Video
February 10, 2005 LONDON FEED: FILE POLAND, GERMANY, UKRAINE MATERIAL FOR EUROPE TRIP NY 2/ X81/ Slugged: 1055 LDN IRAQ X81 POLAND 10:55:59 START 050124#073 Name: 050124#073 Title: RUSSIA PUTIN UKRAINE RTR EVNW Type: EVN FEED In point: 14:38:40.20 Out point: 14:40:13.29 Duration: 00:01:33.09 Clip Locations BROWSE,PDR A Tape ID 0416 Source RTR Notes PUTIN CABINET MEETING Dopesheet Putin Ukraine EVNW Date Shot: 24-JAN-2005 Location: MOSCOW Country: RUSSIAN FEDERATION Source: RURTR Shotlist: Putin comes in, g.v cabinet meeting, Putin speaks about visit of Ukranian President Victor Yushchenko in Moscow. " Dopesheet: Speaking on the occasion of Mr. Yushchenko's visit to Moscow, Vladimir Putin stated that it was important to bring the current relations between Russia and Ukraine up to date. "We have a large volume of joint projects with Ukraine. To my knowledge, trade with Russia constitutes 60% of Ukrainian overall trade turnover,' Mr. Putin announced. "I would like to ask the Cabinet to formulate its proposals on major areas of our cooperation with Ukraine taking into consideration the current situation in Russian-Ukrainian relations after the elections in Ukraine and a certain economic downfall in that country. I should know how this situation reflects on Russian partners and what we should do to improve the current state of affairs as soon as possible," Mr. Putin emphasized. " President Vladimir Putin has instructed the federal government to update key areas of cooperation with Ukraine. "I requested that the government make updated proposals on key areas of our cooperation, bearing in mind the post-election situation in Ukraine," Putin said at a government meeting on Monday. He asked the government to pay special attention "to the decline of economic growth rates in Ukraine, analyze its possible effect on Russian partners, and ways to improve the situation 10:58:16 START 040314#167 Name: 040314#167 Title: RUSSIA PUTIN APTN 2300G Type: Russia In point: 23:25:30.06 Out point: 23:26:11.11 Duration: 00:00:41.03 Clip Locations 019-209 Tape ID Source pool Notes ON DVC PRO 019-209 PUTIN NIGHT WALK ACROSS RED SQUARE TO GIVE SPEECH -SEE PDR D FOR FULL ADDRESS Dopesheet AP-APTN-2300: ++Russia Putin Sunday, 14 March 2004 SOURCE: POOL DATELINE: Moscow, 14 Mar 2004 SHOTLIST: 1. Wide shot Russian President Vladimir Putin walking across Red Square 2. Putin stops to look at St. Basil's Cathedral, then continues walking 3. Mid shot Putin walking 10:58:38 4. Putin walking into his campaign headquarters with Dmitry Kozak, Putin's campaign chief 10:59:39 START 030622#085 Name: 030622#085 Title: RUSSIA TVS CLOSURE APTN EVN2 Type: Russia In point: 18:00:26.20 Out point: 18:02:42.22 Duration: 00:02:16.02 Clip Locations 019-207 Tape ID 9439 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 019-207 RUSSIA TVS CLOSURE APTN EVN2 Dopesheet RU: TVS CLOSURE; EVN2;22-JUN-2003 Source: GBAPTN; RU;MOSCOW;;22-JUN-2003; The Russian government shut down one of the country's two main private television stations on Sunday. In doing so it forced off the air a team of journalists who have been at the centre of a media freedom debate in Russia for the past two years. TVS, created from the ashes of two other television stations that came into conflict with state-connected companies, was shut down early on Sunday. It was replaced with a new state-run sports channel. Some employees learned the station had been closed while listening to the radio on their way to work. Coming ahead of December's parliamentary elections and next year's presidential vote, the demise of TVS gives the government overwhelming influence over what goes out on the nation's airwaves, again raising questions about a free press in President Vladimir Putin's Russia. The closure was not unexpected. Debt-ridden TVS had been dropped earlier this month by Moscow's main cable company over unpaid bills, depriving it of its largest viewer market. Only two days ago, TVS's news director warned that the end might be imminent. Television's strong political influence in Russia is no secret. Independent stations rallied behind former President Boris Yeltsin to help him win re-election over his Communist rival in 1996. But the same stations also angered the Kremlin by bringing piercing war footage of the first Chechen campaign into Russian homes nightly, helping turn public opinion. Yevgeny Kiselyov, TVS channel Editor-in-chief, and some of his journalistic team had originally worked for NTV, the biggest private station. But when NTV was taken over by the government-connected natural gas monopoly in 2001, in what critics said was an attempt to curb the station's critical coverage, Kiselyov and others fled to the privately-run TV6 in protest. That station was shut down last year in a dispute with a shareholder, a government-connected pension fund. TV6 journalists then formed another station, TVS, backed by Media-Sotsium, a group of business executives loyal to the Kremlin. TVS news didn't produce the kind of hard-hitting reporting that distinguished the previous NTV or TV6. But Kiselyov still went after Putin in his weekly Sunday news show, often with obvious disdain. TVS, however, was plagued by financial difficulties, partly due to infighting among its powerful oligarch investors. The channel's staff had not been paid in three months, and it didn't have access to the kind of popular programming that draws-in advertisers. June 22 2003 1. Ostankino TV tower 2. Evgeny Kiselyov coming out to the press 3. Kiselyov and journalists 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Yevgeny Kiselyov, TVS channel Editor-in-chief "We were kicked out of former NTV. We were switched off TV-6 and now we are switched-off for the second time. Actually it is the third time (that) we loose the chance of communicating with Russian audience." FILE - January 2002 5. Various of TV-6 studio and MCR (Master Control Room) switched off air June 22 2003 11:00:52 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Yevgeny Kiselyov, TVS channel Editor-in-chief "It's both politics and economics, finance. The channel was losing money and nobody helped us. The owners decided not to get the channel out of the crisis. It looks like they are going to bankrupt the channel". 7. Journalists around Kiselyov 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Yevgeny Kiselyov, TVS channel Editor-in-chief "First, I am going to help my former colleagues, the journalists, who were working for our channel, to find new jobs. After that, probably, I will looking for myself." FILE - January 2002 11:01:44 9. Various of journalists in TV studios 11:02:44 start 030509#088 Name: 030509#088 Title: POLAND SUMMIT ap1500g Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 16:14:30.10 Out point: 16:16:57.15 Duration: 00:02:27.05 Clip Locations 015-200 Tape ID 7806 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 015-200 Arrivals for meeting IN Wroclaw one day summit designed to try and mend the current rift across in Europe created by the Iraq war Dopesheet Poland Summit - NEW Arrivals for meeting of Polish, French and German leaders LENGTH: 2:27 FIRST RUN: 1500 RESTRICTIONS: APTN Clients Only TYPE: Natsound SOURCE: TVN 24 STORY NUMBER: 373908 DATELINE: Wroclaw - 9 May 2003 SHOTLIST: 1. Wide high of bus carrying European heads of state arriving in square 2. Cutaway of troops on parade 3. French President Jacques Chirac being greeted 4. Various of heads of state and other officials approaching platform 5. High wide of national anthem being played 6. Chirac, Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder listening 7. Side shot of same 8. Wide of square 9. Leaders walking off platform to inspect the Guards of Honour 10. Various of leaders inspecting guard 11:04:13 11. Various of military band marching past 11:04:19 12. Leaders waving with troops in foreground 13. Wide of Chirac, Schroeder and Kwasniewski walking away 11:04:41 14. Long shot of leaders walking past crowds of people waving flags 11:04:52 15. Various wide shots of Chirac, Schroeder and Kwasniewski standing on steps waving to crowd before leaving STORYLINE Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski greeted the leaders of Germany and France on Friday for a one day summit designed to try and mend the current rift across in Europe created by the Iraq war. Kwasniewski is a close friend of U.S. President George W. Bush, and won favour in Washington for supporting the war. The meeting of key nations in Europe's pro- and anti-war coalitions will focus on the role of the United Nations in Iraq's reconstruction, a common European security and defence policy and work on drafting a European constitution. Kwasniewski welcomed German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and French President Jacques Chirac with military honours in the market square of the southwestern city of Wroclaw. The three leaders then went into meetings in the 14th century Gothic city hall. Several thousand Poles lined the brightly painted square, many wearing buttons and waving balloons in support of Poland's entry into the European Union next year. Poles will vote in a referendum on whether they support EU membership -- and the painful reforms that accompany it -- on June 7-8. APTN GERMANY 11:05:58 START 020923#014 Name: 020923#014 Title: GERMANY RESULTS APTN 0800G Type: Germany In point: 09:36:49.25 Out point: 09:40:18.28 Duration: 00:03:29.03 Clip Locations 237-203 Tape ID 9109 Source aptn, + Notes ON DVC PRO 237-203 Dopesheet AP-APTN-0800 ++Germany Results - NEW Schroeder on victory, Stoiber concedes defeat, vox pops RESTRICTIONS: APTN Clients Only TYPE: German/Nat SOURCE: APTN/POOL DATELINE: Berlin/Munich, 23 Sept 2002 SHOTLIST: POOL APTN Clients Only Berlin 1. German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder outside surrounded by press 2. SOUNDBITE: (German) Gerhard Schroeder, German Chancellor "Despite being tired I feel very good as you can imagine." Qu:" And when will things start?" "It will start straight away, already today. We will not be able to have a break, because we have difficult and important decisions ahead of us in Europe and beyond. We will start coalition talks in a small group." APTN APTN Clients Only Munich 11:06:48 3. Press waiting for Bavarian governor Edmund Stoiber 11:06:50 4. SOUNDBITE: (German) Edmund Stoiber, Premier of Bavaria "The way the things stand now the SPD has a large enough majority, this is a small majority, but they should govern with this. We will be a constructive opposition and I will take my influence as leader of the party, who with nine percent contributed to the final result of CDU and CSU. I will use my weight and the position of the CSU in Berlin." 5. Stoiber going into building Berlin 6. Various of train station 7. Medium shot of newspaper shop in station 8. Close up newspaper headlines reading "Gerhard is still on", "It's a shaky victory" and "Fisher wins for Schroeder" 9. Man reading the paper 10. SOUNDBITE: (German) Vox pop "I am relieved that Schroder is staying chancellor, I don't think think Stoiber has any real profile, so I am really relieved." 11. SOUNDBITE: (German) Vox pop " Well it was a neck-and-neck race, but I think it is OK that the CSU did not take over." 12.SOUNDBITE: (German) Vox pop "I am happy. I wanted this coalition and I think this is the lesser evil." 13. People in paper show 14. Wideshot of German parliament the Bundestag STORYLINE: Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's Social Democrats won one of Germany's closest postwar elections on Monday. Schroeder secured another four years for his coalition with the small Greens party in Sunday's vote, handing Europe's dwindling left another boost a week after the Social Democrats triumphed in Sweden. As his challenger the Bavarian premier Edmund Stoiber conceded defeat, Schroeder stressed that coalition talks with the Green party would start straight away. Most newspapers point out that the victory was tight and some even go as far as to say that the chancellor could not have won without his popular Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer of the Greens. But Schroeder looks set to face tougher opposition at home, as well as the task of rebuilding ties with the United States after a campaign that angered Washington. The chancellor will have to tackle problems such as chronic unemployment and slow economic growth and confront strains in the country's generous welfare state with a slender majority that opponents say will not hold. Official results released early Monday showed the Social Democrats and Greens won a combined 47.1 percent of the vote for the lower house, or Bundestag. Opposition parties led by resU-R-G-E-N-T conservatives under Edmund Stoiber totaled 45.9 percent. That gave the Social Democrats and Greens 306 seats in the new 603-seat parliament, compared to 295 for conservatives and the pro-business Free Democrats. Reformed communists won the other two seats. 11:10:35 start 020912#105 Name: 020912#105 Title: GERMANY REAX ZDF EVF 1710G Type: Iraq In point: 18:09:54.26 Out point: 18:12:54.05 Duration: 00:02:59.09 Clip Locations 023-203 Tape ID Source ZDF Notes ON DVC PRO 023-203 REAX TO BUSH SPEECH ON IRAQ Dopesheet DE: GERMAN REAX; EVF;12-SEP-2002 Source: DEZDF; DE;VS;;12-SEP-2002 shot in berlin, regensburg, munich, new york chancellor schroeder in regensburg renewed his opposition to a possible us attack and he said the middle east needs more peace and not a new war he pointed out, that germany will not participate under his leadership. chancellor candidate edmund stoiber, cdu, seeking to beat schoreder in election on spetember 22nd welcomed bush's speech. he said bush strengthened the position of the united nations with his speech. wolfgang gehrhardt, fdp, chairman of faction: bush's address was an offer to proof the own perception . roland claus, pds, chairman of faction, even a threat of strike is a breach of law. fm joschka fischer said in ny, germany will work towards to find a peaceful resolution to the conflict. the german gvmt feels its deep concerns about further open questions have been confirmed. he said it was a very tough and clear speech from the president, it needs to be carfully examined schroeder, regensburg stoiber in munich gerhard and claus in berlin 11:12:57 fischer in ny 11:14:16 start 020805#066 Name: 020805#066 Title: GERMANY - SPD ap1500 Type: Germany In point: 16:00:55.09 Out point: 16:03:46.20 Duration: 00:02:51.09 Clip Locations 237-201 Tape ID 7474 Source AP Notes ON DVC PRO 237-201 Dopesheet GERMANY - SPD ap1500 Schroeder kicks off election campaign LENGTH: 2:50 FIRST RUN: 1500 RESTRICTIONS: APTN Clients Only TYPE: German/Nat SOURCE: APTN STORY NUMBER: 346519 DATELINE: Hanover - 5 Aug 2002 SHOTLIST: 1. Banner for Schroeder, pan to crowd 2. Woman dancing with banner saying 'Keep going, Gerd' 3. Schroeder arrives - surrounded by clapping crowd 4. Schroeder on stage - hands in air 5. Wide of stage 6. People with banners 7. SOUNDBITE (German) Franz Muentefering, SPD General Secretary "We have gathered here to launch the election campaign, our goal is clear, on September 22nd, in 48 days' time, Gerhard Schroeder will be Germany's chancellor again." 8. Big screen with crowd 9. Crowd with banners 10. SOUNDBITE: (German) Gerhard Schroeder, German Chancellor "Ladies and gentlemen, dear friends, it's warm, we're on our way, on our German way. We have achieved a lot, but we haven't achieved everything. That's why I think that we need our mandate to be renewed to be able to take Germany all the way." 11. Flag saying 'Stop Stoiber' 12. Crowd 13. SOUNDBITE (German) Gerhard Schroeder , German Chancellor "I appeal to the business world not to act as the fifth opposition party (and criticise me and my policy) but instead concentrate on creating jobs and apprenticeships in your businesses. That's your duty." 14. Crowd cheering 15. SOUNDBITE (German) Gerhard Schroeder, German Chancellor "The Social Democrats are on their way because they want to win. And because they want to win they will win." 16. People clapping and cheering 17. Pan to big screen STORYLINE: German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder on Monday launched his party's re-election campaign, three weeks earlier than planned, to try to claw back a lead in the polls. Location for the rally was Hanover - capital of the western state of Lower Saxony, a Social Democratic stronghold where Schroeder served as governor before his 1998 election win. The chancellor gave a vigorous, spirited speech which covered issues ranging from unemployment fears to Iraq. He threw out a challenge to the business world to stop criticising him and get on with creating more jobs. The ailing German economy is expected to be the focus of his conservative challenger - Edmund Stoiber. Unemployment went over the psychologically important mark of four (M) million earlier this year and the Christian Democrats are expected to go in hard on the government's failure to create more jobs. On Iraq, Schroeder said his government was not prepared for "adventurism" in the Middle East but he vowed to keep up pressure on Saddam Hussein while warning against "playing around" with threats of military action. Monday's rally was the first of 400 planned campaign events. Schroeder's Social Democrats have been trailing in the polls and matters were made worse during the last three weeks during which the chancellor fired his defence minister over allegations of financial impropriety. His government was also implicated in orchestrating the removal of the chief executive of phone giant Deutsche Telekom. UKRAINE 11:19:01 start 041229#048 Name: 041229#048 Title: UKRAINE BLOCKADE RTV c: AP EVNY Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 10:06:11.17 Out point: 10:08:18.05 Duration: 00:02:06.18 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID 9450 Source RTV c: AP Notes ON DVC 015-204 G Dopesheet Ukraine blockade EVNY Date Shot: 29-DEC-2004 Location: KIEV Country: UKRAINE Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: KIEV, UKRAINE (DECEMBER 29, 2004) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. WIDE EXTERIOR OF GOVERNMENT OFFICES IN KIEV/ SUPPORTERS OF OPPOSITION LEADER VIKTOR YUSHCHENKO OUTSIDE MAIN ENTRANCE TO OFFICES 11:19:10 2. OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS WITH FLAGS AND AND BANNERS AND BEATING DRUMS 3. OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS IN A JEEP AND CHANTING SLOGANS OUTSIDE GOVERNMENT OFFICES 4. OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS ON SIDE OF RAOD AND FACING GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS 5. (SOUNDBITE) (English) MARIA, A TEACHER OF ENGLISH AND AN OPPOSITION SUPPORTER SAYING: "First of all Ukrainian people fight for democracy, free press, for freedom for everyone, for law, and we want to have law in out country, we don't to be like Gongazde, to be killed and we want first of all to be free." 6. VARIOUS OF OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS OUTSIDE GOVERNMENT OFFICES, AND BLOCKADING BUILDING 11:20:26 7. OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS BEATING DRUMS 11:20:32 8. WIDE VIEW OF GOVERNMENT OFFICES 11:20:36 9. VARIOUS OF PROTESTS Dopesheet: Ukraine's government decided not to meet at its headquarters on Wednesday (December 29) after demonstrators massed outside to prevent Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich from entering. "Today there will be no government meeting in this building," Anatoly Tolstoukhov told reporters at the building's main entrance. Hundreds of protesters massed outside the building at the behest of liberal Viktor Yushchenko, winner of last Sunday's presidential election. Yanukovich, his opponent, has refused to concede defeat. 11:21:31 start 041227#008 Name: 041227#008 Title: UKRAINE LVIV CELEBRATION APTN EVF 0330G Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 03:42:44.21 Out point: 03:44:14.01 Duration: 00:01:29.08 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID ------ Source APTN Notes ON DVC 015-204 Dopesheet EVF 0330 Lviv celebration Date Shot: 27-DEC-2004 Location: LVIV Country: UKRAINE Source: APTN Shotlist: 1. Cars driving past supporters of opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko, sounding horns 2. Yushchenko supporters waving Ukrainian flags and chanting his name 3. Cars driving past Yushchenko supporters, sounding horns 4. Yushchenko supporters chanting his name 5. Cars driving past Yushchenko supporters, sounding horns 6. Yushchenko supporters chanting his name 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Yushchenko supporter: "Yushchenko is our president. He is the best man in our country." 8. Yushchenko supporters waving flags 9. SOUNDBIT: (English) Yushchenko supporter: "You see it, you saw it, you will see it. It is one nation and no one can separate us or propose some things that will separate us." 10. Yushchenko supporters waving flags Dopesheet: As victory appeared to beckon for Ukraine's opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko early on Monday, supporters celebrated in Lviv. The town in western Ukraine is part of Yushchenko's heartland. In the last poll, Lviv voted 93 per cent in favour of Yushchenko. Local supporters see him as representing the drive towards Europe, rather than traditional ties to Russia. Yushchenko claimed victory on Monday after three exit polls and partial results projected him winning an easy victory over rival Viktor Yanukovych. With ballots from just over 60 percent of precincts counted, Yushchenko was leading with 56.04 compared to Yanukovych's 40.12 percent, election officials said. 11:23:41 041226#140 Name: 041226#140 Title: UKRAINE COUNTING APTN EVF 1954 Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 19:54:38.16 Out point: 19:56:04.10 Duration: 00:01:25.22 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID 9351 Source APTN Notes ON DVC PRO 015-204 Dopesheet EVF 1954 Kiev counting Date Shot: 26-DEC-2004 Location: KIEV Country: UKRAINE Source: GBAPTN Dopesheet: Counting has started in the Ukrainian presidential election vote. Shotlist: 1. Wide shot, ballot box emptied on table 2. Close up ballots being countred organsied at table 3. Small ballot box emptied on table 4. Ballot box unsealed 5. Ballots on table 6. Close up of writing 7. Ballots being counted 11:26:03 start 041226#032 Name: 041226#032 Title: UKRAINE DONETSK POLLS RTV/APTN EVNY Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 09:39:22.21 Out point: 09:41:35.00 Duration: 00:02:12.11 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID 9330 Source rtv/aptn Notes ON DVC 015-204 Dopesheet Donetsk polls EVNY Date Shot: 26-DEC-2004 Location: DONETSK Country: UKRAINE Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: 1. WIDE POLLING STATION NR. 57 IN KUIBYSHEVSKI REGION IN DONETSK 11:26:09 2. MEDIUM ENTRANCE 3. VOTERS WALKING TO POLLING STATION 4. HOUSE 5. INTERIOR POLLING STATION 6. VARIOUS VOTERS REGISTERING 7. WOMAN WALKS INTO VOTING CABIN 8. VARIOUS CASTING VOTES 9. SOUNDBITE (Russian), VOTER, SAYING: "So, I voted in all three rounds. I voted for Yanukovich. But now I don't know, the situation got completely complicated. It's terrible." 10. SOUNDBITE (Russian), LUBOV BONDARIENKO, SAYING: "If the first and second round were not honest, then I don't know, I don't know. All of our people vote correctly. And I think the commissions also. I just saw that everything is done only with a passport. How can it be unfair?" 11. SOUNDBITE (Russian), OLGA GRIGORIVNA, PENSIONER, SAYING: "I don't believe (the election will be fair). Because who has money, has power. And the money is with YusHchenko. I'm sure of it for one hundred percent, I swear." 12. SOUNDBITE (Russian), VOTER, SAYING: "I voted for Victor Fiodorovich (Yanukovich). He is very righteous, good looking, the first one (president) was terrible, the second one which is pushing for power is terrible, I'm just scared of them. And him, he is righteous, good looking, it's pleasant to look at him, and smart." 13. MAN WALKS OUT OF POLLING STATION People in the Donetsk region of Ukraine, the support base for Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich, began voting in a re-run of last month's annulled presidential election. Voting appeared brisk in Donetsk on Sunday (December 26), but many voters said they had been unhappy with the events that led to the annullment of the outcome of the November 21 vote which had given victory to Yanukovich. Others said that supporters of opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko, widely expect to win the re-run poll, would be rigging the re-run vote in favour of their candidate. (MISSED START TIME) 041226#020 Name: 041226#020 Title: UKRAINE VOTING MORE RTV c APTN EVF 0839G Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 08:39:00.02 Out point: 08:42:46.19 Duration: 00:03:46.19 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID 9329 Source rtv/aptn Notes ON DVC 015-204 Dopesheet Ukraine voting more evf 08:39 Date Shot: 26-DEC-2004 Location: KIEV Country: UKRAINE Source: GBRTV /GBAPTN Shotlist: SHOWS: KIEV, UKRAINE (DECEMBER 26, 2004) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. INTERIOR OF POLLING STATION/ SENIOR ELECTION OFFICIAL TAKING BALLOT PAPERS AND HANDING THEM TO POLLING STATION OFFICIALS 2. POLLING STATION OFFICIALS GETTING READY FOR START OF VOTING 11:29:22 3. VARIOUS OF VOTING IN PROGRESS/ VOTERS REGISTERING TO VOTE 11:29:27 4. VARIOUS OF PEOPLE VOTING 11:30:15 5. ELDERLY COUPLE REGISTERING TO VOTE 6. ELDERLY COUPLE, NADIA AND PROKOFI NEPOMNYASHCHY VOTING 7. NADIA AND PROKOFI NEPOMNYASHCHY 11:30:52 8. (SOUNDBITE) (Ukrainian) NADIA PROKOFI NEPOMNYASHCHY (85), WITH HER HUSBAND PROKOFI (90) OUTSIDE POLLING STATION AND SAYING: "I voted for Yushchenko. One of us voted for Yushchenko and one of us for Yanukovich. We heard a lot about Yushchenko but he (her husband) still voted for Yanukovich." 9. VARIOUS OF KIEV'S TENT CITY IN THE EARLY MORNING / OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS SITTING AROUND FIRE 10. TENTS/ SMOKE FROM FIRES 11. (SOUNDBITE) (Ukrainian) OPPOISTION SUPPORTER ANATOLY GARKAVENKO, 41, SAYING: "I came here to protect my right to a free vote, and have been campaigning for the opposition parties." 12. VARIOUS OF SOME OPPOSITION SUPPORTERS PLAYING EARLY MORNING FOOTBALL NEAR TENTS 13. OPPOSITION SUPPORTER GIVING "V" FOR VICTORY SIGNS Dopesheet: Western-leaning liberal Viktor Yushchenko was favourite to win when Ukrainians began voting in a re-run presidential election on Sunday (December 26) after a rigged ballot last month. More than 33,000 polling stations opened at 8 a.m. (0600 GMT) in mild weather in the former Soviet republic and are due to close at 8 p.m. (1800 GMT). Some of the opposition supporters camped out for weeks near Kiev's Independence square, prepared to vote on Sunday. "I came here to protect my right to a free vote, and have been campaigning s as a citizen and have come stay An exit poll is to be announced soon afterwards but it is uncertain when official results will be available. Some 12,000 foreign observers are monitoring the vote. Yushchenko is running against Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich, whose victory in last month's vote was overturned by the Supreme Court on grounds of mass fraud. Yanukovich, candidate of Ukraine's establishment, advocates closer ties with Russia. Yushchenko has promoted an image of Ukraine gradually integrating with the rest of Europe but has been careful to describe Russia as a strategic partner. The Kremlin, major supplier of energy to Ukraine, had firmly backed Yanukovich at the last election but President Vladimir Putin has said he can work with whoever wins Sunday's poll. If Yushchenko wins, he faces a huge task in transforming an economy that analysts say is still based largely on Soviet-era principles. 11:35:23 041224#110 Name: 041224#110 Title: UKRAINE YANUKOVYCH CAMPAIGN AP DIRECT Type: Poland & Ukraine & Belarus In point: 19:35:12.26 Out point: 19:38:48.29 Duration: 00:03:36.03 Clip Locations 015-204 Tape ID --- Source APTN Notes ON DVC-PRO 015-204 Beregovo, Western Ukraine - YANUKOVYCH / YANUKOVICH SUPPORTERS CHANTING YANUKOVYCH AT RALLY / FLAGS YANUKOVYCH SOT NIGHT YANUKOVYCH AT KIEV RALLY - SEE 088 ALSO Dopesheet AP DIRECT++Ukraine Yanukovych Friday, 24 December 2004 SOURCE: Various DATELINE: Various, 24 Dec 2004 HOTLIST APTN - APTN Clients Only Beregovo, Western Ukraine 1. Tracking shot of snow-filled streets of Beregovo, a town near Ukraine's border with Hungary 11:35:31 2. People walking along the street 11:35:46 3. Ukrainian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych blowing kisses and waving to crowd at a rally 4. Yanukovych supporters shouting at rally 5. Close up of blue banners and flags being waved at the rally (pro-Yanukovych flags) 6. Yanukovych being introduced at rally 7. Zoom out of Yanukovych supporters, AUDIO (Russian) "Ya-nu-ko-vych! Ya-nu-ko-vych!" 8. Yanukovych waving to crowd 9. Supporters shouting at rally, AUDIO (Russian) "Ya-nu-ko-vych! Ya-nu-ko-vych!" 11. Various of Yushchenko supporters (with orange flags) trying to disrupt the Yanukovych rally 13. Orange flags waving 14. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Viktor Yanukovych, Ukrainian Prime Minister and presidential candidate: "I believe that the Ukrainian people will chose freedom. The Ukrainian people will continue running their own affairs and I want my children, my grandchildren, to be living in an independent country." 15. Yanukovych walking through the crowd to his car 10. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vox pop, Olga: "Most of the people in my class support (opposition presidential candidate Viktor) Yushchenko, it's true, but some support Yanukovych like myself. We are being harassed by them. They call us 'skinheads". We are not! We made our choice and we chose Yanukovych." 12. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Vox pop, Maria: "As you can see, I support Yushchenko. I respect him as an honest man. If the elections are fair, he will surely win." " APTN - APTN Clients Only Kiev, Ukraine 17. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Viktor Yanukovych, Ukrainian Prime Minister and presidential candidate: "I bow deeply to you all here for your support. I know that we shall be together until the end, until we win!" 18. Yanukovych supporters chanting at rally 19. Various of Yanukovych waving to crowd, AUDIO (Russian) "Ya-nu-ko-vych! Ya-nu-ko-vych!" STORYLINE: On the last day of campaigning before this weekend's crucial presidential revote, presidential candidate Ukrainian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych flew to the Western-most part of the country to attend a rally in the town of Beregovo, near the border with Hungary. Most of the western Ukraine is firmly in support of his opponent, Viktor Yushchenko, but it mattered little to some five thousand Yanukovych supporters who braved sub-zero temperatures on Christmas Eve to wave blue banners and flags at the rally. Several Yushchenko supporters also attended the event. One student said that she and other Yanukovych supporters had been harassed by pro-Yushchenko residents. Meanwhile in Kiev, outgoing president Leonid Kuchma, who has largely abandoned Yanukovych, his protege, accused both candidates of turning the campaign into one of the bitterest Ukraine has ever seen. In a televised address Kuchma said: "Both sides succumbed to the temptation to attribute to oneself only glory and to accuse one's political rival of all sins, both unintentional and fictitious." Rumours and accusations have been swirling that groups of Ukrainian Cossacks and miners from Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine are preparing to disrupt Sunday's revote, or head to the capital Kiev in case of a Yushchenko victory. Officials from the Yanukovych's campaign have repeatedly denied the allegations and security officials say they will maintain order during the court-ordered rerun. Ukrainian law requires all campaigning to end at midnight on Friday so both sides rushed to rally their supporters. Later in the day, Yanukovych returned to the capital where about 10-thousand of his supporters rallied in Victory Square, chanting "Ya-nu-ko-vych! Ya-nu-ko-vych!" Yanukovych claimed victory in the November 21 presidential runoff but suspicions about fraud and vote-rigging brought tens of thousands of Yushchenko supporters into the streets of Kiev for 17 days of protests, dubbed the Orange Revolution after the opposition leader's campaign colour. The Supreme Court later annulled the results because of fraud and ordered the vote be re-run. The bitter election campaign has underscored stark differences between Ukraine's pro-Yanukovych Russian-speaking east and the western and central parts of the country from where Yushchenko draws his support. Some eastern regions have said they might pursue autonomy if Western-backed Yushchenko wins.
Inauguration of Télé Lille, 25 April 1950
Nord
JOE BIDEN GREENWOOD SC TOWN HALL
TVU 10 JOE BIDEN GREENWOOD SC TOWN HALL ABC UNI 112119 2020 FEED FREEZES -- THERE IS A SEPERATE REFEED VIDEO During a lengthy town hall at Landers University in Greenwood, SC tonight, Joe Biden faced two protests back to back from different issue groups-one on deportations from the Obama administration, and one on taking money from corporations. ++DEPORTATION PROTESTS The first and lengthier interaction came after a man announced he would be translating a question on behalf of a woman who only spoke Spanish, and told Biden she is living in fear of ICE, and heard that he had defended the 3 million deportations that took place under the Obama administration. She then asked Biden, via the translator, if he would commit to ending all deportations on day one in office through executive action. "No. I will not stop all deportations. I'll prioritize deportations. The only people who committed a felony or a serious crime. Number one," Biden told the woman, sticking with the position he has previously shared on the issue. (20:00:11) "Number two. To compare President Obama to this guy is outrageous. He's the guy that came up with the DACA program. He's the guy that came along and said that he would apply the law in response to a commitment from the republicans that in fact they would move toward total immigration reform," Biden said defending his former boss. Biden went on to lay out all that the Obama administration did to help with immigration, but that did not satisfy the protestor who continued to interact with Biden. It was difficult to hear what he was saying, but other reporters relayed the man continued to talk about Obama's deportation record, which elicited a strong response from Biden who said, "Well you should vote for Trump. Well you should vote for Trump." (200325) The man then said he wouldn't do that, but argued that Biden had the power to stop deporting people, "I will not stop all deportations if you commit a crime that is a felony." (204349) At this point, 4 more protestors stood up with signs and chanted "not one more deportation." Biden instructed his staff not to intervene, but when the man translating approached the mic to again talk with Biden, Biden asked him if he felt those who murder should be allowed to stay in the U.S. which the man ignored. "You sound a lot like President Obama sounded to the immigrant community in 2008. 3 million families were deported. 3 million families were separated," the man said, adding "I campaigned for President Obama because I had hope and faith in the promises that he made. And we want to hear you apologies for those 3 million deportations, and we want to hear a commitment to stopping all deportations on day one through executive action." (204458) Biden said that families would not be separated under his administration, which the protestors called a "lie" saying children were being separated before President Trump was elected. "But it stopped, it stopped under our administration." Biden said. (204553) A few minutes into the interaction, the protestors walked out of the event, as the rest of the audience cheered. (Edit: This is not the first time Biden has faced protests like this. A group asking him the same question were at a New Hampshire event earlier this summer, and protested his Headquarters opening in Philly as well (though OTR I was told they were in the wrong building Lobby.) ++CORPORATE MONEY PROTESTS The next questioner who took the mic asked Biden a question about climate change. Biden began to answer touting his record on climate change and attacking Trump for his lack of action, when two protestors (unrelated to the man who asked the original question) stood up and asked Biden to stop taking money from corporations. "I do not take money from corporations," a clearly exasperated Biden told the woman (204826). "You listen to Bernie too much, man. It's not true," Biden said to applause from the audience. (204834) The two protestors-both wearing shirts with a green fist with resist written across it, and holding left much quicker than the previous protestors. ++THE REST OF THE EVENT Aside from those interactions, Biden's town hall was rather tame. He placed a large focus on race before the large (by Biden standards) and diverse crowd, starting off the event by talking about getting his start during the civil rights movement, and drew big applause when he mentioned President Obama's name when asked how he would united the country as president. "First of all, my administration's gonna look like the country. You look at the people who run my campaign now. We have more women and more African Americans in major positions in my -- And by the way, I get it. You know, I worked with a guy who was an African American. His name is Barack Obama," Biden said to a massive eruption of cheers from the crowd. (193413) ----- HIGHLIGHTS Worked for Obama 193352 Q: You talked last night and you talked earlier today here about the sickness of America. And I think you'll agree that America is truly sick. When you become president of the United States, you know it's not gonna take bandaid to fix race relations. You know that we're going to have to heal this country. I would like to know how you're gonna do it. 193413 BIDEN>> First of all, my administration's gonna look like the country. You look at the people who run my campaign now. We have more women and more African Americans in major positions in my -- And by the way, I get it. You know, I worked with a guy who was an African American. His name is Barack Obama. [cheers and applause] Dreamers 194210 Number two, we in fact need to provide a path to citizenship, earned citizenship, like everybody else has had to do, for the 12 thousand -- 12 million undocumented people in the United States now. And by the way, they didn't come across the Rio Grande. They came on, they came on a visa, and they overstayed their visa. 194233 So the deal is that if you want to be an American citizen, you gotta come out of the shadows, and you'll be protected coming out of the shadows, and you get in a process of doing what everyone else has has to do who's come. Learn the language, etcetera, you go through the same process. And if you do, we could -- Thirdly, no more family separations, for God's sake. What are we doing? Deportation Protests 195922 Q: [man translating woman's question speaking in Spanish] Good evening, my name is Sylvia, and everyday, I live under the fear that ICE is going to seperate my family. I have heard that you have defended Obama's record of three million deportations that happened over the eight years that he was in office. 195958 Because of the deportations were so high under the Obama administration, it is hard for me as an immigrant to trust you. And I want to know if you were to be president will you stop deportations on day one through executive action? 200011 BIDEN>> No. I will not stop all deportations. I'll prioritize deportations. The only people who committed a felony or a serious crime. Number one. Number two. To compare President Obama to this guy is outrageous. He's the guy that came up with the DACA program. He's the guy that came along and said that he would apply the law in response to a commitment from the republicans that in fact they would move toward total immigration reform. 200043 When that failed, and I'm not gonna talk about any disagreement I may have had with him internally. That's to be -- one of the reasons he's the vice president -- I'm the vice president of the United States and any disagreement I have with the president was between the president and me. That's the only way it can work. But here's the deal. What's happened is that we came along and he then stopped family separations. ICE did not operate at your door step and worried about when your kid goes to school whether or not you're going to have somebody here that when they come to pick them up to determine whether you should be deported, separating families. 200118 We in fact sent the DACA program and -- millions of kids, not only by the way, not only Hispanic children, Hispanic Dreamers, but Asian-Pacific Dreamers. There's a significant portion of them as well that are Dreamers. Thirdly, the separation of families and putting kids in cages is brutal. It is absolutely, absolutely inhumane. And that'll completely stop. We also provided for, what the president asked me to do was to do one other thing. And that was the significant immigration coming from the, the Central America and the northern triangle. 200157 Why do people come? Do people come because they say, boy, won't it be fun to leave everything I know. No, they come because they are being abused, because they don't have jobs, because they in fact are criminal -- excuse me, cartels are -- are dealing with them and abusing them. So, what I did was I came up with, I came up with a program that I got republicans to vote for for 750 million dollars, the condition which we would -- in those three countries where most immigraiton was coming from, we would, if they reformed their systems, 200234 in terms of schools, in terms of prisons, in terms of police corruption, and all those issues, everything from street lighting in areas to access to electricity, all of those issues and making people pay their fair share in taxes, meaning the very wealthy who pay nothing, then we would in fact help fund the changes in their country. Guess what? Immigration slowed up precipitously. If you notice, there is a net migration to Mexico now. Can she understand what I mean? Okay, okay good. [translator speaking off mic] 200325 Well you should vote for Trump. Well you should vote for Trump. [Biden walks away while man still talking] I will not -- [feed drops] ---- FULL TRINT: [19:11:02] Oh, I have say that. Mr. President, thank you for. I saw the first that put this together. I said it really happens like a candidate, you know, throwing chairs and more work. The the. Now, along the way, the staffers were doing the social work for. [19:11:26] It's good to be back in agreement about a year more than once I came up here. My buddy Fritz Hollings early on and I got my education, so I it. Thank you. Thank you, thank you. Thank you. [19:11:40] Look, folks, you know and thank you for being do this. [19:11:45] I it's like a customer's holiday for the one elected officials coming up here, although I can agree. But the good news is she gets the moderator. She gets to ask the questions and she's coming on the show. [19:11:56] So go. I. I'm delighted to be here. And I really am. And I'm delighted to be back. I I fell in love with, say, long time ago with a. [19:12:10] It's some of the folks not even madly in love with a few. Not to me, not even a woman of the kind of something man. [19:12:17] You know, look, I remember that when I got elected early on and back in nineteen seventy two, it a 29 year old kid in the United States Senate. [19:12:26] And right after he got elected with an accent of all my family and I lost my wife and daughter tractor trailer. He didn't kill my wife, kill my daughter. And my two boys was badly, badly injured and I didn't want to go with him. [19:12:38] I had my Maryland Democrat elected governor with to the point someone and my sister managed my campaign and my brother were working out who who in fact, would take my seat. [19:12:50] The guy who was Fritz Hollings, Peter Collins. Can you see that? Along with a guy named Mike Mansfield, who is from Montana. The guy was the majority leader that convinced me to stay in politics, to say to actually get sworn in. And so I've I had a love affair with Ted for a long, long time. And we're going to commit to your life and do mistress. Oh, but anyway, look, I wish I had come back. And, you know, I just want you to know that I know the press, just as I did three or four press interviews today and tonight when I got here and we're talking about, well, we know you're ahead and this is working and it's going to work. Look, I'm here to urge the very areas where I come from. You know, my dad said it happened when Win showed up and I plan on doing the show tonight. [19:13:43] But for me, throughout this time, I think I've in it. And I decided that every county in the state over the last last year. And I really I really appreciate the friendship that I made. And if people who are whoever the most gay folks look and when I announce surgery, very briefly, do you get your question? [19:14:07] But when I announce my candidacy for president United States, I said at the time, and I'm more than an exaggerated and I think we're in a battle for the soul of America. [19:14:18] I think what's happening today in this country is contrary to everything. We stand for the people. When I saw those come out of the civil rights movement, I don't want to make my soul great shakes. But my city was like, here's to our shared slave state. My saying was as the eighth largest black population in the country as a percent of population. [19:14:42] And that's how I got involved in the first place. And I thought that I had gotten to the point where where things really began to change. When I first got elected in the United States in. [19:14:56] When I first tried to look at it before I get back to law school and yet another eight years ago when I arrived where I knew it was my city city, they were looking to deliver. [19:15:10] This is the only city in America is occupied by the military since the war because I wanted to to that the career woman was not kidding and going you. And then they got killed. That sets my to the school. And I came back to nowhere. [19:15:30] Is it planning to begin with military parts of the city? A third candidate job offer would be on leaving Iraq. The offer would do a lot for me. [19:15:43] I didn't take it or leave it in a bag or admitted it was faster than it was in the midst of what I had called rice. I couldn't sit back. I quit the law firm and I couldn't finish because the people that. [19:16:05] Well, all right, folks, I grew up and ended up in the east of the brewery. This is how we continue to live the rest of your people. Who's responsible for Bernie? [19:16:19] The right answer and then they really down to the Internet TV station laws to go effect all the way to the office in the evening before they get a chance to be dragged off to jail for trial. [19:16:40] I wonder whether or not we have to get back to normal and. [19:16:45] Where does the political guys go off with guys? Secondly, along with the east side or whatever kind of relationships the. And here I was. [19:16:55] And that was a four years ago, the day I was traveling and seeing what happened to the money, see my. [19:17:03] And at the same point, I just finished waiting for the next round pick me, I was on a train kind of waiting for the world to see set of the. [19:17:16] Four years later. It's taken me on another 20 mile ride. And Saunders trains the voice of the United States. [19:17:23] The time that I can move forward with Israel way. I might think to my my, my like a. [19:17:39] A decorated veteran of a major year in Iraq and a rock star. He served in the military. My daughter recognized the. [19:17:51] No, not a fan. Carlson called her. She really loved because of the burnt out and yellow side. No African-American. I never heard that, and I said, so here I am. [19:18:06] Don't tell me. Hey, look what's happened. Look at me. Are you back? Am getting sick. I didn't realize that. I thought a lot of promises you just made about this. What I didn't realize is that he never goes away and only hides. [19:18:26] No one hides. I never thought I would see 2017 historicity in the Virginia people coming out of the field. [19:18:36] Cherry torches, contorted faces, prettiness meaning hate. There are very tall. Do you remember them? [19:18:45] Remember the of coverage? I actually wanted to be both carrying swastikas and chanting and isolating while, say, kids that occurred in Germany in the 30s, accompanied by religious purposes of Ku Klux Klan. [19:19:03] David Duke say this is why we continue. This is why we love you and want to have you till this evening. [19:19:13] And when? Yes. What do you think was come of it? Look at that. [19:19:20] There were barely five people on both sides. No president has ever, ever said he did not. Down the track. [19:19:32] President Johnson? No. Not only stunned the nation, but did it. Absolutely. I'm amazed at the work you get for leaders of the group. We have to watch what we do. [19:19:45] You folks have learned a lot. [19:19:51] I know people that hide under the rocks. If you keep giving it oxygen, you become a better. [19:20:01] The economy, disappearance. You all know time of year. [19:20:07] You see what happened and what happened to those beautiful people were shot and killed over a period of church. [19:20:19] It's like. And many are in need of short songs. [19:20:26] The idea that we're clearly going to start seems to be easy. It's only gotten worse. It's only gotten worse. [19:20:37] The commonly. [19:20:39] Difficulties, folks, international targets to take my over the last several weeks, the first one. [19:20:48] Vladimir Putin doesn't want me to be president. I set up a cement mixer to mess with it, and the other one needs it alone. [19:21:04] I will remember that oxygen depleted in acidic. [19:21:09] Okay. What's the word? Want to run against? [19:21:25] I'd say the time is too precious. It's not a good look. There's a lot more to say that everything off call about everything is different from health care and education to more Americans and talking about housing. [19:21:37] All of the things that, you know, diagnosing and the issue, but with the fundamental requirement is that we should have citizens more. [19:21:47] Know the folks who. [19:21:53] We had never lived up to it, but really the more we were, the only country in the world is going off to the moon idea. [19:22:03] It's too powerful an early being rather than. And it starts off. [19:22:10] We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men and women created good down the line and create certainly when we at war, for we the people in order to form a more perfect union. [19:22:21] We never did live up to it. We would have never really let up. [19:22:25] But every generation has gradually moved. The arts has a greater and greater degree inclusion. [19:22:31] This is the first time I come along and say no, we're we're just throwing out a little longer than we are. [19:22:38] And this is great damage to the national and America may leave the world just why I have to work harder. I know the talk of a long term history of the world. No, I grow weary of clients as lawyers, as if I ever had a position. But here we be led by the executive, by the power of our example. [19:22:58] Our last UN resolution prepared us. That's what the rest of the world as well. And it's all in jeopardy. [19:23:06] So I say restoring the Soul Society is not the place we're treating with. This is what we do. [19:23:12] In fact, do we believe that all people are created equal or we work toward that area? [19:23:19] But it also was ministers virtues maintain national security because as women around the world, what it is we do. [19:23:28] This is depressingly Stubbs pulling a finger in the eye of our allies. He tricks zero type mistakes on a whole range of policies, including policies that I not about my whole life. [19:23:41] That's why I was asked why Iraq we to make it, because I don't get the point. [19:23:48] Almost two weeks in a row. Mrs Clinton is a British man. If you don't think it was the women who were not going to keep her in 15 minutes, I could go home. [19:24:00] And I know when I say sure, the soul of America is not just about justice for African-Americans, minorities. I guess that's critical, but it goes beyond. [19:24:13] You can just make it the life who you are. And we have to reach out with it at another time. And then you can transcend any questions you would like to ask. [19:24:41] I see vise President Biden, that is a better person. I would like to know where designed this war. Estimates some of the surrounding counties that we are likely to find. [19:25:01] What is it you need to buy this house? Well, first of all. [19:25:10] It was rural and urban and rural where me means it's not just the texture. We need to see a town. You, my lawyer, standing by to see my medical understanding of 20 hours of state and the average size of the roofs of towns are down to three hours. [19:25:34] So what's happening is, is he left behind his two year old guy and running away from the most important ways to let up a guy like the candidate's church? My church and I meet every single solitary community the United States should ever have access to. Hi. Hi, sweetie. For man. And the reason for that is how can I have kids in areas that don't have access to that? How can they compete the same way? And in fact, are not because access to information. [19:26:07] Most people are not being told to get really good. But forget or they're only for a week or a minutes. How can a name and access that? I actually order no women so far. [19:26:19] When I was 24. How do I get. [19:26:24] Secondly, we should be investing in infrastructure. [19:26:29] We may need to make sure the water is key to making sure that we're in a situation where you have access to build me back in the day when the flooding begins to make you look a little back into what it used to be black and will continue to level reality. So you have Hemingway. [19:26:48] He has has access to the water, which you have access to all where you think like the game development in your community. You changed my mind back Texas today. [19:26:59] My state is a tiny company with big and small cars today. Well, guess what? [19:27:05] They're all over the place. Nor should it. [19:27:10] The fact is, this is real access to education. That access to the things, is it? And in reality, I haven't asked here at this point. I guess it never met anybody who decides you're going to come here. You decide they ask the question. When I started to get my I got out of work to be able to get in my car before you get it. [19:27:30] And so we would have to invest in infrastructure to make it. My my problem is when you tell it to us. So shut up, you know, but private houses. [19:27:42] How did you know where my guess is? [19:27:45] Right. You can read the cost of rental housing units. [19:27:48] We all have the capacity to make an offer. People, you have a poverty rate that way. Oh, my God. It fell apart after the fact. Secondly, you also have a situation where if you want to be able to borrow money, you desire a business that we do not provide for the kind of help we used to ride out here. [19:28:07] For entrepreneurs, community want to move towards the single most to the best and the single most successful element of society is going to ask the American entrepreneurs. [19:28:18] And so we can do that. [19:28:21] They call a 35 hour window to call how we're all going to all this is there that in fact to provide for significantly more resources for entrepreneurs to be able to borrow money to get started, low interest loans to houses and make sure your position where you can provide with tax credits for people wanting to buy a car. [19:28:43] There's a whole range of things that we need to go on to. Why I can't go on. I'll leave you and the entire plan. [19:28:51] The point is this. Lastly, the most important thing we could do in rural America. [19:28:58] Just like your city is dealing with a Jewish exodus. I see this as a Jewish. [19:29:05] And one of the things I opposed on a first, the point was that we didn't get it done. Is someone like walking in at a time when the school flows to this land? [19:29:18] And what's happening? Schools should be set up to keep me out of here. [19:29:24] Nash I put about 45 million out Junior and I do it my community, their capital gains taxes to the very wealthy and ignore the tax cut. But the point is that we have more problems. [19:29:43] Most of the schools. [19:29:44] Number one, teachers may not be any good at living in our economy. Oh, I'm fine. How do I make one of my teeth smaller? [19:30:05] You know what? Were you get something out of journalism, maybe it really is not under arrest? No, I will call it whatever year we've gotten before. [19:30:19] Yeah. All right. Why did you do that? But look where we are. Is that. Fact? We've invested in got a few things that we've invested in here that that the world wasn't their backyard, no matter how clever they were or what a lack of education they had for you to say to the kids four times, two or three years or four years, and you'll find access to the next to increased prices at. [19:30:54] To number two, we're sure a hundred and five thousand homes to teams from America. [19:31:01] But the big money generation he's talking about now, a lot of you wrinkle in education because they just saw a graduate degree. Really, you need to graduate from the academy, give me 20 years just to kind of let anyone else other than social programs before. [19:31:16] Yes. Now I have something to say to me. [19:31:24] Want have insight on the world here. And you're saying I've got a feeling I wanted to get away with. [19:31:34] What women do with it, you know, I be inside. [19:31:38] OK, so we have that opportunity to do more because what's going to happen? We would lose this next year to the team, which is predicted to happen over the next 10, 15 years. We're going to show it to his team. [19:31:53] And we would have class sizes increase and we're going to do that. [19:31:59] But the bigger classes, the harder it is to keep working intelligently. So teaching to me will mean competitive wages. Your second child has a much easier time getting, you know, number one and number two. [19:32:11] Every single American to be able to work with the school community. Three, four and five years old. [19:32:17] Number three, we would also change the third factor. [19:32:21] I really resent the notion that I am not willing to criticize this. I'm saying it was your idea that there is no reason why you should not be advanced placement courses in control. [19:32:32] There is no reason why she can. A you. Many people. Yeah. Well, maybe so. [19:32:43] The whole point of this is if we invest in early education, we would fundamentally alter the process and anyone would be shocked by it. [19:32:51] And at three point five years old goes to go sort of gather and they critique something a little different from students, choose to dedicate it to the school that I throw. [19:33:00] And then they're going to go beyond beyond high school, beyond high school, whatever teaching will over there get to be of the practice or whether it's a community college or for your school. [19:33:13] Later, I'll get into what I think you should do and really get to see that through Facebook. Having said that, I do think that education is an antique piece of what we can do for earlier today. [19:33:34] They would use. [19:33:45] The third is the last time you talked earlier in the day here about the citizens of America. And I think you read on America's screens. When the president of the United States you have. Then for the police regulations. You know, it's kind of like my. [19:34:13] Oh, I I'm going to see this in a little bit. I mean, look at the people around. Did you know I work with a guy who is a man? [19:34:39] You watch that party every night at the base when you're thinking about how all of a sudden, oh, this is the future of this country. [19:34:53] I mean, I know. [19:34:56] Oh, no, he and his friend John. [19:35:06] As I species in California, he's hunted down. He lives in Toronto, would make a speech and this is about 20 minutes ago, he asked me questions on not on the same day. [19:35:21] And then actually it was turned out I that I was talking to a man or when he did not want to see. [19:35:34] As you say, when you told me to follow my lead. Who is it? Look. I think that people have an opportunity. [19:35:47] I think the government and the courts should look like we're broke because it's one thing to deal with it. [19:35:56] I think you saw just first of all, shooters pointing out if you have, for example, you don't have one of the American teacher in a school. The kids are never going to do it, be credibly bad. And it has to. [19:36:12] It's a little bit like you say, look out there. [19:36:15] And I see people who are really like me. My larger point, though, is that. [19:36:23] You know, a lot of it has to do with what are our verbs? [19:36:30] Care. [19:36:31] And, you know, there's three reasons why I said I right. [19:36:34] The number one was a few other souls to rule number two. [19:36:39] This is the reason in my classes this time, nearly everybody, along with regards to the call in regards to the president and his class. [19:36:47] You're my passes, whether you're someone dealing with a disability. [19:36:53] Everybody gets kind of a reasonable. [19:37:01] This helps the whole country. [19:37:05] Everybody does well when everyone has a shot and a lot of things happen now. [19:37:12] If you know this because of what this experience, this policy is in terms of the economic policy of tax policy. [19:37:19] If you find yourself in a situation where you're have now so many people that at when you saw that in our situation where they had been paying off their debts and unable to deal with their obligations on accident. [19:37:34] Well, guess what? We're consuming society. Those who are not having me right now. [19:37:41] That's the driver during retirement. So people don't have the money to spend on a house. Guess what? The economy slows down having one of these, too. [19:37:52] It was one of the big issues most you cannot be working on growth of people who are working class folks in middle class schools. [19:38:03] In fact, we're not having trouble giving you one. [19:38:06] Case in point, in fact, we were able to which I proposed that we were going to get it. Don't you didn't with that. You said, look, here's the deal. [19:38:16] Every single person who qualified community college gets to go free. And by the way, we have we have an industrial revolution. [19:38:27] And that is because they are finishing at the top of the list, because the whole change take place in the economy. The question is, this is going to be the middle class today. Tell us, look what's happening. [19:38:42] We've lost two hundred thousand of sales jobs to 20. Why? [19:38:48] For people and creates 250. Forty nine percent average salary. Fifty thousand year. The vast. Highs and lows. Well, guess what? [19:38:59] Hamilton comes along and, you know, I out on a limb. [19:39:02] So all of our stories across America from both sides to get them to the events on the night he buried it for close to 50 years old, the last known location. You lost all or have any kind of effect. Why did you do it? [19:39:18] Well, we knew he gave me a little bag. We have returning even. I'm pretty tired of the one who hired me to shoot him free. [19:39:26] If you keep the little things and you couldn't predict anything when he saw you in community college. [19:39:31] In fact, qualify. Including. My sensitivity in your shoes to see you. [19:39:36] He's going to have to push for. [19:39:42] My sense is when he says we're going to get over to you, grow the economy, it's time for me to provide it. [19:39:51] How do we get here are saving lives and you need deal with a dedicated. It really is needed. Well, I was sitting there for five years. I was the most important college. [19:40:04] And I have to cut out more than anyone else. I hope you make more money. Look, I didn't rise to. My point is that I was a citizen of the movement for security. [19:40:19] Probably less a lot of sitting than you know about how I could afford to have some of the community deal making sure just paying rent for childcare. Today, in the big cities of 24000 most of the year, small cities more moist. [19:40:36] Fourteen thousand one year. And so. If you can apply for any tax credit, me, it's all here. While I'm not worried about my taxes, 750000, wouldn't we be back to work? [19:40:51] And guess what? That increases the growth in the country wants to constrain any time you want to create a significant number of jobs. We give tax breaks to research like gardening, God's we to give it back to a people. [19:41:23] This is a writer Hi, my name is Sam and I am a sophomore at neither major any kind of street. My question for you is what are your favorite stories from our studios? Yes. My question for you is, is what are your six year use or you to pass more illegal immigration? [19:41:46] Or was this a big for our dreams? [19:41:55] Even during the last year that every American has more than years. [19:42:05] A further action. OK. [19:42:08] Number two, we need to provide a path to citizenship. [19:42:15] Earned citizenship. [19:42:16] My head is going to have to live for the twelve thousand twelve on document people in nine states right away. [19:42:25] They it kind of goes to the real the K on the Haven visa and they were released. [19:42:32] So the deal is that if you wanted to be an activist, this got out of the shadows as you protected coming out of the shadows and getting the process of doing what everyone else had to learn. Languages, ET said, go through the same process. [19:42:48] And if you do, we could easily. Third, no, no official separation. Just. [19:43:03] By the way, that was my. [19:43:10] This you university, by the way, we talked about it earlier in the week out. You said a long time. Why can't we put more? For now, we gave just six. As we see it, mostly positive, fresh. [19:43:26] So my point is that we have to be who we were as a species. And then right now, I think it's time do this. [19:43:35] We are denying access to people who seek asylum, but only because she thinks about and how to be able to meet. [19:43:46] Is it a legitimate reason to seek asylum? You have a judge who may have seen on the spot. [19:43:51] Now in a position where you can come from a country we had in the past and know firsthand that in America you have to go through asylum offices in. [19:44:01] Well, I tell you what, I'm not going to lower my great great grandfather out of coughing should have an 84 year. [19:44:07] I see. Not Mormons having a little bit over a year without a it for our kids on the way, you know? [19:44:15] So are you saying that we should look at the facts? [19:44:19] The facts are dreamers with us. Dreams are based people. He says, well, maybe not assisted a I. [19:44:29] I can get picture on a 3 year old because the person who got to take me meeting me here. It's illegal. Leave me here. Come on. Come on. [19:44:41] So we have a fact and again and consistently saying that. And by the way, no one has any idea what kind of commitments you realize. [19:44:53] I don't know anywhere else you can tell. I was looking at this. [19:44:55] You realize of the five year anniversary of the term from Yale to the community colleges. [19:45:05] Guess what? Sen. Marco Rubio. [19:45:18] The he decided to camp to set out to sort of share a little bit of all the women we're going in now the and what we did in science math. [19:45:31] Telling a great honor. I agree. [19:45:33] Grandfather very one of the rest of my life, my reaching out to my nieces in the 90s. [19:45:50] Jackie taking off his. [19:45:54] Okay. How you terrorist group? [19:46:00] Over the past few years, we've seen the market price increases in claims that are not consistent, but in my personal opinion has to does not have a long way to go. So if you are elected to office, how would you use your presidential power to decide right after the meeting with which I have. How many of you were here? [19:46:22] I was shown the door, wasn't the word. [19:46:26] Broder, this isn't the case for you. [19:46:29] You have to move. Everybody. Really, this is the calmest. [19:46:42] Were proud to do more with an American this is called really the last show, which is the best of all time. With that in mind, how did you follow suit? Months. I, uh, I decided that if I on I want to do some sort of crazy car walk down the road with me. [19:47:10] Uh. Sort of, sir. This kid's future. [19:47:15] And if you could only be charged, one of these two, you know, if you had a lot of great emissions. But they don't play well, set it office. [19:47:24] No one really made sure that the commission wanted to do this. And he said the first Cold War. [19:47:32] Yes. We had no troops. We had no capacity. [19:47:37] There was no ability to share that information. But now we lose, you know, the military capabilities to check. OK, now here's the deal. If you do that, I put together an organization. [19:47:52] And when I got out of office, I went into this and he said, here's here's what we need is a democracy. May you're really got love it. And when it did, 21 candidates to the 20 page articles came to me as long and long, five Nobel laureates to see what I mean by that. [19:48:12] And then if we did it, we found out that was thinking of that, because they just so far have not reached a deal making working with one another share again. [19:48:26] No one at my age, just a joke somebody told me or I say, and they walk out of here or see an oil prices, I don't want to. And so there's not any way I should add that there was. [19:48:36] That's how I was set up against man, that one of the things that I did, we did an independent commission, which the president gave me when he did it. [19:48:45] It was and it's a little hard across to the world to do whatever I need to do in any industry. [19:48:51] And then one day he came up with a sign that we had really been on a whole range of disciplines that you wouldn't think would make any sense when you're not presenting my boy and asked you, what the hell does this have to do with cancer? [19:49:04] Well, guess what? They gave him one hour more radiation and more. [19:49:10] So we started to figure out that a lot of people were talking about history. [19:49:14] It is a way of this us what's going on in history. [19:49:18] I mean, look back for the last 40 years. Significant. You didn't get it. We were notified. It's usually too late. [19:49:27] We then went and got exercise and take it out. [19:49:31] Usually damage terms that occurred under the word is. We then make sure every day we have Keating affair that in fact is designed to kill the patient because a lot of good it. I don't mean good at fighting, not all the time. [19:49:49] But in addition to that, that aside, I really wish. So I'll give you an example. I don't know to put it that way. [19:49:58] Can you tell us what happened was that they finally came out with any pain suddenly at one was at Walter Reed Hospital. [19:50:08] Let me ask a few. It was really a new class to the jury, didn't really exist to the killer cast. And they were really listening. They were over the moon. [19:50:24] But because it happened, not only was it the best today, because as the New Year celebration, they had Kirsch, but they had Pierce, the Columbus. [19:50:39] This is really something that was all this all this churning and constant on the surface, as I think mine is still piled up and this is very. [19:50:50] Did you try to leave to the next thing on? [19:50:56] We're now finding an exit is that way to appeal to the kids. This is the new normal. Just like any time. [19:51:06] And so they said, well, we can't do tonight because you trying to get let's say you're not. [19:51:13] The four major drug companies are working on one particular strain. [19:51:17] Four hundred and 240 is just sitting there. And so we're not saying. [19:51:23] Well, we've come a long way to do certain economic news, teaching you to go to work on what may be a kind of that could take years to get it done. [19:51:33] So why don't we go inside monetary value to the bureau you're working on before we have to send a hundred or two women to find your. So we started at the drug working group of experts 20 percent year over year. [19:51:50] We're 19 versus taking the. Well, guess what? Any work from all of these companies? We will put our terminal work on the table. [19:52:02] Did he ever talk you into music? We are running here. We have no idea who is in this. You know, what is the responded to this? [19:52:13] You get it. You're on a monster Halloween party site. [19:52:17] And guess what? [19:52:19] The duty is to research the people. The fact is that. [19:52:24] That we're changing the way in which we fight and encourage people to move back. [19:52:30] I'm sure that if, for example, if you were able to take every year to get to work, if in fact you were able to take the sequence with the kids or even begin, you could be deterred by taking out the cell so you could determine what did that particular case is and you did that. It costs about half as much as it used to cost hundreds of miles. And if you sleep with that answer, determine exactly what it is, exactly what time it is and where it is right now. [19:53:08] You can, in fact, when I grew up. So why is it that we want to figure out why is he. I'm a massive atheist guy. You take that out. It's awful for that. And I think I'd argue that. [19:53:22] What? What was the difference? So if you're able to take a little kids, he was putting it in one space, one time using technology. [19:53:32] You have been able to take 15 over the last more time over 10 years than going take this the our ability to achieve its computing capacity. You have to determine what was it about your teenager in mind that allowed it to work on you and me? [19:53:52] That's why you have so many people coming off saying, OK, we're going to let you think. We're going to let the research. [19:54:00] I got it literally over aid for the Palestinians recently convicted in these mass organizations. And you say, OK, I'm going to let you have all that. And then you forget all that he had. [19:54:15] And he said it wasn't going to give up. Oh, a million people asked us to said a military search. We're moving toward finding a solution. You think it's people thinking or how did you make this? [19:54:26] He's just a really great start. Men and women to devote their whole life to the differences. And any of you have had found matter. It's just you know, it's not a matter of years. [19:54:39] It's a matter of moments. Man, it's everything and everything happens. But the difference between being a clinician is extremely dry and research work is the working set of the outcomes we need. [19:54:49] Why is the person who has the permission? It's like Dr.. [19:54:56] Anyway, AQ Khan Academy can't get him to sleep, right, tell us a lot. Can you give me 30 minutes? Making this decision making by. [19:55:14] The middle school you. This is the very latest today during the week's. This is a sense of urgency to change communications during you time. [19:55:29] Surely dead economy one is pass. [19:55:33] Thanks for joining us today. [19:55:35] I know you're one of the very kind of. [19:55:39] No one much larger than with was created and they walk out on the roads are the president nods to the 2016 election and a sign that the president has to be handed the greatest single thing ever said. [19:55:53] I want to get to the person that I was going into the community to know all I'm going to get to try and find out, just do we not have administered the bar they call dark? [19:56:05] This is organization in the Defense Department suddenly finding that allows for just pure research on the places that would make America safe. [19:56:14] Very once thing about the Internet, 30 miles as it came up with the Joneses, they're going to come up with stealth technology. OK. Imagine if we had our brains to me and help me set up city attorney. [19:56:31] If I'm elected president, nine states where I'm going into the first four years on there, make sure that the Sandy 20 billion dollars of can is pure research, a financial regulation that just like you did, just like you it down. In fairness to the world, I want the country to test of limits for good. [19:56:54] But if you do that, you have you have other diseases that we can deal with in the front of the line between the to this country, much at a standstill. [19:57:03] You realize that if you don't find comedy or maybe you break through on almost every single solitary period in America in the next 15 years will mean no one does it decision that he has to own. Well, we are thinking about half Jewish. [19:57:20] Not to enough. Four hundred or a billion dollars? A mere. [19:57:27] OK, that's very good. I think you've been telling me take a look. This is the most widely to ideas because you know, nothing a drop more than any point and say, I'm going to go to the bottom of this and I'm going to be able to stand and we take a good look at our investment. [19:57:47] Decision to do that, but the federal government should be limited. [19:57:52] But the third thing is to keep these diabetes, diabetes. [19:57:59] So I would this because what I like about it is that I asked the Nobel Prize for four, he said. He gave me a car. What would you give back the vaccines that you had, all the money in the world? [19:58:11] What is 100 of the previous targets to give you? Can you do that? I have you can use it all the time in the 90s. [19:58:20] So what lot? The costs of the fundamental changes to the earnings estimates. We need to do it. We do it when I push into. [19:58:51] This came out, we had no one to answer that question, even if similar more neighbors were with water pipes, said the women who entered illegally. So. I'm going to translate the question. Order to do that. I shouldn't be standing today for you. [19:59:16] Hello. Hello. I'm from. [19:59:22] Good evening. I mean, it's still. [19:59:24] And every day I look at the video that I just feel, you know, I haven't defended policies able to deal with conditions that I haven't already made you is that he feels. He said, want to make any money at all because of the deportation was headed in the wrong direction. Is just not moving in the right place. You want to really you heard the president believe 74 nations want to play well with us. Take a much more. [20:00:16] She's only committed a felony. [20:00:20] Not a word not to compare president. Well, this is outrageous. He's the guy that came up with the. He's the guy. [20:00:33] It was part of my response to living in it from the Republicans that in fact they they moved for immigration reform. When that failed. I'm not going to talk about him. And he just reminded me that you have to do better. [20:00:49] That's what one of the reasons why I don't always represent our state. [20:00:53] And in any disagreement, I have a president personally. That's no way. Your. [20:01:00] What's happened is that he came along, he had soft finance, that Americans are just not operating here. George Bush is more involved with keeping it slow. [20:01:10] We're not going to stumble here when it comes to picking up on whether or not she knew she would have separate commitments. [20:01:18] We, in fact, set up a program to take literally. [20:01:21] This is not a limited, by the way, not only decided to send three dreamers, but simply because it's a significant portion of them as well. [20:01:32] Thirdly, the seven major parties is going to communicate to this group. It is absolutely, absolutely not for. [20:01:46] Nice to meet you. And I was just saying, you take. Immigration, it probably won't be the same where tomorrow. [20:01:56] Why do people call me? Because they say, well, I want you to find out, girl. They call me because they're making music, because they don't get a job because of a they. [20:02:07] Are you going to be cartels or are using it? [20:02:14] So what I did was I came up with I came up with a program that I have gone to Republicans over for Senate, not. [20:02:23] Fifty million dollars, the condition looks to me and you know, if you continue to support immorality of innovative company, we wouldn't have any reform in their systems in terms of the small, in terms of privacy, in terms of police corruption and all the issues and everything. [20:02:39] Shooting by. There is no access to electricity. [20:02:44] All of those they make me will pay their fair share of taxes would be very wrong in your hand. Then we will in fact help fund with changes in their country. Guess what? Immigration to sober up to us. There is a net migration to Mexico. [20:03:04] Here we go again. Okay. In 2008, I was a to for a long. [20:03:12] And I believe in the promises that you make to stop using the word.
JOE BIDEN GREENWOOD SC TOWN HALL ABC UNI 2020/HD
TVU 10 JOE BIDEN GREENWOOD SC TOWN HALL ABC UNI 112119 2020 HIGHLIGHTS - EVENT WAS REFEEDED Worked for Obama 193352 Q: You talked last night and you talked earlier today here about the sickness of America. And I think you'll agree that America is truly sick. When you become president of the United States, you know it's not gonna take bandaid to fix race relations. You know that we're going to have to heal this country. I would like to know how you're gonna do it. 193413 BIDEN>> First of all, my administration's gonna look like the country. You look at the people who run my campaign now. We have more women and more African Americans in major positions in my -- And by the way, I get it. You know, I worked with a guy who was an African American. His name is Barack Obama. [cheers and applause] Dreamers 194210 Number two, we in fact need to provide a path to citizenship, earned citizenship, like everybody else has had to do, for the 12 thousand -- 12 million undocumented people in the United States now. And by the way, they didn't come across the Rio Grande. They came on, they came on a visa, and they overstayed their visa. 194233 So the deal is that if you want to be an American citizen, you gotta come out of the shadows, and you'll be protected coming out of the shadows, and you get in a process of doing what everyone else has has to do who's come. Learn the language, etcetera, you go through the same process. And if you do, we could -- Thirdly, no more family separations, for God's sake. What are we doing? Deportation Protests 195922 Q: [man translating woman's question speaking in Spanish] Good evening, my name is Sylvia, and everyday, I live under the fear that ICE is going to seperate my family. I have heard that you have defended Obama's record of three million deportations that happened over the eight years that he was in office. 195958 Because of the deportations were so high under the Obama administration, it is hard for me as an immigrant to trust you. And I want to know if you were to be president will you stop deportations on day one through executive action? 200011 BIDEN>> No. I will not stop all deportations. I'll prioritize deportations. The only people who committed a felony or a serious crime. Number one. Number two. To compare President Obama to this guy is outrageous. He's the guy that came up with the DACA program. He's the guy that came along and said that he would apply the law in response to a commitment from the republicans that in fact they would move toward total immigration reform. 200043 When that failed, and I'm not gonna talk about any disagreement I may have had with him internally. That's to be -- one of the reasons he's the vice president -- I'm the vice president of the United States and any disagreement I have with the president was between the president and me. That's the only way it can work. But here's the deal. What's happened is that we came along and he then stopped family separations. ICE did not operate at your door step and worried about when your kid goes to school whether or not you're going to have somebody here that when they come to pick them up to determine whether you should be deported, separating families. 200118 We in fact sent the DACA program and -- millions of kids, not only by the way, not only Hispanic children, Hispanic Dreamers, but Asian-Pacific Dreamers. There's a significant portion of them as well that are Dreamers. Thirdly, the separation of families and putting kids in cages is brutal. It is absolutely, absolutely inhumane. And that'll completely stop. We also provided for, what the president asked me to do was to do one other thing. And that was the significant immigration coming from the, the Central America and the northern triangle. 200157 Why do people come? Do people come because they say, boy, won't it be fun to leave everything I know. No, they come because they are being abused, because they don't have jobs, because they in fact are criminal -- excuse me, cartels are -- are dealing with them and abusing them. So, what I did was I came up with, I came up with a program that I got republicans to vote for for 750 million dollars, the condition which we would -- in those three countries where most immigraiton was coming from, we would, if they reformed their systems, 200234 in terms of schools, in terms of prisons, in terms of police corruption, and all those issues, everything from street lighting in areas to access to electricity, all of those issues and making people pay their fair share in taxes, meaning the very wealthy who pay nothing, then we would in fact help fund the changes in their country. Guess what? Immigration slowed up precipitously. If you notice, there is a net migration to Mexico now. Can she understand what I mean? Okay, okay good. [translator speaking off mic] 200325 Well you should vote for Trump. Well you should vote for Trump. [Biden walks away while man still talking] I will not -- [feed drops] [19:11:02] Oh, I have say that. Mr. President, thank you for. I saw the first that put this together. I said it really happens like a candidate, you know, throwing chairs and more work. The the. Now, along the way, the staffers were doing the social work for. [19:11:26] It's good to be back in agreement about a year more than once I came up here. My buddy Fritz Hollings early on and I got my education, so I it. Thank you. Thank you, thank you. Thank you. [19:11:40] Look, folks, you know and thank you for being do this. [19:11:45] I it's like a customer's holiday for the one elected officials coming up here, although I can agree. But the good news is she gets the moderator. She gets to ask the questions and she's coming on the show. [19:11:56] So go. I. I'm delighted to be here. And I really am. And I'm delighted to be back. I I fell in love with, say, long time ago with a. [19:12:10] It's some of the folks not even madly in love with a few. Not to me, not even a woman of the kind of something man. [19:12:17] You know, look, I remember that when I got elected early on and back in nineteen seventy two, it a 29 year old kid in the United States Senate. [19:12:26] And right after he got elected with an accent of all my family and I lost my wife and daughter tractor trailer. He didn't kill my wife, kill my daughter. And my two boys was badly, badly injured and I didn't want to go with him. [19:12:38] I had my Maryland Democrat elected governor with to the point someone and my sister managed my campaign and my brother were working out who who in fact, would take my seat. [19:12:50] The guy who was Fritz Hollings, Peter Collins. Can you see that? Along with a guy named Mike Mansfield, who is from Montana. The guy was the majority leader that convinced me to stay in politics, to say to actually get sworn in. And so I've I had a love affair with Ted for a long, long time. And we're going to commit to your life and do mistress. Oh, but anyway, look, I wish I had come back. And, you know, I just want you to know that I know the press, just as I did three or four press interviews today and tonight when I got here and we're talking about, well, we know you're ahead and this is working and it's going to work. Look, I'm here to urge the very areas where I come from. You know, my dad said it happened when Win showed up and I plan on doing the show tonight. [19:13:43] But for me, throughout this time, I think I've in it. And I decided that every county in the state over the last last year. And I really I really appreciate the friendship that I made. And if people who are whoever the most gay folks look and when I announce surgery, very briefly, do you get your question? [19:14:07] But when I announce my candidacy for president United States, I said at the time, and I'm more than an exaggerated and I think we're in a battle for the soul of America. [19:14:18] I think what's happening today in this country is contrary to everything. We stand for the people. When I saw those come out of the civil rights movement, I don't want to make my soul great shakes. But my city was like, here's to our shared slave state. My saying was as the eighth largest black population in the country as a percent of population. [19:14:42] And that's how I got involved in the first place. And I thought that I had gotten to the point where where things really began to change. When I first got elected in the United States in. [19:14:56] When I first tried to look at it before I get back to law school and yet another eight years ago when I arrived where I knew it was my city city, they were looking to deliver. [19:15:10] This is the only city in America is occupied by the military since the war because I wanted to to that the career woman was not kidding and going you. And then they got killed. That sets my to the school. And I came back to nowhere. [19:15:30] Is it planning to begin with military parts of the city? A third candidate job offer would be on leaving Iraq. The offer would do a lot for me. [19:15:43] I didn't take it or leave it in a bag or admitted it was faster than it was in the midst of what I had called rice. I couldn't sit back. I quit the law firm and I couldn't finish because the people that. [19:16:05] Well, all right, folks, I grew up and ended up in the east of the brewery. This is how we continue to live the rest of your people. Who's responsible for Bernie? [19:16:19] The right answer and then they really down to the Internet TV station laws to go effect all the way to the office in the evening before they get a chance to be dragged off to jail for trial. [19:16:40] I wonder whether or not we have to get back to normal and. [19:16:45] Where does the political guys go off with guys? Secondly, along with the east side or whatever kind of relationships the. And here I was. [19:16:55] And that was a four years ago, the day I was traveling and seeing what happened to the money, see my. [19:17:03] And at the same point, I just finished waiting for the next round pick me, I was on a train kind of waiting for the world to see set of the. [19:17:16] Four years later. It's taken me on another 20 mile ride. And Saunders trains the voice of the United States. [19:17:23] The time that I can move forward with Israel way. I might think to my my, my like a. [19:17:39] A decorated veteran of a major year in Iraq and a rock star. He served in the military. My daughter recognized the. [19:17:51] No, not a fan. Carlson called her. She really loved because of the burnt out and yellow side. No African-American. I never heard that, and I said, so here I am. [19:18:06] Don't tell me. Hey, look what's happened. Look at me. Are you back? Am getting sick. I didn't realize that. I thought a lot of promises you just made about this. What I didn't realize is that he never goes away and only hides. [19:18:26] No one hides. I never thought I would see 2017 historicity in the Virginia people coming out of the field. [19:18:36] Cherry torches, contorted faces, prettiness meaning hate. There are very tall. Do you remember them? [19:18:45] Remember the of coverage? I actually wanted to be both carrying swastikas and chanting and isolating while, say, kids that occurred in Germany in the 30s, accompanied by religious purposes of Ku Klux Klan. [19:19:03] David Duke say this is why we continue. This is why we love you and want to have you till this evening. [19:19:13] And when? Yes. What do you think was come of it? Look at that. [19:19:20] There were barely five people on both sides. No president has ever, ever said he did not. Down the track. [19:19:32] President Johnson? No. Not only stunned the nation, but did it. Absolutely. I'm amazed at the work you get for leaders of the group. We have to watch what we do. [19:19:45] You folks have learned a lot. [19:19:51] I know people that hide under the rocks. If you keep giving it oxygen, you become a better. [19:20:01] The economy, disappearance. You all know time of year. [19:20:07] You see what happened and what happened to those beautiful people were shot and killed over a period of church. [19:20:19] It's like. And many are in need of short songs. [19:20:26] The idea that we're clearly going to start seems to be easy. It's only gotten worse. It's only gotten worse. [19:20:37] The commonly. [19:20:39] Difficulties, folks, international targets to take my over the last several weeks, the first one. [19:20:48] Vladimir Putin doesn't want me to be president. I set up a cement mixer to mess with it, and the other one needs it alone. [19:21:04] I will remember that oxygen depleted in acidic. [19:21:09] Okay. What's the word? Want to run against? [19:21:25] I'd say the time is too precious. It's not a good look. There's a lot more to say that everything off call about everything is different from health care and education to more Americans and talking about housing. [19:21:37] All of the things that, you know, diagnosing and the issue, but with the fundamental requirement is that we should have citizens more. [19:21:47] Know the folks who. [19:21:53] We had never lived up to it, but really the more we were, the only country in the world is going off to the moon idea. [19:22:03] It's too powerful an early being rather than. And it starts off. [19:22:10] We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men and women created good down the line and create certainly when we at war, for we the people in order to form a more perfect union. [19:22:21] We never did live up to it. We would have never really let up. [19:22:25] But every generation has gradually moved. The arts has a greater and greater degree inclusion. [19:22:31] This is the first time I come along and say no, we're we're just throwing out a little longer than we are. [19:22:38] And this is great damage to the national and America may leave the world just why I have to work harder. I know the talk of a long term history of the world. No, I grow weary of clients as lawyers, as if I ever had a position. But here we be led by the executive, by the power of our example. [19:22:58] Our last UN resolution prepared us. That's what the rest of the world as well. And it's all in jeopardy. [19:23:06] So I say restoring the Soul Society is not the place we're treating with. This is what we do. [19:23:12] In fact, do we believe that all people are created equal or we work toward that area? [19:23:19] But it also was ministers virtues maintain national security because as women around the world, what it is we do. [19:23:28] This is depressingly Stubbs pulling a finger in the eye of our allies. He tricks zero type mistakes on a whole range of policies, including policies that I not about my whole life. [19:23:41] That's why I was asked why Iraq we to make it, because I don't get the point. [19:23:48] Almost two weeks in a row. Mrs Clinton is a British man. If you don't think it was the women who were not going to keep her in 15 minutes, I could go home. [19:24:00] And I know when I say sure, the soul of America is not just about justice for African-Americans, minorities. I guess that's critical, but it goes beyond. [19:24:13] You can just make it the life who you are. And we have to reach out with it at another time. And then you can transcend any questions you would like to ask. [19:24:41] I see vise President Biden, that is a better person. I would like to know where designed this war. Estimates some of the surrounding counties that we are likely to find. [19:25:01] What is it you need to buy this house? Well, first of all. [19:25:10] It was rural and urban and rural where me means it's not just the texture. We need to see a town. You, my lawyer, standing by to see my medical understanding of 20 hours of state and the average size of the roofs of towns are down to three hours. [19:25:34] So what's happening is, is he left behind his two year old guy and running away from the most important ways to let up a guy like the candidate's church? My church and I meet every single solitary community the United States should ever have access to. Hi. Hi, sweetie. For man. And the reason for that is how can I have kids in areas that don't have access to that? How can they compete the same way? And in fact, are not because access to information. [19:26:07] Most people are not being told to get really good. But forget or they're only for a week or a minutes. How can a name and access that? I actually order no women so far. [19:26:19] When I was 24. How do I get. [19:26:24] Secondly, we should be investing in infrastructure. [19:26:29] We may need to make sure the water is key to making sure that we're in a situation where you have access to build me back in the day when the flooding begins to make you look a little back into what it used to be black and will continue to level reality. So you have Hemingway. [19:26:48] He has has access to the water, which you have access to all where you think like the game development in your community. You changed my mind back Texas today. [19:26:59] My state is a tiny company with big and small cars today. Well, guess what? [19:27:05] They're all over the place. Nor should it. [19:27:10] The fact is, this is real access to education. That access to the things, is it? And in reality, I haven't asked here at this point. I guess it never met anybody who decides you're going to come here. You decide they ask the question. When I started to get my I got out of work to be able to get in my car before you get it. [19:27:30] And so we would have to invest in infrastructure to make it. My my problem is when you tell it to us. So shut up, you know, but private houses. [19:27:42] How did you know where my guess is? [19:27:45] Right. You can read the cost of rental housing units. [19:27:48] We all have the capacity to make an offer. People, you have a poverty rate that way. Oh, my God. It fell apart after the fact. Secondly, you also have a situation where if you want to be able to borrow money, you desire a business that we do not provide for the kind of help we used to ride out here. [19:28:07] For entrepreneurs, community want to move towards the single most to the best and the single most successful element of society is going to ask the American entrepreneurs. [19:28:18] And so we can do that. [19:28:21] They call a 35 hour window to call how we're all going to all this is there that in fact to provide for significantly more resources for entrepreneurs to be able to borrow money to get started, low interest loans to houses and make sure your position where you can provide with tax credits for people wanting to buy a car. [19:28:43] There's a whole range of things that we need to go on to. Why I can't go on. I'll leave you and the entire plan. [19:28:51] The point is this. Lastly, the most important thing we could do in rural America. [19:28:58] Just like your city is dealing with a Jewish exodus. I see this as a Jewish. [19:29:05] And one of the things I opposed on a first, the point was that we didn't get it done. Is someone like walking in at a time when the school flows to this land? [19:29:18] And what's happening? Schools should be set up to keep me out of here. [19:29:24] Nash I put about 45 million out Junior and I do it my community, their capital gains taxes to the very wealthy and ignore the tax cut. But the point is that we have more problems. [19:29:43] Most of the schools. [19:29:44] Number one, teachers may not be any good at living in our economy. Oh, I'm fine. How do I make one of my teeth smaller? [19:30:05] You know what? Were you get something out of journalism, maybe it really is not under arrest? No, I will call it whatever year we've gotten before. [19:30:19] Yeah. All right. Why did you do that? But look where we are. Is that. Fact? We've invested in got a few things that we've invested in here that that the world wasn't their backyard, no matter how clever they were or what a lack of education they had for you to say to the kids four times, two or three years or four years, and you'll find access to the next to increased prices at. [19:30:54] To number two, we're sure a hundred and five thousand homes to teams from America. [19:31:01] But the big money generation he's talking about now, a lot of you wrinkle in education because they just saw a graduate degree. Really, you need to graduate from the academy, give me 20 years just to kind of let anyone else other than social programs before. [19:31:16] Yes. Now I have something to say to me. [19:31:24] Want have insight on the world here. And you're saying I've got a feeling I wanted to get away with. [19:31:34] What women do with it, you know, I be inside. [19:31:38] OK, so we have that opportunity to do more because what's going to happen? We would lose this next year to the team, which is predicted to happen over the next 10, 15 years. We're going to show it to his team. [19:31:53] And we would have class sizes increase and we're going to do that. [19:31:59] But the bigger classes, the harder it is to keep working intelligently. So teaching to me will mean competitive wages. Your second child has a much easier time getting, you know, number one and number two. [19:32:11] Every single American to be able to work with the school community. Three, four and five years old. [19:32:17] Number three, we would also change the third factor. [19:32:21] I really resent the notion that I am not willing to criticize this. I'm saying it was your idea that there is no reason why you should not be advanced placement courses in control. [19:32:32] There is no reason why she can. A you. Many people. Yeah. Well, maybe so. [19:32:43] The whole point of this is if we invest in early education, we would fundamentally alter the process and anyone would be shocked by it. [19:32:51] And at three point five years old goes to go sort of gather and they critique something a little different from students, choose to dedicate it to the school that I throw. [19:33:00] And then they're going to go beyond beyond high school, beyond high school, whatever teaching will over there get to be of the practice or whether it's a community college or for your school. [19:33:13] Later, I'll get into what I think you should do and really get to see that through Facebook. Having said that, I do think that education is an antique piece of what we can do for earlier today. [19:33:34] They would use. [19:33:45] The third is the last time you talked earlier in the day here about the citizens of America. And I think you read on America's screens. When the president of the United States you have. Then for the police regulations. You know, it's kind of like my. [19:34:13] Oh, I I'm going to see this in a little bit. I mean, look at the people around. Did you know I work with a guy who is a man? [19:34:39] You watch that party every night at the base when you're thinking about how all of a sudden, oh, this is the future of this country. [19:34:53] I mean, I know. [19:34:56] Oh, no, he and his friend John. [19:35:06] As I species in California, he's hunted down. He lives in Toronto, would make a speech and this is about 20 minutes ago, he asked me questions on not on the same day. [19:35:21] And then actually it was turned out I that I was talking to a man or when he did not want to see. [19:35:34] As you say, when you told me to follow my lead. Who is it? Look. I think that people have an opportunity. [19:35:47] I think the government and the courts should look like we're broke because it's one thing to deal with it. [19:35:56] I think you saw just first of all, shooters pointing out if you have, for example, you don't have one of the American teacher in a school. The kids are never going to do it, be credibly bad. And it has to. [19:36:12] It's a little bit like you say, look out there. [19:36:15] And I see people who are really like me. My larger point, though, is that. [19:36:23] You know, a lot of it has to do with what are our verbs? [19:36:30] Care. [19:36:31] And, you know, there's three reasons why I said I right. [19:36:34] The number one was a few other souls to rule number two. [19:36:39] This is the reason in my classes this time, nearly everybody, along with regards to the call in regards to the president and his class. [19:36:47] You're my passes, whether you're someone dealing with a disability. [19:36:53] Everybody gets kind of a reasonable. [19:37:01] This helps the whole country. [19:37:05] Everybody does well when everyone has a shot and a lot of things happen now. [19:37:12] If you know this because of what this experience, this policy is in terms of the economic policy of tax policy. [19:37:19] If you find yourself in a situation where you're have now so many people that at when you saw that in our situation where they had been paying off their debts and unable to deal with their obligations on accident. [19:37:34] Well, guess what? We're consuming society. Those who are not having me right now. [19:37:41] That's the driver during retirement. So people don't have the money to spend on a house. Guess what? The economy slows down having one of these, too. [19:37:52] It was one of the big issues most you cannot be working on growth of people who are working class folks in middle class schools. [19:38:03] In fact, we're not having trouble giving you one. [19:38:06] Case in point, in fact, we were able to which I proposed that we were going to get it. Don't you didn't with that. You said, look, here's the deal. [19:38:16] Every single person who qualified community college gets to go free. And by the way, we have we have an industrial revolution. [19:38:27] And that is because they are finishing at the top of the list, because the whole change take place in the economy. The question is, this is going to be the middle class today. Tell us, look what's happening. [19:38:42] We've lost two hundred thousand of sales jobs to 20. Why? [19:38:48] For people and creates 250. Forty nine percent average salary. Fifty thousand year. The vast. Highs and lows. Well, guess what? [19:38:59] Hamilton comes along and, you know, I out on a limb. [19:39:02] So all of our stories across America from both sides to get them to the events on the night he buried it for close to 50 years old, the last known location. You lost all or have any kind of effect. Why did you do it? [19:39:18] Well, we knew he gave me a little bag. We have returning even. I'm pretty tired of the one who hired me to shoot him free. [19:39:26] If you keep the little things and you couldn't predict anything when he saw you in community college. [19:39:31] In fact, qualify. Including. My sensitivity in your shoes to see you. [19:39:36] He's going to have to push for. [19:39:42] My sense is when he says we're going to get over to you, grow the economy, it's time for me to provide it. [19:39:51] How do we get here are saving lives and you need deal with a dedicated. It really is needed. Well, I was sitting there for five years. I was the most important college. [19:40:04] And I have to cut out more than anyone else. I hope you make more money. Look, I didn't rise to. My point is that I was a citizen of the movement for security. [19:40:19] Probably less a lot of sitting than you know about how I could afford to have some of the community deal making sure just paying rent for childcare. Today, in the big cities of 24000 most of the year, small cities more moist. [19:40:36] Fourteen thousand one year. And so. If you can apply for any tax credit, me, it's all here. While I'm not worried about my taxes, 750000, wouldn't we be back to work? [19:40:51] And guess what? That increases the growth in the country wants to constrain any time you want to create a significant number of jobs. We give tax breaks to research like gardening, God's we to give it back to a people. [19:41:23] This is a writer Hi, my name is Sam and I am a sophomore at neither major any kind of street. My question for you is what are your favorite stories from our studios? Yes. My question for you is, is what are your six year use or you to pass more illegal immigration? [19:41:46] Or was this a big for our dreams? [19:41:55] Even during the last year that every American has more than years. [19:42:05] A further action. OK. [19:42:08] Number two, we need to provide a path to citizenship. [19:42:15] Earned citizenship. [19:42:16] My head is going to have to live for the twelve thousand twelve on document people in nine states right away. [19:42:25] They it kind of goes to the real the K on the Haven visa and they were released. [19:42:32] So the deal is that if you wanted to be an activist, this got out of the shadows as you protected coming out of the shadows and getting the process of doing what everyone else had to learn. Languages, ET said, go through the same process. [19:42:48] And if you do, we could easily. Third, no, no official separation. Just. [19:43:03] By the way, that was my. [19:43:10] This you university, by the way, we talked about it earlier in the week out. You said a long time. Why can't we put more? For now, we gave just six. As we see it, mostly positive, fresh. [19:43:26] So my point is that we have to be who we were as a species. And then right now, I think it's time do this. [19:43:35] We are denying access to people who seek asylum, but only because she thinks about and how to be able to meet. [19:43:46] Is it a legitimate reason to seek asylum? You have a judge who may have seen on the spot. [19:43:51] Now in a position where you can come from a country we had in the past and know firsthand that in America you have to go through asylum offices in. [19:44:01] Well, I tell you what, I'm not going to lower my great great grandfather out of coughing should have an 84 year. [19:44:07] I see. Not Mormons having a little bit over a year without a it for our kids on the way, you know? [19:44:15] So are you saying that we should look at the facts? [19:44:19] The facts are dreamers with us. Dreams are based people. He says, well, maybe not assisted a I. [19:44:29] I can get picture on a 3 year old because the person who got to take me meeting me here. It's illegal. Leave me here. Come on. Come on. [19:44:41] So we have a fact and again and consistently saying that. And by the way, no one has any idea what kind of commitments you realize. [19:44:53] I don't know anywhere else you can tell. I was looking at this. [19:44:55] You realize of the five year anniversary of the term from Yale to the community colleges. [19:45:05] Guess what? Sen. Marco Rubio. [19:45:18] The he decided to camp to set out to sort of share a little bit of all the women we're going in now the and what we did in science math. [19:45:31] Telling a great honor. I agree. [19:45:33] Grandfather very one of the rest of my life, my reaching out to my nieces in the 90s. [19:45:50] Jackie taking off his. [19:45:54] Okay. How you terrorist group? [19:46:00] Over the past few years, we've seen the market price increases in claims that are not consistent, but in my personal opinion has to does not have a long way to go. So if you are elected to office, how would you use your presidential power to decide right after the meeting with which I have. How many of you were here? [19:46:22] I was shown the door, wasn't the word. [19:46:26] Broder, this isn't the case for you. [19:46:29] You have to move. Everybody. Really, this is the calmest. [19:46:42] Were proud to do more with an American this is called really the last show, which is the best of all time. With that in mind, how did you follow suit? Months. I, uh, I decided that if I on I want to do some sort of crazy car walk down the road with me. [19:47:10] Uh. Sort of, sir. This kid's future. [19:47:15] And if you could only be charged, one of these two, you know, if you had a lot of great emissions. But they don't play well, set it office. [19:47:24] No one really made sure that the commission wanted to do this. And he said the first Cold War. [19:47:32] Yes. We had no troops. We had no capacity. [19:47:37] There was no ability to share that information. But now we lose, you know, the military capabilities to check. OK, now here's the deal. If you do that, I put together an organization. [19:47:52] And when I got out of office, I went into this and he said, here's here's what we need is a democracy. May you're really got love it. And when it did, 21 candidates to the 20 page articles came to me as long and long, five Nobel laureates to see what I mean by that. [19:48:12] And then if we did it, we found out that was thinking of that, because they just so far have not reached a deal making working with one another share again. [19:48:26] No one at my age, just a joke somebody told me or I say, and they walk out of here or see an oil prices, I don't want to. And so there's not any way I should add that there was. [19:48:36] That's how I was set up against man, that one of the things that I did, we did an independent commission, which the president gave me when he did it. [19:48:45] It was and it's a little hard across to the world to do whatever I need to do in any industry. [19:48:51] And then one day he came up with a sign that we had really been on a whole range of disciplines that you wouldn't think would make any sense when you're not presenting my boy and asked you, what the hell does this have to do with cancer? [19:49:04] Well, guess what? They gave him one hour more radiation and more. [19:49:10] So we started to figure out that a lot of people were talking about history. [19:49:14] It is a way of this us what's going on in history. [19:49:18] I mean, look back for the last 40 years. Significant. You didn't get it. We were notified. It's usually too late. [19:49:27] We then went and got exercise and take it out. [19:49:31] Usually damage terms that occurred under the word is. We then make sure every day we have Keating affair that in fact is designed to kill the patient because a lot of good it. I don't mean good at fighting, not all the time. [19:49:49] But in addition to that, that aside, I really wish. So I'll give you an example. I don't know to put it that way. [19:49:58] Can you tell us what happened was that they finally came out with any pain suddenly at one was at Walter Reed Hospital. [19:50:08] Let me ask a few. It was really a new class to the jury, didn't really exist to the killer cast. And they were really listening. They were over the moon. [19:50:24] But because it happened, not only was it the best today, because as the New Year celebration, they had Kirsch, but they had Pierce, the Columbus. [19:50:39] This is really something that was all this all this churning and constant on the surface, as I think mine is still piled up and this is very. [19:50:50] Did you try to leave to the next thing on? [19:50:56] We're now finding an exit is that way to appeal to the kids. This is the new normal. Just like any time. [19:51:06] And so they said, well, we can't do tonight because you trying to get let's say you're not. [19:51:13] The four major drug companies are working on one particular strain. [19:51:17] Four hundred and 240 is just sitting there. And so we're not saying. [19:51:23] Well, we've come a long way to do certain economic news, teaching you to go to work on what may be a kind of that could take years to get it done. [19:51:33] So why don't we go inside monetary value to the bureau you're working on before we have to send a hundred or two women to find your. So we started at the drug working group of experts 20 percent year over year. [19:51:50] We're 19 versus taking the. Well, guess what? Any work from all of these companies? We will put our terminal work on the table. [19:52:02] Did he ever talk you into music? We are running here. We have no idea who is in this. You know, what is the responded to this? [19:52:13] You get it. You're on a monster Halloween party site. [19:52:17] And guess what? [19:52:19] The duty is to research the people. The fact is that. [19:52:24] That we're changing the way in which we fight and encourage people to move back. [19:52:30] I'm sure that if, for example, if you were able to take every year to get to work, if in fact you were able to take the sequence with the kids or even begin, you could be deterred by taking out the cell so you could determine what did that particular case is and you did that. It costs about half as much as it used to cost hundreds of miles. And if you sleep with that answer, determine exactly what it is, exactly what time it is and where it is right now. [19:53:08] You can, in fact, when I grew up. So why is it that we want to figure out why is he. I'm a massive atheist guy. You take that out. It's awful for that. And I think I'd argue that. [19:53:22] What? What was the difference? So if you're able to take a little kids, he was putting it in one space, one time using technology. [19:53:32] You have been able to take 15 over the last more time over 10 years than going take this the our ability to achieve its computing capacity. You have to determine what was it about your teenager in mind that allowed it to work on you and me? [19:53:52] That's why you have so many people coming off saying, OK, we're going to let you think. We're going to let the research. [19:54:00] I got it literally over aid for the Palestinians recently convicted in these mass organizations. And you say, OK, I'm going to let you have all that. And then you forget all that he had. [19:54:15] And he said it wasn't going to give up. Oh, a million people asked us to said a military search. We're moving toward finding a solution. You think it's people thinking or how did you make this? [19:54:26] He's just a really great start. Men and women to devote their whole life to the differences. And any of you have had found matter. It's just you know, it's not a matter of years. [19:54:39] It's a matter of moments. Man, it's everything and everything happens. But the difference between being a clinician is extremely dry and research work is the working set of the outcomes we need. [19:54:49] Why is the person who has the permission? It's like Dr.. [19:54:56] Anyway, AQ Khan Academy can't get him to sleep, right, tell us a lot. Can you give me 30 minutes? Making this decision making by. [19:55:14] The middle school you. This is the very latest today during the week's. This is a sense of urgency to change communications during you time. [19:55:29] Surely dead economy one is pass. [19:55:33] Thanks for joining us today. [19:55:35] I know you're one of the very kind of. [19:55:39] No one much larger than with was created and they walk out on the roads are the president nods to the 2016 election and a sign that the president has to be handed the greatest single thing ever said. [19:55:53] I want to get to the person that I was going into the community to know all I'm going to get to try and find out, just do we not have administered the bar they call dark? [19:56:05] This is organization in the Defense Department suddenly finding that allows for just pure research on the places that would make America safe. [19:56:14] Very once thing about the Internet, 30 miles as it came up with the Joneses, they're going to come up with stealth technology. OK. Imagine if we had our brains to me and help me set up city attorney. [19:56:31] If I'm elected president, nine states where I'm going into the first four years on there, make sure that the Sandy 20 billion dollars of can is pure research, a financial regulation that just like you did, just like you it down. In fairness to the world, I want the country to test of limits for good. [19:56:54] But if you do that, you have you have other diseases that we can deal with in the front of the line between the to this country, much at a standstill. [19:57:03] You realize that if you don't find comedy or maybe you break through on almost every single solitary period in America in the next 15 years will mean no one does it decision that he has to own. Well, we are thinking about half Jewish. [19:57:20] Not to enough. Four hundred or a billion dollars? A mere. [19:57:27] OK, that's very good. I think you've been telling me take a look. This is the most widely to ideas because you know, nothing a drop more than any point and say, I'm going to go to the bottom of this and I'm going to be able to stand and we take a good look at our investment. [19:57:47] Decision to do that, but the federal government should be limited. [19:57:52] But the third thing is to keep these diabetes, diabetes. [19:57:59] So I would this because what I like about it is that I asked the Nobel Prize for four, he said. He gave me a car. What would you give back the vaccines that you had, all the money in the world? [19:58:11] What is 100 of the previous targets to give you? Can you do that? I have you can use it all the time in the 90s. [19:58:20] So what lot? The costs of the fundamental changes to the earnings estimates. We need to do it. We do it when I push into. [19:58:51] This came out, we had no one to answer that question, even if similar more neighbors were with water pipes, said the women who entered illegally. So. I'm going to translate the question. Order to do that. I shouldn't be standing today for you. [19:59:16] Hello. Hello. I'm from. [19:59:22] Good evening. I mean, it's still. [19:59:24] And every day I look at the video that I just feel, you know, I haven't defended policies able to deal with conditions that I haven't already made you is that he feels. He said, want to make any money at all because of the deportation was headed in the wrong direction. Is just not moving in the right place. You want to really you heard the president believe 74 nations want to play well with us. Take a much more. [20:00:16] She's only committed a felony. [20:00:20] Not a word not to compare president. Well, this is outrageous. He's the guy that came up with the. He's the guy. [20:00:33] It was part of my response to living in it from the Republicans that in fact they they moved for immigration reform. When that failed. I'm not going to talk about him. And he just reminded me that you have to do better. [20:00:49] That's what one of the reasons why I don't always represent our state. [20:00:53] And in any disagreement, I have a president personally. That's no way. Your. [20:01:00] What's happened is that he came along, he had soft finance, that Americans are just not operating here. George Bush is more involved with keeping it slow. [20:01:10] We're not going to stumble here when it comes to picking up on whether or not she knew she would have separate commitments. [20:01:18] We, in fact, set up a program to take literally. [20:01:21] This is not a limited, by the way, not only decided to send three dreamers, but simply because it's a significant portion of them as well. [20:01:32] Thirdly, the seven major parties is going to communicate to this group. It is absolutely, absolutely not for. [20:01:46] Nice to meet you. And I was just saying, you take. Immigration, it probably won't be the same where tomorrow. [20:01:56] Why do people call me? Because they say, well, I want you to find out, girl. They call me because they're making music, because they don't get a job because of a they. [20:02:07] Are you going to be cartels or are using it? [20:02:14] So what I did was I came up with I came up with a program that I have gone to Republicans over for Senate, not. [20:02:23] Fifty million dollars, the condition looks to me and you know, if you continue to support immorality of innovative company, we wouldn't have any reform in their systems in terms of the small, in terms of privacy, in terms of police corruption and all the issues and everything. [20:02:39] Shooting by. There is no access to electricity. [20:02:44] All of those they make me will pay their fair share of taxes would be very wrong in your hand. Then we will in fact help fund with changes in their country. Guess what? Immigration to sober up to us. There is a net migration to Mexico. [20:03:04] Here we go again. Okay. In 2008, I was a to for a long. [20:03:12] And I believe in the promises that you make to stop using the word.
THE PRESIDENT DELIVERS REMARKS ON HOUSE VOTE DEMOCRATS SHOW PARTY UNITY
16:00:00 WARNING: THIS IS AN UNCORRECTED COPY. NOT A FINAL VERSION. ANNOUNCER This is an ABC News Special Report. Now reporting, Charles Gibson. CHARLES GIBSON, ABC NEWS Good afternoon. I m Charles Gibson in New York. And we are awaiting at the moment the appearance of the President of the United States. He is going to appear in the area just adjacent to the South Lawn of the White House. There you are looking at a shot down on the White House. That is the North Lawn, the front lawn of the White House. And the President is inside. He has been meeting with the Democratic members of the House of Representatives. The Democratic members left the Capitol after today s session of the House of Representatives, which, as you probably know by now, at which time, the House adopted two of the four articles of impeachment against the President. There are the buses sitting in front of the White House, and there is the rundown of the House action today. They approved Article 1, which involves perjury before the grand jury. They involved Article number 3, which is the obstruction of justice count. They rejected Articles 2 and 4. As I say, the House Democratic members, who were in the minority on Article 1 and Article 3, then got on buses, which are parked in front of the White House, went to the White House and have been meeting with the President in the East Room. That is the large reception room on the first floor of the White House that many thousands of people have seen when they take the public tour of the White House. Anyway, it is in that room that he was scheduled to meet with the Democratic members, and after that meeting, they were going to be coming out into the area adjacent to the Rose Garden near the South Lawn on the driveway between the White House it s an exit driveway, actually, where functionaries, dignitaries come in. And he was going to have a comment with the press. It s the first time that we ve had a chance to see him on what is obviously a very historic day, not only for President Clinton but for the presidency itself. Sam Donaldson, do we know anything about what they ve been talking about? Is this simply a pep rally, or is there real substance to be discussed here? SAM DONALDSON, ABC NEWS Well, Charlie, it was billed in advance pep rally, I guess, is our term. It was billed in advance as a show of support by Democratic members of the House and leadership up on Capitol Hill for the President. One of the main purposes is to try to counter the idea that Mr Clinton should resign. They anticipated that a lot of people, particularly Republicans, would now call on him to resign, and they wanted to make it clear that not only would he not resign, but his party was behind him in this resolution to stay in office. I think that was principal purpose number one for holding this. And number two, Charlie, the Clinton people for years have been expert at using television to portray messages. And the message they want to portray today is that this president is still in the saddle. He is still doing business as the nation s chief executive, and he has solid support from his party. CHARLES GIBSON Sam, you mention there is you point to the fact that there s great symbolism, therefore, in all of this. But also I think it will be rather important what the President has to say when he comes out. Because it seems to me there are two things he could do when he emerges. Number one, he could be aggrieved. He could be angry. He could be frustrated. Or he could take a rather conciliatory point of view in all of this. SAM DONALDSON That is what we re told the President will do. Maybe other members of the Democratic leadership will continue the assault on the Republicans. But we re told that Mr Clinton, of course, will rise above that, and he will come much more in sorrow than anger. He will say that he wants to continue the job of chief executive. But we re told he also may again express contrition and remorse for having brought the country to this point. And we re also told that he will signal, using perhaps the euphemisms finding some bipartisan solution. Or maybe more direct that he is open to censure. He is open to condemnation. He is open to just about anything the Congress wants to do to him short of removing him from office. CHARLES GIBSON But then, if that is the line he takes, Sam, will we not be in a sort of strange situation where we have countervailing (ph) things happening within the White House. The President being very conciliatory, coming in sorrow not anger, as you point out, and his staff, the people who have to lobby the Senate now in these coming negotiations and perhaps eventually trial, taking a rather hard line about this being unfair, partisan, etc. All the things we heard members of the House Democratic members of the House express in the session today. SAM DONALDSON Well, their strategy at the moment calls for treating the Senate with great respect, including the Republican leaders of the Senate, depending, of course, on how the Republican leaders act in the next few days or weeks. They will concentrate, if they talk about the Republicans at all, about the partisanship in the House of Representatives. But they will come to the Senate showing great respect and asking only for fairness and asking for deliberations. And of course, finding some way, if they can, to avoid coming to the vote. You know, you would think, Charlie, that people who believe in Mr Clinton and think this is an improper process would be very confident that he could win that vote. It takes 67 votes, and they would have to get 15 or more Democrats, depending on how all the Republicans acted, in order to remove him from office. And yet, there is not that great confidence here today that you can just say, Well, all right, let s go to trial, do the Senate work its will, take the vote and we win. They want censure before they come to a vote. CHARLES GIBSON All right, Sam Donaldson. Let me have you stand by, as I know you will. A couple of other things that need to be discussed. And while we re waiting for the President and the Democratic members of the House to come out, we should mention them. Those of you who were watching the debate today heard in rather dramatic fashion the Speaker - elect, Bob Livingston, Republican congressman from Louisiana, who had assumed that he was going to become Speaker on January 6 heard him in rather remarkable fashion say, in front of the House, that I cannot do the job or be the kind of leader that I would like to be under current circumstances. And then he continued by saying the following. REP BOB LIVINGSTON, (R) LOUISIANA So I must set the example that I hope President Clinton will follow. I will not stand for Speaker of the House on January 6, but rather I shall remain as a backbencher in this Congress that I so dearly love for approximately six months into the 106th Congress, whereupon I shall vacate my seat and ask my governor to call a special election to take my place. CHARLES GIBSON That was Bob Livingston in front of the House of Representatives before the votes on the articles of impeachment today. Needless to say, that sent members of the House who did not expect the Livingston announcement into a hub - bub, and there have been some developments on who may be the new Speaker - elect and eventually Speaker of the House. Bill Kristol, who is well piped in to the Republican politics in Washington, is standing by in our Washington studio. Bill, what s happened on that front? BILL KRISTOL, ABC NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST Well, I gather Republicans have been meeting ever since they the impeachment articles passed. It looks like there s a pretty strong consensus behind Denny Hastert, the Republican from Illinois. He s a deputy whip right now, acceptable to all factions of the party. Apparently letters being circulated already has more than 50 signatures in support of him. The other candidate is Chris Cox of California, who mounted a short - lived challenge to Livingston and then withdrew, and Livingston had the votes just seven weeks ago. Current House Republican leadership, the rest of it except for Livingston -- that is to say, Armey and especially Tom DeLay, who s awfully influential with the members they are working hard for Hastert, and they expect Denny Hastert to be the next Speaker of the House. CHARLES GIBSON Now you talk familiarily forget me trying to do that word but you speak with great familiarity about Denny Hastert. But that is a name, this is a face that nobody in this country knows. BILL KRISTOL That s true. That was true of historically many Speakers Carl Albert, John McCormick (ph). They were got along well with all functions of the party, were competent, were respected, had lots of friends, had friends across the aisle. Dick Gephardt is friendly with Denny Hastert. They re from neighboring states, obviously. I think Hastert is really is the end of the age of Newt. It is the end of the Speaker as the voice of the party, as an ideological leader. It has returned to a more old - fashioned Speaker, someone who will, as they keep saying, make the trains run, mediate fights among Republicans, defer on the whole to committee chairmen and try, I think, to reach out across the aisle a little bit to the minority party. CHARLES GIBSON Cokie Roberts is also with us on Capitol Hill. Cokie, it was interesting. Bill just said this is the end of Newt - ism. This is a man who appeals to the conservative wing of the party and to moderate Republicans? COKIE ROBERTS, ABC NEWS Well, enough to both of them, I think. And basically, I have here already a statement from Dick Armey supporting Hastert, and I think that something has to get in the way of this train in order to stop it. CHARLES GIBSON All right. While you are speaking, the President has come out of the residence now. You see him there, joined by Vice President Gore, and Mrs Clinton is also with him. And there, second from the left next to the President is the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives, Dick Gephardt. And I don t honestly know if the other members of the House delegation who went to visit the President are going to be coming with him or not. I m told that they are following him out 101 members. One hundred and one Democrats, that is a good number of the Democrats in the House. That s, also behind them, John Podesta, who is the chief of staff to the President since Erskine Bowles left. Anyway, they are coming out, and 101 100 other Democrats behind or besides Dick Gephardt are also coming out as well. Well, now, the best - laid plans. They ve sneaked into the West Wing of the White House. So I don t know if they re going to come out immediately or not. Anyway, so let me while I ve got, again, this second, let me come back to this, Cokie. To what extent to do we know that this is a done deal, or is the Cox challenge still alive? Do we still have a race between Dennis Hastert and Christopher Cox? Or do we think that this is going to happen? You started to hold up a statement there. COKIE ROBERTS A statement from Dick Armey, the Majority Leader, supporting Dennis Hastert. I think that there s very much an atmosphere right now of trying to get everybody behind Hastert and canonize him or coronate him. But Christopher Cox seems ready to run, and I think he the vote will not be until January. There are a bunch of freshman Republicans that have a say. And I think that you can t quite say that there is already a Speaker - designate yet. CHARLES GIBSON Very quickly, Bill Kristol, while we re seeing the other members of the Democratic delegation come out of the White House, out of the residence and over toward the West Wing, very quickly, there was some talk Democrats were saying, Gee, Bob Livingston, won t you reconsider? I gather that s a nonstarter. There was some talk that perhaps Newt Gingrich now might come back in some sort of cobbled together fashion to resume the speakership. Neither of those were even in the realm of possibility? BILL KRISTOL I don t think so, Charlie. And I guess Cokie was told, heard last night from lots of members yearning for Bob Michel (ph) or Dick Cheney, not going to happen, I think. CHARLES GIBSON All right. There you see the Democratic members David Bonior, the minority whip. John Dingell from Michigan. I can go after name after name after name. But the Democratic delegation gathering around the podium, and I gather once they re all in place, the President will come out. And as we were talking a moment ago, the tone that the President takes here, it is symbolic that all the Democratic members will be standing behind him in this show of solidarity. And as you know by the votes today, there is solidarity among the Democrats. Only five on the critical first article of impeachment abandoned the President and voted with the Republicans. So there is solidarity, and this picture will well demonstrate that. But there is also this question of what tone the President is going to take in the remarks that he makes. And George Stephanopoulos, before the President actually comes out, I was asking Sam there whether the President would be angry or whether he would be conciliatory. I gather you probably agree that he will take a conciliatory tone in the remarks he makes. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, ABC NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST I think so, Charlie. Because you know, the White House and the President have learned their lesson over this year. You know, we ve talked a lot about missed opportunities. The missed opportunities in January, in August when the President gave his very angry speech after his grand jury testimony. The White House and the President are not going to make that mistake again. President Clinton is likely to take the high road today. Call for a bipartisan compromise on censure, but also go back to what always has worked for him. He s going to do the business of the country, do the people s business. And the White House hopes that this show of Democratic unity will be in sharp contrast to the chaos on the Republican side. CHARLES GIBSON George? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Look CHARLES GIBSON George, if he s going to be the good cop then in his response to what has happened today, who s going to be the bad cop? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Look at all those people standing by the podium, Charlie. I think the Democrats will continue to say that this was a partisan, illegitimate lame - duck impeachment. That will be the drum beat over the next month. Meanwhile, the President and his lawyers will take a much will offer an olive branch to the Republicans in the Senate. It s a tough balance, but it s the only one they can do. CHARLES GIBSON You know him. How tough a day was this for Bill Clinton, George? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS I think it s got to have been about the worst day of his life, Charlie. This is a man who s dreamed of being president. Now he s become only the second president to be impeached. But he ll fight through it. CHARLES GIBSON It is seemed, looking at him, and I don t mean to read too much into it, but it is seemed looking at him in the last couple of weeks through that trip to the Mideast and since he came back it looks to me like he has aged, and he s looked tired. And I thought you could see it in his visage. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS I think that s exactly right, Charlie. I think it s finally settled in. You know, President Clinton has an amazing capacity for denial. But in the last few days, it s all come in on him. This is real. Tomorrow morning, he ll wake up and see these results, and I think he knows that. And he also knows this is probably the hardest thing to deal with that it was, at large part, his fault, and there s nothing he can do about it. CHARLES GIBSON If he feels that, George, though, why is everyone so quick to say it has not entered his mind, he does not give a thought to the idea of resignation? I think the Vice President said that it would be, what is it, it would be more likely that a meteor GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS A meteor striking. Yeah. I think for two reasons. Number one, it s just not in his makeup. Because as much as he feels that he s to blame in part for this, he also believes he s been a victim of illegitimate attacks. But more than that and the argument that unifies all Democrats is that this would be bad for the presidency, that it is somehow wrong for a president to be driven from office, driven to resignation by a partisan vote of the Congress. They think that would be a violation of the presidency, of the independence of the presidency. And they re going to fight on those grounds. CHARLES GIBSON Sam? Is Sam Donaldson still there? Sam, are you there? SAM DONALDSON Charlie? CHARLES GIBSON Yeah, George knows him so well. You have watched him so well in the last few months. Do you see this? Do you see it really settling in on the President? SAM DONALDSON Absolutely. I was in the White House the second time for one week before the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke. And the difference between the Bill Clinton that I saw for that first week and that we ve all seen on television and elsewhere before that, and the one that s aged through these months. George is quite right. The President is expert at denial and expert at believing that others have caused all this problem. But I agree that at this point, I think it is dawning on him that he has no one but himself to blame. Whatever the sins of a Kenneth Starr, whatever the sins of partisan Republicans, he brought us to this point by his actions, and I think it may be really dawning on him that not only is that the fact, but that the future is uncertain. You know, Charlie, Bill Clinton has been very skillful, very good some say also lucky in that he has won the important political battles of his life. But it maybe dawning on him that here is one at last that he may not win. CHARLES GIBSON I should mention we talked about the symbolism of this picture the Democrats from the House of Representatives gathered around that podium, where the President will make his remarks, give his reaction to the actions of the House today in approving two articles of impeachment. There is also symbolism into the picture that you are looking at now. Mrs Clinton right at her husband s side, arm in arm with him, as he comes out, and what we have said over and over again, but it doesn t detract from the fact that it is an historic day. And we now get the President s reaction to what has happened. As we mentioned, Vice President Gore, Minority Leader Gephardt and John Podesta, the chief of staff right behind him. The President getting applause from the Democratic members, and he will speak in just a moment. (Applause) by John Podesta, the chief of staff. JOHN PODESTA, CHIEF OF STAFF On behalf of the President and the First Lady, the Vice President and Mr -- Mrs Gore, the White House and the entire administration, I want to thank the members who came here today and all the members who stood with you on the floor of the House over the past several days. Thank you for standing up for what you believe in. Thank you for standing up for fairness. Thank you for standing up for the American people. Thank you for standing up for the Constitution. And thank you for doing so with dignity and determination, passion and patriotism. I would like to introduce a man who has done so much for our country, a great leader, a great friend of the American people, Congressman Dick Gephardt. (Applause) REP RICHARD GEPHARDT, (D) MINORITY LEADER Mr President, Mr Vice President, First Lady Hillary Clinton, we have just witnessed a partisan vote that was a disgrace to our country and our Constitution. Chairman Henry Hyde once called impeachment "the ultimate weapon" and said that "for it to succeed, ultimately it has to be bipartisan." The fact that a vote as important as this occurred in such a partisan way, violated the spirit of our democracy. We must turn away now from the politics of personal destruction and return to a politics of values. The American people deserve better than what they've received over these long five months. They want their Congress to bring this issue to a speedy compromise, closure. And they want their president, twice elected to his office, to continue his work fighting for their priorities. (Applause) The Democratic caucus in the House will continue to stand alongside our president, and we will work to enact the agenda that we were sent here to pass. (Applause) We look forward to supporting his agenda in the upcoming session of Congress. The President has demonstrated his effectiveness as a national and world leader in the face of intense and unprecedented negative attacks by his opponents. I am confident that he will continue to do so for the rest of his elected term of office. (Applause) Despite the worst efforts of the Republican leadership in the House, the Constitution will bear up under the strain, and our nation will survive. The constitutional process about to play out in the United States Senate will hopefully, finally, be fair and allow us to put an end to this sad chapter of our history. Ladies and gentlemen, it is now my honor to present our great Vice President of these United States, Al Gore. CHARLES GIBSON We mentioned, obviously we re all interested in the President s reaction. They realize that, and so a couple of political speeches from the Minority Leader and the Vice President. Then we ll hear the President. VICE PRES AL GORE Thank you very much, Mr Leader. To you and to David Bonior and to the entire Democratic caucus leadership, thank you for what you have done for our country. I would also like to single out for a special thanks and praise Congressman John Conyers and all of the members of the Judiciary Committee who are present here today. (Applause) And to you, Dick Gephardt, I would like to repeat a judgment that I made to the smaller group earlier. You and I came here on the same day 22 years ago. And in all that time I don't believe I have heard a finer speech on the floor of the House of Representatives than the one that you delivered this morning. (Applause) But in all that time, I do believe this is the saddest day I have seen in our nation's capital. Because today's vote in the House of Representatives disregarded the plain wishes and good will of the American people and the plain meaning of our Constitution. Let me say simply, the President has acknowledged that what he did was wrong. But we must all acknowledge that invoking the solemn power of impeachment in the cause of partisan politics is wrong -- wrong for our Constitution, wrong for the United States of America. (Applause) Republican leaders would not even allow the members of the House or Representatives to cast the vote they wanted to. They were not allowed to vote their conscience. What happened as a result does a great disservice to a man I believe will be regarded in the history books as one of our greatest presidents. (Applause) There is no doubt in my mind that the verdict of history will undo the unworthy judgment rendered a short while ago in the United States Capitol. But we do not have to wait for history. Instead, let us live up to the ideals of this season. Let us reach out to one another and reach out for what is best in ourselves, our history and our country. Let us heal this land, not tear it apart. Let us move forward, not toward bitter and angry division. Our Founders anticipated that there might be a day like this one, when excessive partisanship unlocked a forum of vitriol and vehemence that hurts our nation. We all know that a process that wounds good people in both parties does no service to this country. What America needs is not resignations, but the renewal of civility, respect for one another, decency toward each other and the certain belief that together we can serve this land and make a better life for all of our people. That is what President Clinton has done. That is what he is doing, and that is what he will continue to do for the next two years. I feel extremely privileged to have been able to serve with him as his partner for the past six years, and I look forward to serving with him for the next two years. I have seen him close at hand, day after day, making the most important decisions about peace, prosperity and our future. And making them always by asking, "What is right for the American people? What is right for all of the American people?" I know him. I know his wonderful first lady. I know his ... (Applause) I know his heart and his will. And I have seen his work. Six years ago, he was left with the highest budget deficit in history, and he ended it. Six years ago, he was handed a failing economy. Today, because of his leadership, we are on the verge of the longest period of peacetime prosperity in all of American history. And I know nothing will stop him from doing the job that the American people sent him here to do. I say to you today, President William Jefferson Clinton will continue and will complete his mission on behalf of the American people. I'm proud to present to you my friend, America's great president, Bill Clinton. (Applause) PRES BILL CLINTON Thank you very much. Thank you. Good afternoon. Let me begin by expressing my profound and heartfelt thanks to Congressman Gephardt and the leadership and all the members of the Democratic caucus for what they did today. I thank the few brave Republicans who withstood enormous pressure to stand with them for the plain meaning of the Constitution and for the proposition that we need to pull together, to move beyond partisanship, to get on with the business of our country. I thank the millions upon millions of American citizens who have expressed their support and their friendship to Hillary, to me, to our family and to our administration during these last several weeks. The words of the members here with me and others who were a part of their endeavor in defense of our Constitution were powerful and moving, and I will never forget them. The question is, what are we going to do now? I have accepted responsibility for what I did wrong in my personal life, and I have invited members of Congress to work with us to find a reasonable bipartisan and proportionate response. That approach was rejected today by Republicans in the House, but I hope it will be embraced by the Senate. I hope there will be a constitutional and fair means of resolving this matter in a prompt manner. Meanwhile, I will continue to do the work of the American people. We still, after all, have to save Social Security and Medicare for the 21st century. We have to give all our children world - class schools. We have to pass a patients' bill of rights. We have to make sure the economic turbulence around the world does not curb our economic opportunity here at home. We have to keep America the world's strongest force for peace and freedom. In short, we have a lot to do before we enter the 21st century. And we still have to keep working to build that elusive one America I have talked so much about. For six years now, I have done everything I could to bring our country together across the lines that divide us, including bringing Washington together across party lines. Out in the country, people are pulling together. But just as America is coming together, it must look -- from the country's point of view -- like Washington is coming apart. I want to echo something Mr Gephardt said. It is something I have felt strongly all my life. We must stop the politics of personal destruction. (Applause) We must get rid of the poisonous venom of excessive partisanship, obsessive animosity and uncontrolled anger. That is not what America deserves. That is not what America is about. We are doing well now. We are a good and decent country, but we have significant challenges we have to face. In order to do it right, we have to have some atmosphere of decency and civility, some presumption of good faith, some sense of proportionality and balance in bringing judgment against those who are in different parties. We have important work to do. We need a constructive debate that has all the different voices in this country heard in the halls of Congress. I want the American people to know today that I am still committed to working with people of good faith and good will of both parties to do what's best for our country, to bring our nation together, to lift our people up, to move us all forward together. It's what I've tried to do for six years. It's what I intend to do for two more until the last hour of the last day of my term. (Applause) So with profound gratitude for the defense of the Constitution and the best in America that was raised today by the members here and those who joined them, I ask the American people to move with me to go on from here to rise above the rancor, to overcome the pain and division, to be a repairer of the breach -- all of us -- to make this country as one America what it can and must be for our children in the new century about to dawn. Thank you very much. (Applause) CHARLES GIBSON The President concluding his remarks on the South Lawn of the White House, and some very interesting aspects to all of this. As you watched it, you almost had the feeling that you were watching a political rally. The President saying thank you, thank you, as he looked forward from that dais. But really, all that was in front of that dais were a few cameras. Basically, the audience, obviously the television audience, and that is the audience upon which he wanted to have an effect as he made those remarks. So while it appeared that he was talking to a group of people, he really wasn t. This was designed, obviously, for the cameras. And the President saying now he wants a reasonable bipartisan and proportionate response to what he has done. Obviously, another reaching out to the Congress in hopes that some sort of accommodation can be reached. Some sort of a penalty can be imposed that comes short of the impeachment that was voted by the House today and for which the Senate will now try him. He did say, in all of that, that he hopes all of this will stop the politics of personal destruction and get rid of the poisonous venom that is in Washington. I guess that was a somewhat slap at those who oppose him. But for the most part, his tone was conciliatory. One other interesting byproduct to all of this as you watched it, the Vice President of the United States, Al Gore, was saying to Dick Gephardt, the Minority Leader of the House, that it was the finest speech that he d ever heard in the House given by Gephardt today. And then Gephardt introduced the Vice President in glowing terms, and yet, as you probably know, Dick Gephardt, has entertained the idea of running for president against Al Gore. And so, the two of them, who have some differences of political ambition, were there brought together by the history of this moment and were put in the position of giving high praise to one another on that platform. Sam, let me get your reaction to the President s remarks. Sam Donaldson. SAM DONALDSON Well, Charlie, it s fascinating. If you were the man or woman from Mars suddenly dropped down on the South Lawn and didn t know any of the background and said, What is all of this about? You d be hard pressed to understand that it is about this president having been impeached by the House and sent to the Senate for trial. Mr Clinton made two powerful themes one, that he s accepted responsibility, that he wants to work out something that, as he said, is reasonable bipartisan proportional approach to punish him. He didn t use the words to punish him, but that s what he meant, short of removal. And the second theme, as George Stephanopoulos pointed out earlier, was his plea to stop the politics of personal destruction. He hopes the American people will see this not as the Republicans claim as a matter of about crimes. There s a lot of evidence that the President may have committed crime. But as some sort of bipart or rather partisan, venomous push against him for reasons that would escape this man and woman from Mars. It s really interesting, Charlie. We don t have a precedent for this. Andrew Johnson I don t know what happened then. He certainly didn t come out on the South Lawn, and there was no television. But to have this sort of rally at the end of this day is just phenomenal. CHARLES GIBSON Bill Kristol, your reaction to this, and then I want to ask you a question. BILL KRISTOL I was struck by -- well, he s going to have to reach across the aisle to Republicans in the Senate to work out censure. Or obviously, ultimately, I guess he could just get Democratic votes and fail to get convicted. But if he wants to avert a long trial in the Senate, he needs Republicans. It s odd to begin that process with a purely partisan event. And I was very struck by the sentence, I have accepted responsibility for what I did wrong in my personal life. That is not at issue. The Democrats in the House let s remember, these Democrats in the House introduced a censure resolution that said the President had dishonored his office and abused the public trust. I really think the President needs to say something like that. He needs to acknowledge what the House Democrats have acknowledged -- that he has failed in his official capacity. He can t just keep saying he s made mistakes in his personal life. CHARLES GIBSON There s a fascinating picture, George. And I just want to call attention to it. And I don t want to diminish in any way what you re saying. But we re looking in through the windows into the Oval Office, and one of the people applauding Bill Clinton was Betty Currie. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS We re looking at Betty Currie s office, Charlie. CHARLES GIBSON I m sorry. Betty Currie s office. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Yes, that is Betty Currie s office right off the Oval Office. CHARLES GIBSON Thanks, George. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS And that s Mrs Currie, and you see Gene Sperling, the director of the National Economic Council. The staff obviously wanted to welcome the President back, and there s Betty Currie giving the President a hug. CHARLES GIBSON And wearing a Christmas sweater, which is very nice. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Exactly. CHARLES GIBSON Let me come back to the point. Thank you, George, for clarifying me on the geography there of the West Wing of the White House, which, I should point out, was very much an issue before the grand jury of where all those rooms were situated. But let me come back to what you were saying, because, Bill, you pointed me right to the question that I wanted to ask. For a long time in this House debate, moderate Republicans were saying if we re going to support the President, he needs to come forward and take greater responsibility for what he did in front of the grand jury. They wanted him to acknowledge in some way that he had lied. Now, obviously, he was not going to do that in the statement he made today. Does are the Republicans in the Senate going to insist on that kind of an action from the President, or are we back to basically the President staying exactly where he s been all along? BILL KRISTOL Oh, I think, look, Republicans in the Senate are going to have the view Republicans in the Senate are not going to believe that 223 out of 228 Republicans in the House are somehow purely the captives of partisan spirit, that their action is fundamentally illegitimate or without any merits. Reasonable people can differ on impeachment versus censure. As Cokie said earlier today, for many members it probably was a 51 - 49 percent call. But I don t think the President s going to win over Republican members in the Senate if he makes it seem that you were kind of a nut or just a purely partisan character if you voted for impeachment. I mean, Arlen Specter, the moderate Republican senator from Pennsylvania -- every House Republican, many of them moderates, from Pennsylvania voted for impeachment. Arlen Specter is not going to agree in a sense that his colleagues in the House from Pennsylvania didn t act in good faith. And I think the President will need to distance himself from Dick Gephardt s rhetoric here, say, Look, reasonable people may have made what we regard as a mistaken interpretation of the Constitution here. I acknowledge my errors. Let s close this in an appropriate way. I do think the President, in other words, is going to have to move away from the rhetoric of today. This may have been useful to bolster morale among Democrats. It s not going to be useful reaching out to Republicans in the Senate. CHARLES GIBSON George Stephanopoulos, will he do that move away from that rhetoric of today? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Well, not all of it. But I agree with parts of what Bill is saying. First of all, I think the President was a bit more conciliatory than Bill is suggesting, except that he didn t say a lot of the words that Republican senators are going to demand. Perhaps today was not the right day for it, but he is going to have to move in that direction and go farther not in contrition. That s not the issue, but in his admissions of wrongdoing. But the words you will hear in the future are what you heard today the Constitution. There will be a lot of talk about the Constitution by the President and his defenders. The word compromise, the word bipartisan. What the President is going to try to do is reach over the head of the senators and hope that they re affected by public opinion. CHARLES GIBSON Of course, both sides were invoking the Constitution in the debate today. Cokie, let me come to you to finish this. And let me ask you about what George and Bill were just saying. George was saying that he s going to invoke the word bipartisan a lot. It s interesting the Democrats were saying this is an illegitimate process in the House because there was no bipartisanship for impeachment. But I wonder if it is just the Democrats standing fast in the Senate, will we be as offended by bipartisanship if it exists over there as well? COKIE ROBERTS Well, of course, bipartisanship is a two - way street by definition, and the Democrats hung together, and the Republicans hung together. So they were equally partisan. Dick Gephardt, invoking Henry Hyde s line that impeachment ultimately has to be bipartisan, and that s true. Because ultimately two - thirds of the Senate, at least conviction, ultimately has to be bipartisan because two thirds of the Senate has to vote to convict. But it was interesting how he had his other people do the attacks and the thanks, and then the President s main message was move on, which is, of course, the message that he has been very effectively getting across. CHARLES GIBSON Well, I thank all of you for the service with Peter through the day and in this few moments, as we saw the President giving his reaction to what had occurred today in the House of Representatives as they approved two articles of impeachment. There was an event that occurred after Peter went off the air that you should see. Henry Hyde, on behalf of the Judiciary Committee, led a delegation of Republicans to the Office of the Secretary of the Senate, a man named Gary Sisko (ph). And as you see, Chairman Hyde read this statement saying that he was presenting in official form House Resolution 614, which is the resolution of impeachment, contains the two articles of impeachment. The Secretary of the Senate accepted that on behalf of the Senate, and now we wait to find out if, indeed, there will be a formal trial of the President of the United States in the Senate with the Chief Justice of the United States presiding that could ultimately result in the removal of the President of the United States from office. We will have a wrap - up of what has been a very historic day on Saturday World News Tonight later this evening. I should also mention that on This Week With Sam Donaldson & Cokie Roberts tomorrow, Congressman Christopher Cox, who is one of those being considered for Speaker now that Bob Livingston has withdrawn his candidacy -- Christopher Cox of California will be with them. Also, because there is this other story that is going on the bombing of Iraq. There were explosions in Baghdad at the very moment that the Speaker Pro Tempore, the man in the chair, Ray LaHood of Illinois, was announcing that the House had adopted the first article of impeachment, at that very moment, bombs were dropping over Baghdad. And so, tomorrow on This Week will be the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Henry Shelton, and also the Secretary of Defense, William Cohen. I m Charles Gibson in New York. Good afternoon.
THE PRESIDENT DELIVERS REMARKS ON HOUSE VOTE DEMOCRATS SHOW PARTY UNITY
16:00:00 WARNING: THIS IS AN UNCORRECTED COPY. NOT A FINAL VERSION. ANNOUNCER This is an ABC News Special Report. Now reporting, Charles Gibson. CHARLES GIBSON, ABC NEWS Good afternoon. I m Charles Gibson in New York. And we are awaiting at the moment the appearance of the President of the United States. He is going to appear in the area just adjacent to the South Lawn of the White House. There you are looking at a shot down on the White House. That is the North Lawn, the front lawn of the White House. And the President is inside. He has been meeting with the Democratic members of the House of Representatives. The Democratic members left the Capitol after today s session of the House of Representatives, which, as you probably know by now, at which time, the House adopted two of the four articles of impeachment against the President. There are the buses sitting in front of the White House, and there is the rundown of the House action today. They approved Article 1, which involves perjury before the grand jury. They involved Article number 3, which is the obstruction of justice count. They rejected Articles 2 and 4. As I say, the House Democratic members, who were in the minority on Article 1 and Article 3, then got on buses, which are parked in front of the White House, went to the White House and have been meeting with the President in the East Room. That is the large reception room on the first floor of the White House that many thousands of people have seen when they take the public tour of the White House. Anyway, it is in that room that he was scheduled to meet with the Democratic members, and after that meeting, they were going to be coming out into the area adjacent to the Rose Garden near the South Lawn on the driveway between the White House it s an exit driveway, actually, where functionaries, dignitaries come in. And he was going to have a comment with the press. It s the first time that we ve had a chance to see him on what is obviously a very historic day, not only for President Clinton but for the presidency itself. Sam Donaldson, do we know anything about what they ve been talking about? Is this simply a pep rally, or is there real substance to be discussed here? SAM DONALDSON, ABC NEWS Well, Charlie, it was billed in advance pep rally, I guess, is our term. It was billed in advance as a show of support by Democratic members of the House and leadership up on Capitol Hill for the President. One of the main purposes is to try to counter the idea that Mr Clinton should resign. They anticipated that a lot of people, particularly Republicans, would now call on him to resign, and they wanted to make it clear that not only would he not resign, but his party was behind him in this resolution to stay in office. I think that was principal purpose number one for holding this. And number two, Charlie, the Clinton people for years have been expert at using television to portray messages. And the message they want to portray today is that this president is still in the saddle. He is still doing business as the nation s chief executive, and he has solid support from his party. CHARLES GIBSON Sam, you mention there is you point to the fact that there s great symbolism, therefore, in all of this. But also I think it will be rather important what the President has to say when he comes out. Because it seems to me there are two things he could do when he emerges. Number one, he could be aggrieved. He could be angry. He could be frustrated. Or he could take a rather conciliatory point of view in all of this. SAM DONALDSON That is what we re told the President will do. Maybe other members of the Democratic leadership will continue the assault on the Republicans. But we re told that Mr Clinton, of course, will rise above that, and he will come much more in sorrow than anger. He will say that he wants to continue the job of chief executive. But we re told he also may again express contrition and remorse for having brought the country to this point. And we re also told that he will signal, using perhaps the euphemisms finding some bipartisan solution. Or maybe more direct that he is open to censure. He is open to condemnation. He is open to just about anything the Congress wants to do to him short of removing him from office. CHARLES GIBSON But then, if that is the line he takes, Sam, will we not be in a sort of strange situation where we have countervailing (ph) things happening within the White House. The President being very conciliatory, coming in sorrow not anger, as you point out, and his staff, the people who have to lobby the Senate now in these coming negotiations and perhaps eventually trial, taking a rather hard line about this being unfair, partisan, etc. All the things we heard members of the House Democratic members of the House express in the session today. SAM DONALDSON Well, their strategy at the moment calls for treating the Senate with great respect, including the Republican leaders of the Senate, depending, of course, on how the Republican leaders act in the next few days or weeks. They will concentrate, if they talk about the Republicans at all, about the partisanship in the House of Representatives. But they will come to the Senate showing great respect and asking only for fairness and asking for deliberations. And of course, finding some way, if they can, to avoid coming to the vote. You know, you would think, Charlie, that people who believe in Mr Clinton and think this is an improper process would be very confident that he could win that vote. It takes 67 votes, and they would have to get 15 or more Democrats, depending on how all the Republicans acted, in order to remove him from office. And yet, there is not that great confidence here today that you can just say, Well, all right, let s go to trial, do the Senate work its will, take the vote and we win. They want censure before they come to a vote. CHARLES GIBSON All right, Sam Donaldson. Let me have you stand by, as I know you will. A couple of other things that need to be discussed. And while we re waiting for the President and the Democratic members of the House to come out, we should mention them. Those of you who were watching the debate today heard in rather dramatic fashion the Speaker - elect, Bob Livingston, Republican congressman from Louisiana, who had assumed that he was going to become Speaker on January 6 heard him in rather remarkable fashion say, in front of the House, that I cannot do the job or be the kind of leader that I would like to be under current circumstances. And then he continued by saying the following. REP BOB LIVINGSTON, (R) LOUISIANA So I must set the example that I hope President Clinton will follow. I will not stand for Speaker of the House on January 6, but rather I shall remain as a backbencher in this Congress that I so dearly love for approximately six months into the 106th Congress, whereupon I shall vacate my seat and ask my governor to call a special election to take my place. CHARLES GIBSON That was Bob Livingston in front of the House of Representatives before the votes on the articles of impeachment today. Needless to say, that sent members of the House who did not expect the Livingston announcement into a hub - bub, and there have been some developments on who may be the new Speaker - elect and eventually Speaker of the House. Bill Kristol, who is well piped in to the Republican politics in Washington, is standing by in our Washington studio. Bill, what s happened on that front? BILL KRISTOL, ABC NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST Well, I gather Republicans have been meeting ever since they the impeachment articles passed. It looks like there s a pretty strong consensus behind Denny Hastert, the Republican from Illinois. He s a deputy whip right now, acceptable to all factions of the party. Apparently letters being circulated already has more than 50 signatures in support of him. The other candidate is Chris Cox of California, who mounted a short - lived challenge to Livingston and then withdrew, and Livingston had the votes just seven weeks ago. Current House Republican leadership, the rest of it except for Livingston -- that is to say, Armey and especially Tom DeLay, who s awfully influential with the members they are working hard for Hastert, and they expect Denny Hastert to be the next Speaker of the House. CHARLES GIBSON Now you talk familiarily forget me trying to do that word but you speak with great familiarity about Denny Hastert. But that is a name, this is a face that nobody in this country knows. BILL KRISTOL That s true. That was true of historically many Speakers Carl Albert, John McCormick (ph). They were got along well with all functions of the party, were competent, were respected, had lots of friends, had friends across the aisle. Dick Gephardt is friendly with Denny Hastert. They re from neighboring states, obviously. I think Hastert is really is the end of the age of Newt. It is the end of the Speaker as the voice of the party, as an ideological leader. It has returned to a more old - fashioned Speaker, someone who will, as they keep saying, make the trains run, mediate fights among Republicans, defer on the whole to committee chairmen and try, I think, to reach out across the aisle a little bit to the minority party. CHARLES GIBSON Cokie Roberts is also with us on Capitol Hill. Cokie, it was interesting. Bill just said this is the end of Newt - ism. This is a man who appeals to the conservative wing of the party and to moderate Republicans? COKIE ROBERTS, ABC NEWS Well, enough to both of them, I think. And basically, I have here already a statement from Dick Armey supporting Hastert, and I think that something has to get in the way of this train in order to stop it. CHARLES GIBSON All right. While you are speaking, the President has come out of the residence now. You see him there, joined by Vice President Gore, and Mrs Clinton is also with him. And there, second from the left next to the President is the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives, Dick Gephardt. And I don t honestly know if the other members of the House delegation who went to visit the President are going to be coming with him or not. I m told that they are following him out 101 members. One hundred and one Democrats, that is a good number of the Democrats in the House. That s, also behind them, John Podesta, who is the chief of staff to the President since Erskine Bowles left. Anyway, they are coming out, and 101 100 other Democrats behind or besides Dick Gephardt are also coming out as well. Well, now, the best - laid plans. They ve sneaked into the West Wing of the White House. So I don t know if they re going to come out immediately or not. Anyway, so let me while I ve got, again, this second, let me come back to this, Cokie. To what extent to do we know that this is a done deal, or is the Cox challenge still alive? Do we still have a race between Dennis Hastert and Christopher Cox? Or do we think that this is going to happen? You started to hold up a statement there. COKIE ROBERTS A statement from Dick Armey, the Majority Leader, supporting Dennis Hastert. I think that there s very much an atmosphere right now of trying to get everybody behind Hastert and canonize him or coronate him. But Christopher Cox seems ready to run, and I think he the vote will not be until January. There are a bunch of freshman Republicans that have a say. And I think that you can t quite say that there is already a Speaker - designate yet. CHARLES GIBSON Very quickly, Bill Kristol, while we re seeing the other members of the Democratic delegation come out of the White House, out of the residence and over toward the West Wing, very quickly, there was some talk Democrats were saying, Gee, Bob Livingston, won t you reconsider? I gather that s a nonstarter. There was some talk that perhaps Newt Gingrich now might come back in some sort of cobbled together fashion to resume the speakership. Neither of those were even in the realm of possibility? BILL KRISTOL I don t think so, Charlie. And I guess Cokie was told, heard last night from lots of members yearning for Bob Michel (ph) or Dick Cheney, not going to happen, I think. CHARLES GIBSON All right. There you see the Democratic members David Bonior, the minority whip. John Dingell from Michigan. I can go after name after name after name. But the Democratic delegation gathering around the podium, and I gather once they re all in place, the President will come out. And as we were talking a moment ago, the tone that the President takes here, it is symbolic that all the Democratic members will be standing behind him in this show of solidarity. And as you know by the votes today, there is solidarity among the Democrats. Only five on the critical first article of impeachment abandoned the President and voted with the Republicans. So there is solidarity, and this picture will well demonstrate that. But there is also this question of what tone the President is going to take in the remarks that he makes. And George Stephanopoulos, before the President actually comes out, I was asking Sam there whether the President would be angry or whether he would be conciliatory. I gather you probably agree that he will take a conciliatory tone in the remarks he makes. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, ABC NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST I think so, Charlie. Because you know, the White House and the President have learned their lesson over this year. You know, we ve talked a lot about missed opportunities. The missed opportunities in January, in August when the President gave his very angry speech after his grand jury testimony. The White House and the President are not going to make that mistake again. President Clinton is likely to take the high road today. Call for a bipartisan compromise on censure, but also go back to what always has worked for him. He s going to do the business of the country, do the people s business. And the White House hopes that this show of Democratic unity will be in sharp contrast to the chaos on the Republican side. CHARLES GIBSON George? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Look CHARLES GIBSON George, if he s going to be the good cop then in his response to what has happened today, who s going to be the bad cop? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Look at all those people standing by the podium, Charlie. I think the Democrats will continue to say that this was a partisan, illegitimate lame - duck impeachment. That will be the drum beat over the next month. Meanwhile, the President and his lawyers will take a much will offer an olive branch to the Republicans in the Senate. It s a tough balance, but it s the only one they can do. CHARLES GIBSON You know him. How tough a day was this for Bill Clinton, George? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS I think it s got to have been about the worst day of his life, Charlie. This is a man who s dreamed of being president. Now he s become only the second president to be impeached. But he ll fight through it. CHARLES GIBSON It is seemed, looking at him, and I don t mean to read too much into it, but it is seemed looking at him in the last couple of weeks through that trip to the Mideast and since he came back it looks to me like he has aged, and he s looked tired. And I thought you could see it in his visage. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS I think that s exactly right, Charlie. I think it s finally settled in. You know, President Clinton has an amazing capacity for denial. But in the last few days, it s all come in on him. This is real. Tomorrow morning, he ll wake up and see these results, and I think he knows that. And he also knows this is probably the hardest thing to deal with that it was, at large part, his fault, and there s nothing he can do about it. CHARLES GIBSON If he feels that, George, though, why is everyone so quick to say it has not entered his mind, he does not give a thought to the idea of resignation? I think the Vice President said that it would be, what is it, it would be more likely that a meteor GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS A meteor striking. Yeah. I think for two reasons. Number one, it s just not in his makeup. Because as much as he feels that he s to blame in part for this, he also believes he s been a victim of illegitimate attacks. But more than that and the argument that unifies all Democrats is that this would be bad for the presidency, that it is somehow wrong for a president to be driven from office, driven to resignation by a partisan vote of the Congress. They think that would be a violation of the presidency, of the independence of the presidency. And they re going to fight on those grounds. CHARLES GIBSON Sam? Is Sam Donaldson still there? Sam, are you there? SAM DONALDSON Charlie? CHARLES GIBSON Yeah, George knows him so well. You have watched him so well in the last few months. Do you see this? Do you see it really settling in on the President? SAM DONALDSON Absolutely. I was in the White House the second time for one week before the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke. And the difference between the Bill Clinton that I saw for that first week and that we ve all seen on television and elsewhere before that, and the one that s aged through these months. George is quite right. The President is expert at denial and expert at believing that others have caused all this problem. But I agree that at this point, I think it is dawning on him that he has no one but himself to blame. Whatever the sins of a Kenneth Starr, whatever the sins of partisan Republicans, he brought us to this point by his actions, and I think it may be really dawning on him that not only is that the fact, but that the future is uncertain. You know, Charlie, Bill Clinton has been very skillful, very good some say also lucky in that he has won the important political battles of his life. But it maybe dawning on him that here is one at last that he may not win. CHARLES GIBSON I should mention we talked about the symbolism of this picture the Democrats from the House of Representatives gathered around that podium, where the President will make his remarks, give his reaction to the actions of the House today in approving two articles of impeachment. There is also symbolism into the picture that you are looking at now. Mrs Clinton right at her husband s side, arm in arm with him, as he comes out, and what we have said over and over again, but it doesn t detract from the fact that it is an historic day. And we now get the President s reaction to what has happened. As we mentioned, Vice President Gore, Minority Leader Gephardt and John Podesta, the chief of staff right behind him. The President getting applause from the Democratic members, and he will speak in just a moment. (Applause) by John Podesta, the chief of staff. JOHN PODESTA, CHIEF OF STAFF On behalf of the President and the First Lady, the Vice President and Mr -- Mrs Gore, the White House and the entire administration, I want to thank the members who came here today and all the members who stood with you on the floor of the House over the past several days. Thank you for standing up for what you believe in. Thank you for standing up for fairness. Thank you for standing up for the American people. Thank you for standing up for the Constitution. And thank you for doing so with dignity and determination, passion and patriotism. I would like to introduce a man who has done so much for our country, a great leader, a great friend of the American people, Congressman Dick Gephardt. (Applause) REP RICHARD GEPHARDT, (D) MINORITY LEADER Mr President, Mr Vice President, First Lady Hillary Clinton, we have just witnessed a partisan vote that was a disgrace to our country and our Constitution. Chairman Henry Hyde once called impeachment "the ultimate weapon" and said that "for it to succeed, ultimately it has to be bipartisan." The fact that a vote as important as this occurred in such a partisan way, violated the spirit of our democracy. We must turn away now from the politics of personal destruction and return to a politics of values. The American people deserve better than what they've received over these long five months. They want their Congress to bring this issue to a speedy compromise, closure. And they want their president, twice elected to his office, to continue his work fighting for their priorities. (Applause) The Democratic caucus in the House will continue to stand alongside our president, and we will work to enact the agenda that we were sent here to pass. (Applause) We look forward to supporting his agenda in the upcoming session of Congress. The President has demonstrated his effectiveness as a national and world leader in the face of intense and unprecedented negative attacks by his opponents. I am confident that he will continue to do so for the rest of his elected term of office. (Applause) Despite the worst efforts of the Republican leadership in the House, the Constitution will bear up under the strain, and our nation will survive. The constitutional process about to play out in the United States Senate will hopefully, finally, be fair and allow us to put an end to this sad chapter of our history. Ladies and gentlemen, it is now my honor to present our great Vice President of these United States, Al Gore. CHARLES GIBSON We mentioned, obviously we re all interested in the President s reaction. They realize that, and so a couple of political speeches from the Minority Leader and the Vice President. Then we ll hear the President. VICE PRES AL GORE Thank you very much, Mr Leader. To you and to David Bonior and to the entire Democratic caucus leadership, thank you for what you have done for our country. I would also like to single out for a special thanks and praise Congressman John Conyers and all of the members of the Judiciary Committee who are present here today. (Applause) And to you, Dick Gephardt, I would like to repeat a judgment that I made to the smaller group earlier. You and I came here on the same day 22 years ago. And in all that time I don't believe I have heard a finer speech on the floor of the House of Representatives than the one that you delivered this morning. (Applause) But in all that time, I do believe this is the saddest day I have seen in our nation's capital. Because today's vote in the House of Representatives disregarded the plain wishes and good will of the American people and the plain meaning of our Constitution. Let me say simply, the President has acknowledged that what he did was wrong. But we must all acknowledge that invoking the solemn power of impeachment in the cause of partisan politics is wrong -- wrong for our Constitution, wrong for the United States of America. (Applause) Republican leaders would not even allow the members of the House or Representatives to cast the vote they wanted to. They were not allowed to vote their conscience. What happened as a result does a great disservice to a man I believe will be regarded in the history books as one of our greatest presidents. (Applause) There is no doubt in my mind that the verdict of history will undo the unworthy judgment rendered a short while ago in the United States Capitol. But we do not have to wait for history. Instead, let us live up to the ideals of this season. Let us reach out to one another and reach out for what is best in ourselves, our history and our country. Let us heal this land, not tear it apart. Let us move forward, not toward bitter and angry division. Our Founders anticipated that there might be a day like this one, when excessive partisanship unlocked a forum of vitriol and vehemence that hurts our nation. We all know that a process that wounds good people in both parties does no service to this country. What America needs is not resignations, but the renewal of civility, respect for one another, decency toward each other and the certain belief that together we can serve this land and make a better life for all of our people. That is what President Clinton has done. That is what he is doing, and that is what he will continue to do for the next two years. I feel extremely privileged to have been able to serve with him as his partner for the past six years, and I look forward to serving with him for the next two years. I have seen him close at hand, day after day, making the most important decisions about peace, prosperity and our future. And making them always by asking, "What is right for the American people? What is right for all of the American people?" I know him. I know his wonderful first lady. I know his ... (Applause) I know his heart and his will. And I have seen his work. Six years ago, he was left with the highest budget deficit in history, and he ended it. Six years ago, he was handed a failing economy. Today, because of his leadership, we are on the verge of the longest period of peacetime prosperity in all of American history. And I know nothing will stop him from doing the job that the American people sent him here to do. I say to you today, President William Jefferson Clinton will continue and will complete his mission on behalf of the American people. I'm proud to present to you my friend, America's great president, Bill Clinton. (Applause) PRES BILL CLINTON Thank you very much. Thank you. Good afternoon. Let me begin by expressing my profound and heartfelt thanks to Congressman Gephardt and the leadership and all the members of the Democratic caucus for what they did today. I thank the few brave Republicans who withstood enormous pressure to stand with them for the plain meaning of the Constitution and for the proposition that we need to pull together, to move beyond partisanship, to get on with the business of our country. I thank the millions upon millions of American citizens who have expressed their support and their friendship to Hillary, to me, to our family and to our administration during these last several weeks. The words of the members here with me and others who were a part of their endeavor in defense of our Constitution were powerful and moving, and I will never forget them. The question is, what are we going to do now? I have accepted responsibility for what I did wrong in my personal life, and I have invited members of Congress to work with us to find a reasonable bipartisan and proportionate response. That approach was rejected today by Republicans in the House, but I hope it will be embraced by the Senate. I hope there will be a constitutional and fair means of resolving this matter in a prompt manner. Meanwhile, I will continue to do the work of the American people. We still, after all, have to save Social Security and Medicare for the 21st century. We have to give all our children world - class schools. We have to pass a patients' bill of rights. We have to make sure the economic turbulence around the world does not curb our economic opportunity here at home. We have to keep America the world's strongest force for peace and freedom. In short, we have a lot to do before we enter the 21st century. And we still have to keep working to build that elusive one America I have talked so much about. For six years now, I have done everything I could to bring our country together across the lines that divide us, including bringing Washington together across party lines. Out in the country, people are pulling together. But just as America is coming together, it must look -- from the country's point of view -- like Washington is coming apart. I want to echo something Mr Gephardt said. It is something I have felt strongly all my life. We must stop the politics of personal destruction. (Applause) We must get rid of the poisonous venom of excessive partisanship, obsessive animosity and uncontrolled anger. That is not what America deserves. That is not what America is about. We are doing well now. We are a good and decent country, but we have significant challenges we have to face. In order to do it right, we have to have some atmosphere of decency and civility, some presumption of good faith, some sense of proportionality and balance in bringing judgment against those who are in different parties. We have important work to do. We need a constructive debate that has all the different voices in this country heard in the halls of Congress. I want the American people to know today that I am still committed to working with people of good faith and good will of both parties to do what's best for our country, to bring our nation together, to lift our people up, to move us all forward together. It's what I've tried to do for six years. It's what I intend to do for two more until the last hour of the last day of my term. (Applause) So with profound gratitude for the defense of the Constitution and the best in America that was raised today by the members here and those who joined them, I ask the American people to move with me to go on from here to rise above the rancor, to overcome the pain and division, to be a repairer of the breach -- all of us -- to make this country as one America what it can and must be for our children in the new century about to dawn. Thank you very much. (Applause) CHARLES GIBSON The President concluding his remarks on the South Lawn of the White House, and some very interesting aspects to all of this. As you watched it, you almost had the feeling that you were watching a political rally. The President saying thank you, thank you, as he looked forward from that dais. But really, all that was in front of that dais were a few cameras. Basically, the audience, obviously the television audience, and that is the audience upon which he wanted to have an effect as he made those remarks. So while it appeared that he was talking to a group of people, he really wasn t. This was designed, obviously, for the cameras. And the President saying now he wants a reasonable bipartisan and proportionate response to what he has done. Obviously, another reaching out to the Congress in hopes that some sort of accommodation can be reached. Some sort of a penalty can be imposed that comes short of the impeachment that was voted by the House today and for which the Senate will now try him. He did say, in all of that, that he hopes all of this will stop the politics of personal destruction and get rid of the poisonous venom that is in Washington. I guess that was a somewhat slap at those who oppose him. But for the most part, his tone was conciliatory. One other interesting byproduct to all of this as you watched it, the Vice President of the United States, Al Gore, was saying to Dick Gephardt, the Minority Leader of the House, that it was the finest speech that he d ever heard in the House given by Gephardt today. And then Gephardt introduced the Vice President in glowing terms, and yet, as you probably know, Dick Gephardt, has entertained the idea of running for president against Al Gore. And so, the two of them, who have some differences of political ambition, were there brought together by the history of this moment and were put in the position of giving high praise to one another on that platform. Sam, let me get your reaction to the President s remarks. Sam Donaldson. SAM DONALDSON Well, Charlie, it s fascinating. If you were the man or woman from Mars suddenly dropped down on the South Lawn and didn t know any of the background and said, What is all of this about? You d be hard pressed to understand that it is about this president having been impeached by the House and sent to the Senate for trial. Mr Clinton made two powerful themes one, that he s accepted responsibility, that he wants to work out something that, as he said, is reasonable bipartisan proportional approach to punish him. He didn t use the words to punish him, but that s what he meant, short of removal. And the second theme, as George Stephanopoulos pointed out earlier, was his plea to stop the politics of personal destruction. He hopes the American people will see this not as the Republicans claim as a matter of about crimes. There s a lot of evidence that the President may have committed crime. But as some sort of bipart or rather partisan, venomous push against him for reasons that would escape this man and woman from Mars. It s really interesting, Charlie. We don t have a precedent for this. Andrew Johnson I don t know what happened then. He certainly didn t come out on the South Lawn, and there was no television. But to have this sort of rally at the end of this day is just phenomenal. CHARLES GIBSON Bill Kristol, your reaction to this, and then I want to ask you a question. BILL KRISTOL I was struck by -- well, he s going to have to reach across the aisle to Republicans in the Senate to work out censure. Or obviously, ultimately, I guess he could just get Democratic votes and fail to get convicted. But if he wants to avert a long trial in the Senate, he needs Republicans. It s odd to begin that process with a purely partisan event. And I was very struck by the sentence, I have accepted responsibility for what I did wrong in my personal life. That is not at issue. The Democrats in the House let s remember, these Democrats in the House introduced a censure resolution that said the President had dishonored his office and abused the public trust. I really think the President needs to say something like that. He needs to acknowledge what the House Democrats have acknowledged -- that he has failed in his official capacity. He can t just keep saying he s made mistakes in his personal life. CHARLES GIBSON There s a fascinating picture, George. And I just want to call attention to it. And I don t want to diminish in any way what you re saying. But we re looking in through the windows into the Oval Office, and one of the people applauding Bill Clinton was Betty Currie. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS We re looking at Betty Currie s office, Charlie. CHARLES GIBSON I m sorry. Betty Currie s office. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Yes, that is Betty Currie s office right off the Oval Office. CHARLES GIBSON Thanks, George. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS And that s Mrs Currie, and you see Gene Sperling, the director of the National Economic Council. The staff obviously wanted to welcome the President back, and there s Betty Currie giving the President a hug. CHARLES GIBSON And wearing a Christmas sweater, which is very nice. GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Exactly. CHARLES GIBSON Let me come back to the point. Thank you, George, for clarifying me on the geography there of the West Wing of the White House, which, I should point out, was very much an issue before the grand jury of where all those rooms were situated. But let me come back to what you were saying, because, Bill, you pointed me right to the question that I wanted to ask. For a long time in this House debate, moderate Republicans were saying if we re going to support the President, he needs to come forward and take greater responsibility for what he did in front of the grand jury. They wanted him to acknowledge in some way that he had lied. Now, obviously, he was not going to do that in the statement he made today. Does are the Republicans in the Senate going to insist on that kind of an action from the President, or are we back to basically the President staying exactly where he s been all along? BILL KRISTOL Oh, I think, look, Republicans in the Senate are going to have the view Republicans in the Senate are not going to believe that 223 out of 228 Republicans in the House are somehow purely the captives of partisan spirit, that their action is fundamentally illegitimate or without any merits. Reasonable people can differ on impeachment versus censure. As Cokie said earlier today, for many members it probably was a 51 - 49 percent call. But I don t think the President s going to win over Republican members in the Senate if he makes it seem that you were kind of a nut or just a purely partisan character if you voted for impeachment. I mean, Arlen Specter, the moderate Republican senator from Pennsylvania -- every House Republican, many of them moderates, from Pennsylvania voted for impeachment. Arlen Specter is not going to agree in a sense that his colleagues in the House from Pennsylvania didn t act in good faith. And I think the President will need to distance himself from Dick Gephardt s rhetoric here, say, Look, reasonable people may have made what we regard as a mistaken interpretation of the Constitution here. I acknowledge my errors. Let s close this in an appropriate way. I do think the President, in other words, is going to have to move away from the rhetoric of today. This may have been useful to bolster morale among Democrats. It s not going to be useful reaching out to Republicans in the Senate. CHARLES GIBSON George Stephanopoulos, will he do that move away from that rhetoric of today? GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS Well, not all of it. But I agree with parts of what Bill is saying. First of all, I think the President was a bit more conciliatory than Bill is suggesting, except that he didn t say a lot of the words that Republican senators are going to demand. Perhaps today was not the right day for it, but he is going to have to move in that direction and go farther not in contrition. That s not the issue, but in his admissions of wrongdoing. But the words you will hear in the future are what you heard today the Constitution. There will be a lot of talk about the Constitution by the President and his defenders. The word compromise, the word bipartisan. What the President is going to try to do is reach over the head of the senators and hope that they re affected by public opinion. CHARLES GIBSON Of course, both sides were invoking the Constitution in the debate today. Cokie, let me come to you to finish this. And let me ask you about what George and Bill were just saying. George was saying that he s going to invoke the word bipartisan a lot. It s interesting the Democrats were saying this is an illegitimate process in the House because there was no bipartisanship for impeachment. But I wonder if it is just the Democrats standing fast in the Senate, will we be as offended by bipartisanship if it exists over there as well? COKIE ROBERTS Well, of course, bipartisanship is a two - way street by definition, and the Democrats hung together, and the Republicans hung together. So they were equally partisan. Dick Gephardt, invoking Henry Hyde s line that impeachment ultimately has to be bipartisan, and that s true. Because ultimately two - thirds of the Senate, at least conviction, ultimately has to be bipartisan because two thirds of the Senate has to vote to convict. But it was interesting how he had his other people do the attacks and the thanks, and then the President s main message was move on, which is, of course, the message that he has been very effectively getting across. CHARLES GIBSON Well, I thank all of you for the service with Peter through the day and in this few moments, as we saw the President giving his reaction to what had occurred today in the House of Representatives as they approved two articles of impeachment. There was an event that occurred after Peter went off the air that you should see. Henry Hyde, on behalf of the Judiciary Committee, led a delegation of Republicans to the Office of the Secretary of the Senate, a man named Gary Sisko (ph). And as you see, Chairman Hyde read this statement saying that he was presenting in official form House Resolution 614, which is the resolution of impeachment, contains the two articles of impeachment. The Secretary of the Senate accepted that on behalf of the Senate, and now we wait to find out if, indeed, there will be a formal trial of the President of the United States in the Senate with the Chief Justice of the United States presiding that could ultimately result in the removal of the President of the United States from office. We will have a wrap - up of what has been a very historic day on Saturday World News Tonight later this evening. I should also mention that on This Week With Sam Donaldson & Cokie Roberts tomorrow, Congressman Christopher Cox, who is one of those being considered for Speaker now that Bob Livingston has withdrawn his candidacy -- Christopher Cox of California will be with them. Also, because there is this other story that is going on the bombing of Iraq. There were explosions in Baghdad at the very moment that the Speaker Pro Tempore, the man in the chair, Ray LaHood of Illinois, was announcing that the House had adopted the first article of impeachment, at that very moment, bombs were dropping over Baghdad. And so, tomorrow on This Week will be the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Henry Shelton, and also the Secretary of Defense, William Cohen. I m Charles Gibson in New York. Good afternoon.
APTN 1830 PRIME NEWS NORTH AMERICA
AP-APTN-1830 North America Prime News -Final Sunday, 17 January 2010 North America Prime News +Haiti Aftermath 3 04:45 AP Clients Only WRAP Airport, mass in damaged cathedral ADDS US people leaving Haiti Elderly 02:25 AP Clients Only REPLAY Elderly starving residents abandoned in nursing home after quake US Haiti 02:22 See Script REPLAY Sunday talk shows on Haiti, officials on airport situation Afghanistan Holbrooke 01:54 AP Clients Only REPLAY Presser by US special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan Iraq Ali 2 01:52 Part No Access Iraq WRAP Al-Majid gets death penalty for Halabja attack; sentencing +GRAPHIC+ Spain Politician 02:43 See Script REPLAY Spanish lawmaker comments after FBI uses his photo for bin Laden poster Chile Voting 2 03:11 Pt No Access Chile WRAP Chileans cast votes in presidential election, Bachelet +Ukraine Election 9 03:17 AP Clients Only WRAP Yushchenko sot; Donetsk, monks, troops vote ADDS exit poll B-u-l-l-e-t-i-n begins at 1830 GMT. APEX 01-17-10 1357EST -----------End of rundown----------- AP-APTN-1830: +Haiti Aftermath 3 Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:+Haiti Aftermath 3- WRAP Airport, mass in damaged cathedral ADDS US people leaving LENGTH: 03:51 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Creole/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 633661 DATELINE: Port au Prince, 17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 03:51 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1830 NORTH AMERICA PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) 1. Wide of evacuees lined up on runway 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevan Hanson, US Coast Guard Lieutenant: "The medical treatment will be better there. The living conditions are going to be better. Just to get them out of here." 3. Two boys in foreground, other evacuees behind them 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Colleen Hedglin, American escorting children being evacuated: "It's a gift right now. We're leaving lots of good friends behind them. I'm going to come back." (Question: You're going to come back?) "I have to." 5. Evacuees heading to Coast Guard plane 6. Coast Guard official and evacuees 7. Woman and child and other evacuees waiting 8. Hedglin and children getting on plane 9. Wide of plane with evacuees waiting (FIRST RUN 1430 ME EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) 10. Pan from Continental airline plane to workers organising shipping boxes 11. Workers organising boxes 12. Slow pan of workers and equipment 13. Helicopter preparing to take off 14. Pan of front loader moving supplies past workers 15. Soldiers on tarmac with helicopter taking off and coast guard plane taxiing in background (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) 16. Wide of shattered Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption, car under rubble in foreground 17. Close of broken stained glass window, pull out to show remains of cathedral 18. Pan of congregation 19. Close of young congregant 20. Man directing song 21. Wide of congregation singing 22. Close of woman singing 23. Close of woman's hand counting rosary 24. Close of woman's face, pulls out 25. Father Marie-Eric Toussaint leading prayers 26. Congregation praying 27. Close of woman holding rosary 28. Congregants taking communion 29. Close of communion chalice 30. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Father Marie-Eric Toussaint, Catholic Priest: "We tell them to live with faith because it is a difficult situation to live through, but they have to trust God because he is there to help them to rebuild Haiti and the community." 31. Top shot, pan from Toussaint to congregation STORYLINE US Coast Guard officials loaded 50 earthquake survivors on a plane bound for Santo Domingo on Sunday, while Haitians in the quake-devastated capital of Port-au-Prince attended Sunday Mass in a partially collapsed cathedral. From the Dominican capital, the evacuees were expected to travel on to other destinations. Coast Guard Lieutenant Kevan Hanson the evacuees are being ferried to Santo Domingo to get them in "a better condition." "The medical treatment will be better there. The living conditions will be better. Just to get them out of here," he said. Many of the evacuees were children. Colleen Hedglin was escorting children to safety. She described the evacuation as "a gift." But said she would have to return. "We're leaving lots of good friends behind. I'm going to come back." As the main delivery point for aid, the airport was clogged with planes and personnel. Workers unload planes that make it in, while helicopters and other planes land and takeoff. The airport is a choke point for supplies, with the international effort straining its capacity. The aid was slowly reaching survivors as rescue crews battled against time to pull out a shrinking number of people still alive under the ruins. Among the ruins of Port-au-Prince's Roman Catholic cathedral, Haitians were giving thanks for simply being alive at Sunday Mass. Preaching to a small crowd of survivors inside the cathedral's remaining walls after Tuesday's magnitude-7.0 earthquake, Father Marie-Eric Toussaint said he advisor his congregation "live with faith because it is a difficult situation to live through, but they have to trust God." Congregants responded with particular fervour to the priest's invocation "The Lord Be With You," responding with "And also with you. May the Lord be with All of us." As Catholic and Protestant worshippers across the city met for their first Sunday services since the magnitude-7.0 quake, many Haitians were still waiting for food and water and some took vengeance against looters. Haitians seemed increasingly frustrated by a seemingly invisible government and rescue workers were exasperated by the struggle to get aid through the small, damaged and clogged airport run by US military controllers, and to get it from the airport into town. Doctors Without Borders said Sunday that a cargo plane carrying a field hospital was denied permission to land at the airport and had to be rerouted through the Dominican Republic - creating a 24-hour delay in setting up a crucial field hospital. Nobody knows how many died in Tuesday's quake. Haiti's government alone has already recovered 20-thousand bodies - not counting those recovered by independent agencies or relatives themselves, Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive told The Associated Press. The Pan American Health Organisation now says 50-thousand to 100-thousand people perished in the quake. Bellerive said 100-thousand would "seem to be the minimum." UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon called the quake "one of the most serious crises in decades." Yet President Rene Preval has made no broadcast address to his nation, nor has he been seen at any disaster site. Instead he has met Cabinet ministers and foreign visitors at a police station that serves as his base following the collapse of the National Palace. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1418EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Haiti Elderly Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:Haiti Elderly- REPLAY Elderly starving residents abandoned in nursing home after quake LENGTH: 02:25 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: French/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 633654 DATELINE: Port au Prince, 17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 02:25 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Pan from hospice sign to elderly people 2. Mid of elderly woman sitting on ground 3. Close-up of elderly woman 4. Mid of elderly people sheltering from sun under tree 5. Mid of hospice administrator Jean Emmanuel talking to patient 6. SOUNDBITE (French) Jean Emmanuel, hospice administrator: "The priority is to help feed our elders, because they will die of hunger, old men were killed during the earthquake. Yesterday an old man died of hunger, he was a survivor of the earthquake but he died of hunger afterwards." 7. Wide of body under sheet 8. Close-up of foot and flies 9. Wide of street scene, bed next to street 10. Mid of elderly man in wheel chair 11. Wide of man in wheel chair and body on ground 12. SOUNDBITE (French) Jean Emmanuel, hospice administrator: "Now our old people survive, but some of them cannot even breathe normally. I do not think that they will survive another day without drinking or eating." 13. Wide of elderly in wheelchairs, people helping 14. Mid of elderly man being washed 15. Close-up of elderly man being washed 16. Wide of person being pushed in wheelchair 17. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Lucien Phileas, hospice patient: ++NON VERBATIM++ "If we do not eat we'll die, if you do not drink ...." 18. Mid of elderly woman lying down 19. Close-up of elderly woman's hand 20. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Marie Ange Leve, hospice patient: ++NON VERBATIM++ "We need medication..." 21. Mid of people lying down 22. Wide of elderly people gathered under tree STORYLINE: There was no food, water or medicine on Sunday for the 85 surviving residents of the Port-au-Prince Municipal Nursing Home, just a mile (1 1/2 kilometres) from the airport where a massive international aid effort was taking shape. One man has already died, and administrator Jean Emmanuel said more would follow soon unless water and food arrive immediately. The dead man was Joseph Julien, a 70-year-old diabetic who was pulled from the partially collapsed building and passed away on Thursday for lack of food. On Sunday his body was still laying on a mattress close to those who were still alive. With six residents killed in the quake, the institution now has 25 men and 60 women camped outside their former home. Only some have a mattress in the dirt to lie on. One resident said some of them had pooled their money to buy three packets of pasta, which the dozens of pensioners shared on Thursday, their last meal. Since there was no drinking water, some didn't touch the noodles because they were cooked in gutter water. Many residents were wearing diapers that hadn't been changed since the quake. The diapers were beginning to attract rats. Nobody knows how many died in Tuesday's quake in Haiti. Haiti's government alone has already recovered 20-thousand bodies - not counting those recovered by independent agencies or relatives themselves, Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive told The Associated Press. The Pan American Health Organisation now says 50-thousand to 100-thousand people perished in the quake. Bellerive said 100-thousand would "seem to be the minimum." Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1400EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: US Haiti Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:US Haiti- REPLAY Sunday talk shows on Haiti, officials on airport situation LENGTH: 02:22 FIRST RUN: 1630 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/ABC STORY NUMBER: 633653 DATELINE: Washington DC - 16/17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 02:22 ABC THIS WEEK - NO ACCESS N AMERICA / NO ACCESS INTERNET / COURTESY ABC "THIS WEEK" AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: ABC THIS WEEK - NO ACCESS N AMERICA / NO ACCESS INTERNET / COURTESY ABC "THIS WEEK" 17 January 2010 1. Dr Rajiv Shah, Director USAID, in studio interview 2. Mid shot of news anchor 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr Rajiv Shah, Director USAID "We... immediately after this happened, the President pulled everyone together and said look I want you all to work together. I want you to move quickly and I want you to be aggressive and be coordinated and that's exactly what we did." 4. Shah and news anchor 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr Rajiv Shah, Director USAID "I mean that happened in parallel. We didn't wait. And in terms of engaging the military and the response that happened from the very beginning. The reason we are going to have all of these military assets there that will expand our distribution capability this coming week is because we acted to make that happen immediately after this disaster occurred." 6. News anchor speaking in live hook-up with Lieutenant General P.K. "Ken" Keen 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant General P.K. "Ken" Keen, Military Deputy Commander, USSOUTHCOM "And we are going to have to address the situation of security. As you've said we've had incidents of violence that impede our ability to support the government of Haiti and answer the challenges that this country faces, suffering the tragedy of epic proportions." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY 16 January 2010 8. US President Barack Obama walking to podium with former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush ABC THIS WEEK - NO ACCESS N AMERICA / NO ACCESS INTERNET / COURTESY ABC "THIS WEEK" 17 January 2010 9. Former Presidents Clinton and Bush with ABC host 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bill Clinton, former US President, UN Haiti envoy "But people have to understand, not only was the city levelled and others as well, west, the Parliament building was wrecked, the Presidential palace was wrecked. As of yesterday, there was still missing parliamentarians, still missing government ministers. I mean the country, the structure of the country was taken down and I think the United States has done a good job and I think the international community has done a good job. The UN structure was taken down. The biggest loss of life in a single day in UN history so, President Bush and I were talking before, people get frustrated by this but I think if you just, within two or three days the thing will be in much better order." 11. Three shot of Bush, Clinton and host 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, former US President: "We've got to deal with the desperation and there ought to be no politicisation of that." 13. Three shot of Clinton, Bush and host 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, former US President: "The question, the fundamental question for the country is "Do we care?". Beyond the storm, or earthquake, do we care? And the answer is, "I think we should". And I think we ought to care from a humanitarian perspective and I also think from a strategic perspective because it makes sense to have a stable democracy in our neighbourhood." 15. Two shot of Clinton and Bush STORYLINE: US officials said Sunday that relief efforts were focussed firmly on getting food, water and medical supplies to victims and survivors simultaneously in the aftermath of Haiti's devastating magnitude 7 earthquake. Speaking on ABC's "This Week" Sunday show, Rajiv Shah, who leads the US Agency for International Development, said President Obama had called on his agency and the military to work in parallel to gets efforts mobilised aggressively and that initial efforts were also focused on trying to find survivors in the rubble. Lieutenant General Ken Keen of the US Southern Command, speaking from Haiti, called the situation a "a disaster of epic proportions with tremendous logistical challenges." He told viewers that while more infrastructure was arriving in to the country, security had become a great concern. "As you've said, we've had incidents of violence that impede our ability to support the government of Haiti and answer the challenges that this country faces", he said. Officials believe that 100-thousand or more people died in the quake that struck the impoverished country on Tuesday. Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton both refuted any attempt to politicise the government's response to the Haiti earthquake. Bush said that he doesn't know what critics are talking about when they claim Obama is trying to score political points with a broad response to Haiti's woes. The most vocal critic has been conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh who urged people not to donate and said he wouldn't trust that money donated to Haiti through the White House Web site would go to the relief efforts. He said people contribute enough by paying income taxes. Clinton stressed that the infrastructure of Haiti had been completely destroyed and key government buildings had collapsed. He added that once the search and rescue efforts was wound down, relief efforts would become more coordinated and that the situation would then improve over the next few days. With the outpouring of donations, US officials have been urging Americans to make sure their contributions flowed to legitimate organisations. Former President George W. Bush, speaking of Haiti's despair, said Americans should care about what happens for humanitarian and national security reasons. The Haitian government meanwhile has set up 14 distribution points for food and other supplies, while US Army helicopters are scouting locations for more. Aid groups have opened five emergency health centres since the quake occurred and the UN says it's already feeding 40-thousand affected by the disaster. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1332EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Afghanistan Holbrooke Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:Afghanistan Holbrooke- REPLAY Presser by US special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan LENGTH: 01:54 FIRST RUN: 1330 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 633642 DATELINE: Kabul, 17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 01:54 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Wide of US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, Richard Holbrooke, taking seat at conference room 2. Mid of Holbrooke and interviewer 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Holbrooke, US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan: "The people who demand that the foreign troops leave Afghanistan before they talk about peace are actually asking for surrender. Let us not be naive about this. In the long run, foreign troops will leave Afghanistan. We don't want to occupy Afghanistan, we are here to help you." 4. Cutaway of photographer 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Holbrooke, US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan: "The majority of the people fighting with the Taliban are not supporters of (Taliban leader) Mullah Omar, they are not supporters of the ideology of al-Qaida, they don't even know who al-Qaida is. And yet they fight because they have been misled by false information. They have been led to believe false things." 6. Mid of journalist asking question 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Holbrooke, US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan: "As for the people on what you call the blacklist, you know there are several lists and I have not read the lists carefully, because a lot of the names don't mean much to me. Some of the people on the list are dead, some shouldn't be on the list and some are amongst the most dangerous people in the world and I would be all in favour of looking at the list on a case by case basis. To see if there are people on the list who are on it by mistake and should be removed or in fact are dead." 8. Close of writing on notepad 9. Mid of Holbrooke leaving conference room STORYLINE US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, Richard Holbrooke told reporters in Kabul on Sunday that foreign troops would eventually pull out of Afghanistan but not in a way that suggested abandoning their mission. Holbrooke was speaking on his return from a trip to the Swat valley on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. It was his sixth visit to Afghanistan in the past 12 months. He told reporters that "the people who demand that the foreign troops leave Afghanistan before they talk about peace are actually asking for surrender." He also said that he supports a proposal to lure fighters with no strong allegiance to militants away from the insurgency and reintegrate them into Afghan society. "Let us not be naive about this. In the long run, foreign troops will leave Afghanistan. We don't want to occupy Afghanistan, we are here to help you," he explained. He also said he believed the support base for Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar and for al-Qaida was limited and based on deception and what he called "false information." Holbrooke, who had a heated meeting last year with Afghan President Hamid Karzai over the fraud-stained Afghan presidential election, spoke at town hall-style event in the Afghan capital of Kabul where about 40 academics, videographers, representatives from non-governmental organisations, radio broadcasters and others were invited to ask Holbrooke questions. Their inquiries ranged from questions about reintegration and corruption to US economic assistance and the Pakistani intelligence service's involvement in violence in the region - a question Holbrooke declined to answer. Holbrooke also said he talked with Karzai on Sunday about a plan the government is crafting to offer jobs, vocational training and other economic incentives to tens of thousands of Taliban foot soldiers willing to switch sides after eight years of war. Asked if he would favour removing individuals, such as Mullah Omar or Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, from a United Nations sanctions list, Holbrooke said he could not "imagine what would justify such an action at this time, and I don't know anyone who has suggested that." However he said that "would be all in favour of looking at the list on a case by case basis. To see if there are people on the list who are on it by mistake and should be removed or in fact are dead." The UN Security Council imposed sanctions against the Taliban in November 1999 for refusing to send Osama bin Laden to stand trial on "terrorism" charges in connection with two 1998 US embassy bombings in Africa. The sanctions - a travel ban, arms embargo and assets freeze - were later extended to al-Qaida. In July 2005, the council extended the sanctions again to cover affiliates and splinter groups of al-Qaida and the Taliban. But questions have been raised about the fairness of the list and the rights of those subject to punitive measures to argue their case for being removed. Last month, the council approved new measures to make sure that UN sanctions target the right people, companies and organisations for links to al-Qaida and the Taliban. The sanctions committee is reviewing all 488 individuals and entities on the list. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1334EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Iraq Ali 2 Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:Iraq Ali 2- WRAP Al-Majid gets death penalty for Halabja attack; sentencing +GRAPHIC+ LENGTH: 01:52 FIRST RUN: 1230 RESTRICTIONS: Part No Access Iraq TYPE: Arabic/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/Al-Iraqiya STORY NUMBER: 633624 DATELINE: Baghdad, 17 Jan 2010/FILE LENGTH: 01:52 ++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES OF DEAD BODIES++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY AL-IRAQIYA - NO ACCESS IRAQ SHOTLIST ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1230 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) AL-IRAQIYA - NO ACCESS IRAQ 1. Former Iraqi official Ali Hassan al-Majid, also known as "Chemical Ali", in dock listening to sentence being read by Judge Aboud Mostafa 2. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Judge Aboud Mostafa: ++Partly overlaid with al-Majid responding to sentence++ "Ali Hassan al-Majid was sentenced to death by hanging (Al-Majid: "Thanks to God, Thanks to God")...for the crime of murder as a crime against humanity." 3. Mid of judges bench 4. Former Iraqi Defence Minister, Sultan Hashim al-Taie, in dock 5. Mostafa speaking 6. Iraq's former Director of Military Intelligence, Sabir Azizi al-Douri 7. Lawyers taking notes (FIRST RUN 0930 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY 8. Various of traffic on Baghdad streets 9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Adnan Farhan, Baghdad Resident: "I think Chemical Ali deserved to be executed a long time ago, because the Baath (party) has committed many crimes and continues to do so today. So I think that carrying out this execution will curb these crimes and atrocities." 10. Traffic on street 11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ansam al-Mahdawi, Baghdad Resident: "I think it is an unfair sentence. They were officials directed by a regime leading the country. Even now, we are all being directed by a regime or whatever political organisation or entity is in charge." (FIRST RUN 0930 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Halabja - March 1988 (exact date unknown) 12. Aerial of destruction after gas attack 13. Various of dead bodies in street following gas attack ++GRAPHIC++ STORYLINE Saddam Hussein's cousin Ali Hassan al-Majid, also known as "Chemical Ali", was convicted on Sunday of crimes against humanity and received a death sentence for his involvement in the 1988 poison gas attack on Halabja. Families of some of the victims in the Baghdad court cheered when the guilty verdict against al-Majid was handed down in a trial over one of the worst poisonous gas attacks against civilians. The attack left 5,600 people dead. Al-Majid has already received previous death sentences for atrocities committed during Saddam's rule, particularly in the government's suppression of the Kurds in the late 1980s. One Baghdad resident on Sunday welcomed the court's ruling, while another described the sentence as "unfair," saying al-Majid was simply following orders. Other officials in Saddam's regime received jail terms for their roles in the attack on Halabja, a Kurdish town near the Iranian border. Former Defence Minister Sultan Hashim al-Taie faces 15 years in prison, as does Iraq's former director of military intelligence, Sabir Azizi al-Douri. Farhan Mutlaq al-Jubouri, the former head of military intelligence's eastern regional office, was sentenced to 10 years. The jail terms were handed down following guilty verdicts on charges that included crimes against humanity. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1335EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Spain Politician Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:Spain Politician- REPLAY Spanish lawmaker comments after FBI uses his photo for bin Laden poster LENGTH: 02:43 FIRST RUN: 1230 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: Spanish/Nat SOURCE: AP PHOTOS/ATLAS/DoS TV STORY NUMBER: 633638 DATELINE: Madrid, 16 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 02:43 US STATE DEPARTMENT - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE ATLAS AGENCY - NO ACCESS SPAIN SHOTLIST AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and Location Unknown 1. STILL photo of al-Qaida leader, Osama bin Laden, not digitally aged 2. STILL of bin Laden, digitally enhanced to make him look older, wearing turban and beard 3. STILL of bin Laden, digitally enhanced to make him look older, with no beard and no turban ATLAS AGENCY - NO ACCESS SPAIN Madrid - 16 January 2010 4. Spanish politician, Gaspar Llamazares walking up to speak to reporters 5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Gaspar Llamazares, Politician: "In the first instance, this matter of using my image in the cut and paste picture of bin Laden without a beard would be comical if weren't an issue that affected the safety and freedom of every citizen. It's comic because it illustrates the extremely basic standards among intelligence and security services which we've noticed recently in the US and now have experienced first hand not only in the CIA, but also within the FBI." US STATE DEPARTMENT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Date and Location Unknown 6. Internet page showing digitally aged photos of al-Qaida leader, Osama bin Laden ATLAS AGENCY - NO ACCESS SPAIN Madrid - 16 January 2010 7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Gaspar Llamazares, Politician: "No. From what I've seen there have been no explanations given. They've not had the grace to give any explanation either to myself or to the Unidad Left." (Question: How did you feel when you heard the news. I suppose...?) "In the first instance I didn't believe it. I thought it was a joke. But it was no longer the 28th December (Saint's Day - when typically people in Spain play jokes on each other) and later, when I realised it was not a joke and that it was serious, I took it seriously and decided to act seriously." US STATE DEPARTMENT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Date and Location Unknown 8. Internet page showing digitally aged photos of bin Laden ATLAS AGENCY - NO ACCESS SPAIN Madrid - 16 January 2010 9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Gaspar Llamazares, Politician: "They have not said anything. They have not said anything to us, the ones who have been affected. The least they could do... the least they could have done was a phone call and a convincing explanation. But until now there have been less than excuses." AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Date and Location Unknown 10. Sequence of all three STILL photos of bin Laden ATLAS AGENCY - NO ACCESS SPAIN Madrid - 16 January 2010 11. UPSOUND (Spanish) Gaspar Llamazares, Politician: "It would not occur to me to go to, or have anything to do with the United States at this time. It wouldn't occur to me to travel to the United States. I had reservations before about going there but now I don't have reservations, I am convinced that I wouldn't be able to enter the country and that I would run into difficulties." (Question: If they invited you on a friendly basis) "No idea. Under these circumstances I think it would be unlikely. The security of Bin Laden seems not to be in any danger but mine does." 12. Llamazares walks away from cameras STORYLINE A Spanish lawmaker said he was horrified to learn that the FBI (US Federal Bureau of Investigation) used an online photograph of him to create an image showing what al-Qaida leader, Osama bin Laden might look like today. The digitally enhanced image of bin Laden - made to show what he would look like today as an older man - reportedly used Spanish lawmaker Gaspar Llamazares' photo and appeared on a wanted poster updating the US government's 1998 photo of the al-Qaida leader. FBI spokesman Ken Hoffman acknowledged to the Spanish newspaper El Mundo that the agency used a picture of Llamazares taken from Google Images. In a statement on Saturday, the agency would say only that it was aware of similarities between their age-progressed image and that of an existing photograph of a Spanish public official. The wanted poster appeared on the State Department website rewardsforjustice.net, listing a reward of up to 25 (m) million US dollars. The FBI said the photo of bin Laden would be removed from the website. Llamazares, former leader of the United Left party, was elected to Spain's parliament in 2000. The photograph of him reportedly used to make the wanted poster originally appeared on posters for his 2004 general-election campaign. He told reporters in Madrid on Saturday that he found the whole thing hard to believe at first. "In the first instance I didn't believe it. I thought it was a joke. But it was no longer the 28th December (Saint's Day - when typically people in Spain play jokes on each other) and later, when I realised it was not a joke and that it was serious, I took it seriously and decided to act seriously," he explained. Llamazares said he planned to ask the US government for an explanation and said he reserved the right to take legal action. He also said he was concerned to see the government resorting to what he called sloppy techniques, especially in the light of recent security alerts such as the attempted Christmas Day bombing of a Detroit-bound airplane. Bin Laden, who is wanted in the September 11, 2001 attacks on New York and Washington DC and the 1998 US embassy bombings in Tanzania and Kenya, is believed to be hiding in the lawless Pakistan frontier bordering Afghanistan. His exact whereabouts have been unknown since late 2001, when he and some bodyguards slipped out of the Tora Bora mountains after evading air-strikes, special forces and Afghan militias. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1337EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: Chile Voting 2 Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:Chile Voting 2- WRAP Chileans cast votes in presidential election, Bachelet LENGTH: 03:11 FIRST RUN: 1530 RESTRICTIONS: Pt No Access Chile TYPE: Spanish/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/CH7 STORY NUMBER: 633651 DATELINE: Santiago - 17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 03:11 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY CHANNEL 7 - NO ACCESS CHILE SHOTLIST ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1530 NEWS UPDATE - 17 JANUARY 2009) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Santiago 1. Presidential candidate Sebastian Pinera emerging from voting booth and walking over to ballot box 2. Cutaway of photographers 3. Pinera casting his ballot, with sons Cristobal (left) and Sebastian standing behind him 4. Close of ballots 5. Pinera shaking hands with unidentified man and showing his ink-stained thumb to media, hugs his wife, Cecilia Morel, before leaving poling station ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1530 NEWS UPDATE - 17 JANUARY 2009) CHANNEL 7 - NO ACCESS CHILE Santiago 6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Sebastian Pinera, Chilean Presidential Candidate: "Tonight we are going to celebrate a big triumph but we are going to celebrate it as democrats do, the men of good will, with joy and hope but also with unity. The triumph is the triumph of democracy." 7. Chilean president Michelle Bachelet emerging from voting booth and casting her vote 8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, Chilean President: "As with all the election days in Chile I am convinced that this one as well will be quiet and normal. I call the Chilean people to go and vote early and wait with tranquillity in their homes for the results. This is a very competitive election but once again Chile will show its democratic capacities." ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1530 NEWS UPDATE - 17 JANUARY 2009) CHANNEL 7 - NO ACCESS CHILE La Union 9. Various of presidential candidate and former president Eduardo Frei casting his ballot (FIRST RUN 1230 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2009) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Santiago 10. Exterior of polling station 11. Couple reading information outside polling station 12. Security outside polling station 13. Wide interior of school where of polling station is being prepared 14. Close of ballot box 15. Various of woman casting her vote 16. Close of ballot box with ballots inside 17. Various of woman registering with polling station officials 18. Woman walking into polling booth 19. Cutaway of officials 20. Woman casting vote STORYLINE Chile's presidential election on Sunday could come down to a nerve-racking, vote-by-vote count after a late surge by former President Eduardo Frei made his race against billionaire Sebastian Pinera too close to predict. Pinera led every poll until Frei and outgoing President Michelle Bachelet repeatedly invoked the legacy of Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship, raising fears of a retreat on human rights if the centre-right Pinera gains power. The theme shook up the well-organised campaign of Harvard-trained economist Pinera, which had focused on economic growth, jobs and change in a country led by a coalition of centre-left politicians for 20 years. Pinera said the government was spreading lies to frighten voters. Flanked by his sons Cristobal and Sebastian, Pinera cast his ballot in the capital Santiago, hugging his wife, Cecilia Morel, as he left the polling station. "Tonight we are going to celebrate a big triumph but we are going to celebrate it as democrats do, the men of good will, with joy and hope but also with unity. The triumph is the triumph of democracy," Pinera said. Bachelet also voted in Santiago, telling reporters that the election was "very competitive." Frei, meanwhile, cast his ballot at a school in the city of La Union, nearly 900 kilometres (559 miles) south of Santiago. With Frei and Pinera agreeing on most government policies - a reflection of the remarkable economic, social and political success that has given Bachelet nearly 80 percent approval ratings as she ends her five-year term - human rights became the wild card. Bachelet, herself a torture victim, steadfastly supported judicial efforts to resolve crimes against humanity during the 1973-1990 dictatorship, and more than 700 former military and security officials have been put on trial. But efforts to resolve dictatorship-era rights abuses remain a painful topic around Latin America, and aggressive moves are not always popular. Voters in Uruguay rejected an initiative to overturn that country's amnesty laws last year, even as they elected a former rebel as president. Amnesties also remain in force in Brazil, and while Argentina overturned its amnesty laws, rights trials there have become highly politicised. The issue came to the forefront of Chile's presidential campaign last month when a judge concluded that Frei's father, a Pinochet critic, had been secretly poisoned to death. Bachelet raised it again by inaugurating Chile's Museum of Memory less than a week before the vote. And Frei pressed it hard in Wednesday's televised debate, forcing Pinera to acknowledge that "part of my sector committed errors" during the dictatorship by denying human rights violations even as thousands of Pinochet's opponents were tortured or killed. The ruling coalition "may have committed errors, but not horrors," Frei countered, noting that the death of his father would never have been investigated had the amnesty proposal Pinera made as a senator been approved. The 60-year-old Pinera said no former Pinochet Cabinet members would serve in his Cabinet, but angry supporters quickly forced him to take back the promise. The key question is whether fears of a retreat on rights cases run deep enough to persuade voters who stayed home during last month's first-round election to show up on Sunday. Most of those who abstained are leftists, and if enough of them vote this time, Pinera would lose his edge. Pinera's 15-point lead in December dropped to 1.8 percent, according to a nationwide poll published on Wednesday by the independent firm Market Opinion Research International, which showed him leading by 50.9 percent to 49.1 percent for Frei. But the 3 percentage point error margin made the race anybody's guess. Both sides ordered party representatives to scrutinise Sunday's vote count, and to challenge questionable paper ballots. Pinera had lawyers staff a hotline for challenges, and Frei's campaign was focusing its watchdog efforts on precincts where Pinera had a first-round advantage. Pinera put his PhD in economics to use popularising credit cards in Chile, growing a fortune that now includes a large share of Chile's main airline, a leading television channel and the country's most popular soccer team. He said the government has "run out of gas," and that he would create a (m) million jobs and double the Chile's median income of 12-thousand US dollars a year. Frei's 1995-2000 term was rather unremarkable and many leftists preferred the more dynamic Marco Enriquez-Ominami, who came in third in the first round and tepidly endorsed Frei last week, saying the right should be kept from the presidency. Chile's population is nearly 17 (m) million, but only 8.3 (m) million are registered to vote, and fewer than 760-thousand new voters have been added in the last 21 years under a system that makes voting mandatory for life for those who register. Frei has promised to make a priority of Enriquez-Ominami's proposal to make registration automatic and voting optional. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1338EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1830: +Ukraine Election 9 Sunday, 17 January 2010 STORY:+Ukraine Election 9- WRAP Yushchenko sot; Donetsk, monks, troops vote ADDS exit poll LENGTH: 03:17 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Ukrainian/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/POOL STORY NUMBER: 633659 DATELINE: Various - 17 Jan 2010 LENGTH: 03:17 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY NATIONAL EXIT POLL POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Kiev 1. Wide pan of street and polling station 2. Wide of people entering polling station 3. Mid of polling station officials 4. Wide of monks going to polling station officials to get ballot papers 5. Mid of two monks 6. Mid of monk coming out voting cabin and putting his ballot in voting box 7. Close of ballot falling inside voting box, tilt down 8. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vladimir Kotsaba, Monk: "We hope that God will send that well-deserved person who will be able to lead our country out from that difficult condition that we have. For this we pray our God." (FIRST RUN 1230 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Kiev 9. Wide of incumbent presidential candidate, Victor Yuschenko approaching press 10. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Victor Yushchenko, Ukrainian President: "I regret that Georgia, and our beloved Georgian people are being used for manipulations in Ukraine, and it once more proves who in reality our political leaders are and in which direction they are heading." 11. Wide of Yushchenko leaving (FIRST RUN 1130 NEWS UPDATE - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Donetsk 12. Wide of mine 13. Mid interior of polling station 14. Mid of man casting ballot 15. Woman arranging food and drinks on table 16. Close of lard 17. Pan of food and drinks on table 18. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Nikolai Sergeychuk, Voter from Donetsk: "He (Yanukovych) has done everything for Donetsk and went to Kiev to make order there, but Yulia (Tymoshenko) does not let him to put everything in order." 19. Mid of people in hallway (FIRST RUN 1330 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Sevastopol 20. Sevastopol skyline with harbour 21. Sailors coming out of voting booth and casting votes 22. Close-up of vote being cast 23. Pan of polling station interior 24. Mid of ballot boxes 25. Wide of interior of polling station 26. Zoom out of exterior of polling station ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1830 NORTH AMERICA PRIME NEWS - 17 JANUARY 2010) NATIONAL EXIT POLL POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Kiev 27. Members of Democratic Initiative Fund announcing exit poll results 28. Democratic Initiative Fund members 29. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Elko Kucherev, Director of Democratic Initiative Fund: "The results are as follows: Yanukovych, Viktor - 31. 5; Tymoshenko, Yulia - 27. 2 percent; Tigipko, Sergei - 13.5; Yatseniuk, Arseniy - 7.8 percent, Yushchenko, Victor 6.0 percent." 30. Mid of exit poll announcement STORYLINE Disillusioned Ukrainian voters appear to have given archenemy of the 2004 Orange Revolution a first-place finish in the initial round of presidential voting on Sunday, setting up a showdown with the heroine of the Orange movement, an exit poll showed. Early predictions suggest the pro-Russian opposition leader Viktor Yanukovych will finish first in the hard-fought contest and Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko will finish second, clearing the path for a runoff between the pair sometime next month. The two candidates stood on opposite sides of the barricades during the peaceful mass demonstrations that kicked out a reputedly corrupt government in 2004, when Yanukovych had the backing of the Kremlin and Orange forces denounced Russian interference. Both candidates now say they will abandon efforts to join NATO and pledge to repair ties to Russia, the region's dominant power. Among those casting their vote in the capital Kiev on Sunday was monk Vladimir Kotsaba who said he hoped the election would bring a more positive future to the country. "We hope that God will send that well-deserved person who will be able to lead our country out from that difficult condition that we have. For this we pray our God," he said. President Viktor Yushchenko, elected in 2004 with 52 per cent of the vote, appeared at a polling station in Kiev although exit polls are predicting he'll take just six percent of the vote. The National Exit Poll is by a consortium of groups that conduct up to 13-thousand interviews outside 240 polling places and has a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points. Yushchenko was hospitalised with a massive dose of the chemical dioxin during the 2004 race, and his poison-scarred face became a symbol of defiance to tyranny for (m) millions around the world. Five years later, he is widely seen as an ineffective leader for failing to curb corruption and modernise Ukraine's economy. In Donetsk and in the Black Sea harbour city of Sevastopol, a southern Ukrainian city on the Crimea peninsula, many voters cast their ballots yet kept expectations low. One recent poll showed a majority of voters were concerned the election could be rigged. A suspicious Yuschenko reacted angrily to the arrival of electoral observers from neighbouring Georgia - at least 152 to the eastern city of Donetsk - on Saturday. "I regret that Georgia, and our beloved Georgian people are being used for manipulations in Ukraine, and it once more proves who in reality our political leaders are and in which direction they are heading," he said. Foes of Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko released a tape this week of a purported conversation between her and Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, in which he supposedly said he was sending 2,000 "battle-ready" observers to monitor the race. In a December opinion poll, only 34 per cent of Ukrainians said that they expected the election to be fair overall, while 57 per cent said the results could be manipulated or were certain to be stolen. As part of an international effort to bolster confidence in the election, foreign observers have fanned out across Ukraine to monitor voting in this country of 46 (m) million people with 36.6 (m) million registered voters. A spokesman for the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, said on Saturday that about 600 OSCE election monitors are in place, in addition to thousands of other foreign observers. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 01-17-10 1435EST ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------
CSPAN / ANDREW CARD INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LAMB
CSPAN / BRIAN LAMB INTERVIEW WITH WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF, ANDY CARD RS23 X86 slugged: 1555 CARD X86 Friday, October 14, 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SIMULTANEOUS ON-AIR CREDIT LOGO MAY NOT BE COVERED / NO MORE THAN A THREE MINUTE CLIP MAY BE USED AT A TIME 15:59:55 BRIAN LAMB, HOST: Andy Card, chief of staff to the president, why do you think that conservatives have reacted as strongly against Harriet Miers as they have? 16:00:04 ANDREW CARD, WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF: I don't think they know her. And I wish that they had been skeptical and looked to learn more about her and they would have been very comforted. I'm a little surprised that they came out of the box so cynically. 16:00:14 But, you know, she's a wonderful person. She has got a great track record. She broke through that glass ceiling before many people knew there was a ceiling there. And she was the first woman to be hired by a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of the Dallas Bar Association The first woman head of the Texas Bar Association. Very active in the American Bar Association. One of the top 50 female lawyers in America consistently. One of the top 100 lawyers in America. 16:00:45 And the White counsel, and the White House counsel has to deal with an awful of issues that touch on the Constitution. So she's really quite an expert on dealing with the realities of the struggles between the executive branch, the legislative branch, and I'm going to say, the judicial branch. 16:00:58 LAMB: But there seems to be more to this from the conservatives than just Harriet Miers. It seems like they're using this to really come after the president for some reason or another. Have you thought about this? 16:01:07 CARD: Well, of course, I'm concerned by it. But, you know, I have great confidence in the president and how he leads. And when he stood up and took that oath to be president of the United States, and it's shortest oath taken by anyone who serves in government, he said that he would preserve, protect and defend that Constitution. 16:01:21 And that's exactly what he does every day. And by selecting Harriet Miers as his nominee to the Supreme Court, he is confident that that Constitution will be protected for the future. 16:01:32 LAMB: What's the different being the chief of staff in the second term right now from what it was in the first term? 16:01:39 CARD: Well, as you know, when you're second-term president, you're not worried about reelection. So the first I would say is that the president understands that he has got a short amount of time to accomplish an awful lot. And he has got an awful lot of things that he knows should be done for America and for the world. 16:01:54 He has always had a great vision for where he should take the country. And he was able to accomplish some of that visionary leadership in his first term when he got the No Child Left Behind Act passed, and education -- reform our education system. 16:02:07 He inherited a recession and he cut taxes so that we could build our way out of the recession and get a strong economy moving. And then we had that horrible attack on September 11th, 2001, and that changed an awful lot, but it did not deter the president from the vision he had for the country in where he wants to tackle those tough issues that he knew about so that future generations wouldn't have to worry about them. 16:02:30 LAMB: Why do you do this for as long as you have? And you're -- what, now it has been 50 years since somebody has done as long as you have. 16:02:37 CARD: Well, I serve at the pleasure of the president for the time being. And that's what the piece of paper that hangs on my wall says, and I'm reminded of that everyday when I look at it. 16:02:45 I feel very privileged to work for the president of the United States. I feel it's a great privilege to work at the White House no matter who the president is, but I am particularly proud of this president and how he makes his decisions and the vision that he has for the country and the expectations that he has for the world. So I feel very privileged. But I serve at his pleasure. And if I'm not doing the job, I shouldn't be in the position. 16:03:05 I'm very comfortable with the reality that I am a staffer. I'm just a staffer. I'm responsible for the rest of the staff, but my job is to make sure the president has all that he needs in order to be able to do the job. 16:03:18 LAMB: The total years you have spent in the White House working for three different presidents? 16:03:22 CARD: Well, I started in 18 -- 1983, 18, 1983. (LAUGHTER) 16:03:28 CARD: And I had a respite from that experience when I helped run a campaign for president in New Hampshire in '87-'88, then came back to the White House and served former President Bush and was deputy chief of staff and then Secretary of Transportation. Oh, I guess I started in '83 and I am and other than the Clinton years I was in the White House for almost every year. 16:03:49 LAMB: Here's a piece of videotape in 1992 when you were Secretary of Transportation. 16:03:54 (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) CARD: My job as deputy chief of staff was to be everywhere that the chief of staff was not. And obviously he was not more places than he was. So I frequently had to run from meeting to meeting. My job was basically to be the managing partner at the White House, to make sure that it functioned on a day-to-day basis. One of the exciting parts of the job was being able to spend a lot of time with the president, because when the chief of staff was not with the president, I had the opportunity to be with the president. So I accompanied him on most of his foreign trips. I was able to participate in a lot of the foreign diplomacy and discussion that took place, a lot of the domestic policy discussions and the economic policy discussions that took place. But really I was kind of the micromanager at the White House. (END VIDEOTAPE) 16:04:35 LAMB: What are you now? 16:04:39 CARD: I'm responsible for making sure the White House meets the president's expectations of preparing him to make tough decisions. And I worry about the care and feeding of the president. That's probably the biggest responsibility that a chief of staff has. After all, the president has to have time to eat, sleep, and be merry. And I want to make sure that he has time to eat, sleep, and be merry. 16:04:56 I also have to make sure that the policy that he has to address is well-developed. So we have policy counsels, outstanding people. Steve Hadley replaced Condi Rice in the foreign policy world. And Al Hubbard doing the economic policy. And Claude Allen with the domestic policy. And we have Fran Townsend doing the homeland security policy. 16:05:12 So we have a good policy nucleus. And I make sure that that policy group gets to stimulate the president's thinking about the policy options that he has to consider. And then I have to make sure that we communicate with the right people at the right time when the president has made a decision. And I call that marketing and selling. 16:05:27 We have to communicate with Congress, with the American people, with other world leaders. And we have to communicate with the rest of the executive branch of government so that when a decision is made by the president, the people who had to implement that decision understand what the decision is, why he made it, why it's important that it be implemented the way the president has an expectation for the it be implemented. 16:05:47 LAMB: How do you stay in touch with him? 16:05:49 CARD: The president sees an awful lot of me. I greet him first thing in the morning and I say good night to him when he goes off to go home for the night. He probably sees much more of me than he wants to. I really do feel very blessed. 16:06:03 And we have a very candid, open relationship. It's a relationship that allows me to speak to him without any fear of retribution. I feel comfortable talking with him. And I know that he feels comfortable talking with me. But those conversations should be private. And they are, because I offer the president candid counsel, and he offers me sometimes very un-candid criticism. 16:06:27 So -- but, no, he's wonderful to work with and I spend a lot of time with him. I'm blessed that he and my wife get along well, and Laura and my wife get along well. So I feel that I'm very blessed but I am still just a staffer. The president is my friend and I do not want to let him down. But I am not his friend, I am a staffer. 16:06:49 LAMB: What do you call him? 16:06:51 CARD: I call him Mr. President. And he earned that title by gaining the respect of the American people and winning a vote for president of the United States. And it's a wonderful, wonderful title to have. And I'm proud to call him Mr. President. 16:07:01 LAMB: Did you ever call him George in the old days? 16:07:04 CARD: In the old days, before he was president, before he was governor? Yes. I called him George or W or Junior as many of us did. But he is the president and I'm proud to call him president. 16:07:13 LAMB: You know, for a long time there was a story about that he was called in to fire John Sununu when he was chief of staff. But recent reports in The Washington Post, among other places, say that you fired John Sununu, your boss. 16:07:27 CARD: Well, I have great respect for John Sununu. He was an outstanding chief of staff, and he's a good, close friend and someone that I admire an awful lot. But he had reached the point where he was not serving the president as well the president needed to be served. 16:07:43 And yes, I did deliver a message to the chief of staff, then John Sununu, that it was probably time for him to tender his resignation. I think that George Bush then had also delivered a similar message, but it didn't take. So I think I was brought in to help make sure the message was understood. 16:08:01 LAMB: Was that hard? 16:08:03 CARD: It was very hard because I had tremendous respect for John Sununu. And I was his deputy, I was the deputy chief of staff when he was the chief of staff. And -- but I also respect and support the president of the United States and I know that we all serve at his pleasure. And that's an obligation that I take very, very seriously. 16:08:21 LAMB: There was a -- I was trying to find the quote here where it talks about when you fire somebody, this isn't the quote, people feel like they've just been given a free car. How often have you had to fire people in your life? 16:08:35 CARD: Quite a few times in a lot of different experiences in my life. I worked at McDonald's when I was in college and had to fire people. I was a manager of McDonald's. I worked in business where I had to fire people. I ran a trade association where I had to fire people. 16:08:51 So it's not comfortable experience, but it is part of a life experience for people. And I don't think that we should ashamed when we suggest people should move on to find something better that is better suited to their lives as well. 16:09:05 LAMB: The president's critics say he hasn't fired enough people. 16:09:09 CARD: Well, I know who is no longer serving his administration and I know the views that the president has had. And I think that he has a great team serving him right now, but we all serve for the time being which means that no one should be secure in their job, they should just do it. And that's the president's prerogative. And he has a great number of people who are doing a terrific job for him right now. 16:09:29 LAMB: Where -- how far is your office away from his? 16:09:32 CARD: Oh, probably 50 yards away from the Oval Office, and the opposite corner of the White House. I guess you can't call the Oval Office in a corner because there are no corners in the Oval Office, but I have the corner office in the West Wing of the White House. 16:09:45 The other corners are located -- or have occupants Steve Hadley, the national security adviser to the president; Scott McClellan, the press secretary of the president; the president is one corner; and I'm in the next corner. 16:09:57 LAMB: What time do you get up in the morning? 16:09:58 CARD: I get up at 4:20. And my wife wakes up with me and we have breakfast together. And I'm usually in the White House at my desk at 5:30 a.m. And cramming to do an awful lot of reading to get ready for the day. I go through the intelligence reports, skim all the newspapers, go through the domestic policy issues and review the president's schedule that day, and then rush down to the Oval Office and get to exercise a phenomenal privilege when I say, good morning, Mr. President, when he shows up for work. 16:10:24 He shows up between 6:45 and 7:00 in the morning. 16:10:27 LAMB: What time do you go home at night? 16:10:30 CARD: I usually get home about 8:30, 9:00. And if Congress is in session, it could be later. And it's not unusual for me to be on the phone after I get home, especially if Congress is in session. I usually try to get to bed around 10:30, 11:00. 16:10:41 LAMB: How much sleep do you get? CARD: Not enough. But my experience has been that I get just barely enough to survive and I look forward to the opportunities to catch a nap every once in a while. 16:10:51 LAMB: Your wife, who is a minister, was quoted as saying, "I'm sure who you're married to, George Bush or me." (LAUGHTER)16:10:57 CARD: Well, there's an interesting story that is around that quote. It came during the 2000 election and I had just completed work on helping with the presidential debates. And I had been gone for quite some time and hadn't been around. And I was anxious to come home. I arrived home much later than I had planned because my flight was delayed and I had hoped to get home in time to take Kathy out for dinner. And got home, we just went to bed, got up the next morning, made a nice breakfast and proceeded to spurt out all of the excitement around the presidential debates and how much I respect then-Governor Bush and the effort he was making to be president. 16:11:36 And she said, are you married to me or to George Bush? And the phone rang, and Kathy answered the phone, and she said, it's George W. Bush, and handed me the phone. (LAUGHTER) 16:11:49 CARD: And -- no, I'm very committed to the president and how he does his job, but I love my wife and I am grateful that she married me. We've been married for 38 years and I'm very, very blessed that she has had her life with me. And I will tell you, she's giving a lot more than I give. And I'm grateful for it. 16:12:05 LAMB: How old are your three kids? 16:12:07 CARD: We have three children and four grandchildren. So our grandchildren are 12, 10, 8 and 6. So that will give some sense of how old our children are. We have two daughters that live in the D.C. area and a son who lives in South Carolina, and they're all married. 16:12:23 LAMB: Is there -- you know, we read that the president has a regimen that gets him rest, but you work seven days a week, you get very little sleep at night, is there a risk that you work too long and you're tired and make decisions when you're tired? 16:12:36 CARD: Well, thankfully I'm helping people make decisions. I'm not a penultimate decision-maker. The president is the decision-maker. And he has got the toughest decisions to make. And my job is to help him make those decisions. 16:12:49 But I -- all my life I have worked kind of this schedule. When I was in college I delivered newspapers early in the morning and worked at McDonald's late at night. So even when I was in high school I would get up in the morning and get the newspapers ready for the paperboys early in the morning. 16:13:03 So I've had this kind of lifestyle of early-to-bed and early-to-rise. And so far seem to be doing pretty well. 16:13:11 LAMB: When you first came in as chief of staff, it's my understanding that you had a dinner or something where former chiefs of staff came and gave advice? 16:13:23 CARD: I did. Mack McLarty, who was chief of staff to President Clinton, and Ken Duberstein who was chief of staff to President Reagan. They invited all of the other living chiefs of staff to a dinner that was given in my honor, and it was a wonderful experience. And, you know, regardless of the politics, of the philosophy that people bring to this office, there was great empathy for the challenge that I was about to take. And I learned a lot from other chiefs of staff. 16:13:43 I served with great pleasure under Jim Baker when he was chief of staff in the Reagan administration, and then Don Regan, and then Howard Baker, and Ken Duberstein, and then John Sununu, and Sam Skinner, and then Jim Baker again. So I've been very, very blessed and have learned an awful lot from each one of them. 16:14:00 LAMB: Let's say it's 2009, there's a brand new president of the United States and there's a new chief of staff, and they call you up and say, come to a dinner. And you're sitting around that dinner, what are you going to tell the next chief of staff that you've learned that you didn't know about before you got in this job? 16:14:14 CARD: I would say to remember that the job is not about the individual chief of staff, it's about the president of the United States and making sure that he is well-served. The hardest part about my job is, I think what I mentioned, that I cannot become his friend, I've got to stay his staffer. And there is great temptation to want to be the president's friend. But I fight that temptation every day and remind myself that I'm a staffer and if he's not comfortable with how he is being served, he should say good bye to his staffer. 16:14:46 Now as soon he says good bye to me, I want to be his friend. And he is my friend. 16:14:51 LAMB: There has got to be more. 16:14:57 CARD: Well, I think there's paying attention to the schedule. Most of the challenges of the chief of staff has centers around what other people don't think about. And most people presume that the president has all kinds of time to consider policy or to meet with people. And I want to make sure that the president does have time to take care of his spiritual being, his emotional health, his mental health and his physical health so that he's in a position to make a good decision. 16:15:20 Obviously he has to be well-prepared to make that decision in terms of learning the content of the policy and the ramifications of the policy. But I want to make sure he's in the right frame of mind and that he's ready to make a decision even when it's not anticipated, because we didn't plan on a September 11th, for example, and yet the president exhibited great leadership during that period of time because he was well-prepared just to make decisions. 16:15:45 LAMB: What happens if Don Rumsfeld calls up and says, I want to talk to the president? 16:15:51 CARD: He gets to talk to the president. One thing I do not do is restrict access to the president. In fact, I have a rule, if anyone who is on the White House staff or anyone who is in the cabinet needs to see the president, they should feel comfortable going to see the president. I don't want them to see the president if they just want to see the president, and you know a lot of people pretend they have a need and it's just a thin veneer of need covering a giant want, and I police that pretty carefully. 16:16:10 But I do not control access to the Oval Office with people who need to be there. I do expect to be informed about it, either before, during, or after. And the president is terrific about keeping me very well informed on what his day has been like. 16:16:24 But no, I don't sit outside the Oval Office with a turnstile and tell people they have to put quarters in in order to get into the Oval Office. 16:16:30 LAMB: What are the president's rules? 16:16:33 CARD: I think he is very open door. His rule is candor and efficiency. He is very efficient with his time. Meetings start on time and they end on time. He's very respectful of other people's schedules. He expects the briefings to be short and consistent with the word "brief," and yet wants them to be broad enough to include all of the policy options and all of the deliberations that rose those policy considerations to his level. 16:17:00 He understands that a presidential decision is a big deal. And so he gives the decision the kind of attention that it needs before he makes it. But he has the courage to make those decisions. 16:17:12 LAMB: When do you know he's mad? CARD: Oh, he's usually pretty candid about telling me, and I know how to read his body language pretty well. And I'll pull it out of him. I can tell when he's upset. But he has got a very candid relationship with me. And I value that and when the door is shut and it's just the two of us standing in the Oval Office, I feel very comfortable that he will tell me if he's unhappy about something. 16:17:33 LAMB: There has been a lot copy written recently, both from conservatives and others. I just want to read what some have said, and we rarely get a chance to have you respond to what is said about you. This is Cal Thomas, conservative columnist: "What should President Bush do about his declining poll numbers and when should he did it? The president is in danger of losing his base which wanted more than a Republican president, it believed it had twice elected a conservative president." Conservatives are writing every day, they're mad. What do you say to Cal Thomas? 16:18:10 CARD: The president is a conservative. He's a true-blue conservative who's track record speaks volumes. I think that he has been very consistent that which he promised the American people, that what he believes. He's a good conservative president and I think that the conservatives should be applauding the president's leadership and how he has chosen people to bring similar leadership to other parts of government. So I disagree with the premise of the story. LAMB: Cal Thomas writes: "Staffers with conviction seem unable to express differences with the president for fear it might jeopardize their access or even their jobs. Instead they tell him things that make him feel good." Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers has called him the most brilliant man she has ever known. CARD: Well, I agree with Harriet Miers, he is a brilliant man. And I think that she will make a terrific justice on the Supreme Court. But I also know that the president gets unvarnished advice from a lot of staffers. The one thing that is common at the White House is candor. And there is a lot of candor in the Oval Office and people do not tell the president what he wants to hear all the time. In fact, there is a healthy banter about the candor that exists in the Oval Office and how the president is candid with us and how the staff is candid with him. There is not a lot of yes-men or yes-women around the president. There are competent who do a good job and they know that his leadership is what the people elected and so he's the one that makes the decisions. And we respect the decisions he makes because we know how he makes those decisions. LAMB: Let me try this on you and see if you agree. Anybody that has met the president off-camera finds a different person than they find on-camera. I mean, he is a friendly, outgoing individual that you hear people who don't follow his politics, they say they like him, but the minute the camera comes on, it has been done many times in our history, it's a different George Bush. Do you agree with that? 16:19:56 CARD: Well, I think -- it's probably an unfair question of me because I know him so well and I don't see the distinction between on-camera and off-camera. 16:20:03 LAMB: You really don't see any difference? 16:20:05 CARD: And there are times when I can tell the klieg lights probably bother him, but I haven't found him to put on a veneer. He kind of tells it like it is. He's very candid and forthright. He has got core values and core convictions and he's not afraid to express them and to bring them to leadership. 16:20:23 He does not make decisions based on which way the wind is blowing or who is sitting opposite him in a television studio. He is a man of great principal and he's very thoughtful and he's not afraid to be thought-provoking. 16:20:37 LAMB: The president has said almost from the beginning that he doesn't read the newspapers, watch the television shows, but he relies on you and others to provide him with the news. Is that true? 16:20:48 CARD: Well, I think -- he skims the newspapers. And remember, he wakes up every morning with a wonderful wife and she reads the newspapers and is frequently reading to him. And so he gets an awful lot of information. In fact, I'm generally amazed at the amount of peripheral information that the president gets. 16:21:05 He has got a great network of friends who make sure that he understands what's happening in the real world. You know, the White House is a bubble and the president is always trying to get out of that bubble. And he has great access to people who aren't bound by the Beltway and Washington, D.C., and he gets a good deal of information. 16:21:21 But no, he skims the newspapers, but he does not dwell on them, and he certainly doesn't get wrapped around the action with regard to an editorial page or two. 16:21:29 LAMB: Back right after he reelected, he gave of series of 15 interviews, and most of them were short. And I was watching that process, it struck me that because they're short, everybody that sits down with him wants to get the "gotcha!" question in. They want to make the news. Is it a bit of a risk? I mean, why doesn't he open up and have more lengthy conversations where you don't have this pent-up emotion to get him? 16:21:57 CARD: Well, it's unfortunate that there are so many in the media and so many in Washington who like to play "gotcha!" That's not how the president plays the game at all. And, you know, he's a very thoughtful, thought-provoking individual because he has the courage to make decisions. 16:22:13 And he has a vision for the country and a vision for the world, and that is the right vision and he is doing everything he can to implement it. But remember, the burden that he carries is the burden that centers around that oath that he took, to protect and defend that Constitution. 16:22:25 And he knows that he cannot do it alone. He needs a lot of help. And the help should come from the White House staff, that's the only reason we exist as a White House staff, is to help the president do his job. It comes from everyone who serves in the executive branch of government because they are part of Article II of that Constitution. 16:22:39 But most significantly, it comes from a lot of young men and women who volunteer to put on a uniform and serve in the armed forces. And they took an oath as well to protect and defend the Constitution, but they also took an oath to follow the command of the commander-in-chief. 16:22:54 And I am grateful that the president shows up in the Oval Office every day understanding that. And he is cognizant that there are young men and women who are putting their lives on the line at great risk to help him meet his constitutional obligation. 16:23:10 And the fact that he knows that and thinks about them and how they're meeting their responsibilities, helps him meet the responsibilities that he has when he has to make those tough decisions, because, again, the president doesn't have the luxury of making easy decisions. Only the tough decisions make it to the Oval Office, and the president has to make those tough decisions. 16:23:28 LAMB: What has been the impact on the running of the White House through all of this discussion about the special prosecutor and -- I don't think you call it special prosecutor, but the -- Mr. Fitzgerald, and the whole Valerie Plame issue? 16:23:42 CARD: Well, obviously we're all human beings and we know that there are external activities that impact the environment you're working in. And the ongoing investigation is one where everyone at the White House to my knowledge has been cooperating and helping. 16:23:58 The president has asked that we all cooperate, and we are. And -- but it is something that is there, but it is something that we don't talk about because it would be inappropriate. We all have a job to do. The president has appointed people who do their job and they do it very well. And I haven't found anyone that is distracted because of the ongoing investigation, but we all know that it's taking place and we're all working to cooperate with the investigators. 16:24:21 And we hope that it will come to a conclusion, but we're going to do the job for the president. After all, our job is to help the president do his job. And it's not to worry about each other as we deal with problems that are external to the White House. 16:24:35 LAMB: Do you ever long for the day when Andy Card can speak for himself? CARD: I've. LAMB: I mean, you can your personal views and. 16:24:44 CARD: Well, you know, as you know, Brian, I come from Massachusetts so I can "pahk the cah in Hah-vad Yahd" and most people in America won't understand me. And I served in local government in Holbrook, Massachusetts, on the planning board, and I'm very proud of my hometown, Holbrook. I served in the Massachusetts legislature for eight years where I was able to exercise a frustrating role as being part of a distinct minority in the overwhelmingly Democrat House of Representatives in Massachusetts, but I made lifelong friends there, people that I love to debate with. Some of them are serving as Democrat members of Congress right now. 16:25:13 But no, I've had plenty of opportunity to express my personal opinions, but right now I serve a person who was elected by the American people to lead, and I'm going to help him lead as he sees fit. And I'm very comfortable with the kind of leadership that he gives. LAMB: How interested are you in ever running for office? CARD: Oh, I would love to run for office again, but I know that it's not about a desire, you have to have someone marching in the parade behind you when you go to lead it. So I'm doing the job for the president and I'm focused on that right now. I'm not going to worry about what the future holds for me. But I feel very blessed to live in this great country. And all of us should. You know, we take for granted what is America. And America is great because the people are great and we've got to participate in our democracy. And that's something that C-SPAN has helped to motivate. And so I compliment C-SPAN for helping to motivate people to participate in their great democracy and make sure their representatives under Article I are doing their job in Congress, and that their representative leading the executive branch, the president of the United States, Article II, is doing his job, and that those who are there to enforce the laws and respect the Constitution are doing so to the letter of the Constitution with an understanding of our Founding Fathers' intent. LAMB: So what advice would you give someone who is about to come to work for Andy Card? CARD: Enjoy the experience, it may not last very long because we all serve at the pleasure of the president. Remember that our task is to serve the president, and there is one team, the president's team. It's not Andy Card's team or Karl Rove's team or Dan Bartlett's team or Steve Hadley's team or the State Department team or the Defense Department team, it's the president's team. And we all play different positions. And in order for the team to be successful, we have to play our position well. So whether your position is that of helping to make sure that the paper cups are cleaned up after a meeting or whether you're helping to advise the president on policy, do your job well, and the team will succeed. LAMB: But what are your pet beefs about people and the way they inter-react in a place like the White House? 16:27:12 CARD: Well, I like collegiality. I like respect. I like to recognize that the president has attracted the best and the brightest and therefore we should respect the best and the brightest that we work with. 16:27:25 And I encourage candor and forthright responses to questions. But more important than anything else is honesty and ethics. And I ask people to follow their moral compass because it's always pointing in the right direction. And that's what I expect from the people who work directly with me. But anyone who works for me is working for the president and it's a great privilege. 16:27:44 LAMB: So if I were working for you, what should I know about you in the way I -- you know, do I call straight on the phone? Do I send you a one-page memo versus three pages? 16:27:53 CARD: I prefer to do most of my meetings with people face-to-face or over the phone. So I tend to have an open door policy rather than a closed door policy. I wander the halls of the White House and like to pop in on people and ask how they're doing and what they're working on. 16:28:07 I tend to be more interactive than sitting there to read papers. But I will read all of the papers that are sent to me. I feel if a paper is on my desk it must be important. Therefore I must read it. And I've got terrific staff to make sure that the right papers are under my desk at the right time. 16:28:24 But, no, I believe in candor and people who are ethical and will tell me when they think I've done something wrong. One thing I like to tell people is if you make a mistake, eat your meal of crow as soon as the crow gets on the plate, because the longer the crow sits there the more toxic it gets. 16:28:40 And so I would like people to let me know if there is a meal of crow waiting for me and I had better start enjoying it. LAMB: What issue do you think the president cares about the most? CARD: Democracy, freedom, protecting the country. You know, the attack on September 11th taught us something, that that which we were secure with required an awful lot of work. And that meant the work of winning the war on terror. And so the president's preeminent responsibility is to win the war on terror, but in doing so making sure that future president don't have to deal with terrorists, and the best way to do that is to bring democracy to more places around the world. 16:29:20 So when our troops succeeded in Afghanistan to help install a democracy that was of, by, and for the Afghan people, and the troops that are working to help bring a democracy in Iraq with the Iraqi people will have their own government and their own constitution, that's a great testament to the president, and I think that's a great legacy that it would leave. Domestically, I think the president is probably most proud of the fact that he's going to make sure that every child gets a good education in this country and that no one is left behind and they'll be able to meet responsibilities as American citizens for the 21st Century. LAMB: As you know, a lot of these conservatives today are now calling for Harriet Miers either to quit, pull her nomination off, or somehow or another the president withdraws it. What are the chances? CARD: Well, I think she's going to be on the Supreme Court and she will be a good conservative justice on the Supreme Court. And I'm looking forward to the hearings. I do think too many people have rushed to a judgment without having had an opportunity to know Harriet Miers. So let's look for those hearings that will take place with the Senate. She has a great story to tell, but more than that, she has a great commitment to our Constitution and how it should be interpreted. And she will live up to the president's expectation of interpreting that Constitution with the words that are there in appreciate for what our Founding Fathers believed. LAMB: You know you're getting blamed for this? 16:30:36 CARD: Well, I am glad to carry any blame. I have great respect for the president and how he makes decisions and the decisions that he has made. 16:30:44 LAMB: I have The American Spectator here, somebody called "The Prowler." CARD: I read that. LAMB: "It appears that conservatives' long simmering distrust of moderate Chief of Staff Andrew Card has been confirmed by the nomination of Harriet Miers." One more paragraph. "Sources inside the White House say Card in several meetings literally shouted down opposition to Miers during the vetting process. Quote: 'Harriet was his pick all the way up until the president jumped on board wholeheartedly,' says a White House staffer. 'This was not a Rove pick or a Laura Bush pick, it was Card's pick,' unquote." CARD: Well, that is fiction and I live in a nonfiction world. LAMB: Total fiction. CARD: Total fiction. LAMB: Didn't happen. 16:31:25 CARD: It did not happen. First of all, it's not my style to speak up that way at meetings. I'm very respectful of people that participate in the vetting process and the process that considers candidates. And I respect Harriet Miers, I have great respect for her. And even more than that, I respect the president and how he made a decision to put Harriet Miers on the Supreme Court. 16:31:37 LAMB: Where do you think these kind of things come from? You watch it. I mean, you know what's right and what's wrong and when these leaks come out. 16:31:44 CARD: Yes. Well, that's -- I try not to get too worried about what is printed because I have found there is more myth than reality frequently to what is written. And I just go ahead and do my job and help the president do his job. LAMB: James -- Jim Hoagland. CARD: Yes. LAMB: . 15 days ago wrote this: "What George W. Bush needs right now is his own version of Clark Clifford. He needs a friend close enough to tell him that his presidency is failing and wise enough to describe what Bush must do to salvage it." And he's not an enemy of George Bush, as you know. 16:32:17 CARD: Well, the president has great friends who are very candid with him. And they all have access to him and the president reaches out to them. And I'm sure that he is getting wise counsel and sage advice. And I encourage that. I do not discourage it. 16:32:31 I do not believe the president should be isolated from his friends, from their perception of reality, nor from the reality that others may perceive. So I'm all in favor of the president getting candid, forthright advice from anyone that he chooses to listen to. And he is not isolated in terms of the White House staff, nor is he isolated from his friends. 16:32:51 LAMB: But you see what people are saying outside, he says he doesn't watch television, doesn't read the newspaper, takes all his advice. I mean, they really -- I don't know if they're pointing the finger at your or not. 16:32:59 CARD: I'm glad to have anyone point the finger at me, but. LAMB: Are you a moderate instead of a conservative? 16:33:03 CARD: No. I think I'm a conservative. I know I'm a conservative. I'm proudly from Massachusetts. And I think the word "Massachusetts" and "conservative" seem like oxymorons, they're not. And I am a conservative from Massachusetts, proudly so. 16:33:20 And I grew up in family that believes in the values that make this country great. And I had a grandmother who had tremendous influence on my life and she was a suffragette and I'm going to make that that which she believed was so important, which was participating in our democracy, was going to be there. And I will participate and I'm encouraging my children and grandchildren to do it as well. LAMB: How did your grandmother have that kind of influence on you? CARD: Well, my parents were married at a very young age and they were very young when I was born. LAMB: How old? CARD: There were 16 when they were married and 17 when I was born. And I was blessed to be able to spend a lot of time at my grandmother's house. And she was a schoolteacher in Brockton, Massachusetts, and we lived in Holbrook, Massachusetts. 16:34:04 And sitting around the dining room table she would begin the meals with a prayer, but then obligate us to each repeat something from the newspaper that day. And inevitably that caused conversations to center around politics or policy or partisan interests. 16:34:17 So I grew up in a family that kind of enjoyed the dinner table as a place to argue. And we had plenty of arguments. But she also had a picture that was hanging on the wall in her dining room. And it was of women marching down Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts, and they were all suffragettes. And she was in that picture. And she fought for women to have the right to vote. And when women got the right to vote in 1920, she was very proud and she ran for the school committee in the town of Holbrook and served for many years on the school committee, and was very controversial and outspoken. 16:34:50 And so I grew up with a grandmother instilling in me a sense of responsibility to participate in our great democracy. And I will do it. LAMB: How much time did you spend around her? 16:34:59 CARD: Well, I obviously was very close to her growing up. And after I was married and came back from college, I moved in with my grandmother. And then when she got sick she moved in with me and Kathy and the kids. And so I spent a lot time with my grandmother. 16:35:17 My senior year of high school I must have been a challenge to my parents because they sent me to grandmother's house a lot and she made sure I finished my homework. 16:35:24 LAMB: When you were senior in high school, your parents would have been about 34. 16:35:29 CARD: My parents were very young and wonderful parents. They're both passed now. And I was very blessed to have parents that cared so much about their children and about their community. They were all active in their community. Both my father and mother were active in Holbrook and took great pride in Holbrook and Massachusetts. So I was blessed. LAMB: Why were your married at age 16? 16:35:52 CARD: They loved each other and they shared that love with the children. And I've got wonderful siblings and a very close family. I feel very, very fortunate. LAMB: How many siblings? CARD: I have a brother a year younger than I am, two sisters, and then a younger brother. And I get to see them not as often as I would like to, not as often as I should, but they're all terrific and they've all been actively engaged in helping to make America a better country. LAMB: In what way, what do they do? 16:36:18 CARD: Oh gosh. My sister Sara was in Florida, they just moved to Tennessee, but she worked for Governor Bush in Florida. My sister Lisi has worked in government for a number of years and now in the private sector. My brother John is active in Las Vegas with a business and a family. And my brother Brad has served and he was a police officer, a state trooper, served helping to bring drug lords to their knees, and -- as an undercover agent, and then worked for a member of Congress and now works in Washington, D.C. So they've all grown up and recognizing that we've got a great democracy, but it's only as good as the people who participate in it. LAMB: What does brother Brad do here? CARD: He is working with a lobbying firm and does very, very well. LAMB: You did some lobbying. 16:37:06 CARD: I did. I was fortunate to -- after I left the Department of Transportation and helped former President Bush with his transition out of government, I went to work as the head of the trade association for General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler. And it was the American Automobile Manufacturers Association. It's a great industry and I learned an awful lot from management with that relatively large trade association. At the time that I was there, the headquarters was located in Detroit. They moved the headquarters to Washington, D.C. 16:37:35 And we had about 150 employees. And I had to downsize a little bit. But there were a lot of important issues that I had to address, including some important trade disputes with Japan and Korea. So it was a wonderful experience. And then I went and worked with General Motors with about a year before I then helped the current president in his campaign LAMB: Let's go back to some of the issues. Would you have done Katrina differently if you had it to do all over again? 16:38:00 CARD: Oh, I think we all learned lessons from Katrina. And, you know, I was sent down by former President Bush to help with the recovery effort after Hurricane Andrew. And when I went back and one of my staffers pulled out some of the press clips from 1992 -- August of 1992, and you could have almost changed the word "Andrew" to "Katrina," Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Katrina, and changed the name of the players from Wally Stickney to Mike Brown and whatever. 16:38:30 You would have found similar criticisms. But we learned from the experiences in Katrina and will be putting some of that -- of what we learned into practice right now. FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security have already made a number of changes. We're making changes at the White House. There is a lessons learned process going on at the White House that is very important and the president is paying close attention to. 16:38:51 But, you know, this was a horrific natural disaster. And the land area involved was greater than the land area of all of Great Britain, just to put things in perspective. And I've been down to the region four times. The president has been down there eight times. And it is indescribable, the amount of destruction. And the work that has to be down will require a long time, a lot of money, and a great commitment from the private sector as well as the public sector. 16:39:17 LAMB: So what would you do differently next time? 16:39:21 CARD: Well, I think that understanding the relationship between the federal government, state governments, and local governments is something that we came to find was strained. The president was anxious to do things that didn't -- that he didn't have the authority to do because FEMA is a response mechanism to a request that comes from a governor. And the request for disaster assistance came very, very early and for the first time in many storms, the president approved a disaster declaration before the disaster actually struck. So we pre-positioned an awful lot of aid. But you understand you cannot pre-position aid in the disaster area. And once the disaster struck, you get the aid in their as quickly as you can, but a lot of infrastructure was destroyed. So that's a lesson that we learned, better where to pre-position assistance. We learned to get the military involved a little earlier in the process if we can. We have a law on the books, Posse Comitatus, which prevents the military from exercising any police authority. And yet there was a need for greater security in New Orleans in particular. And those needs should have been met by the local police, but the local police had kind of taken off and -- not all of them, but some of them. And the National Guard, under the governor's command, wasn't able to get as much order as we had hoped. And that's something we learned. But the U.S. troops, the military that the president commands as commander-in-chief, were not able to do and are not able to do police enforcement or security enforcement. So we've learned a lot of lessons and the president has asked us to take a look at all of them. LAMB: On the issue of Iraq, the war in Iraq, when we're recording this, the vote on constitution hasn't taken place, but when people see it, it will have taken place. Let's assume it passes, what does that mean? CARD: Well, that's giant step. Think of the step that America took when it adopted its Constitution. And it took us many years to get to the point where we could adopt a Constitution: 1776, we think, started the Revolutionary War, but it wasn't until September 17th, 1887, that we had a Constitution that was presented to the people for ratification. And it took some time to ratify it. And then we had to get the Bill of Rights. But this is a big, giant step for the people of Iraq, to have a constitution, and guarantee that they will have election where they will leaders under that constitution in an election on December 15th, I think it's the 15th, it's in December. And that is an important step. So this day will go down in history in Iraq as a great day where they have a constitution and it was written for and by the people of Iraq and ratified by them rather than imposed by some theocracy or by some totalitarian dictator. 16:42:04 LAMB: How much pressure do you expect to get for the 2006 election to get some of the troops out of there next year? 16:42:08 CARD: Well, the president is anxious to get the troops out of Iraq, but he wants to accomplish the mission before we do so. And, as you know, we're working very hard to make sure that the Iraqis are trained to meet their own security obligations. 16:42:22 And increasingly we find that Iraqis are leading the fight against the insurgents and leading the fight to secure their nation. And that's a good sign. And I think that we're making significant progress. But the troops should not come home prematurely. That would be a terrible thing. They should stay there until the job is done. 16:42:39 After all, we want the democracy in Iraq to take hold, because it's important that the democracy in Iraq take hold so that people in Iran can see its impact, and Syria, and the other countries in the region. 16:42:50 So victory is very, very important, and the president will make sure that we secure victory in Iraq before the troops come home. LAMB: Taxes, the whole idea of making the tax cut permanent, off the rails because of what happened in Katrina. Will it get back on? 16:43:08 CARD: I think it will get back on. You know, we clearly want to have America as a place where not only the people here like to invest, but people around the world like to invest. And that we means we have to have a tax policy in place that is competitive with other nations in this 21st Century. We have a global economy. We have to make sure we are competitive in that global economy. And that means we can't have a high-tax state. So the president, I think, is on the right track to ask for a permanent reduction of the -- elimination of the so-called "death tax." I think that he's right to call for a tax rate that is reasonable and not excessive and will invite investment and stimulate economic activity. You know, we've been on the track for pretty significant economic growth, and it's because of those tax cuts the president put in place that we've had that economic growth. And our economy is poised for long-term growth and there seems to be great confidence in that, as reflected in the bond market and interest rates. So I'm optimistic. LAMB: As you know, the market isn't going anywhere, hasn't been for a long time. 16:44:10 CARD: Well, it's a little higher today than it was a year-and-a-half ago, two years ago, so we've seen growth. And the projections are that the economy will still continue to grow. I know the 50 blue chip economists are prognosticating that we should have growth in the 3 percent range-plus. And I think that is appropriate growth. And Alan Greenspan and the Fed have done a great job of keeping inflation in check and allowing for us to continue togrow this economy. And I think it will continue. LAMB: What's going to happen, though, this winter when the old monthly gas bill comes in or the oil bill comes and it's at least 50 percent higher than it was last year? 16:44:41 CARD: Well, I am concerned about energy prices. And the good news is we have a new energy policy in place. It took an awful long time for us to have an energy policy as law. And Congress did pass one in the summertime. And we have an energy bill -- energy law. But that's not going to provide short-term relief. We need more energy supply in this country. We need to have more conservation in this country. And the president has called for more conservation. We need to have more research and development. And we need to move to a hydrocarbon less-dependent society in energy. We should have hydrogen fuel used in our vehicles, for example. But that's research and development that must be done. I personally believe we need more nuclear power in this country. We can't be as dependent on other countries around the world for our energy supply as we are today. But we do have short-term challenges in the energy sector because of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita where we lost a lot of natural gas production out of the Gulf. And our refineries are down, some refineries are still down and they're not producing as much gasoline as we would like. We know that there are shortages of natural gas in some parts of the country. So the president is looking for short-term efforts to mitigate the impact of these energy shortages. But we have to recognize that demand and supply set prices more than government policy, and we need more supply and we need to do everything we can to reduce our demand, but still allow our economy to grow. LAMB: What are the chances that there will be private accounts for Social Security before this president's term is over? 16:46:23 CARD: I think the chances are pretty good. You know, the president is right to call for us to address the challenge of Social Security because the status quo is not sustainable. There isn't one expert that says we can survive the next 25, 50 years with the current Social Security system. We've got to make changes. And the president knows that making changes now will be less painful than making changes in the future. And one aspect of reform that would make a big difference would be to have personal savings accounts. They're like an IRA that would be part of your Social Security system that would supplement and compliment the Social Security benefits that would be there under a Social Security system, and I think it's the right thing to do. I think it will happen before the president leaves office. LAMB: As you know, we've talked about this earlier in the program, secretary of transportation, deputy chief of staff to the president, worked in the Reagan administration, 41, and 43 chief of staff. What would you change about the media if you could? 16:47:08 CARD: Boy, I'm not sure that I would change anything about the media except to invite them to take a deeper look into some of the policies that they talk about in 30-second sound bites. LAMB: You're talking about television. 16:47:22 CARD: Television in particular. There is a lot of competition in the media today. When I first came to the Reagan White House, there wasn't a lot of competition, especially on television. There were no cable networks. You didn't have a CNN even when I started. 16:47:36 And so there was a cycle to the news that was easily anticipated. And I can remember the press secretary saying, the lid is on, and there was no more news that came out of the White House. 16:47:48 The lid never is put on at the White House now in terms of the news cycle, and that's because of the competitive demands in cable television and with the broadcast networks, and I think that's a reality so we have to live with that reality. 16:48:01 But I do think we have a tendency now to get our news in very short blasts rather than informed discussion. And I would like to see more informed discussion. That's one reason I like C-SPAN. 16:48:12 LAMB: Why do you send Scott McClellan out there every day to be pummeled by people in the press corps? 16:48:18 CARD: He is feeding a giant monster called the media. And they are insatiable. And if he were not out there providing information for them, they would probably be scratching at doors that they shouldn't scratch at. 16:48:32 So I think that he is helping to open the doors of the White House to the media so that the American people can see what's happening there. But he has got one of the toughest jobs in government because he has to exhaust the questions and respond candidly and with forthright answers, and he does a terrific job. The president is lucky to have him. 16:48:50 LAMB: So what is the number one requirement for somebody like Scott McClellan in order to get that job? 16:48:56 CARD: Patience. Understanding, respect for the president, respect for the media. You can't be hostile to the media and understand that they are doing their job. And I think Scott understands that. He understands the demands of the president and the presidency, but he also understands the expectations of the media to have information sometimes that is not available and sometimes wanted before its mature. And I think that he finds the right balance. LAMB: Why do you like George Bush so much? 16:49:26 CARD: Because he is a man of great character. He has good moral compass. He follows it. He is very disciplined in his life. I respect the discipline that he has. I respect how much he loves Laura and Jenna and Barbara. I respect that he is a man of faith and that he's not afraid to be a man of faith. 16:49:45 I respect that he makes decisions and has the courage to make decisions. I respect the fact that he is understanding that time is fleeting and he wants to take advantage of the time that he is president of the United States to do important things for the country. And he's also respectful of the time that other people give to the country or to him as he is making decisions. So it's really centered around respect. That's why I like him so much. 16:50:12 LAMB: We have some photos that are on the White House Web site of you. We'll show one of them on the screen right now. And this was a view on Air Force One. Do you -- are you always on there with him? 16:50:22 CARD: I tend to travel when he goes on long, overnight trips, or I will tend to travel with the president. Most foreign trips I travel with the president. On day-to-day travel that the president does, Joe Hagin, who is deputy chief of staff for operations, tends to travel with the president. That's. LAMB: Well, we haven't -- this is one in the Oval Office that -- you are there at the very back. CARD: Yes, I am. LAMB: And when I see that, it reminds me that you are always around watching everything that goes on. Do you write it down? CARD: No, I do not. LAMB: No diary? 16:50:52 CARD: I do not keep a diary. I think the conversations that I have with the president are the most privileged in our government. And so I try not to keep a diary. I work very hard at making sure the president is well-prepared and understanding, so that's what I try to do. LAMB: Here you are with Condoleezza Rice and the vice president. What is your relationship to the vice president? 16:51:14 CARD: His office is right next to my office. I have great respect for the vice president and I appreciate the fact that he has great empathy for me, because he was a chief of staff. (LAUGHTER) CARD: So he understands the burdens that I carry. LAMB: What is your reaction when you read that everything thinks he really runs the government? 16:51:29 CARD: Well, I -- the vice president is the vice president and he knows his role, probably better than anyone else. And he is not the president. He is very respectful of the president and a wonderful adviser to the president. And he's a wonderful adviser to me. LAMB: Here we have another photo of you briefing, it looks like some military folks? Do you remember this? 16:51:51 CARD: This is in the Roosevelt Room of the White House and I don't remember what the issue is, but I think that these may be some airmen that had participated when the president took the trip to Baghdad. And I was thanking them for the secrecy that they kept as the president -- as we planned the trip to Baghdad and then went over there. 16:52:14 And that was the Thanksgiving day trip to Baghdad when the president snuck out of Crawford, Texas, and people didn't even know where he had gone. And the next thing they knew, he was landing at Baghdad and going to a Thanksgiving dinner with the troops. LAMB: Were you with him? CARD: Yes, I was. LAMB: How soon in advance did you know that he was going to go there? 16:52:28 CARD: Well, I had been planning it for about a month before we took the trip. I did it with a very small circle of people, because security was very, very important. But it took a lot of planning to have that trip come off the way that it did. And thank the military and Joe Hagin and the Secret Service, and the media for their help in making sure that that trip could be accomplished without any danger to the president of the United States. LAMB: One last photo of you, in the Oval Office, again, with the vice president and. CARD: Secretary Don Evans. LAMB: Yes. And then you are right next to the president. Andy Card is our guest, chief of staff to the president. And we only have a couple of minutes to go. Let me go back again to what we were talking about earlier, because I want to find out what you've learned from being chief of staff. What is the best training for the job? 16:53:08 CARD: I think being involved in the political process and having worked at the White House. I can't discount the value that came because I worked at the White House under President Reagan and former President Bush. 16:53:22 I also think it's important that you have the confidence of the president. And probably more important than any training is the fact that the president has confidence in the chief of staff. I believe that the president and I have a candid relationship that allows me to enjoy his confidence, but when the confidence disappears, I should disappear, and I accept that. LAMB: What do you want to do after this is over? 16:53:43 CARD: I would like to be a wonderful spouse of a minister. And my wife has sacrificed so much for me and her love of this country that I would like to be able to give her back some of what she has given me. LAMB: How are you going to do that? 16:53:57 CARD: Any way that I'm given the opportunity to. My -- Kathy and I have enjoyed a wonderful life together, and I'm looking forward to spending the rest of my life with her. But her calling is much greater than the calling that I've answered because she is helping with a much greater responsibility than even protecting and defending that Constitution. LAMB: Where is her church? What's her denomination? 16:54:20 CARD: She is a United Methodist minister and she comes from my hometown. I met her in the fifth grade, so we have been almost lifelong friends. And she is active in the McLean community in Virginia. And that's where her church is, Trinity United Methodist Church. LAMB: And do you talk to her about this job you're doing? 16:54:39 CARD: I do. I share my experiences with her. I'm blessed that the president has allowed me to include her in the job that I do. And when I was asked to take the job of chief of staff, I asked the president to recognize that if I come, my wife is coming with me. We're partners in everything we do and that she would be a partner in this process. 16:54:58 And he said, absolutely. And then I went and had the same conversation with Laura Bush. And she said, absolutely. LAMB: As you know, the president's popularity is down to 39 percent in a couple of polls. This is one of those dips that happens. What is it going to take to get him out of this? 16:55:13 CARD: Well, I think as we continue with the recovery in Katrina and Rita down in New Orleans and Mississippi, that will help. The successes in Iraq that are much greater than reported by the media will help because it will become increasingly known by the American people as the Iraqis accept more responsibility under their democracy. As the troops begin to come home, when the Iraqis are taking over responsibility for their own security. And the president's good policy initiatives are taking hold in America and more young kids are getting a good education in the public school system and that faith-based communities respected for the partnership it plays with the federal government to help people in need. And when we find that the tax policies are making a difference. Next year in January when Medicare prescription drug coverage is available for seniors for the first time. All of that will help to demonstrate to the American the outstanding leadership that the president has provided and the direction that he wants to take the country is still the right direction. LAMB: Andy Card, thank you very much. CARD: Thank you, Brian. END
CSPAN / ANDREW CARD INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LAMB
CSPAN / BRIAN LAMB INTERVIEW WITH WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF, ANDY CARD RS23 X86 slugged: 1555 CARD X86 Friday, October 14, 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SIMULTANEOUS ON-AIR CREDIT LOGO MAY NOT BE COVERED / NO MORE THAN A THREE MINUTE CLIP MAY BE USED AT A TIME 15:59:55 BRIAN LAMB, HOST: Andy Card, chief of staff to the president, why do you think that conservatives have reacted as strongly against Harriet Miers as they have? 16:00:04 ANDREW CARD, WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF: I don't think they know her. And I wish that they had been skeptical and looked to learn more about her and they would have been very comforted. I'm a little surprised that they came out of the box so cynically. 16:00:14 But, you know, she's a wonderful person. She has got a great track record. She broke through that glass ceiling before many people knew there was a ceiling there. And she was the first woman to be hired by a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of the Dallas Bar Association The first woman head of the Texas Bar Association. Very active in the American Bar Association. One of the top 50 female lawyers in America consistently. One of the top 100 lawyers in America. 16:00:45 And the White counsel, and the White House counsel has to deal with an awful of issues that touch on the Constitution. So she's really quite an expert on dealing with the realities of the struggles between the executive branch, the legislative branch, and I'm going to say, the judicial branch. 16:00:58 LAMB: But there seems to be more to this from the conservatives than just Harriet Miers. It seems like they're using this to really come after the president for some reason or another. Have you thought about this? 16:01:07 CARD: Well, of course, I'm concerned by it. But, you know, I have great confidence in the president and how he leads. And when he stood up and took that oath to be president of the United States, and it's shortest oath taken by anyone who serves in government, he said that he would preserve, protect and defend that Constitution. 16:01:21 And that's exactly what he does every day. And by selecting Harriet Miers as his nominee to the Supreme Court, he is confident that that Constitution will be protected for the future. 16:01:32 LAMB: What's the different being the chief of staff in the second term right now from what it was in the first term? 16:01:39 CARD: Well, as you know, when you're second-term president, you're not worried about reelection. So the first I would say is that the president understands that he has got a short amount of time to accomplish an awful lot. And he has got an awful lot of things that he knows should be done for America and for the world. 16:01:54 He has always had a great vision for where he should take the country. And he was able to accomplish some of that visionary leadership in his first term when he got the No Child Left Behind Act passed, and education -- reform our education system. 16:02:07 He inherited a recession and he cut taxes so that we could build our way out of the recession and get a strong economy moving. And then we had that horrible attack on September 11th, 2001, and that changed an awful lot, but it did not deter the president from the vision he had for the country in where he wants to tackle those tough issues that he knew about so that future generations wouldn't have to worry about them. 16:02:30 LAMB: Why do you do this for as long as you have? And you're -- what, now it has been 50 years since somebody has done as long as you have. 16:02:37 CARD: Well, I serve at the pleasure of the president for the time being. And that's what the piece of paper that hangs on my wall says, and I'm reminded of that everyday when I look at it. 16:02:45 I feel very privileged to work for the president of the United States. I feel it's a great privilege to work at the White House no matter who the president is, but I am particularly proud of this president and how he makes his decisions and the vision that he has for the country and the expectations that he has for the world. So I feel very privileged. But I serve at his pleasure. And if I'm not doing the job, I shouldn't be in the position. 16:03:05 I'm very comfortable with the reality that I am a staffer. I'm just a staffer. I'm responsible for the rest of the staff, but my job is to make sure the president has all that he needs in order to be able to do the job. 16:03:18 LAMB: The total years you have spent in the White House working for three different presidents? 16:03:22 CARD: Well, I started in 18 -- 1983, 18, 1983. (LAUGHTER) 16:03:28 CARD: And I had a respite from that experience when I helped run a campaign for president in New Hampshire in '87-'88, then came back to the White House and served former President Bush and was deputy chief of staff and then Secretary of Transportation. Oh, I guess I started in '83 and I am and other than the Clinton years I was in the White House for almost every year. 16:03:49 LAMB: Here's a piece of videotape in 1992 when you were Secretary of Transportation. 16:03:54 (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) CARD: My job as deputy chief of staff was to be everywhere that the chief of staff was not. And obviously he was not more places than he was. So I frequently had to run from meeting to meeting. My job was basically to be the managing partner at the White House, to make sure that it functioned on a day-to-day basis. One of the exciting parts of the job was being able to spend a lot of time with the president, because when the chief of staff was not with the president, I had the opportunity to be with the president. So I accompanied him on most of his foreign trips. I was able to participate in a lot of the foreign diplomacy and discussion that took place, a lot of the domestic policy discussions and the economic policy discussions that took place. But really I was kind of the micromanager at the White House. (END VIDEOTAPE) 16:04:35 LAMB: What are you now? 16:04:39 CARD: I'm responsible for making sure the White House meets the president's expectations of preparing him to make tough decisions. And I worry about the care and feeding of the president. That's probably the biggest responsibility that a chief of staff has. After all, the president has to have time to eat, sleep, and be merry. And I want to make sure that he has time to eat, sleep, and be merry. 16:04:56 I also have to make sure that the policy that he has to address is well-developed. So we have policy counsels, outstanding people. Steve Hadley replaced Condi Rice in the foreign policy world. And Al Hubbard doing the economic policy. And Claude Allen with the domestic policy. And we have Fran Townsend doing the homeland security policy. 16:05:12 So we have a good policy nucleus. And I make sure that that policy group gets to stimulate the president's thinking about the policy options that he has to consider. And then I have to make sure that we communicate with the right people at the right time when the president has made a decision. And I call that marketing and selling. 16:05:27 We have to communicate with Congress, with the American people, with other world leaders. And we have to communicate with the rest of the executive branch of government so that when a decision is made by the president, the people who had to implement that decision understand what the decision is, why he made it, why it's important that it be implemented the way the president has an expectation for the it be implemented. 16:05:47 LAMB: How do you stay in touch with him? 16:05:49 CARD: The president sees an awful lot of me. I greet him first thing in the morning and I say good night to him when he goes off to go home for the night. He probably sees much more of me than he wants to. I really do feel very blessed. 16:06:03 And we have a very candid, open relationship. It's a relationship that allows me to speak to him without any fear of retribution. I feel comfortable talking with him. And I know that he feels comfortable talking with me. But those conversations should be private. And they are, because I offer the president candid counsel, and he offers me sometimes very un-candid criticism. 16:06:27 So -- but, no, he's wonderful to work with and I spend a lot of time with him. I'm blessed that he and my wife get along well, and Laura and my wife get along well. So I feel that I'm very blessed but I am still just a staffer. The president is my friend and I do not want to let him down. But I am not his friend, I am a staffer. 16:06:49 LAMB: What do you call him? 16:06:51 CARD: I call him Mr. President. And he earned that title by gaining the respect of the American people and winning a vote for president of the United States. And it's a wonderful, wonderful title to have. And I'm proud to call him Mr. President. 16:07:01 LAMB: Did you ever call him George in the old days? 16:07:04 CARD: In the old days, before he was president, before he was governor? Yes. I called him George or W or Junior as many of us did. But he is the president and I'm proud to call him president. 16:07:13 LAMB: You know, for a long time there was a story about that he was called in to fire John Sununu when he was chief of staff. But recent reports in The Washington Post, among other places, say that you fired John Sununu, your boss. 16:07:27 CARD: Well, I have great respect for John Sununu. He was an outstanding chief of staff, and he's a good, close friend and someone that I admire an awful lot. But he had reached the point where he was not serving the president as well the president needed to be served. 16:07:43 And yes, I did deliver a message to the chief of staff, then John Sununu, that it was probably time for him to tender his resignation. I think that George Bush then had also delivered a similar message, but it didn't take. So I think I was brought in to help make sure the message was understood. 16:08:01 LAMB: Was that hard? 16:08:03 CARD: It was very hard because I had tremendous respect for John Sununu. And I was his deputy, I was the deputy chief of staff when he was the chief of staff. And -- but I also respect and support the president of the United States and I know that we all serve at his pleasure. And that's an obligation that I take very, very seriously. 16:08:21 LAMB: There was a -- I was trying to find the quote here where it talks about when you fire somebody, this isn't the quote, people feel like they've just been given a free car. How often have you had to fire people in your life? 16:08:35 CARD: Quite a few times in a lot of different experiences in my life. I worked at McDonald's when I was in college and had to fire people. I was a manager of McDonald's. I worked in business where I had to fire people. I ran a trade association where I had to fire people. 16:08:51 So it's not comfortable experience, but it is part of a life experience for people. And I don't think that we should ashamed when we suggest people should move on to find something better that is better suited to their lives as well. 16:09:05 LAMB: The president's critics say he hasn't fired enough people. 16:09:09 CARD: Well, I know who is no longer serving his administration and I know the views that the president has had. And I think that he has a great team serving him right now, but we all serve for the time being which means that no one should be secure in their job, they should just do it. And that's the president's prerogative. And he has a great number of people who are doing a terrific job for him right now. 16:09:29 LAMB: Where -- how far is your office away from his? 16:09:32 CARD: Oh, probably 50 yards away from the Oval Office, and the opposite corner of the White House. I guess you can't call the Oval Office in a corner because there are no corners in the Oval Office, but I have the corner office in the West Wing of the White House. 16:09:45 The other corners are located -- or have occupants Steve Hadley, the national security adviser to the president; Scott McClellan, the press secretary of the president; the president is one corner; and I'm in the next corner. 16:09:57 LAMB: What time do you get up in the morning? 16:09:58 CARD: I get up at 4:20. And my wife wakes up with me and we have breakfast together. And I'm usually in the White House at my desk at 5:30 a.m. And cramming to do an awful lot of reading to get ready for the day. I go through the intelligence reports, skim all the newspapers, go through the domestic policy issues and review the president's schedule that day, and then rush down to the Oval Office and get to exercise a phenomenal privilege when I say, good morning, Mr. President, when he shows up for work. 16:10:24 He shows up between 6:45 and 7:00 in the morning. 16:10:27 LAMB: What time do you go home at night? 16:10:30 CARD: I usually get home about 8:30, 9:00. And if Congress is in session, it could be later. And it's not unusual for me to be on the phone after I get home, especially if Congress is in session. I usually try to get to bed around 10:30, 11:00. 16:10:41 LAMB: How much sleep do you get? CARD: Not enough. But my experience has been that I get just barely enough to survive and I look forward to the opportunities to catch a nap every once in a while. 16:10:51 LAMB: Your wife, who is a minister, was quoted as saying, "I'm sure who you're married to, George Bush or me." (LAUGHTER)16:10:57 CARD: Well, there's an interesting story that is around that quote. It came during the 2000 election and I had just completed work on helping with the presidential debates. And I had been gone for quite some time and hadn't been around. And I was anxious to come home. I arrived home much later than I had planned because my flight was delayed and I had hoped to get home in time to take Kathy out for dinner. And got home, we just went to bed, got up the next morning, made a nice breakfast and proceeded to spurt out all of the excitement around the presidential debates and how much I respect then-Governor Bush and the effort he was making to be president. 16:11:36 And she said, are you married to me or to George Bush? And the phone rang, and Kathy answered the phone, and she said, it's George W. Bush, and handed me the phone. (LAUGHTER) 16:11:49 CARD: And -- no, I'm very committed to the president and how he does his job, but I love my wife and I am grateful that she married me. We've been married for 38 years and I'm very, very blessed that she has had her life with me. And I will tell you, she's giving a lot more than I give. And I'm grateful for it. 16:12:05 LAMB: How old are your three kids? 16:12:07 CARD: We have three children and four grandchildren. So our grandchildren are 12, 10, 8 and 6. So that will give some sense of how old our children are. We have two daughters that live in the D.C. area and a son who lives in South Carolina, and they're all married. 16:12:23 LAMB: Is there -- you know, we read that the president has a regimen that gets him rest, but you work seven days a week, you get very little sleep at night, is there a risk that you work too long and you're tired and make decisions when you're tired? 16:12:36 CARD: Well, thankfully I'm helping people make decisions. I'm not a penultimate decision-maker. The president is the decision-maker. And he has got the toughest decisions to make. And my job is to help him make those decisions. 16:12:49 But I -- all my life I have worked kind of this schedule. When I was in college I delivered newspapers early in the morning and worked at McDonald's late at night. So even when I was in high school I would get up in the morning and get the newspapers ready for the paperboys early in the morning. 16:13:03 So I've had this kind of lifestyle of early-to-bed and early-to-rise. And so far seem to be doing pretty well. 16:13:11 LAMB: When you first came in as chief of staff, it's my understanding that you had a dinner or something where former chiefs of staff came and gave advice? 16:13:23 CARD: I did. Mack McLarty, who was chief of staff to President Clinton, and Ken Duberstein who was chief of staff to President Reagan. They invited all of the other living chiefs of staff to a dinner that was given in my honor, and it was a wonderful experience. And, you know, regardless of the politics, of the philosophy that people bring to this office, there was great empathy for the challenge that I was about to take. And I learned a lot from other chiefs of staff. 16:13:43 I served with great pleasure under Jim Baker when he was chief of staff in the Reagan administration, and then Don Regan, and then Howard Baker, and Ken Duberstein, and then John Sununu, and Sam Skinner, and then Jim Baker again. So I've been very, very blessed and have learned an awful lot from each one of them. 16:14:00 LAMB: Let's say it's 2009, there's a brand new president of the United States and there's a new chief of staff, and they call you up and say, come to a dinner. And you're sitting around that dinner, what are you going to tell the next chief of staff that you've learned that you didn't know about before you got in this job? 16:14:14 CARD: I would say to remember that the job is not about the individual chief of staff, it's about the president of the United States and making sure that he is well-served. The hardest part about my job is, I think what I mentioned, that I cannot become his friend, I've got to stay his staffer. And there is great temptation to want to be the president's friend. But I fight that temptation every day and remind myself that I'm a staffer and if he's not comfortable with how he is being served, he should say good bye to his staffer. 16:14:46 Now as soon he says good bye to me, I want to be his friend. And he is my friend. 16:14:51 LAMB: There has got to be more. 16:14:57 CARD: Well, I think there's paying attention to the schedule. Most of the challenges of the chief of staff has centers around what other people don't think about. And most people presume that the president has all kinds of time to consider policy or to meet with people. And I want to make sure that the president does have time to take care of his spiritual being, his emotional health, his mental health and his physical health so that he's in a position to make a good decision. 16:15:20 Obviously he has to be well-prepared to make that decision in terms of learning the content of the policy and the ramifications of the policy. But I want to make sure he's in the right frame of mind and that he's ready to make a decision even when it's not anticipated, because we didn't plan on a September 11th, for example, and yet the president exhibited great leadership during that period of time because he was well-prepared just to make decisions. 16:15:45 LAMB: What happens if Don Rumsfeld calls up and says, I want to talk to the president? 16:15:51 CARD: He gets to talk to the president. One thing I do not do is restrict access to the president. In fact, I have a rule, if anyone who is on the White House staff or anyone who is in the cabinet needs to see the president, they should feel comfortable going to see the president. I don't want them to see the president if they just want to see the president, and you know a lot of people pretend they have a need and it's just a thin veneer of need covering a giant want, and I police that pretty carefully. 16:16:10 But I do not control access to the Oval Office with people who need to be there. I do expect to be informed about it, either before, during, or after. And the president is terrific about keeping me very well informed on what his day has been like. 16:16:24 But no, I don't sit outside the Oval Office with a turnstile and tell people they have to put quarters in in order to get into the Oval Office. 16:16:30 LAMB: What are the president's rules? 16:16:33 CARD: I think he is very open door. His rule is candor and efficiency. He is very efficient with his time. Meetings start on time and they end on time. He's very respectful of other people's schedules. He expects the briefings to be short and consistent with the word "brief," and yet wants them to be broad enough to include all of the policy options and all of the deliberations that rose those policy considerations to his level. 16:17:00 He understands that a presidential decision is a big deal. And so he gives the decision the kind of attention that it needs before he makes it. But he has the courage to make those decisions. 16:17:12 LAMB: When do you know he's mad? CARD: Oh, he's usually pretty candid about telling me, and I know how to read his body language pretty well. And I'll pull it out of him. I can tell when he's upset. But he has got a very candid relationship with me. And I value that and when the door is shut and it's just the two of us standing in the Oval Office, I feel very comfortable that he will tell me if he's unhappy about something. 16:17:33 LAMB: There has been a lot copy written recently, both from conservatives and others. I just want to read what some have said, and we rarely get a chance to have you respond to what is said about you. This is Cal Thomas, conservative columnist: "What should President Bush do about his declining poll numbers and when should he did it? The president is in danger of losing his base which wanted more than a Republican president, it believed it had twice elected a conservative president." Conservatives are writing every day, they're mad. What do you say to Cal Thomas? 16:18:10 CARD: The president is a conservative. He's a true-blue conservative who's track record speaks volumes. I think that he has been very consistent that which he promised the American people, that what he believes. He's a good conservative president and I think that the conservatives should be applauding the president's leadership and how he has chosen people to bring similar leadership to other parts of government. So I disagree with the premise of the story. LAMB: Cal Thomas writes: "Staffers with conviction seem unable to express differences with the president for fear it might jeopardize their access or even their jobs. Instead they tell him things that make him feel good." Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers has called him the most brilliant man she has ever known. CARD: Well, I agree with Harriet Miers, he is a brilliant man. And I think that she will make a terrific justice on the Supreme Court. But I also know that the president gets unvarnished advice from a lot of staffers. The one thing that is common at the White House is candor. And there is a lot of candor in the Oval Office and people do not tell the president what he wants to hear all the time. In fact, there is a healthy banter about the candor that exists in the Oval Office and how the president is candid with us and how the staff is candid with him. There is not a lot of yes-men or yes-women around the president. There are competent who do a good job and they know that his leadership is what the people elected and so he's the one that makes the decisions. And we respect the decisions he makes because we know how he makes those decisions. LAMB: Let me try this on you and see if you agree. Anybody that has met the president off-camera finds a different person than they find on-camera. I mean, he is a friendly, outgoing individual that you hear people who don't follow his politics, they say they like him, but the minute the camera comes on, it has been done many times in our history, it's a different George Bush. Do you agree with that? 16:19:56 CARD: Well, I think -- it's probably an unfair question of me because I know him so well and I don't see the distinction between on-camera and off-camera. 16:20:03 LAMB: You really don't see any difference? 16:20:05 CARD: And there are times when I can tell the klieg lights probably bother him, but I haven't found him to put on a veneer. He kind of tells it like it is. He's very candid and forthright. He has got core values and core convictions and he's not afraid to express them and to bring them to leadership. 16:20:23 He does not make decisions based on which way the wind is blowing or who is sitting opposite him in a television studio. He is a man of great principal and he's very thoughtful and he's not afraid to be thought-provoking. 16:20:37 LAMB: The president has said almost from the beginning that he doesn't read the newspapers, watch the television shows, but he relies on you and others to provide him with the news. Is that true? 16:20:48 CARD: Well, I think -- he skims the newspapers. And remember, he wakes up every morning with a wonderful wife and she reads the newspapers and is frequently reading to him. And so he gets an awful lot of information. In fact, I'm generally amazed at the amount of peripheral information that the president gets. 16:21:05 He has got a great network of friends who make sure that he understands what's happening in the real world. You know, the White House is a bubble and the president is always trying to get out of that bubble. And he has great access to people who aren't bound by the Beltway and Washington, D.C., and he gets a good deal of information. 16:21:21 But no, he skims the newspapers, but he does not dwell on them, and he certainly doesn't get wrapped around the action with regard to an editorial page or two. 16:21:29 LAMB: Back right after he reelected, he gave of series of 15 interviews, and most of them were short. And I was watching that process, it struck me that because they're short, everybody that sits down with him wants to get the "gotcha!" question in. They want to make the news. Is it a bit of a risk? I mean, why doesn't he open up and have more lengthy conversations where you don't have this pent-up emotion to get him? 16:21:57 CARD: Well, it's unfortunate that there are so many in the media and so many in Washington who like to play "gotcha!" That's not how the president plays the game at all. And, you know, he's a very thoughtful, thought-provoking individual because he has the courage to make decisions. 16:22:13 And he has a vision for the country and a vision for the world, and that is the right vision and he is doing everything he can to implement it. But remember, the burden that he carries is the burden that centers around that oath that he took, to protect and defend that Constitution. 16:22:25 And he knows that he cannot do it alone. He needs a lot of help. And the help should come from the White House staff, that's the only reason we exist as a White House staff, is to help the president do his job. It comes from everyone who serves in the executive branch of government because they are part of Article II of that Constitution. 16:22:39 But most significantly, it comes from a lot of young men and women who volunteer to put on a uniform and serve in the armed forces. And they took an oath as well to protect and defend the Constitution, but they also took an oath to follow the command of the commander-in-chief. 16:22:54 And I am grateful that the president shows up in the Oval Office every day understanding that. And he is cognizant that there are young men and women who are putting their lives on the line at great risk to help him meet his constitutional obligation. 16:23:10 And the fact that he knows that and thinks about them and how they're meeting their responsibilities, helps him meet the responsibilities that he has when he has to make those tough decisions, because, again, the president doesn't have the luxury of making easy decisions. Only the tough decisions make it to the Oval Office, and the president has to make those tough decisions. 16:23:28 LAMB: What has been the impact on the running of the White House through all of this discussion about the special prosecutor and -- I don't think you call it special prosecutor, but the -- Mr. Fitzgerald, and the whole Valerie Plame issue? 16:23:42 CARD: Well, obviously we're all human beings and we know that there are external activities that impact the environment you're working in. And the ongoing investigation is one where everyone at the White House to my knowledge has been cooperating and helping. 16:23:58 The president has asked that we all cooperate, and we are. And -- but it is something that is there, but it is something that we don't talk about because it would be inappropriate. We all have a job to do. The president has appointed people who do their job and they do it very well. And I haven't found anyone that is distracted because of the ongoing investigation, but we all know that it's taking place and we're all working to cooperate with the investigators. 16:24:21 And we hope that it will come to a conclusion, but we're going to do the job for the president. After all, our job is to help the president do his job. And it's not to worry about each other as we deal with problems that are external to the White House. 16:24:35 LAMB: Do you ever long for the day when Andy Card can speak for himself? CARD: I've. LAMB: I mean, you can your personal views and. 16:24:44 CARD: Well, you know, as you know, Brian, I come from Massachusetts so I can "pahk the cah in Hah-vad Yahd" and most people in America won't understand me. And I served in local government in Holbrook, Massachusetts, on the planning board, and I'm very proud of my hometown, Holbrook. I served in the Massachusetts legislature for eight years where I was able to exercise a frustrating role as being part of a distinct minority in the overwhelmingly Democrat House of Representatives in Massachusetts, but I made lifelong friends there, people that I love to debate with. Some of them are serving as Democrat members of Congress right now. 16:25:13 But no, I've had plenty of opportunity to express my personal opinions, but right now I serve a person who was elected by the American people to lead, and I'm going to help him lead as he sees fit. And I'm very comfortable with the kind of leadership that he gives. LAMB: How interested are you in ever running for office? CARD: Oh, I would love to run for office again, but I know that it's not about a desire, you have to have someone marching in the parade behind you when you go to lead it. So I'm doing the job for the president and I'm focused on that right now. I'm not going to worry about what the future holds for me. But I feel very blessed to live in this great country. And all of us should. You know, we take for granted what is America. And America is great because the people are great and we've got to participate in our democracy. And that's something that C-SPAN has helped to motivate. And so I compliment C-SPAN for helping to motivate people to participate in their great democracy and make sure their representatives under Article I are doing their job in Congress, and that their representative leading the executive branch, the president of the United States, Article II, is doing his job, and that those who are there to enforce the laws and respect the Constitution are doing so to the letter of the Constitution with an understanding of our Founding Fathers' intent. LAMB: So what advice would you give someone who is about to come to work for Andy Card? CARD: Enjoy the experience, it may not last very long because we all serve at the pleasure of the president. Remember that our task is to serve the president, and there is one team, the president's team. It's not Andy Card's team or Karl Rove's team or Dan Bartlett's team or Steve Hadley's team or the State Department team or the Defense Department team, it's the president's team. And we all play different positions. And in order for the team to be successful, we have to play our position well. So whether your position is that of helping to make sure that the paper cups are cleaned up after a meeting or whether you're helping to advise the president on policy, do your job well, and the team will succeed. LAMB: But what are your pet beefs about people and the way they inter-react in a place like the White House? 16:27:12 CARD: Well, I like collegiality. I like respect. I like to recognize that the president has attracted the best and the brightest and therefore we should respect the best and the brightest that we work with. 16:27:25 And I encourage candor and forthright responses to questions. But more important than anything else is honesty and ethics. And I ask people to follow their moral compass because it's always pointing in the right direction. And that's what I expect from the people who work directly with me. But anyone who works for me is working for the president and it's a great privilege. 16:27:44 LAMB: So if I were working for you, what should I know about you in the way I -- you know, do I call straight on the phone? Do I send you a one-page memo versus three pages? 16:27:53 CARD: I prefer to do most of my meetings with people face-to-face or over the phone. So I tend to have an open door policy rather than a closed door policy. I wander the halls of the White House and like to pop in on people and ask how they're doing and what they're working on. 16:28:07 I tend to be more interactive than sitting there to read papers. But I will read all of the papers that are sent to me. I feel if a paper is on my desk it must be important. Therefore I must read it. And I've got terrific staff to make sure that the right papers are under my desk at the right time. 16:28:24 But, no, I believe in candor and people who are ethical and will tell me when they think I've done something wrong. One thing I like to tell people is if you make a mistake, eat your meal of crow as soon as the crow gets on the plate, because the longer the crow sits there the more toxic it gets. 16:28:40 And so I would like people to let me know if there is a meal of crow waiting for me and I had better start enjoying it. LAMB: What issue do you think the president cares about the most? CARD: Democracy, freedom, protecting the country. You know, the attack on September 11th taught us something, that that which we were secure with required an awful lot of work. And that meant the work of winning the war on terror. And so the president's preeminent responsibility is to win the war on terror, but in doing so making sure that future president don't have to deal with terrorists, and the best way to do that is to bring democracy to more places around the world. 16:29:20 So when our troops succeeded in Afghanistan to help install a democracy that was of, by, and for the Afghan people, and the troops that are working to help bring a democracy in Iraq with the Iraqi people will have their own government and their own constitution, that's a great testament to the president, and I think that's a great legacy that it would leave. Domestically, I think the president is probably most proud of the fact that he's going to make sure that every child gets a good education in this country and that no one is left behind and they'll be able to meet responsibilities as American citizens for the 21st Century. LAMB: As you know, a lot of these conservatives today are now calling for Harriet Miers either to quit, pull her nomination off, or somehow or another the president withdraws it. What are the chances? CARD: Well, I think she's going to be on the Supreme Court and she will be a good conservative justice on the Supreme Court. And I'm looking forward to the hearings. I do think too many people have rushed to a judgment without having had an opportunity to know Harriet Miers. So let's look for those hearings that will take place with the Senate. She has a great story to tell, but more than that, she has a great commitment to our Constitution and how it should be interpreted. And she will live up to the president's expectation of interpreting that Constitution with the words that are there in appreciate for what our Founding Fathers believed. LAMB: You know you're getting blamed for this? 16:30:36 CARD: Well, I am glad to carry any blame. I have great respect for the president and how he makes decisions and the decisions that he has made. 16:30:44 LAMB: I have The American Spectator here, somebody called "The Prowler." CARD: I read that. LAMB: "It appears that conservatives' long simmering distrust of moderate Chief of Staff Andrew Card has been confirmed by the nomination of Harriet Miers." One more paragraph. "Sources inside the White House say Card in several meetings literally shouted down opposition to Miers during the vetting process. Quote: 'Harriet was his pick all the way up until the president jumped on board wholeheartedly,' says a White House staffer. 'This was not a Rove pick or a Laura Bush pick, it was Card's pick,' unquote." CARD: Well, that is fiction and I live in a nonfiction world. LAMB: Total fiction. CARD: Total fiction. LAMB: Didn't happen. 16:31:25 CARD: It did not happen. First of all, it's not my style to speak up that way at meetings. I'm very respectful of people that participate in the vetting process and the process that considers candidates. And I respect Harriet Miers, I have great respect for her. And even more than that, I respect the president and how he made a decision to put Harriet Miers on the Supreme Court. 16:31:37 LAMB: Where do you think these kind of things come from? You watch it. I mean, you know what's right and what's wrong and when these leaks come out. 16:31:44 CARD: Yes. Well, that's -- I try not to get too worried about what is printed because I have found there is more myth than reality frequently to what is written. And I just go ahead and do my job and help the president do his job. LAMB: James -- Jim Hoagland. CARD: Yes. LAMB: . 15 days ago wrote this: "What George W. Bush needs right now is his own version of Clark Clifford. He needs a friend close enough to tell him that his presidency is failing and wise enough to describe what Bush must do to salvage it." And he's not an enemy of George Bush, as you know. 16:32:17 CARD: Well, the president has great friends who are very candid with him. And they all have access to him and the president reaches out to them. And I'm sure that he is getting wise counsel and sage advice. And I encourage that. I do not discourage it. 16:32:31 I do not believe the president should be isolated from his friends, from their perception of reality, nor from the reality that others may perceive. So I'm all in favor of the president getting candid, forthright advice from anyone that he chooses to listen to. And he is not isolated in terms of the White House staff, nor is he isolated from his friends. 16:32:51 LAMB: But you see what people are saying outside, he says he doesn't watch television, doesn't read the newspaper, takes all his advice. I mean, they really -- I don't know if they're pointing the finger at your or not. 16:32:59 CARD: I'm glad to have anyone point the finger at me, but. LAMB: Are you a moderate instead of a conservative? 16:33:03 CARD: No. I think I'm a conservative. I know I'm a conservative. I'm proudly from Massachusetts. And I think the word "Massachusetts" and "conservative" seem like oxymorons, they're not. And I am a conservative from Massachusetts, proudly so. 16:33:20 And I grew up in family that believes in the values that make this country great. And I had a grandmother who had tremendous influence on my life and she was a suffragette and I'm going to make that that which she believed was so important, which was participating in our democracy, was going to be there. And I will participate and I'm encouraging my children and grandchildren to do it as well. LAMB: How did your grandmother have that kind of influence on you? CARD: Well, my parents were married at a very young age and they were very young when I was born. LAMB: How old? CARD: There were 16 when they were married and 17 when I was born. And I was blessed to be able to spend a lot of time at my grandmother's house. And she was a schoolteacher in Brockton, Massachusetts, and we lived in Holbrook, Massachusetts. 16:34:04 And sitting around the dining room table she would begin the meals with a prayer, but then obligate us to each repeat something from the newspaper that day. And inevitably that caused conversations to center around politics or policy or partisan interests. 16:34:17 So I grew up in a family that kind of enjoyed the dinner table as a place to argue. And we had plenty of arguments. But she also had a picture that was hanging on the wall in her dining room. And it was of women marching down Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts, and they were all suffragettes. And she was in that picture. And she fought for women to have the right to vote. And when women got the right to vote in 1920, she was very proud and she ran for the school committee in the town of Holbrook and served for many years on the school committee, and was very controversial and outspoken. 16:34:50 And so I grew up with a grandmother instilling in me a sense of responsibility to participate in our great democracy. And I will do it. LAMB: How much time did you spend around her? 16:34:59 CARD: Well, I obviously was very close to her growing up. And after I was married and came back from college, I moved in with my grandmother. And then when she got sick she moved in with me and Kathy and the kids. And so I spent a lot time with my grandmother. 16:35:17 My senior year of high school I must have been a challenge to my parents because they sent me to grandmother's house a lot and she made sure I finished my homework. 16:35:24 LAMB: When you were senior in high school, your parents would have been about 34. 16:35:29 CARD: My parents were very young and wonderful parents. They're both passed now. And I was very blessed to have parents that cared so much about their children and about their community. They were all active in their community. Both my father and mother were active in Holbrook and took great pride in Holbrook and Massachusetts. So I was blessed. LAMB: Why were your married at age 16? 16:35:52 CARD: They loved each other and they shared that love with the children. And I've got wonderful siblings and a very close family. I feel very, very fortunate. LAMB: How many siblings? CARD: I have a brother a year younger than I am, two sisters, and then a younger brother. And I get to see them not as often as I would like to, not as often as I should, but they're all terrific and they've all been actively engaged in helping to make America a better country. LAMB: In what way, what do they do? 16:36:18 CARD: Oh gosh. My sister Sara was in Florida, they just moved to Tennessee, but she worked for Governor Bush in Florida. My sister Lisi has worked in government for a number of years and now in the private sector. My brother John is active in Las Vegas with a business and a family. And my brother Brad has served and he was a police officer, a state trooper, served helping to bring drug lords to their knees, and -- as an undercover agent, and then worked for a member of Congress and now works in Washington, D.C. So they've all grown up and recognizing that we've got a great democracy, but it's only as good as the people who participate in it. LAMB: What does brother Brad do here? CARD: He is working with a lobbying firm and does very, very well. LAMB: You did some lobbying. 16:37:06 CARD: I did. I was fortunate to -- after I left the Department of Transportation and helped former President Bush with his transition out of government, I went to work as the head of the trade association for General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler. And it was the American Automobile Manufacturers Association. It's a great industry and I learned an awful lot from management with that relatively large trade association. At the time that I was there, the headquarters was located in Detroit. They moved the headquarters to Washington, D.C. 16:37:35 And we had about 150 employees. And I had to downsize a little bit. But there were a lot of important issues that I had to address, including some important trade disputes with Japan and Korea. So it was a wonderful experience. And then I went and worked with General Motors with about a year before I then helped the current president in his campaign LAMB: Let's go back to some of the issues. Would you have done Katrina differently if you had it to do all over again? 16:38:00 CARD: Oh, I think we all learned lessons from Katrina. And, you know, I was sent down by former President Bush to help with the recovery effort after Hurricane Andrew. And when I went back and one of my staffers pulled out some of the press clips from 1992 -- August of 1992, and you could have almost changed the word "Andrew" to "Katrina," Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Katrina, and changed the name of the players from Wally Stickney to Mike Brown and whatever. 16:38:30 You would have found similar criticisms. But we learned from the experiences in Katrina and will be putting some of that -- of what we learned into practice right now. FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security have already made a number of changes. We're making changes at the White House. There is a lessons learned process going on at the White House that is very important and the president is paying close attention to. 16:38:51 But, you know, this was a horrific natural disaster. And the land area involved was greater than the land area of all of Great Britain, just to put things in perspective. And I've been down to the region four times. The president has been down there eight times. And it is indescribable, the amount of destruction. And the work that has to be down will require a long time, a lot of money, and a great commitment from the private sector as well as the public sector. 16:39:17 LAMB: So what would you do differently next time? 16:39:21 CARD: Well, I think that understanding the relationship between the federal government, state governments, and local governments is something that we came to find was strained. The president was anxious to do things that didn't -- that he didn't have the authority to do because FEMA is a response mechanism to a request that comes from a governor. And the request for disaster assistance came very, very early and for the first time in many storms, the president approved a disaster declaration before the disaster actually struck. So we pre-positioned an awful lot of aid. But you understand you cannot pre-position aid in the disaster area. And once the disaster struck, you get the aid in their as quickly as you can, but a lot of infrastructure was destroyed. So that's a lesson that we learned, better where to pre-position assistance. We learned to get the military involved a little earlier in the process if we can. We have a law on the books, Posse Comitatus, which prevents the military from exercising any police authority. And yet there was a need for greater security in New Orleans in particular. And those needs should have been met by the local police, but the local police had kind of taken off and -- not all of them, but some of them. And the National Guard, under the governor's command, wasn't able to get as much order as we had hoped. And that's something we learned. But the U.S. troops, the military that the president commands as commander-in-chief, were not able to do and are not able to do police enforcement or security enforcement. So we've learned a lot of lessons and the president has asked us to take a look at all of them. LAMB: On the issue of Iraq, the war in Iraq, when we're recording this, the vote on constitution hasn't taken place, but when people see it, it will have taken place. Let's assume it passes, what does that mean? CARD: Well, that's giant step. Think of the step that America took when it adopted its Constitution. And it took us many years to get to the point where we could adopt a Constitution: 1776, we think, started the Revolutionary War, but it wasn't until September 17th, 1887, that we had a Constitution that was presented to the people for ratification. And it took some time to ratify it. And then we had to get the Bill of Rights. But this is a big, giant step for the people of Iraq, to have a constitution, and guarantee that they will have election where they will leaders under that constitution in an election on December 15th, I think it's the 15th, it's in December. And that is an important step. So this day will go down in history in Iraq as a great day where they have a constitution and it was written for and by the people of Iraq and ratified by them rather than imposed by some theocracy or by some totalitarian dictator. 16:42:04 LAMB: How much pressure do you expect to get for the 2006 election to get some of the troops out of there next year? 16:42:08 CARD: Well, the president is anxious to get the troops out of Iraq, but he wants to accomplish the mission before we do so. And, as you know, we're working very hard to make sure that the Iraqis are trained to meet their own security obligations. 16:42:22 And increasingly we find that Iraqis are leading the fight against the insurgents and leading the fight to secure their nation. And that's a good sign. And I think that we're making significant progress. But the troops should not come home prematurely. That would be a terrible thing. They should stay there until the job is done. 16:42:39 After all, we want the democracy in Iraq to take hold, because it's important that the democracy in Iraq take hold so that people in Iran can see its impact, and Syria, and the other countries in the region. 16:42:50 So victory is very, very important, and the president will make sure that we secure victory in Iraq before the troops come home. LAMB: Taxes, the whole idea of making the tax cut permanent, off the rails because of what happened in Katrina. Will it get back on? 16:43:08 CARD: I think it will get back on. You know, we clearly want to have America as a place where not only the people here like to invest, but people around the world like to invest. And that we means we have to have a tax policy in place that is competitive with other nations in this 21st Century. We have a global economy. We have to make sure we are competitive in that global economy. And that means we can't have a high-tax state. So the president, I think, is on the right track to ask for a permanent reduction of the -- elimination of the so-called "death tax." I think that he's right to call for a tax rate that is reasonable and not excessive and will invite investment and stimulate economic activity. You know, we've been on the track for pretty significant economic growth, and it's because of those tax cuts the president put in place that we've had that economic growth. And our economy is poised for long-term growth and there seems to be great confidence in that, as reflected in the bond market and interest rates. So I'm optimistic. LAMB: As you know, the market isn't going anywhere, hasn't been for a long time. 16:44:10 CARD: Well, it's a little higher today than it was a year-and-a-half ago, two years ago, so we've seen growth. And the projections are that the economy will still continue to grow. I know the 50 blue chip economists are prognosticating that we should have growth in the 3 percent range-plus. And I think that is appropriate growth. And Alan Greenspan and the Fed have done a great job of keeping inflation in check and allowing for us to continue togrow this economy. And I think it will continue. LAMB: What's going to happen, though, this winter when the old monthly gas bill comes in or the oil bill comes and it's at least 50 percent higher than it was last year? 16:44:41 CARD: Well, I am concerned about energy prices. And the good news is we have a new energy policy in place. It took an awful long time for us to have an energy policy as law. And Congress did pass one in the summertime. And we have an energy bill -- energy law. But that's not going to provide short-term relief. We need more energy supply in this country. We need to have more conservation in this country. And the president has called for more conservation. We need to have more research and development. And we need to move to a hydrocarbon less-dependent society in energy. We should have hydrogen fuel used in our vehicles, for example. But that's research and development that must be done. I personally believe we need more nuclear power in this country. We can't be as dependent on other countries around the world for our energy supply as we are today. But we do have short-term challenges in the energy sector because of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita where we lost a lot of natural gas production out of the Gulf. And our refineries are down, some refineries are still down and they're not producing as much gasoline as we would like. We know that there are shortages of natural gas in some parts of the country. So the president is looking for short-term efforts to mitigate the impact of these energy shortages. But we have to recognize that demand and supply set prices more than government policy, and we need more supply and we need to do everything we can to reduce our demand, but still allow our economy to grow. LAMB: What are the chances that there will be private accounts for Social Security before this president's term is over? 16:46:23 CARD: I think the chances are pretty good. You know, the president is right to call for us to address the challenge of Social Security because the status quo is not sustainable. There isn't one expert that says we can survive the next 25, 50 years with the current Social Security system. We've got to make changes. And the president knows that making changes now will be less painful than making changes in the future. And one aspect of reform that would make a big difference would be to have personal savings accounts. They're like an IRA that would be part of your Social Security system that would supplement and compliment the Social Security benefits that would be there under a Social Security system, and I think it's the right thing to do. I think it will happen before the president leaves office. LAMB: As you know, we've talked about this earlier in the program, secretary of transportation, deputy chief of staff to the president, worked in the Reagan administration, 41, and 43 chief of staff. What would you change about the media if you could? 16:47:08 CARD: Boy, I'm not sure that I would change anything about the media except to invite them to take a deeper look into some of the policies that they talk about in 30-second sound bites. LAMB: You're talking about television. 16:47:22 CARD: Television in particular. There is a lot of competition in the media today. When I first came to the Reagan White House, there wasn't a lot of competition, especially on television. There were no cable networks. You didn't have a CNN even when I started. 16:47:36 And so there was a cycle to the news that was easily anticipated. And I can remember the press secretary saying, the lid is on, and there was no more news that came out of the White House. 16:47:48 The lid never is put on at the White House now in terms of the news cycle, and that's because of the competitive demands in cable television and with the broadcast networks, and I think that's a reality so we have to live with that reality. 16:48:01 But I do think we have a tendency now to get our news in very short blasts rather than informed discussion. And I would like to see more informed discussion. That's one reason I like C-SPAN. 16:48:12 LAMB: Why do you send Scott McClellan out there every day to be pummeled by people in the press corps? 16:48:18 CARD: He is feeding a giant monster called the media. And they are insatiable. And if he were not out there providing information for them, they would probably be scratching at doors that they shouldn't scratch at. 16:48:32 So I think that he is helping to open the doors of the White House to the media so that the American people can see what's happening there. But he has got one of the toughest jobs in government because he has to exhaust the questions and respond candidly and with forthright answers, and he does a terrific job. The president is lucky to have him. 16:48:50 LAMB: So what is the number one requirement for somebody like Scott McClellan in order to get that job? 16:48:56 CARD: Patience. Understanding, respect for the president, respect for the media. You can't be hostile to the media and understand that they are doing their job. And I think Scott understands that. He understands the demands of the president and the presidency, but he also understands the expectations of the media to have information sometimes that is not available and sometimes wanted before its mature. And I think that he finds the right balance. LAMB: Why do you like George Bush so much? 16:49:26 CARD: Because he is a man of great character. He has good moral compass. He follows it. He is very disciplined in his life. I respect the discipline that he has. I respect how much he loves Laura and Jenna and Barbara. I respect that he is a man of faith and that he's not afraid to be a man of faith. 16:49:45 I respect that he makes decisions and has the courage to make decisions. I respect the fact that he is understanding that time is fleeting and he wants to take advantage of the time that he is president of the United States to do important things for the country. And he's also respectful of the time that other people give to the country or to him as he is making decisions. So it's really centered around respect. That's why I like him so much. 16:50:12 LAMB: We have some photos that are on the White House Web site of you. We'll show one of them on the screen right now. And this was a view on Air Force One. Do you -- are you always on there with him? 16:50:22 CARD: I tend to travel when he goes on long, overnight trips, or I will tend to travel with the president. Most foreign trips I travel with the president. On day-to-day travel that the president does, Joe Hagin, who is deputy chief of staff for operations, tends to travel with the president. That's. LAMB: Well, we haven't -- this is one in the Oval Office that -- you are there at the very back. CARD: Yes, I am. LAMB: And when I see that, it reminds me that you are always around watching everything that goes on. Do you write it down? CARD: No, I do not. LAMB: No diary? 16:50:52 CARD: I do not keep a diary. I think the conversations that I have with the president are the most privileged in our government. And so I try not to keep a diary. I work very hard at making sure the president is well-prepared and understanding, so that's what I try to do. LAMB: Here you are with Condoleezza Rice and the vice president. What is your relationship to the vice president? 16:51:14 CARD: His office is right next to my office. I have great respect for the vice president and I appreciate the fact that he has great empathy for me, because he was a chief of staff. (LAUGHTER) CARD: So he understands the burdens that I carry. LAMB: What is your reaction when you read that everything thinks he really runs the government? 16:51:29 CARD: Well, I -- the vice president is the vice president and he knows his role, probably better than anyone else. And he is not the president. He is very respectful of the president and a wonderful adviser to the president. And he's a wonderful adviser to me. LAMB: Here we have another photo of you briefing, it looks like some military folks? Do you remember this? 16:51:51 CARD: This is in the Roosevelt Room of the White House and I don't remember what the issue is, but I think that these may be some airmen that had participated when the president took the trip to Baghdad. And I was thanking them for the secrecy that they kept as the president -- as we planned the trip to Baghdad and then went over there. 16:52:14 And that was the Thanksgiving day trip to Baghdad when the president snuck out of Crawford, Texas, and people didn't even know where he had gone. And the next thing they knew, he was landing at Baghdad and going to a Thanksgiving dinner with the troops. LAMB: Were you with him? CARD: Yes, I was. LAMB: How soon in advance did you know that he was going to go there? 16:52:28 CARD: Well, I had been planning it for about a month before we took the trip. I did it with a very small circle of people, because security was very, very important. But it took a lot of planning to have that trip come off the way that it did. And thank the military and Joe Hagin and the Secret Service, and the media for their help in making sure that that trip could be accomplished without any danger to the president of the United States. LAMB: One last photo of you, in the Oval Office, again, with the vice president and. CARD: Secretary Don Evans. LAMB: Yes. And then you are right next to the president. Andy Card is our guest, chief of staff to the president. And we only have a couple of minutes to go. Let me go back again to what we were talking about earlier, because I want to find out what you've learned from being chief of staff. What is the best training for the job? 16:53:08 CARD: I think being involved in the political process and having worked at the White House. I can't discount the value that came because I worked at the White House under President Reagan and former President Bush. 16:53:22 I also think it's important that you have the confidence of the president. And probably more important than any training is the fact that the president has confidence in the chief of staff. I believe that the president and I have a candid relationship that allows me to enjoy his confidence, but when the confidence disappears, I should disappear, and I accept that. LAMB: What do you want to do after this is over? 16:53:43 CARD: I would like to be a wonderful spouse of a minister. And my wife has sacrificed so much for me and her love of this country that I would like to be able to give her back some of what she has given me. LAMB: How are you going to do that? 16:53:57 CARD: Any way that I'm given the opportunity to. My -- Kathy and I have enjoyed a wonderful life together, and I'm looking forward to spending the rest of my life with her. But her calling is much greater than the calling that I've answered because she is helping with a much greater responsibility than even protecting and defending that Constitution. LAMB: Where is her church? What's her denomination? 16:54:20 CARD: She is a United Methodist minister and she comes from my hometown. I met her in the fifth grade, so we have been almost lifelong friends. And she is active in the McLean community in Virginia. And that's where her church is, Trinity United Methodist Church. LAMB: And do you talk to her about this job you're doing? 16:54:39 CARD: I do. I share my experiences with her. I'm blessed that the president has allowed me to include her in the job that I do. And when I was asked to take the job of chief of staff, I asked the president to recognize that if I come, my wife is coming with me. We're partners in everything we do and that she would be a partner in this process. 16:54:58 And he said, absolutely. And then I went and had the same conversation with Laura Bush. And she said, absolutely. LAMB: As you know, the president's popularity is down to 39 percent in a couple of polls. This is one of those dips that happens. What is it going to take to get him out of this? 16:55:13 CARD: Well, I think as we continue with the recovery in Katrina and Rita down in New Orleans and Mississippi, that will help. The successes in Iraq that are much greater than reported by the media will help because it will become increasingly known by the American people as the Iraqis accept more responsibility under their democracy. As the troops begin to come home, when the Iraqis are taking over responsibility for their own security. And the president's good policy initiatives are taking hold in America and more young kids are getting a good education in the public school system and that faith-based communities respected for the partnership it plays with the federal government to help people in need. And when we find that the tax policies are making a difference. Next year in January when Medicare prescription drug coverage is available for seniors for the first time. All of that will help to demonstrate to the American the outstanding leadership that the president has provided and the direction that he wants to take the country is still the right direction. LAMB: Andy Card, thank you very much. CARD: Thank you, Brian. END
CSPAN / ANDREW CARD INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LAMB
CSPAN / BRIAN LAMB INTERVIEW WITH WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF, ANDY CARD RS23 X86 slugged: 1555 CARD X86 Friday, October 14, 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SIMULTANEOUS ON-AIR CREDIT LOGO MAY NOT BE COVERED / NO MORE THAN A THREE MINUTE CLIP MAY BE USED AT A TIME 15:59:55 BRIAN LAMB, HOST: Andy Card, chief of staff to the president, why do you think that conservatives have reacted as strongly against Harriet Miers as they have? 16:00:04 ANDREW CARD, WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF: I don't think they know her. And I wish that they had been skeptical and looked to learn more about her and they would have been very comforted. I'm a little surprised that they came out of the box so cynically. 16:00:14 But, you know, she's a wonderful person. She has got a great track record. She broke through that glass ceiling before many people knew there was a ceiling there. And she was the first woman to be hired by a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of the Dallas Bar Association The first woman head of the Texas Bar Association. Very active in the American Bar Association. One of the top 50 female lawyers in America consistently. One of the top 100 lawyers in America. 16:00:45 And the White counsel, and the White House counsel has to deal with an awful of issues that touch on the Constitution. So she's really quite an expert on dealing with the realities of the struggles between the executive branch, the legislative branch, and I'm going to say, the judicial branch. 16:00:58 LAMB: But there seems to be more to this from the conservatives than just Harriet Miers. It seems like they're using this to really come after the president for some reason or another. Have you thought about this? 16:01:07 CARD: Well, of course, I'm concerned by it. But, you know, I have great confidence in the president and how he leads. And when he stood up and took that oath to be president of the United States, and it's shortest oath taken by anyone who serves in government, he said that he would preserve, protect and defend that Constitution. 16:01:21 And that's exactly what he does every day. And by selecting Harriet Miers as his nominee to the Supreme Court, he is confident that that Constitution will be protected for the future. 16:01:32 LAMB: What's the different being the chief of staff in the second term right now from what it was in the first term? 16:01:39 CARD: Well, as you know, when you're second-term president, you're not worried about reelection. So the first I would say is that the president understands that he has got a short amount of time to accomplish an awful lot. And he has got an awful lot of things that he knows should be done for America and for the world. 16:01:54 He has always had a great vision for where he should take the country. And he was able to accomplish some of that visionary leadership in his first term when he got the No Child Left Behind Act passed, and education -- reform our education system. 16:02:07 He inherited a recession and he cut taxes so that we could build our way out of the recession and get a strong economy moving. And then we had that horrible attack on September 11th, 2001, and that changed an awful lot, but it did not deter the president from the vision he had for the country in where he wants to tackle those tough issues that he knew about so that future generations wouldn't have to worry about them. 16:02:30 LAMB: Why do you do this for as long as you have? And you're -- what, now it has been 50 years since somebody has done as long as you have. 16:02:37 CARD: Well, I serve at the pleasure of the president for the time being. And that's what the piece of paper that hangs on my wall says, and I'm reminded of that everyday when I look at it. 16:02:45 I feel very privileged to work for the president of the United States. I feel it's a great privilege to work at the White House no matter who the president is, but I am particularly proud of this president and how he makes his decisions and the vision that he has for the country and the expectations that he has for the world. So I feel very privileged. But I serve at his pleasure. And if I'm not doing the job, I shouldn't be in the position. 16:03:05 I'm very comfortable with the reality that I am a staffer. I'm just a staffer. I'm responsible for the rest of the staff, but my job is to make sure the president has all that he needs in order to be able to do the job. 16:03:18 LAMB: The total years you have spent in the White House working for three different presidents? 16:03:22 CARD: Well, I started in 18 -- 1983, 18, 1983. (LAUGHTER) 16:03:28 CARD: And I had a respite from that experience when I helped run a campaign for president in New Hampshire in '87-'88, then came back to the White House and served former President Bush and was deputy chief of staff and then Secretary of Transportation. Oh, I guess I started in '83 and I am and other than the Clinton years I was in the White House for almost every year. 16:03:49 LAMB: Here's a piece of videotape in 1992 when you were Secretary of Transportation. 16:03:54 (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) CARD: My job as deputy chief of staff was to be everywhere that the chief of staff was not. And obviously he was not more places than he was. So I frequently had to run from meeting to meeting. My job was basically to be the managing partner at the White House, to make sure that it functioned on a day-to-day basis. One of the exciting parts of the job was being able to spend a lot of time with the president, because when the chief of staff was not with the president, I had the opportunity to be with the president. So I accompanied him on most of his foreign trips. I was able to participate in a lot of the foreign diplomacy and discussion that took place, a lot of the domestic policy discussions and the economic policy discussions that took place. But really I was kind of the micromanager at the White House. (END VIDEOTAPE) 16:04:35 LAMB: What are you now? 16:04:39 CARD: I'm responsible for making sure the White House meets the president's expectations of preparing him to make tough decisions. And I worry about the care and feeding of the president. That's probably the biggest responsibility that a chief of staff has. After all, the president has to have time to eat, sleep, and be merry. And I want to make sure that he has time to eat, sleep, and be merry. 16:04:56 I also have to make sure that the policy that he has to address is well-developed. So we have policy counsels, outstanding people. Steve Hadley replaced Condi Rice in the foreign policy world. And Al Hubbard doing the economic policy. And Claude Allen with the domestic policy. And we have Fran Townsend doing the homeland security policy. 16:05:12 So we have a good policy nucleus. And I make sure that that policy group gets to stimulate the president's thinking about the policy options that he has to consider. And then I have to make sure that we communicate with the right people at the right time when the president has made a decision. And I call that marketing and selling. 16:05:27 We have to communicate with Congress, with the American people, with other world leaders. And we have to communicate with the rest of the executive branch of government so that when a decision is made by the president, the people who had to implement that decision understand what the decision is, why he made it, why it's important that it be implemented the way the president has an expectation for the it be implemented. 16:05:47 LAMB: How do you stay in touch with him? 16:05:49 CARD: The president sees an awful lot of me. I greet him first thing in the morning and I say good night to him when he goes off to go home for the night. He probably sees much more of me than he wants to. I really do feel very blessed. 16:06:03 And we have a very candid, open relationship. It's a relationship that allows me to speak to him without any fear of retribution. I feel comfortable talking with him. And I know that he feels comfortable talking with me. But those conversations should be private. And they are, because I offer the president candid counsel, and he offers me sometimes very un-candid criticism. 16:06:27 So -- but, no, he's wonderful to work with and I spend a lot of time with him. I'm blessed that he and my wife get along well, and Laura and my wife get along well. So I feel that I'm very blessed but I am still just a staffer. The president is my friend and I do not want to let him down. But I am not his friend, I am a staffer. 16:06:49 LAMB: What do you call him? 16:06:51 CARD: I call him Mr. President. And he earned that title by gaining the respect of the American people and winning a vote for president of the United States. And it's a wonderful, wonderful title to have. And I'm proud to call him Mr. President. 16:07:01 LAMB: Did you ever call him George in the old days? 16:07:04 CARD: In the old days, before he was president, before he was governor? Yes. I called him George or W or Junior as many of us did. But he is the president and I'm proud to call him president. 16:07:13 LAMB: You know, for a long time there was a story about that he was called in to fire John Sununu when he was chief of staff. But recent reports in The Washington Post, among other places, say that you fired John Sununu, your boss. 16:07:27 CARD: Well, I have great respect for John Sununu. He was an outstanding chief of staff, and he's a good, close friend and someone that I admire an awful lot. But he had reached the point where he was not serving the president as well the president needed to be served. 16:07:43 And yes, I did deliver a message to the chief of staff, then John Sununu, that it was probably time for him to tender his resignation. I think that George Bush then had also delivered a similar message, but it didn't take. So I think I was brought in to help make sure the message was understood. 16:08:01 LAMB: Was that hard? 16:08:03 CARD: It was very hard because I had tremendous respect for John Sununu. And I was his deputy, I was the deputy chief of staff when he was the chief of staff. And -- but I also respect and support the president of the United States and I know that we all serve at his pleasure. And that's an obligation that I take very, very seriously. 16:08:21 LAMB: There was a -- I was trying to find the quote here where it talks about when you fire somebody, this isn't the quote, people feel like they've just been given a free car. How often have you had to fire people in your life? 16:08:35 CARD: Quite a few times in a lot of different experiences in my life. I worked at McDonald's when I was in college and had to fire people. I was a manager of McDonald's. I worked in business where I had to fire people. I ran a trade association where I had to fire people. 16:08:51 So it's not comfortable experience, but it is part of a life experience for people. And I don't think that we should ashamed when we suggest people should move on to find something better that is better suited to their lives as well. 16:09:05 LAMB: The president's critics say he hasn't fired enough people. 16:09:09 CARD: Well, I know who is no longer serving his administration and I know the views that the president has had. And I think that he has a great team serving him right now, but we all serve for the time being which means that no one should be secure in their job, they should just do it. And that's the president's prerogative. And he has a great number of people who are doing a terrific job for him right now. 16:09:29 LAMB: Where -- how far is your office away from his? 16:09:32 CARD: Oh, probably 50 yards away from the Oval Office, and the opposite corner of the White House. I guess you can't call the Oval Office in a corner because there are no corners in the Oval Office, but I have the corner office in the West Wing of the White House. 16:09:45 The other corners are located -- or have occupants Steve Hadley, the national security adviser to the president; Scott McClellan, the press secretary of the president; the president is one corner; and I'm in the next corner. 16:09:57 LAMB: What time do you get up in the morning? 16:09:58 CARD: I get up at 4:20. And my wife wakes up with me and we have breakfast together. And I'm usually in the White House at my desk at 5:30 a.m. And cramming to do an awful lot of reading to get ready for the day. I go through the intelligence reports, skim all the newspapers, go through the domestic policy issues and review the president's schedule that day, and then rush down to the Oval Office and get to exercise a phenomenal privilege when I say, good morning, Mr. President, when he shows up for work. 16:10:24 He shows up between 6:45 and 7:00 in the morning. 16:10:27 LAMB: What time do you go home at night? 16:10:30 CARD: I usually get home about 8:30, 9:00. And if Congress is in session, it could be later. And it's not unusual for me to be on the phone after I get home, especially if Congress is in session. I usually try to get to bed around 10:30, 11:00. 16:10:41 LAMB: How much sleep do you get? CARD: Not enough. But my experience has been that I get just barely enough to survive and I look forward to the opportunities to catch a nap every once in a while. 16:10:51 LAMB: Your wife, who is a minister, was quoted as saying, "I'm sure who you're married to, George Bush or me." (LAUGHTER)16:10:57 CARD: Well, there's an interesting story that is around that quote. It came during the 2000 election and I had just completed work on helping with the presidential debates. And I had been gone for quite some time and hadn't been around. And I was anxious to come home. I arrived home much later than I had planned because my flight was delayed and I had hoped to get home in time to take Kathy out for dinner. And got home, we just went to bed, got up the next morning, made a nice breakfast and proceeded to spurt out all of the excitement around the presidential debates and how much I respect then-Governor Bush and the effort he was making to be president. 16:11:36 And she said, are you married to me or to George Bush? And the phone rang, and Kathy answered the phone, and she said, it's George W. Bush, and handed me the phone. (LAUGHTER) 16:11:49 CARD: And -- no, I'm very committed to the president and how he does his job, but I love my wife and I am grateful that she married me. We've been married for 38 years and I'm very, very blessed that she has had her life with me. And I will tell you, she's giving a lot more than I give. And I'm grateful for it. 16:12:05 LAMB: How old are your three kids? 16:12:07 CARD: We have three children and four grandchildren. So our grandchildren are 12, 10, 8 and 6. So that will give some sense of how old our children are. We have two daughters that live in the D.C. area and a son who lives in South Carolina, and they're all married. 16:12:23 LAMB: Is there -- you know, we read that the president has a regimen that gets him rest, but you work seven days a week, you get very little sleep at night, is there a risk that you work too long and you're tired and make decisions when you're tired? 16:12:36 CARD: Well, thankfully I'm helping people make decisions. I'm not a penultimate decision-maker. The president is the decision-maker. And he has got the toughest decisions to make. And my job is to help him make those decisions. 16:12:49 But I -- all my life I have worked kind of this schedule. When I was in college I delivered newspapers early in the morning and worked at McDonald's late at night. So even when I was in high school I would get up in the morning and get the newspapers ready for the paperboys early in the morning. 16:13:03 So I've had this kind of lifestyle of early-to-bed and early-to-rise. And so far seem to be doing pretty well. 16:13:11 LAMB: When you first came in as chief of staff, it's my understanding that you had a dinner or something where former chiefs of staff came and gave advice? 16:13:23 CARD: I did. Mack McLarty, who was chief of staff to President Clinton, and Ken Duberstein who was chief of staff to President Reagan. They invited all of the other living chiefs of staff to a dinner that was given in my honor, and it was a wonderful experience. And, you know, regardless of the politics, of the philosophy that people bring to this office, there was great empathy for the challenge that I was about to take. And I learned a lot from other chiefs of staff. 16:13:43 I served with great pleasure under Jim Baker when he was chief of staff in the Reagan administration, and then Don Regan, and then Howard Baker, and Ken Duberstein, and then John Sununu, and Sam Skinner, and then Jim Baker again. So I've been very, very blessed and have learned an awful lot from each one of them. 16:14:00 LAMB: Let's say it's 2009, there's a brand new president of the United States and there's a new chief of staff, and they call you up and say, come to a dinner. And you're sitting around that dinner, what are you going to tell the next chief of staff that you've learned that you didn't know about before you got in this job? 16:14:14 CARD: I would say to remember that the job is not about the individual chief of staff, it's about the president of the United States and making sure that he is well-served. The hardest part about my job is, I think what I mentioned, that I cannot become his friend, I've got to stay his staffer. And there is great temptation to want to be the president's friend. But I fight that temptation every day and remind myself that I'm a staffer and if he's not comfortable with how he is being served, he should say good bye to his staffer. 16:14:46 Now as soon he says good bye to me, I want to be his friend. And he is my friend. 16:14:51 LAMB: There has got to be more. 16:14:57 CARD: Well, I think there's paying attention to the schedule. Most of the challenges of the chief of staff has centers around what other people don't think about. And most people presume that the president has all kinds of time to consider policy or to meet with people. And I want to make sure that the president does have time to take care of his spiritual being, his emotional health, his mental health and his physical health so that he's in a position to make a good decision. 16:15:20 Obviously he has to be well-prepared to make that decision in terms of learning the content of the policy and the ramifications of the policy. But I want to make sure he's in the right frame of mind and that he's ready to make a decision even when it's not anticipated, because we didn't plan on a September 11th, for example, and yet the president exhibited great leadership during that period of time because he was well-prepared just to make decisions. 16:15:45 LAMB: What happens if Don Rumsfeld calls up and says, I want to talk to the president? 16:15:51 CARD: He gets to talk to the president. One thing I do not do is restrict access to the president. In fact, I have a rule, if anyone who is on the White House staff or anyone who is in the cabinet needs to see the president, they should feel comfortable going to see the president. I don't want them to see the president if they just want to see the president, and you know a lot of people pretend they have a need and it's just a thin veneer of need covering a giant want, and I police that pretty carefully. 16:16:10 But I do not control access to the Oval Office with people who need to be there. I do expect to be informed about it, either before, during, or after. And the president is terrific about keeping me very well informed on what his day has been like. 16:16:24 But no, I don't sit outside the Oval Office with a turnstile and tell people they have to put quarters in in order to get into the Oval Office. 16:16:30 LAMB: What are the president's rules? 16:16:33 CARD: I think he is very open door. His rule is candor and efficiency. He is very efficient with his time. Meetings start on time and they end on time. He's very respectful of other people's schedules. He expects the briefings to be short and consistent with the word "brief," and yet wants them to be broad enough to include all of the policy options and all of the deliberations that rose those policy considerations to his level. 16:17:00 He understands that a presidential decision is a big deal. And so he gives the decision the kind of attention that it needs before he makes it. But he has the courage to make those decisions. 16:17:12 LAMB: When do you know he's mad? CARD: Oh, he's usually pretty candid about telling me, and I know how to read his body language pretty well. And I'll pull it out of him. I can tell when he's upset. But he has got a very candid relationship with me. And I value that and when the door is shut and it's just the two of us standing in the Oval Office, I feel very comfortable that he will tell me if he's unhappy about something. 16:17:33 LAMB: There has been a lot copy written recently, both from conservatives and others. I just want to read what some have said, and we rarely get a chance to have you respond to what is said about you. This is Cal Thomas, conservative columnist: "What should President Bush do about his declining poll numbers and when should he did it? The president is in danger of losing his base which wanted more than a Republican president, it believed it had twice elected a conservative president." Conservatives are writing every day, they're mad. What do you say to Cal Thomas? 16:18:10 CARD: The president is a conservative. He's a true-blue conservative who's track record speaks volumes. I think that he has been very consistent that which he promised the American people, that what he believes. He's a good conservative president and I think that the conservatives should be applauding the president's leadership and how he has chosen people to bring similar leadership to other parts of government. So I disagree with the premise of the story. LAMB: Cal Thomas writes: "Staffers with conviction seem unable to express differences with the president for fear it might jeopardize their access or even their jobs. Instead they tell him things that make him feel good." Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers has called him the most brilliant man she has ever known. CARD: Well, I agree with Harriet Miers, he is a brilliant man. And I think that she will make a terrific justice on the Supreme Court. But I also know that the president gets unvarnished advice from a lot of staffers. The one thing that is common at the White House is candor. And there is a lot of candor in the Oval Office and people do not tell the president what he wants to hear all the time. In fact, there is a healthy banter about the candor that exists in the Oval Office and how the president is candid with us and how the staff is candid with him. There is not a lot of yes-men or yes-women around the president. There are competent who do a good job and they know that his leadership is what the people elected and so he's the one that makes the decisions. And we respect the decisions he makes because we know how he makes those decisions. LAMB: Let me try this on you and see if you agree. Anybody that has met the president off-camera finds a different person than they find on-camera. I mean, he is a friendly, outgoing individual that you hear people who don't follow his politics, they say they like him, but the minute the camera comes on, it has been done many times in our history, it's a different George Bush. Do you agree with that? 16:19:56 CARD: Well, I think -- it's probably an unfair question of me because I know him so well and I don't see the distinction between on-camera and off-camera. 16:20:03 LAMB: You really don't see any difference? 16:20:05 CARD: And there are times when I can tell the klieg lights probably bother him, but I haven't found him to put on a veneer. He kind of tells it like it is. He's very candid and forthright. He has got core values and core convictions and he's not afraid to express them and to bring them to leadership. 16:20:23 He does not make decisions based on which way the wind is blowing or who is sitting opposite him in a television studio. He is a man of great principal and he's very thoughtful and he's not afraid to be thought-provoking. 16:20:37 LAMB: The president has said almost from the beginning that he doesn't read the newspapers, watch the television shows, but he relies on you and others to provide him with the news. Is that true? 16:20:48 CARD: Well, I think -- he skims the newspapers. And remember, he wakes up every morning with a wonderful wife and she reads the newspapers and is frequently reading to him. And so he gets an awful lot of information. In fact, I'm generally amazed at the amount of peripheral information that the president gets. 16:21:05 He has got a great network of friends who make sure that he understands what's happening in the real world. You know, the White House is a bubble and the president is always trying to get out of that bubble. And he has great access to people who aren't bound by the Beltway and Washington, D.C., and he gets a good deal of information. 16:21:21 But no, he skims the newspapers, but he does not dwell on them, and he certainly doesn't get wrapped around the action with regard to an editorial page or two. 16:21:29 LAMB: Back right after he reelected, he gave of series of 15 interviews, and most of them were short. And I was watching that process, it struck me that because they're short, everybody that sits down with him wants to get the "gotcha!" question in. They want to make the news. Is it a bit of a risk? I mean, why doesn't he open up and have more lengthy conversations where you don't have this pent-up emotion to get him? 16:21:57 CARD: Well, it's unfortunate that there are so many in the media and so many in Washington who like to play "gotcha!" That's not how the president plays the game at all. And, you know, he's a very thoughtful, thought-provoking individual because he has the courage to make decisions. 16:22:13 And he has a vision for the country and a vision for the world, and that is the right vision and he is doing everything he can to implement it. But remember, the burden that he carries is the burden that centers around that oath that he took, to protect and defend that Constitution. 16:22:25 And he knows that he cannot do it alone. He needs a lot of help. And the help should come from the White House staff, that's the only reason we exist as a White House staff, is to help the president do his job. It comes from everyone who serves in the executive branch of government because they are part of Article II of that Constitution. 16:22:39 But most significantly, it comes from a lot of young men and women who volunteer to put on a uniform and serve in the armed forces. And they took an oath as well to protect and defend the Constitution, but they also took an oath to follow the command of the commander-in-chief. 16:22:54 And I am grateful that the president shows up in the Oval Office every day understanding that. And he is cognizant that there are young men and women who are putting their lives on the line at great risk to help him meet his constitutional obligation. 16:23:10 And the fact that he knows that and thinks about them and how they're meeting their responsibilities, helps him meet the responsibilities that he has when he has to make those tough decisions, because, again, the president doesn't have the luxury of making easy decisions. Only the tough decisions make it to the Oval Office, and the president has to make those tough decisions. 16:23:28 LAMB: What has been the impact on the running of the White House through all of this discussion about the special prosecutor and -- I don't think you call it special prosecutor, but the -- Mr. Fitzgerald, and the whole Valerie Plame issue? 16:23:42 CARD: Well, obviously we're all human beings and we know that there are external activities that impact the environment you're working in. And the ongoing investigation is one where everyone at the White House to my knowledge has been cooperating and helping. 16:23:58 The president has asked that we all cooperate, and we are. And -- but it is something that is there, but it is something that we don't talk about because it would be inappropriate. We all have a job to do. The president has appointed people who do their job and they do it very well. And I haven't found anyone that is distracted because of the ongoing investigation, but we all know that it's taking place and we're all working to cooperate with the investigators. 16:24:21 And we hope that it will come to a conclusion, but we're going to do the job for the president. After all, our job is to help the president do his job. And it's not to worry about each other as we deal with problems that are external to the White House. 16:24:35 LAMB: Do you ever long for the day when Andy Card can speak for himself? CARD: I've. LAMB: I mean, you can your personal views and. 16:24:44 CARD: Well, you know, as you know, Brian, I come from Massachusetts so I can "pahk the cah in Hah-vad Yahd" and most people in America won't understand me. And I served in local government in Holbrook, Massachusetts, on the planning board, and I'm very proud of my hometown, Holbrook. I served in the Massachusetts legislature for eight years where I was able to exercise a frustrating role as being part of a distinct minority in the overwhelmingly Democrat House of Representatives in Massachusetts, but I made lifelong friends there, people that I love to debate with. Some of them are serving as Democrat members of Congress right now. 16:25:13 But no, I've had plenty of opportunity to express my personal opinions, but right now I serve a person who was elected by the American people to lead, and I'm going to help him lead as he sees fit. And I'm very comfortable with the kind of leadership that he gives. LAMB: How interested are you in ever running for office? CARD: Oh, I would love to run for office again, but I know that it's not about a desire, you have to have someone marching in the parade behind you when you go to lead it. So I'm doing the job for the president and I'm focused on that right now. I'm not going to worry about what the future holds for me. But I feel very blessed to live in this great country. And all of us should. You know, we take for granted what is America. And America is great because the people are great and we've got to participate in our democracy. And that's something that C-SPAN has helped to motivate. And so I compliment C-SPAN for helping to motivate people to participate in their great democracy and make sure their representatives under Article I are doing their job in Congress, and that their representative leading the executive branch, the president of the United States, Article II, is doing his job, and that those who are there to enforce the laws and respect the Constitution are doing so to the letter of the Constitution with an understanding of our Founding Fathers' intent. LAMB: So what advice would you give someone who is about to come to work for Andy Card? CARD: Enjoy the experience, it may not last very long because we all serve at the pleasure of the president. Remember that our task is to serve the president, and there is one team, the president's team. It's not Andy Card's team or Karl Rove's team or Dan Bartlett's team or Steve Hadley's team or the State Department team or the Defense Department team, it's the president's team. And we all play different positions. And in order for the team to be successful, we have to play our position well. So whether your position is that of helping to make sure that the paper cups are cleaned up after a meeting or whether you're helping to advise the president on policy, do your job well, and the team will succeed. LAMB: But what are your pet beefs about people and the way they inter-react in a place like the White House? 16:27:12 CARD: Well, I like collegiality. I like respect. I like to recognize that the president has attracted the best and the brightest and therefore we should respect the best and the brightest that we work with. 16:27:25 And I encourage candor and forthright responses to questions. But more important than anything else is honesty and ethics. And I ask people to follow their moral compass because it's always pointing in the right direction. And that's what I expect from the people who work directly with me. But anyone who works for me is working for the president and it's a great privilege. 16:27:44 LAMB: So if I were working for you, what should I know about you in the way I -- you know, do I call straight on the phone? Do I send you a one-page memo versus three pages? 16:27:53 CARD: I prefer to do most of my meetings with people face-to-face or over the phone. So I tend to have an open door policy rather than a closed door policy. I wander the halls of the White House and like to pop in on people and ask how they're doing and what they're working on. 16:28:07 I tend to be more interactive than sitting there to read papers. But I will read all of the papers that are sent to me. I feel if a paper is on my desk it must be important. Therefore I must read it. And I've got terrific staff to make sure that the right papers are under my desk at the right time. 16:28:24 But, no, I believe in candor and people who are ethical and will tell me when they think I've done something wrong. One thing I like to tell people is if you make a mistake, eat your meal of crow as soon as the crow gets on the plate, because the longer the crow sits there the more toxic it gets. 16:28:40 And so I would like people to let me know if there is a meal of crow waiting for me and I had better start enjoying it. LAMB: What issue do you think the president cares about the most? CARD: Democracy, freedom, protecting the country. You know, the attack on September 11th taught us something, that that which we were secure with required an awful lot of work. And that meant the work of winning the war on terror. And so the president's preeminent responsibility is to win the war on terror, but in doing so making sure that future president don't have to deal with terrorists, and the best way to do that is to bring democracy to more places around the world. 16:29:20 So when our troops succeeded in Afghanistan to help install a democracy that was of, by, and for the Afghan people, and the troops that are working to help bring a democracy in Iraq with the Iraqi people will have their own government and their own constitution, that's a great testament to the president, and I think that's a great legacy that it would leave. Domestically, I think the president is probably most proud of the fact that he's going to make sure that every child gets a good education in this country and that no one is left behind and they'll be able to meet responsibilities as American citizens for the 21st Century. LAMB: As you know, a lot of these conservatives today are now calling for Harriet Miers either to quit, pull her nomination off, or somehow or another the president withdraws it. What are the chances? CARD: Well, I think she's going to be on the Supreme Court and she will be a good conservative justice on the Supreme Court. And I'm looking forward to the hearings. I do think too many people have rushed to a judgment without having had an opportunity to know Harriet Miers. So let's look for those hearings that will take place with the Senate. She has a great story to tell, but more than that, she has a great commitment to our Constitution and how it should be interpreted. And she will live up to the president's expectation of interpreting that Constitution with the words that are there in appreciate for what our Founding Fathers believed. LAMB: You know you're getting blamed for this? 16:30:36 CARD: Well, I am glad to carry any blame. I have great respect for the president and how he makes decisions and the decisions that he has made. 16:30:44 LAMB: I have The American Spectator here, somebody called "The Prowler." CARD: I read that. LAMB: "It appears that conservatives' long simmering distrust of moderate Chief of Staff Andrew Card has been confirmed by the nomination of Harriet Miers." One more paragraph. "Sources inside the White House say Card in several meetings literally shouted down opposition to Miers during the vetting process. Quote: 'Harriet was his pick all the way up until the president jumped on board wholeheartedly,' says a White House staffer. 'This was not a Rove pick or a Laura Bush pick, it was Card's pick,' unquote." CARD: Well, that is fiction and I live in a nonfiction world. LAMB: Total fiction. CARD: Total fiction. LAMB: Didn't happen. 16:31:25 CARD: It did not happen. First of all, it's not my style to speak up that way at meetings. I'm very respectful of people that participate in the vetting process and the process that considers candidates. And I respect Harriet Miers, I have great respect for her. And even more than that, I respect the president and how he made a decision to put Harriet Miers on the Supreme Court. 16:31:37 LAMB: Where do you think these kind of things come from? You watch it. I mean, you know what's right and what's wrong and when these leaks come out. 16:31:44 CARD: Yes. Well, that's -- I try not to get too worried about what is printed because I have found there is more myth than reality frequently to what is written. And I just go ahead and do my job and help the president do his job. LAMB: James -- Jim Hoagland. CARD: Yes. LAMB: . 15 days ago wrote this: "What George W. Bush needs right now is his own version of Clark Clifford. He needs a friend close enough to tell him that his presidency is failing and wise enough to describe what Bush must do to salvage it." And he's not an enemy of George Bush, as you know. 16:32:17 CARD: Well, the president has great friends who are very candid with him. And they all have access to him and the president reaches out to them. And I'm sure that he is getting wise counsel and sage advice. And I encourage that. I do not discourage it. 16:32:31 I do not believe the president should be isolated from his friends, from their perception of reality, nor from the reality that others may perceive. So I'm all in favor of the president getting candid, forthright advice from anyone that he chooses to listen to. And he is not isolated in terms of the White House staff, nor is he isolated from his friends. 16:32:51 LAMB: But you see what people are saying outside, he says he doesn't watch television, doesn't read the newspaper, takes all his advice. I mean, they really -- I don't know if they're pointing the finger at your or not. 16:32:59 CARD: I'm glad to have anyone point the finger at me, but. LAMB: Are you a moderate instead of a conservative? 16:33:03 CARD: No. I think I'm a conservative. I know I'm a conservative. I'm proudly from Massachusetts. And I think the word "Massachusetts" and "conservative" seem like oxymorons, they're not. And I am a conservative from Massachusetts, proudly so. 16:33:20 And I grew up in family that believes in the values that make this country great. And I had a grandmother who had tremendous influence on my life and she was a suffragette and I'm going to make that that which she believed was so important, which was participating in our democracy, was going to be there. And I will participate and I'm encouraging my children and grandchildren to do it as well. LAMB: How did your grandmother have that kind of influence on you? CARD: Well, my parents were married at a very young age and they were very young when I was born. LAMB: How old? CARD: There were 16 when they were married and 17 when I was born. And I was blessed to be able to spend a lot of time at my grandmother's house. And she was a schoolteacher in Brockton, Massachusetts, and we lived in Holbrook, Massachusetts. 16:34:04 And sitting around the dining room table she would begin the meals with a prayer, but then obligate us to each repeat something from the newspaper that day. And inevitably that caused conversations to center around politics or policy or partisan interests. 16:34:17 So I grew up in a family that kind of enjoyed the dinner table as a place to argue. And we had plenty of arguments. But she also had a picture that was hanging on the wall in her dining room. And it was of women marching down Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts, and they were all suffragettes. And she was in that picture. And she fought for women to have the right to vote. And when women got the right to vote in 1920, she was very proud and she ran for the school committee in the town of Holbrook and served for many years on the school committee, and was very controversial and outspoken. 16:34:50 And so I grew up with a grandmother instilling in me a sense of responsibility to participate in our great democracy. And I will do it. LAMB: How much time did you spend around her? 16:34:59 CARD: Well, I obviously was very close to her growing up. And after I was married and came back from college, I moved in with my grandmother. And then when she got sick she moved in with me and Kathy and the kids. And so I spent a lot time with my grandmother. 16:35:17 My senior year of high school I must have been a challenge to my parents because they sent me to grandmother's house a lot and she made sure I finished my homework. 16:35:24 LAMB: When you were senior in high school, your parents would have been about 34. 16:35:29 CARD: My parents were very young and wonderful parents. They're both passed now. And I was very blessed to have parents that cared so much about their children and about their community. They were all active in their community. Both my father and mother were active in Holbrook and took great pride in Holbrook and Massachusetts. So I was blessed. LAMB: Why were your married at age 16? 16:35:52 CARD: They loved each other and they shared that love with the children. And I've got wonderful siblings and a very close family. I feel very, very fortunate. LAMB: How many siblings? CARD: I have a brother a year younger than I am, two sisters, and then a younger brother. And I get to see them not as often as I would like to, not as often as I should, but they're all terrific and they've all been actively engaged in helping to make America a better country. LAMB: In what way, what do they do? 16:36:18 CARD: Oh gosh. My sister Sara was in Florida, they just moved to Tennessee, but she worked for Governor Bush in Florida. My sister Lisi has worked in government for a number of years and now in the private sector. My brother John is active in Las Vegas with a business and a family. And my brother Brad has served and he was a police officer, a state trooper, served helping to bring drug lords to their knees, and -- as an undercover agent, and then worked for a member of Congress and now works in Washington, D.C. So they've all grown up and recognizing that we've got a great democracy, but it's only as good as the people who participate in it. LAMB: What does brother Brad do here? CARD: He is working with a lobbying firm and does very, very well. LAMB: You did some lobbying. 16:37:06 CARD: I did. I was fortunate to -- after I left the Department of Transportation and helped former President Bush with his transition out of government, I went to work as the head of the trade association for General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler. And it was the American Automobile Manufacturers Association. It's a great industry and I learned an awful lot from management with that relatively large trade association. At the time that I was there, the headquarters was located in Detroit. They moved the headquarters to Washington, D.C. 16:37:35 And we had about 150 employees. And I had to downsize a little bit. But there were a lot of important issues that I had to address, including some important trade disputes with Japan and Korea. So it was a wonderful experience. And then I went and worked with General Motors with about a year before I then helped the current president in his campaign LAMB: Let's go back to some of the issues. Would you have done Katrina differently if you had it to do all over again? 16:38:00 CARD: Oh, I think we all learned lessons from Katrina. And, you know, I was sent down by former President Bush to help with the recovery effort after Hurricane Andrew. And when I went back and one of my staffers pulled out some of the press clips from 1992 -- August of 1992, and you could have almost changed the word "Andrew" to "Katrina," Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Katrina, and changed the name of the players from Wally Stickney to Mike Brown and whatever. 16:38:30 You would have found similar criticisms. But we learned from the experiences in Katrina and will be putting some of that -- of what we learned into practice right now. FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security have already made a number of changes. We're making changes at the White House. There is a lessons learned process going on at the White House that is very important and the president is paying close attention to. 16:38:51 But, you know, this was a horrific natural disaster. And the land area involved was greater than the land area of all of Great Britain, just to put things in perspective. And I've been down to the region four times. The president has been down there eight times. And it is indescribable, the amount of destruction. And the work that has to be down will require a long time, a lot of money, and a great commitment from the private sector as well as the public sector. 16:39:17 LAMB: So what would you do differently next time? 16:39:21 CARD: Well, I think that understanding the relationship between the federal government, state governments, and local governments is something that we came to find was strained. The president was anxious to do things that didn't -- that he didn't have the authority to do because FEMA is a response mechanism to a request that comes from a governor. And the request for disaster assistance came very, very early and for the first time in many storms, the president approved a disaster declaration before the disaster actually struck. So we pre-positioned an awful lot of aid. But you understand you cannot pre-position aid in the disaster area. And once the disaster struck, you get the aid in their as quickly as you can, but a lot of infrastructure was destroyed. So that's a lesson that we learned, better where to pre-position assistance. We learned to get the military involved a little earlier in the process if we can. We have a law on the books, Posse Comitatus, which prevents the military from exercising any police authority. And yet there was a need for greater security in New Orleans in particular. And those needs should have been met by the local police, but the local police had kind of taken off and -- not all of them, but some of them. And the National Guard, under the governor's command, wasn't able to get as much order as we had hoped. And that's something we learned. But the U.S. troops, the military that the president commands as commander-in-chief, were not able to do and are not able to do police enforcement or security enforcement. So we've learned a lot of lessons and the president has asked us to take a look at all of them. LAMB: On the issue of Iraq, the war in Iraq, when we're recording this, the vote on constitution hasn't taken place, but when people see it, it will have taken place. Let's assume it passes, what does that mean? CARD: Well, that's giant step. Think of the step that America took when it adopted its Constitution. And it took us many years to get to the point where we could adopt a Constitution: 1776, we think, started the Revolutionary War, but it wasn't until September 17th, 1887, that we had a Constitution that was presented to the people for ratification. And it took some time to ratify it. And then we had to get the Bill of Rights. But this is a big, giant step for the people of Iraq, to have a constitution, and guarantee that they will have election where they will leaders under that constitution in an election on December 15th, I think it's the 15th, it's in December. And that is an important step. So this day will go down in history in Iraq as a great day where they have a constitution and it was written for and by the people of Iraq and ratified by them rather than imposed by some theocracy or by some totalitarian dictator. 16:42:04 LAMB: How much pressure do you expect to get for the 2006 election to get some of the troops out of there next year? 16:42:08 CARD: Well, the president is anxious to get the troops out of Iraq, but he wants to accomplish the mission before we do so. And, as you know, we're working very hard to make sure that the Iraqis are trained to meet their own security obligations. 16:42:22 And increasingly we find that Iraqis are leading the fight against the insurgents and leading the fight to secure their nation. And that's a good sign. And I think that we're making significant progress. But the troops should not come home prematurely. That would be a terrible thing. They should stay there until the job is done. 16:42:39 After all, we want the democracy in Iraq to take hold, because it's important that the democracy in Iraq take hold so that people in Iran can see its impact, and Syria, and the other countries in the region. 16:42:50 So victory is very, very important, and the president will make sure that we secure victory in Iraq before the troops come home. LAMB: Taxes, the whole idea of making the tax cut permanent, off the rails because of what happened in Katrina. Will it get back on? 16:43:08 CARD: I think it will get back on. You know, we clearly want to have America as a place where not only the people here like to invest, but people around the world like to invest. And that we means we have to have a tax policy in place that is competitive with other nations in this 21st Century. We have a global economy. We have to make sure we are competitive in that global economy. And that means we can't have a high-tax state. So the president, I think, is on the right track to ask for a permanent reduction of the -- elimination of the so-called "death tax." I think that he's right to call for a tax rate that is reasonable and not excessive and will invite investment and stimulate economic activity. You know, we've been on the track for pretty significant economic growth, and it's because of those tax cuts the president put in place that we've had that economic growth. And our economy is poised for long-term growth and there seems to be great confidence in that, as reflected in the bond market and interest rates. So I'm optimistic. LAMB: As you know, the market isn't going anywhere, hasn't been for a long time. 16:44:10 CARD: Well, it's a little higher today than it was a year-and-a-half ago, two years ago, so we've seen growth. And the projections are that the economy will still continue to grow. I know the 50 blue chip economists are prognosticating that we should have growth in the 3 percent range-plus. And I think that is appropriate growth. And Alan Greenspan and the Fed have done a great job of keeping inflation in check and allowing for us to continue togrow this economy. And I think it will continue. LAMB: What's going to happen, though, this winter when the old monthly gas bill comes in or the oil bill comes and it's at least 50 percent higher than it was last year? 16:44:41 CARD: Well, I am concerned about energy prices. And the good news is we have a new energy policy in place. It took an awful long time for us to have an energy policy as law. And Congress did pass one in the summertime. And we have an energy bill -- energy law. But that's not going to provide short-term relief. We need more energy supply in this country. We need to have more conservation in this country. And the president has called for more conservation. We need to have more research and development. And we need to move to a hydrocarbon less-dependent society in energy. We should have hydrogen fuel used in our vehicles, for example. But that's research and development that must be done. I personally believe we need more nuclear power in this country. We can't be as dependent on other countries around the world for our energy supply as we are today. But we do have short-term challenges in the energy sector because of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita where we lost a lot of natural gas production out of the Gulf. And our refineries are down, some refineries are still down and they're not producing as much gasoline as we would like. We know that there are shortages of natural gas in some parts of the country. So the president is looking for short-term efforts to mitigate the impact of these energy shortages. But we have to recognize that demand and supply set prices more than government policy, and we need more supply and we need to do everything we can to reduce our demand, but still allow our economy to grow. LAMB: What are the chances that there will be private accounts for Social Security before this president's term is over? 16:46:23 CARD: I think the chances are pretty good. You know, the president is right to call for us to address the challenge of Social Security because the status quo is not sustainable. There isn't one expert that says we can survive the next 25, 50 years with the current Social Security system. We've got to make changes. And the president knows that making changes now will be less painful than making changes in the future. And one aspect of reform that would make a big difference would be to have personal savings accounts. They're like an IRA that would be part of your Social Security system that would supplement and compliment the Social Security benefits that would be there under a Social Security system, and I think it's the right thing to do. I think it will happen before the president leaves office. LAMB: As you know, we've talked about this earlier in the program, secretary of transportation, deputy chief of staff to the president, worked in the Reagan administration, 41, and 43 chief of staff. What would you change about the media if you could? 16:47:08 CARD: Boy, I'm not sure that I would change anything about the media except to invite them to take a deeper look into some of the policies that they talk about in 30-second sound bites. LAMB: You're talking about television. 16:47:22 CARD: Television in particular. There is a lot of competition in the media today. When I first came to the Reagan White House, there wasn't a lot of competition, especially on television. There were no cable networks. You didn't have a CNN even when I started. 16:47:36 And so there was a cycle to the news that was easily anticipated. And I can remember the press secretary saying, the lid is on, and there was no more news that came out of the White House. 16:47:48 The lid never is put on at the White House now in terms of the news cycle, and that's because of the competitive demands in cable television and with the broadcast networks, and I think that's a reality so we have to live with that reality. 16:48:01 But I do think we have a tendency now to get our news in very short blasts rather than informed discussion. And I would like to see more informed discussion. That's one reason I like C-SPAN. 16:48:12 LAMB: Why do you send Scott McClellan out there every day to be pummeled by people in the press corps? 16:48:18 CARD: He is feeding a giant monster called the media. And they are insatiable. And if he were not out there providing information for them, they would probably be scratching at doors that they shouldn't scratch at. 16:48:32 So I think that he is helping to open the doors of the White House to the media so that the American people can see what's happening there. But he has got one of the toughest jobs in government because he has to exhaust the questions and respond candidly and with forthright answers, and he does a terrific job. The president is lucky to have him. 16:48:50 LAMB: So what is the number one requirement for somebody like Scott McClellan in order to get that job? 16:48:56 CARD: Patience. Understanding, respect for the president, respect for the media. You can't be hostile to the media and understand that they are doing their job. And I think Scott understands that. He understands the demands of the president and the presidency, but he also understands the expectations of the media to have information sometimes that is not available and sometimes wanted before its mature. And I think that he finds the right balance. LAMB: Why do you like George Bush so much? 16:49:26 CARD: Because he is a man of great character. He has good moral compass. He follows it. He is very disciplined in his life. I respect the discipline that he has. I respect how much he loves Laura and Jenna and Barbara. I respect that he is a man of faith and that he's not afraid to be a man of faith. 16:49:45 I respect that he makes decisions and has the courage to make decisions. I respect the fact that he is understanding that time is fleeting and he wants to take advantage of the time that he is president of the United States to do important things for the country. And he's also respectful of the time that other people give to the country or to him as he is making decisions. So it's really centered around respect. That's why I like him so much. 16:50:12 LAMB: We have some photos that are on the White House Web site of you. We'll show one of them on the screen right now. And this was a view on Air Force One. Do you -- are you always on there with him? 16:50:22 CARD: I tend to travel when he goes on long, overnight trips, or I will tend to travel with the president. Most foreign trips I travel with the president. On day-to-day travel that the president does, Joe Hagin, who is deputy chief of staff for operations, tends to travel with the president. That's. LAMB: Well, we haven't -- this is one in the Oval Office that -- you are there at the very back. CARD: Yes, I am. LAMB: And when I see that, it reminds me that you are always around watching everything that goes on. Do you write it down? CARD: No, I do not. LAMB: No diary? 16:50:52 CARD: I do not keep a diary. I think the conversations that I have with the president are the most privileged in our government. And so I try not to keep a diary. I work very hard at making sure the president is well-prepared and understanding, so that's what I try to do. LAMB: Here you are with Condoleezza Rice and the vice president. What is your relationship to the vice president? 16:51:14 CARD: His office is right next to my office. I have great respect for the vice president and I appreciate the fact that he has great empathy for me, because he was a chief of staff. (LAUGHTER) CARD: So he understands the burdens that I carry. LAMB: What is your reaction when you read that everything thinks he really runs the government? 16:51:29 CARD: Well, I -- the vice president is the vice president and he knows his role, probably better than anyone else. And he is not the president. He is very respectful of the president and a wonderful adviser to the president. And he's a wonderful adviser to me. LAMB: Here we have another photo of you briefing, it looks like some military folks? Do you remember this? 16:51:51 CARD: This is in the Roosevelt Room of the White House and I don't remember what the issue is, but I think that these may be some airmen that had participated when the president took the trip to Baghdad. And I was thanking them for the secrecy that they kept as the president -- as we planned the trip to Baghdad and then went over there. 16:52:14 And that was the Thanksgiving day trip to Baghdad when the president snuck out of Crawford, Texas, and people didn't even know where he had gone. And the next thing they knew, he was landing at Baghdad and going to a Thanksgiving dinner with the troops. LAMB: Were you with him? CARD: Yes, I was. LAMB: How soon in advance did you know that he was going to go there? 16:52:28 CARD: Well, I had been planning it for about a month before we took the trip. I did it with a very small circle of people, because security was very, very important. But it took a lot of planning to have that trip come off the way that it did. And thank the military and Joe Hagin and the Secret Service, and the media for their help in making sure that that trip could be accomplished without any danger to the president of the United States. LAMB: One last photo of you, in the Oval Office, again, with the vice president and. CARD: Secretary Don Evans. LAMB: Yes. And then you are right next to the president. Andy Card is our guest, chief of staff to the president. And we only have a couple of minutes to go. Let me go back again to what we were talking about earlier, because I want to find out what you've learned from being chief of staff. What is the best training for the job? 16:53:08 CARD: I think being involved in the political process and having worked at the White House. I can't discount the value that came because I worked at the White House under President Reagan and former President Bush. 16:53:22 I also think it's important that you have the confidence of the president. And probably more important than any training is the fact that the president has confidence in the chief of staff. I believe that the president and I have a candid relationship that allows me to enjoy his confidence, but when the confidence disappears, I should disappear, and I accept that. LAMB: What do you want to do after this is over? 16:53:43 CARD: I would like to be a wonderful spouse of a minister. And my wife has sacrificed so much for me and her love of this country that I would like to be able to give her back some of what she has given me. LAMB: How are you going to do that? 16:53:57 CARD: Any way that I'm given the opportunity to. My -- Kathy and I have enjoyed a wonderful life together, and I'm looking forward to spending the rest of my life with her. But her calling is much greater than the calling that I've answered because she is helping with a much greater responsibility than even protecting and defending that Constitution. LAMB: Where is her church? What's her denomination? 16:54:20 CARD: She is a United Methodist minister and she comes from my hometown. I met her in the fifth grade, so we have been almost lifelong friends. And she is active in the McLean community in Virginia. And that's where her church is, Trinity United Methodist Church. LAMB: And do you talk to her about this job you're doing? 16:54:39 CARD: I do. I share my experiences with her. I'm blessed that the president has allowed me to include her in the job that I do. And when I was asked to take the job of chief of staff, I asked the president to recognize that if I come, my wife is coming with me. We're partners in everything we do and that she would be a partner in this process. 16:54:58 And he said, absolutely. And then I went and had the same conversation with Laura Bush. And she said, absolutely. LAMB: As you know, the president's popularity is down to 39 percent in a couple of polls. This is one of those dips that happens. What is it going to take to get him out of this? 16:55:13 CARD: Well, I think as we continue with the recovery in Katrina and Rita down in New Orleans and Mississippi, that will help. The successes in Iraq that are much greater than reported by the media will help because it will become increasingly known by the American people as the Iraqis accept more responsibility under their democracy. As the troops begin to come home, when the Iraqis are taking over responsibility for their own security. And the president's good policy initiatives are taking hold in America and more young kids are getting a good education in the public school system and that faith-based communities respected for the partnership it plays with the federal government to help people in need. And when we find that the tax policies are making a difference. Next year in January when Medicare prescription drug coverage is available for seniors for the first time. All of that will help to demonstrate to the American the outstanding leadership that the president has provided and the direction that he wants to take the country is still the right direction. LAMB: Andy Card, thank you very much. CARD: Thank you, Brian. END
CSPAN / ANDREW CARD INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LAMB
CSPAN / BRIAN LAMB INTERVIEW WITH WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF, ANDY CARD RS23 X86 slugged: 1555 CARD X86 Friday, October 14, 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SIMULTANEOUS ON-AIR CREDIT LOGO MAY NOT BE COVERED / NO MORE THAN A THREE MINUTE CLIP MAY BE USED AT A TIME 15:59:55 BRIAN LAMB, HOST: Andy Card, chief of staff to the president, why do you think that conservatives have reacted as strongly against Harriet Miers as they have? 16:00:04 ANDREW CARD, WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF: I don't think they know her. And I wish that they had been skeptical and looked to learn more about her and they would have been very comforted. I'm a little surprised that they came out of the box so cynically. 16:00:14 But, you know, she's a wonderful person. She has got a great track record. She broke through that glass ceiling before many people knew there was a ceiling there. And she was the first woman to be hired by a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of a major law firm in Texas. The first woman president of the Dallas Bar Association The first woman head of the Texas Bar Association. Very active in the American Bar Association. One of the top 50 female lawyers in America consistently. One of the top 100 lawyers in America. 16:00:45 And the White counsel, and the White House counsel has to deal with an awful of issues that touch on the Constitution. So she's really quite an expert on dealing with the realities of the struggles between the executive branch, the legislative branch, and I'm going to say, the judicial branch. 16:00:58 LAMB: But there seems to be more to this from the conservatives than just Harriet Miers. It seems like they're using this to really come after the president for some reason or another. Have you thought about this? 16:01:07 CARD: Well, of course, I'm concerned by it. But, you know, I have great confidence in the president and how he leads. And when he stood up and took that oath to be president of the United States, and it's shortest oath taken by anyone who serves in government, he said that he would preserve, protect and defend that Constitution. 16:01:21 And that's exactly what he does every day. And by selecting Harriet Miers as his nominee to the Supreme Court, he is confident that that Constitution will be protected for the future. 16:01:32 LAMB: What's the different being the chief of staff in the second term right now from what it was in the first term? 16:01:39 CARD: Well, as you know, when you're second-term president, you're not worried about reelection. So the first I would say is that the president understands that he has got a short amount of time to accomplish an awful lot. And he has got an awful lot of things that he knows should be done for America and for the world. 16:01:54 He has always had a great vision for where he should take the country. And he was able to accomplish some of that visionary leadership in his first term when he got the No Child Left Behind Act passed, and education -- reform our education system. 16:02:07 He inherited a recession and he cut taxes so that we could build our way out of the recession and get a strong economy moving. And then we had that horrible attack on September 11th, 2001, and that changed an awful lot, but it did not deter the president from the vision he had for the country in where he wants to tackle those tough issues that he knew about so that future generations wouldn't have to worry about them. 16:02:30 LAMB: Why do you do this for as long as you have? And you're -- what, now it has been 50 years since somebody has done as long as you have. 16:02:37 CARD: Well, I serve at the pleasure of the president for the time being. And that's what the piece of paper that hangs on my wall says, and I'm reminded of that everyday when I look at it. 16:02:45 I feel very privileged to work for the president of the United States. I feel it's a great privilege to work at the White House no matter who the president is, but I am particularly proud of this president and how he makes his decisions and the vision that he has for the country and the expectations that he has for the world. So I feel very privileged. But I serve at his pleasure. And if I'm not doing the job, I shouldn't be in the position. 16:03:05 I'm very comfortable with the reality that I am a staffer. I'm just a staffer. I'm responsible for the rest of the staff, but my job is to make sure the president has all that he needs in order to be able to do the job. 16:03:18 LAMB: The total years you have spent in the White House working for three different presidents? 16:03:22 CARD: Well, I started in 18 -- 1983, 18, 1983. (LAUGHTER) 16:03:28 CARD: And I had a respite from that experience when I helped run a campaign for president in New Hampshire in '87-'88, then came back to the White House and served former President Bush and was deputy chief of staff and then Secretary of Transportation. Oh, I guess I started in '83 and I am and other than the Clinton years I was in the White House for almost every year. 16:03:49 LAMB: Here's a piece of videotape in 1992 when you were Secretary of Transportation. 16:03:54 (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) CARD: My job as deputy chief of staff was to be everywhere that the chief of staff was not. And obviously he was not more places than he was. So I frequently had to run from meeting to meeting. My job was basically to be the managing partner at the White House, to make sure that it functioned on a day-to-day basis. One of the exciting parts of the job was being able to spend a lot of time with the president, because when the chief of staff was not with the president, I had the opportunity to be with the president. So I accompanied him on most of his foreign trips. I was able to participate in a lot of the foreign diplomacy and discussion that took place, a lot of the domestic policy discussions and the economic policy discussions that took place. But really I was kind of the micromanager at the White House. (END VIDEOTAPE) 16:04:35 LAMB: What are you now? 16:04:39 CARD: I'm responsible for making sure the White House meets the president's expectations of preparing him to make tough decisions. And I worry about the care and feeding of the president. That's probably the biggest responsibility that a chief of staff has. After all, the president has to have time to eat, sleep, and be merry. And I want to make sure that he has time to eat, sleep, and be merry. 16:04:56 I also have to make sure that the policy that he has to address is well-developed. So we have policy counsels, outstanding people. Steve Hadley replaced Condi Rice in the foreign policy world. And Al Hubbard doing the economic policy. And Claude Allen with the domestic policy. And we have Fran Townsend doing the homeland security policy. 16:05:12 So we have a good policy nucleus. And I make sure that that policy group gets to stimulate the president's thinking about the policy options that he has to consider. And then I have to make sure that we communicate with the right people at the right time when the president has made a decision. And I call that marketing and selling. 16:05:27 We have to communicate with Congress, with the American people, with other world leaders. And we have to communicate with the rest of the executive branch of government so that when a decision is made by the president, the people who had to implement that decision understand what the decision is, why he made it, why it's important that it be implemented the way the president has an expectation for the it be implemented. 16:05:47 LAMB: How do you stay in touch with him? 16:05:49 CARD: The president sees an awful lot of me. I greet him first thing in the morning and I say good night to him when he goes off to go home for the night. He probably sees much more of me than he wants to. I really do feel very blessed. 16:06:03 And we have a very candid, open relationship. It's a relationship that allows me to speak to him without any fear of retribution. I feel comfortable talking with him. And I know that he feels comfortable talking with me. But those conversations should be private. And they are, because I offer the president candid counsel, and he offers me sometimes very un-candid criticism. 16:06:27 So -- but, no, he's wonderful to work with and I spend a lot of time with him. I'm blessed that he and my wife get along well, and Laura and my wife get along well. So I feel that I'm very blessed but I am still just a staffer. The president is my friend and I do not want to let him down. But I am not his friend, I am a staffer. 16:06:49 LAMB: What do you call him? 16:06:51 CARD: I call him Mr. President. And he earned that title by gaining the respect of the American people and winning a vote for president of the United States. And it's a wonderful, wonderful title to have. And I'm proud to call him Mr. President. 16:07:01 LAMB: Did you ever call him George in the old days? 16:07:04 CARD: In the old days, before he was president, before he was governor? Yes. I called him George or W or Junior as many of us did. But he is the president and I'm proud to call him president. 16:07:13 LAMB: You know, for a long time there was a story about that he was called in to fire John Sununu when he was chief of staff. But recent reports in The Washington Post, among other places, say that you fired John Sununu, your boss. 16:07:27 CARD: Well, I have great respect for John Sununu. He was an outstanding chief of staff, and he's a good, close friend and someone that I admire an awful lot. But he had reached the point where he was not serving the president as well the president needed to be served. 16:07:43 And yes, I did deliver a message to the chief of staff, then John Sununu, that it was probably time for him to tender his resignation. I think that George Bush then had also delivered a similar message, but it didn't take. So I think I was brought in to help make sure the message was understood. 16:08:01 LAMB: Was that hard? 16:08:03 CARD: It was very hard because I had tremendous respect for John Sununu. And I was his deputy, I was the deputy chief of staff when he was the chief of staff. And -- but I also respect and support the president of the United States and I know that we all serve at his pleasure. And that's an obligation that I take very, very seriously. 16:08:21 LAMB: There was a -- I was trying to find the quote here where it talks about when you fire somebody, this isn't the quote, people feel like they've just been given a free car. How often have you had to fire people in your life? 16:08:35 CARD: Quite a few times in a lot of different experiences in my life. I worked at McDonald's when I was in college and had to fire people. I was a manager of McDonald's. I worked in business where I had to fire people. I ran a trade association where I had to fire people. 16:08:51 So it's not comfortable experience, but it is part of a life experience for people. And I don't think that we should ashamed when we suggest people should move on to find something better that is better suited to their lives as well. 16:09:05 LAMB: The president's critics say he hasn't fired enough people. 16:09:09 CARD: Well, I know who is no longer serving his administration and I know the views that the president has had. And I think that he has a great team serving him right now, but we all serve for the time being which means that no one should be secure in their job, they should just do it. And that's the president's prerogative. And he has a great number of people who are doing a terrific job for him right now. 16:09:29 LAMB: Where -- how far is your office away from his? 16:09:32 CARD: Oh, probably 50 yards away from the Oval Office, and the opposite corner of the White House. I guess you can't call the Oval Office in a corner because there are no corners in the Oval Office, but I have the corner office in the West Wing of the White House. 16:09:45 The other corners are located -- or have occupants Steve Hadley, the national security adviser to the president; Scott McClellan, the press secretary of the president; the president is one corner; and I'm in the next corner. 16:09:57 LAMB: What time do you get up in the morning? 16:09:58 CARD: I get up at 4:20. And my wife wakes up with me and we have breakfast together. And I'm usually in the White House at my desk at 5:30 a.m. And cramming to do an awful lot of reading to get ready for the day. I go through the intelligence reports, skim all the newspapers, go through the domestic policy issues and review the president's schedule that day, and then rush down to the Oval Office and get to exercise a phenomenal privilege when I say, good morning, Mr. President, when he shows up for work. 16:10:24 He shows up between 6:45 and 7:00 in the morning. 16:10:27 LAMB: What time do you go home at night? 16:10:30 CARD: I usually get home about 8:30, 9:00. And if Congress is in session, it could be later. And it's not unusual for me to be on the phone after I get home, especially if Congress is in session. I usually try to get to bed around 10:30, 11:00. 16:10:41 LAMB: How much sleep do you get? CARD: Not enough. But my experience has been that I get just barely enough to survive and I look forward to the opportunities to catch a nap every once in a while. 16:10:51 LAMB: Your wife, who is a minister, was quoted as saying, "I'm sure who you're married to, George Bush or me." (LAUGHTER)16:10:57 CARD: Well, there's an interesting story that is around that quote. It came during the 2000 election and I had just completed work on helping with the presidential debates. And I had been gone for quite some time and hadn't been around. And I was anxious to come home. I arrived home much later than I had planned because my flight was delayed and I had hoped to get home in time to take Kathy out for dinner. And got home, we just went to bed, got up the next morning, made a nice breakfast and proceeded to spurt out all of the excitement around the presidential debates and how much I respect then-Governor Bush and the effort he was making to be president. 16:11:36 And she said, are you married to me or to George Bush? And the phone rang, and Kathy answered the phone, and she said, it's George W. Bush, and handed me the phone. (LAUGHTER) 16:11:49 CARD: And -- no, I'm very committed to the president and how he does his job, but I love my wife and I am grateful that she married me. We've been married for 38 years and I'm very, very blessed that she has had her life with me. And I will tell you, she's giving a lot more than I give. And I'm grateful for it. 16:12:05 LAMB: How old are your three kids? 16:12:07 CARD: We have three children and four grandchildren. So our grandchildren are 12, 10, 8 and 6. So that will give some sense of how old our children are. We have two daughters that live in the D.C. area and a son who lives in South Carolina, and they're all married. 16:12:23 LAMB: Is there -- you know, we read that the president has a regimen that gets him rest, but you work seven days a week, you get very little sleep at night, is there a risk that you work too long and you're tired and make decisions when you're tired? 16:12:36 CARD: Well, thankfully I'm helping people make decisions. I'm not a penultimate decision-maker. The president is the decision-maker. And he has got the toughest decisions to make. And my job is to help him make those decisions. 16:12:49 But I -- all my life I have worked kind of this schedule. When I was in college I delivered newspapers early in the morning and worked at McDonald's late at night. So even when I was in high school I would get up in the morning and get the newspapers ready for the paperboys early in the morning. 16:13:03 So I've had this kind of lifestyle of early-to-bed and early-to-rise. And so far seem to be doing pretty well. 16:13:11 LAMB: When you first came in as chief of staff, it's my understanding that you had a dinner or something where former chiefs of staff came and gave advice? 16:13:23 CARD: I did. Mack McLarty, who was chief of staff to President Clinton, and Ken Duberstein who was chief of staff to President Reagan. They invited all of the other living chiefs of staff to a dinner that was given in my honor, and it was a wonderful experience. And, you know, regardless of the politics, of the philosophy that people bring to this office, there was great empathy for the challenge that I was about to take. And I learned a lot from other chiefs of staff. 16:13:43 I served with great pleasure under Jim Baker when he was chief of staff in the Reagan administration, and then Don Regan, and then Howard Baker, and Ken Duberstein, and then John Sununu, and Sam Skinner, and then Jim Baker again. So I've been very, very blessed and have learned an awful lot from each one of them. 16:14:00 LAMB: Let's say it's 2009, there's a brand new president of the United States and there's a new chief of staff, and they call you up and say, come to a dinner. And you're sitting around that dinner, what are you going to tell the next chief of staff that you've learned that you didn't know about before you got in this job? 16:14:14 CARD: I would say to remember that the job is not about the individual chief of staff, it's about the president of the United States and making sure that he is well-served. The hardest part about my job is, I think what I mentioned, that I cannot become his friend, I've got to stay his staffer. And there is great temptation to want to be the president's friend. But I fight that temptation every day and remind myself that I'm a staffer and if he's not comfortable with how he is being served, he should say good bye to his staffer. 16:14:46 Now as soon he says good bye to me, I want to be his friend. And he is my friend. 16:14:51 LAMB: There has got to be more. 16:14:57 CARD: Well, I think there's paying attention to the schedule. Most of the challenges of the chief of staff has centers around what other people don't think about. And most people presume that the president has all kinds of time to consider policy or to meet with people. And I want to make sure that the president does have time to take care of his spiritual being, his emotional health, his mental health and his physical health so that he's in a position to make a good decision. 16:15:20 Obviously he has to be well-prepared to make that decision in terms of learning the content of the policy and the ramifications of the policy. But I want to make sure he's in the right frame of mind and that he's ready to make a decision even when it's not anticipated, because we didn't plan on a September 11th, for example, and yet the president exhibited great leadership during that period of time because he was well-prepared just to make decisions. 16:15:45 LAMB: What happens if Don Rumsfeld calls up and says, I want to talk to the president? 16:15:51 CARD: He gets to talk to the president. One thing I do not do is restrict access to the president. In fact, I have a rule, if anyone who is on the White House staff or anyone who is in the cabinet needs to see the president, they should feel comfortable going to see the president. I don't want them to see the president if they just want to see the president, and you know a lot of people pretend they have a need and it's just a thin veneer of need covering a giant want, and I police that pretty carefully. 16:16:10 But I do not control access to the Oval Office with people who need to be there. I do expect to be informed about it, either before, during, or after. And the president is terrific about keeping me very well informed on what his day has been like. 16:16:24 But no, I don't sit outside the Oval Office with a turnstile and tell people they have to put quarters in in order to get into the Oval Office. 16:16:30 LAMB: What are the president's rules? 16:16:33 CARD: I think he is very open door. His rule is candor and efficiency. He is very efficient with his time. Meetings start on time and they end on time. He's very respectful of other people's schedules. He expects the briefings to be short and consistent with the word "brief," and yet wants them to be broad enough to include all of the policy options and all of the deliberations that rose those policy considerations to his level. 16:17:00 He understands that a presidential decision is a big deal. And so he gives the decision the kind of attention that it needs before he makes it. But he has the courage to make those decisions. 16:17:12 LAMB: When do you know he's mad? CARD: Oh, he's usually pretty candid about telling me, and I know how to read his body language pretty well. And I'll pull it out of him. I can tell when he's upset. But he has got a very candid relationship with me. And I value that and when the door is shut and it's just the two of us standing in the Oval Office, I feel very comfortable that he will tell me if he's unhappy about something. 16:17:33 LAMB: There has been a lot copy written recently, both from conservatives and others. I just want to read what some have said, and we rarely get a chance to have you respond to what is said about you. This is Cal Thomas, conservative columnist: "What should President Bush do about his declining poll numbers and when should he did it? The president is in danger of losing his base which wanted more than a Republican president, it believed it had twice elected a conservative president." Conservatives are writing every day, they're mad. What do you say to Cal Thomas? 16:18:10 CARD: The president is a conservative. He's a true-blue conservative who's track record speaks volumes. I think that he has been very consistent that which he promised the American people, that what he believes. He's a good conservative president and I think that the conservatives should be applauding the president's leadership and how he has chosen people to bring similar leadership to other parts of government. So I disagree with the premise of the story. LAMB: Cal Thomas writes: "Staffers with conviction seem unable to express differences with the president for fear it might jeopardize their access or even their jobs. Instead they tell him things that make him feel good." Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers has called him the most brilliant man she has ever known. CARD: Well, I agree with Harriet Miers, he is a brilliant man. And I think that she will make a terrific justice on the Supreme Court. But I also know that the president gets unvarnished advice from a lot of staffers. The one thing that is common at the White House is candor. And there is a lot of candor in the Oval Office and people do not tell the president what he wants to hear all the time. In fact, there is a healthy banter about the candor that exists in the Oval Office and how the president is candid with us and how the staff is candid with him. There is not a lot of yes-men or yes-women around the president. There are competent who do a good job and they know that his leadership is what the people elected and so he's the one that makes the decisions. And we respect the decisions he makes because we know how he makes those decisions. LAMB: Let me try this on you and see if you agree. Anybody that has met the president off-camera finds a different person than they find on-camera. I mean, he is a friendly, outgoing individual that you hear people who don't follow his politics, they say they like him, but the minute the camera comes on, it has been done many times in our history, it's a different George Bush. Do you agree with that? 16:19:56 CARD: Well, I think -- it's probably an unfair question of me because I know him so well and I don't see the distinction between on-camera and off-camera. 16:20:03 LAMB: You really don't see any difference? 16:20:05 CARD: And there are times when I can tell the klieg lights probably bother him, but I haven't found him to put on a veneer. He kind of tells it like it is. He's very candid and forthright. He has got core values and core convictions and he's not afraid to express them and to bring them to leadership. 16:20:23 He does not make decisions based on which way the wind is blowing or who is sitting opposite him in a television studio. He is a man of great principal and he's very thoughtful and he's not afraid to be thought-provoking. 16:20:37 LAMB: The president has said almost from the beginning that he doesn't read the newspapers, watch the television shows, but he relies on you and others to provide him with the news. Is that true? 16:20:48 CARD: Well, I think -- he skims the newspapers. And remember, he wakes up every morning with a wonderful wife and she reads the newspapers and is frequently reading to him. And so he gets an awful lot of information. In fact, I'm generally amazed at the amount of peripheral information that the president gets. 16:21:05 He has got a great network of friends who make sure that he understands what's happening in the real world. You know, the White House is a bubble and the president is always trying to get out of that bubble. And he has great access to people who aren't bound by the Beltway and Washington, D.C., and he gets a good deal of information. 16:21:21 But no, he skims the newspapers, but he does not dwell on them, and he certainly doesn't get wrapped around the action with regard to an editorial page or two. 16:21:29 LAMB: Back right after he reelected, he gave of series of 15 interviews, and most of them were short. And I was watching that process, it struck me that because they're short, everybody that sits down with him wants to get the "gotcha!" question in. They want to make the news. Is it a bit of a risk? I mean, why doesn't he open up and have more lengthy conversations where you don't have this pent-up emotion to get him? 16:21:57 CARD: Well, it's unfortunate that there are so many in the media and so many in Washington who like to play "gotcha!" That's not how the president plays the game at all. And, you know, he's a very thoughtful, thought-provoking individual because he has the courage to make decisions. 16:22:13 And he has a vision for the country and a vision for the world, and that is the right vision and he is doing everything he can to implement it. But remember, the burden that he carries is the burden that centers around that oath that he took, to protect and defend that Constitution. 16:22:25 And he knows that he cannot do it alone. He needs a lot of help. And the help should come from the White House staff, that's the only reason we exist as a White House staff, is to help the president do his job. It comes from everyone who serves in the executive branch of government because they are part of Article II of that Constitution. 16:22:39 But most significantly, it comes from a lot of young men and women who volunteer to put on a uniform and serve in the armed forces. And they took an oath as well to protect and defend the Constitution, but they also took an oath to follow the command of the commander-in-chief. 16:22:54 And I am grateful that the president shows up in the Oval Office every day understanding that. And he is cognizant that there are young men and women who are putting their lives on the line at great risk to help him meet his constitutional obligation. 16:23:10 And the fact that he knows that and thinks about them and how they're meeting their responsibilities, helps him meet the responsibilities that he has when he has to make those tough decisions, because, again, the president doesn't have the luxury of making easy decisions. Only the tough decisions make it to the Oval Office, and the president has to make those tough decisions. 16:23:28 LAMB: What has been the impact on the running of the White House through all of this discussion about the special prosecutor and -- I don't think you call it special prosecutor, but the -- Mr. Fitzgerald, and the whole Valerie Plame issue? 16:23:42 CARD: Well, obviously we're all human beings and we know that there are external activities that impact the environment you're working in. And the ongoing investigation is one where everyone at the White House to my knowledge has been cooperating and helping. 16:23:58 The president has asked that we all cooperate, and we are. And -- but it is something that is there, but it is something that we don't talk about because it would be inappropriate. We all have a job to do. The president has appointed people who do their job and they do it very well. And I haven't found anyone that is distracted because of the ongoing investigation, but we all know that it's taking place and we're all working to cooperate with the investigators. 16:24:21 And we hope that it will come to a conclusion, but we're going to do the job for the president. After all, our job is to help the president do his job. And it's not to worry about each other as we deal with problems that are external to the White House. 16:24:35 LAMB: Do you ever long for the day when Andy Card can speak for himself? CARD: I've. LAMB: I mean, you can your personal views and. 16:24:44 CARD: Well, you know, as you know, Brian, I come from Massachusetts so I can "pahk the cah in Hah-vad Yahd" and most people in America won't understand me. And I served in local government in Holbrook, Massachusetts, on the planning board, and I'm very proud of my hometown, Holbrook. I served in the Massachusetts legislature for eight years where I was able to exercise a frustrating role as being part of a distinct minority in the overwhelmingly Democrat House of Representatives in Massachusetts, but I made lifelong friends there, people that I love to debate with. Some of them are serving as Democrat members of Congress right now. 16:25:13 But no, I've had plenty of opportunity to express my personal opinions, but right now I serve a person who was elected by the American people to lead, and I'm going to help him lead as he sees fit. And I'm very comfortable with the kind of leadership that he gives. LAMB: How interested are you in ever running for office? CARD: Oh, I would love to run for office again, but I know that it's not about a desire, you have to have someone marching in the parade behind you when you go to lead it. So I'm doing the job for the president and I'm focused on that right now. I'm not going to worry about what the future holds for me. But I feel very blessed to live in this great country. And all of us should. You know, we take for granted what is America. And America is great because the people are great and we've got to participate in our democracy. And that's something that C-SPAN has helped to motivate. And so I compliment C-SPAN for helping to motivate people to participate in their great democracy and make sure their representatives under Article I are doing their job in Congress, and that their representative leading the executive branch, the president of the United States, Article II, is doing his job, and that those who are there to enforce the laws and respect the Constitution are doing so to the letter of the Constitution with an understanding of our Founding Fathers' intent. LAMB: So what advice would you give someone who is about to come to work for Andy Card? CARD: Enjoy the experience, it may not last very long because we all serve at the pleasure of the president. Remember that our task is to serve the president, and there is one team, the president's team. It's not Andy Card's team or Karl Rove's team or Dan Bartlett's team or Steve Hadley's team or the State Department team or the Defense Department team, it's the president's team. And we all play different positions. And in order for the team to be successful, we have to play our position well. So whether your position is that of helping to make sure that the paper cups are cleaned up after a meeting or whether you're helping to advise the president on policy, do your job well, and the team will succeed. LAMB: But what are your pet beefs about people and the way they inter-react in a place like the White House? 16:27:12 CARD: Well, I like collegiality. I like respect. I like to recognize that the president has attracted the best and the brightest and therefore we should respect the best and the brightest that we work with. 16:27:25 And I encourage candor and forthright responses to questions. But more important than anything else is honesty and ethics. And I ask people to follow their moral compass because it's always pointing in the right direction. And that's what I expect from the people who work directly with me. But anyone who works for me is working for the president and it's a great privilege. 16:27:44 LAMB: So if I were working for you, what should I know about you in the way I -- you know, do I call straight on the phone? Do I send you a one-page memo versus three pages? 16:27:53 CARD: I prefer to do most of my meetings with people face-to-face or over the phone. So I tend to have an open door policy rather than a closed door policy. I wander the halls of the White House and like to pop in on people and ask how they're doing and what they're working on. 16:28:07 I tend to be more interactive than sitting there to read papers. But I will read all of the papers that are sent to me. I feel if a paper is on my desk it must be important. Therefore I must read it. And I've got terrific staff to make sure that the right papers are under my desk at the right time. 16:28:24 But, no, I believe in candor and people who are ethical and will tell me when they think I've done something wrong. One thing I like to tell people is if you make a mistake, eat your meal of crow as soon as the crow gets on the plate, because the longer the crow sits there the more toxic it gets. 16:28:40 And so I would like people to let me know if there is a meal of crow waiting for me and I had better start enjoying it. LAMB: What issue do you think the president cares about the most? CARD: Democracy, freedom, protecting the country. You know, the attack on September 11th taught us something, that that which we were secure with required an awful lot of work. And that meant the work of winning the war on terror. And so the president's preeminent responsibility is to win the war on terror, but in doing so making sure that future president don't have to deal with terrorists, and the best way to do that is to bring democracy to more places around the world. 16:29:20 So when our troops succeeded in Afghanistan to help install a democracy that was of, by, and for the Afghan people, and the troops that are working to help bring a democracy in Iraq with the Iraqi people will have their own government and their own constitution, that's a great testament to the president, and I think that's a great legacy that it would leave. Domestically, I think the president is probably most proud of the fact that he's going to make sure that every child gets a good education in this country and that no one is left behind and they'll be able to meet responsibilities as American citizens for the 21st Century. LAMB: As you know, a lot of these conservatives today are now calling for Harriet Miers either to quit, pull her nomination off, or somehow or another the president withdraws it. What are the chances? CARD: Well, I think she's going to be on the Supreme Court and she will be a good conservative justice on the Supreme Court. And I'm looking forward to the hearings. I do think too many people have rushed to a judgment without having had an opportunity to know Harriet Miers. So let's look for those hearings that will take place with the Senate. She has a great story to tell, but more than that, she has a great commitment to our Constitution and how it should be interpreted. And she will live up to the president's expectation of interpreting that Constitution with the words that are there in appreciate for what our Founding Fathers believed. LAMB: You know you're getting blamed for this? 16:30:36 CARD: Well, I am glad to carry any blame. I have great respect for the president and how he makes decisions and the decisions that he has made. 16:30:44 LAMB: I have The American Spectator here, somebody called "The Prowler." CARD: I read that. LAMB: "It appears that conservatives' long simmering distrust of moderate Chief of Staff Andrew Card has been confirmed by the nomination of Harriet Miers." One more paragraph. "Sources inside the White House say Card in several meetings literally shouted down opposition to Miers during the vetting process. Quote: 'Harriet was his pick all the way up until the president jumped on board wholeheartedly,' says a White House staffer. 'This was not a Rove pick or a Laura Bush pick, it was Card's pick,' unquote." CARD: Well, that is fiction and I live in a nonfiction world. LAMB: Total fiction. CARD: Total fiction. LAMB: Didn't happen. 16:31:25 CARD: It did not happen. First of all, it's not my style to speak up that way at meetings. I'm very respectful of people that participate in the vetting process and the process that considers candidates. And I respect Harriet Miers, I have great respect for her. And even more than that, I respect the president and how he made a decision to put Harriet Miers on the Supreme Court. 16:31:37 LAMB: Where do you think these kind of things come from? You watch it. I mean, you know what's right and what's wrong and when these leaks come out. 16:31:44 CARD: Yes. Well, that's -- I try not to get too worried about what is printed because I have found there is more myth than reality frequently to what is written. And I just go ahead and do my job and help the president do his job. LAMB: James -- Jim Hoagland. CARD: Yes. LAMB: . 15 days ago wrote this: "What George W. Bush needs right now is his own version of Clark Clifford. He needs a friend close enough to tell him that his presidency is failing and wise enough to describe what Bush must do to salvage it." And he's not an enemy of George Bush, as you know. 16:32:17 CARD: Well, the president has great friends who are very candid with him. And they all have access to him and the president reaches out to them. And I'm sure that he is getting wise counsel and sage advice. And I encourage that. I do not discourage it. 16:32:31 I do not believe the president should be isolated from his friends, from their perception of reality, nor from the reality that others may perceive. So I'm all in favor of the president getting candid, forthright advice from anyone that he chooses to listen to. And he is not isolated in terms of the White House staff, nor is he isolated from his friends. 16:32:51 LAMB: But you see what people are saying outside, he says he doesn't watch television, doesn't read the newspaper, takes all his advice. I mean, they really -- I don't know if they're pointing the finger at your or not. 16:32:59 CARD: I'm glad to have anyone point the finger at me, but. LAMB: Are you a moderate instead of a conservative? 16:33:03 CARD: No. I think I'm a conservative. I know I'm a conservative. I'm proudly from Massachusetts. And I think the word "Massachusetts" and "conservative" seem like oxymorons, they're not. And I am a conservative from Massachusetts, proudly so. 16:33:20 And I grew up in family that believes in the values that make this country great. And I had a grandmother who had tremendous influence on my life and she was a suffragette and I'm going to make that that which she believed was so important, which was participating in our democracy, was going to be there. And I will participate and I'm encouraging my children and grandchildren to do it as well. LAMB: How did your grandmother have that kind of influence on you? CARD: Well, my parents were married at a very young age and they were very young when I was born. LAMB: How old? CARD: There were 16 when they were married and 17 when I was born. And I was blessed to be able to spend a lot of time at my grandmother's house. And she was a schoolteacher in Brockton, Massachusetts, and we lived in Holbrook, Massachusetts. 16:34:04 And sitting around the dining room table she would begin the meals with a prayer, but then obligate us to each repeat something from the newspaper that day. And inevitably that caused conversations to center around politics or policy or partisan interests. 16:34:17 So I grew up in a family that kind of enjoyed the dinner table as a place to argue. And we had plenty of arguments. But she also had a picture that was hanging on the wall in her dining room. And it was of women marching down Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts, and they were all suffragettes. And she was in that picture. And she fought for women to have the right to vote. And when women got the right to vote in 1920, she was very proud and she ran for the school committee in the town of Holbrook and served for many years on the school committee, and was very controversial and outspoken. 16:34:50 And so I grew up with a grandmother instilling in me a sense of responsibility to participate in our great democracy. And I will do it. LAMB: How much time did you spend around her? 16:34:59 CARD: Well, I obviously was very close to her growing up. And after I was married and came back from college, I moved in with my grandmother. And then when she got sick she moved in with me and Kathy and the kids. And so I spent a lot time with my grandmother. 16:35:17 My senior year of high school I must have been a challenge to my parents because they sent me to grandmother's house a lot and she made sure I finished my homework. 16:35:24 LAMB: When you were senior in high school, your parents would have been about 34. 16:35:29 CARD: My parents were very young and wonderful parents. They're both passed now. And I was very blessed to have parents that cared so much about their children and about their community. They were all active in their community. Both my father and mother were active in Holbrook and took great pride in Holbrook and Massachusetts. So I was blessed. LAMB: Why were your married at age 16? 16:35:52 CARD: They loved each other and they shared that love with the children. And I've got wonderful siblings and a very close family. I feel very, very fortunate. LAMB: How many siblings? CARD: I have a brother a year younger than I am, two sisters, and then a younger brother. And I get to see them not as often as I would like to, not as often as I should, but they're all terrific and they've all been actively engaged in helping to make America a better country. LAMB: In what way, what do they do? 16:36:18 CARD: Oh gosh. My sister Sara was in Florida, they just moved to Tennessee, but she worked for Governor Bush in Florida. My sister Lisi has worked in government for a number of years and now in the private sector. My brother John is active in Las Vegas with a business and a family. And my brother Brad has served and he was a police officer, a state trooper, served helping to bring drug lords to their knees, and -- as an undercover agent, and then worked for a member of Congress and now works in Washington, D.C. So they've all grown up and recognizing that we've got a great democracy, but it's only as good as the people who participate in it. LAMB: What does brother Brad do here? CARD: He is working with a lobbying firm and does very, very well. LAMB: You did some lobbying. 16:37:06 CARD: I did. I was fortunate to -- after I left the Department of Transportation and helped former President Bush with his transition out of government, I went to work as the head of the trade association for General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler. And it was the American Automobile Manufacturers Association. It's a great industry and I learned an awful lot from management with that relatively large trade association. At the time that I was there, the headquarters was located in Detroit. They moved the headquarters to Washington, D.C. 16:37:35 And we had about 150 employees. And I had to downsize a little bit. But there were a lot of important issues that I had to address, including some important trade disputes with Japan and Korea. So it was a wonderful experience. And then I went and worked with General Motors with about a year before I then helped the current president in his campaign LAMB: Let's go back to some of the issues. Would you have done Katrina differently if you had it to do all over again? 16:38:00 CARD: Oh, I think we all learned lessons from Katrina. And, you know, I was sent down by former President Bush to help with the recovery effort after Hurricane Andrew. And when I went back and one of my staffers pulled out some of the press clips from 1992 -- August of 1992, and you could have almost changed the word "Andrew" to "Katrina," Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Katrina, and changed the name of the players from Wally Stickney to Mike Brown and whatever. 16:38:30 You would have found similar criticisms. But we learned from the experiences in Katrina and will be putting some of that -- of what we learned into practice right now. FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security have already made a number of changes. We're making changes at the White House. There is a lessons learned process going on at the White House that is very important and the president is paying close attention to. 16:38:51 But, you know, this was a horrific natural disaster. And the land area involved was greater than the land area of all of Great Britain, just to put things in perspective. And I've been down to the region four times. The president has been down there eight times. And it is indescribable, the amount of destruction. And the work that has to be down will require a long time, a lot of money, and a great commitment from the private sector as well as the public sector. 16:39:17 LAMB: So what would you do differently next time? 16:39:21 CARD: Well, I think that understanding the relationship between the federal government, state governments, and local governments is something that we came to find was strained. The president was anxious to do things that didn't -- that he didn't have the authority to do because FEMA is a response mechanism to a request that comes from a governor. And the request for disaster assistance came very, very early and for the first time in many storms, the president approved a disaster declaration before the disaster actually struck. So we pre-positioned an awful lot of aid. But you understand you cannot pre-position aid in the disaster area. And once the disaster struck, you get the aid in their as quickly as you can, but a lot of infrastructure was destroyed. So that's a lesson that we learned, better where to pre-position assistance. We learned to get the military involved a little earlier in the process if we can. We have a law on the books, Posse Comitatus, which prevents the military from exercising any police authority. And yet there was a need for greater security in New Orleans in particular. And those needs should have been met by the local police, but the local police had kind of taken off and -- not all of them, but some of them. And the National Guard, under the governor's command, wasn't able to get as much order as we had hoped. And that's something we learned. But the U.S. troops, the military that the president commands as commander-in-chief, were not able to do and are not able to do police enforcement or security enforcement. So we've learned a lot of lessons and the president has asked us to take a look at all of them. LAMB: On the issue of Iraq, the war in Iraq, when we're recording this, the vote on constitution hasn't taken place, but when people see it, it will have taken place. Let's assume it passes, what does that mean? CARD: Well, that's giant step. Think of the step that America took when it adopted its Constitution. And it took us many years to get to the point where we could adopt a Constitution: 1776, we think, started the Revolutionary War, but it wasn't until September 17th, 1887, that we had a Constitution that was presented to the people for ratification. And it took some time to ratify it. And then we had to get the Bill of Rights. But this is a big, giant step for the people of Iraq, to have a constitution, and guarantee that they will have election where they will leaders under that constitution in an election on December 15th, I think it's the 15th, it's in December. And that is an important step. So this day will go down in history in Iraq as a great day where they have a constitution and it was written for and by the people of Iraq and ratified by them rather than imposed by some theocracy or by some totalitarian dictator. 16:42:04 LAMB: How much pressure do you expect to get for the 2006 election to get some of the troops out of there next year? 16:42:08 CARD: Well, the president is anxious to get the troops out of Iraq, but he wants to accomplish the mission before we do so. And, as you know, we're working very hard to make sure that the Iraqis are trained to meet their own security obligations. 16:42:22 And increasingly we find that Iraqis are leading the fight against the insurgents and leading the fight to secure their nation. And that's a good sign. And I think that we're making significant progress. But the troops should not come home prematurely. That would be a terrible thing. They should stay there until the job is done. 16:42:39 After all, we want the democracy in Iraq to take hold, because it's important that the democracy in Iraq take hold so that people in Iran can see its impact, and Syria, and the other countries in the region. 16:42:50 So victory is very, very important, and the president will make sure that we secure victory in Iraq before the troops come home. LAMB: Taxes, the whole idea of making the tax cut permanent, off the rails because of what happened in Katrina. Will it get back on? 16:43:08 CARD: I think it will get back on. You know, we clearly want to have America as a place where not only the people here like to invest, but people around the world like to invest. And that we means we have to have a tax policy in place that is competitive with other nations in this 21st Century. We have a global economy. We have to make sure we are competitive in that global economy. And that means we can't have a high-tax state. So the president, I think, is on the right track to ask for a permanent reduction of the -- elimination of the so-called "death tax." I think that he's right to call for a tax rate that is reasonable and not excessive and will invite investment and stimulate economic activity. You know, we've been on the track for pretty significant economic growth, and it's because of those tax cuts the president put in place that we've had that economic growth. And our economy is poised for long-term growth and there seems to be great confidence in that, as reflected in the bond market and interest rates. So I'm optimistic. LAMB: As you know, the market isn't going anywhere, hasn't been for a long time. 16:44:10 CARD: Well, it's a little higher today than it was a year-and-a-half ago, two years ago, so we've seen growth. And the projections are that the economy will still continue to grow. I know the 50 blue chip economists are prognosticating that we should have growth in the 3 percent range-plus. And I think that is appropriate growth. And Alan Greenspan and the Fed have done a great job of keeping inflation in check and allowing for us to continue togrow this economy. And I think it will continue. LAMB: What's going to happen, though, this winter when the old monthly gas bill comes in or the oil bill comes and it's at least 50 percent higher than it was last year? 16:44:41 CARD: Well, I am concerned about energy prices. And the good news is we have a new energy policy in place. It took an awful long time for us to have an energy policy as law. And Congress did pass one in the summertime. And we have an energy bill -- energy law. But that's not going to provide short-term relief. We need more energy supply in this country. We need to have more conservation in this country. And the president has called for more conservation. We need to have more research and development. And we need to move to a hydrocarbon less-dependent society in energy. We should have hydrogen fuel used in our vehicles, for example. But that's research and development that must be done. I personally believe we need more nuclear power in this country. We can't be as dependent on other countries around the world for our energy supply as we are today. But we do have short-term challenges in the energy sector because of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita where we lost a lot of natural gas production out of the Gulf. And our refineries are down, some refineries are still down and they're not producing as much gasoline as we would like. We know that there are shortages of natural gas in some parts of the country. So the president is looking for short-term efforts to mitigate the impact of these energy shortages. But we have to recognize that demand and supply set prices more than government policy, and we need more supply and we need to do everything we can to reduce our demand, but still allow our economy to grow. LAMB: What are the chances that there will be private accounts for Social Security before this president's term is over? 16:46:23 CARD: I think the chances are pretty good. You know, the president is right to call for us to address the challenge of Social Security because the status quo is not sustainable. There isn't one expert that says we can survive the next 25, 50 years with the current Social Security system. We've got to make changes. And the president knows that making changes now will be less painful than making changes in the future. And one aspect of reform that would make a big difference would be to have personal savings accounts. They're like an IRA that would be part of your Social Security system that would supplement and compliment the Social Security benefits that would be there under a Social Security system, and I think it's the right thing to do. I think it will happen before the president leaves office. LAMB: As you know, we've talked about this earlier in the program, secretary of transportation, deputy chief of staff to the president, worked in the Reagan administration, 41, and 43 chief of staff. What would you change about the media if you could? 16:47:08 CARD: Boy, I'm not sure that I would change anything about the media except to invite them to take a deeper look into some of the policies that they talk about in 30-second sound bites. LAMB: You're talking about television. 16:47:22 CARD: Television in particular. There is a lot of competition in the media today. When I first came to the Reagan White House, there wasn't a lot of competition, especially on television. There were no cable networks. You didn't have a CNN even when I started. 16:47:36 And so there was a cycle to the news that was easily anticipated. And I can remember the press secretary saying, the lid is on, and there was no more news that came out of the White House. 16:47:48 The lid never is put on at the White House now in terms of the news cycle, and that's because of the competitive demands in cable television and with the broadcast networks, and I think that's a reality so we have to live with that reality. 16:48:01 But I do think we have a tendency now to get our news in very short blasts rather than informed discussion. And I would like to see more informed discussion. That's one reason I like C-SPAN. 16:48:12 LAMB: Why do you send Scott McClellan out there every day to be pummeled by people in the press corps? 16:48:18 CARD: He is feeding a giant monster called the media. And they are insatiable. And if he were not out there providing information for them, they would probably be scratching at doors that they shouldn't scratch at. 16:48:32 So I think that he is helping to open the doors of the White House to the media so that the American people can see what's happening there. But he has got one of the toughest jobs in government because he has to exhaust the questions and respond candidly and with forthright answers, and he does a terrific job. The president is lucky to have him. 16:48:50 LAMB: So what is the number one requirement for somebody like Scott McClellan in order to get that job? 16:48:56 CARD: Patience. Understanding, respect for the president, respect for the media. You can't be hostile to the media and understand that they are doing their job. And I think Scott understands that. He understands the demands of the president and the presidency, but he also understands the expectations of the media to have information sometimes that is not available and sometimes wanted before its mature. And I think that he finds the right balance. LAMB: Why do you like George Bush so much? 16:49:26 CARD: Because he is a man of great character. He has good moral compass. He follows it. He is very disciplined in his life. I respect the discipline that he has. I respect how much he loves Laura and Jenna and Barbara. I respect that he is a man of faith and that he's not afraid to be a man of faith. 16:49:45 I respect that he makes decisions and has the courage to make decisions. I respect the fact that he is understanding that time is fleeting and he wants to take advantage of the time that he is president of the United States to do important things for the country. And he's also respectful of the time that other people give to the country or to him as he is making decisions. So it's really centered around respect. That's why I like him so much. 16:50:12 LAMB: We have some photos that are on the White House Web site of you. We'll show one of them on the screen right now. And this was a view on Air Force One. Do you -- are you always on there with him? 16:50:22 CARD: I tend to travel when he goes on long, overnight trips, or I will tend to travel with the president. Most foreign trips I travel with the president. On day-to-day travel that the president does, Joe Hagin, who is deputy chief of staff for operations, tends to travel with the president. That's. LAMB: Well, we haven't -- this is one in the Oval Office that -- you are there at the very back. CARD: Yes, I am. LAMB: And when I see that, it reminds me that you are always around watching everything that goes on. Do you write it down? CARD: No, I do not. LAMB: No diary? 16:50:52 CARD: I do not keep a diary. I think the conversations that I have with the president are the most privileged in our government. And so I try not to keep a diary. I work very hard at making sure the president is well-prepared and understanding, so that's what I try to do. LAMB: Here you are with Condoleezza Rice and the vice president. What is your relationship to the vice president? 16:51:14 CARD: His office is right next to my office. I have great respect for the vice president and I appreciate the fact that he has great empathy for me, because he was a chief of staff. (LAUGHTER) CARD: So he understands the burdens that I carry. LAMB: What is your reaction when you read that everything thinks he really runs the government? 16:51:29 CARD: Well, I -- the vice president is the vice president and he knows his role, probably better than anyone else. And he is not the president. He is very respectful of the president and a wonderful adviser to the president. And he's a wonderful adviser to me. LAMB: Here we have another photo of you briefing, it looks like some military folks? Do you remember this? 16:51:51 CARD: This is in the Roosevelt Room of the White House and I don't remember what the issue is, but I think that these may be some airmen that had participated when the president took the trip to Baghdad. And I was thanking them for the secrecy that they kept as the president -- as we planned the trip to Baghdad and then went over there. 16:52:14 And that was the Thanksgiving day trip to Baghdad when the president snuck out of Crawford, Texas, and people didn't even know where he had gone. And the next thing they knew, he was landing at Baghdad and going to a Thanksgiving dinner with the troops. LAMB: Were you with him? CARD: Yes, I was. LAMB: How soon in advance did you know that he was going to go there? 16:52:28 CARD: Well, I had been planning it for about a month before we took the trip. I did it with a very small circle of people, because security was very, very important. But it took a lot of planning to have that trip come off the way that it did. And thank the military and Joe Hagin and the Secret Service, and the media for their help in making sure that that trip could be accomplished without any danger to the president of the United States. LAMB: One last photo of you, in the Oval Office, again, with the vice president and. CARD: Secretary Don Evans. LAMB: Yes. And then you are right next to the president. Andy Card is our guest, chief of staff to the president. And we only have a couple of minutes to go. Let me go back again to what we were talking about earlier, because I want to find out what you've learned from being chief of staff. What is the best training for the job? 16:53:08 CARD: I think being involved in the political process and having worked at the White House. I can't discount the value that came because I worked at the White House under President Reagan and former President Bush. 16:53:22 I also think it's important that you have the confidence of the president. And probably more important than any training is the fact that the president has confidence in the chief of staff. I believe that the president and I have a candid relationship that allows me to enjoy his confidence, but when the confidence disappears, I should disappear, and I accept that. LAMB: What do you want to do after this is over? 16:53:43 CARD: I would like to be a wonderful spouse of a minister. And my wife has sacrificed so much for me and her love of this country that I would like to be able to give her back some of what she has given me. LAMB: How are you going to do that? 16:53:57 CARD: Any way that I'm given the opportunity to. My -- Kathy and I have enjoyed a wonderful life together, and I'm looking forward to spending the rest of my life with her. But her calling is much greater than the calling that I've answered because she is helping with a much greater responsibility than even protecting and defending that Constitution. LAMB: Where is her church? What's her denomination? 16:54:20 CARD: She is a United Methodist minister and she comes from my hometown. I met her in the fifth grade, so we have been almost lifelong friends. And she is active in the McLean community in Virginia. And that's where her church is, Trinity United Methodist Church. LAMB: And do you talk to her about this job you're doing? 16:54:39 CARD: I do. I share my experiences with her. I'm blessed that the president has allowed me to include her in the job that I do. And when I was asked to take the job of chief of staff, I asked the president to recognize that if I come, my wife is coming with me. We're partners in everything we do and that she would be a partner in this process. 16:54:58 And he said, absolutely. And then I went and had the same conversation with Laura Bush. And she said, absolutely. LAMB: As you know, the president's popularity is down to 39 percent in a couple of polls. This is one of those dips that happens. What is it going to take to get him out of this? 16:55:13 CARD: Well, I think as we continue with the recovery in Katrina and Rita down in New Orleans and Mississippi, that will help. The successes in Iraq that are much greater than reported by the media will help because it will become increasingly known by the American people as the Iraqis accept more responsibility under their democracy. As the troops begin to come home, when the Iraqis are taking over responsibility for their own security. And the president's good policy initiatives are taking hold in America and more young kids are getting a good education in the public school system and that faith-based communities respected for the partnership it plays with the federal government to help people in need. And when we find that the tax policies are making a difference. Next year in January when Medicare prescription drug coverage is available for seniors for the first time. All of that will help to demonstrate to the American the outstanding leadership that the president has provided and the direction that he wants to take the country is still the right direction. LAMB: Andy Card, thank you very much. CARD: Thank you, Brian. END
Iraq - April 2003 - February 2005
International Events 00148 Subject: Iraq Source: APTN Library Thematic Clipreels - Volume 41 Iraq VIII (Post War/Insurgency: April 2003-February 2005) 10:00:00 (Twelve days after U.S. forces seized Iraq, retired U.S. Lieutenant General Jay Garner arrived to take up his duties as Iraq's postwar civil administrator. His main priorities included restoring basic services such as electricity and water as well as civil order. In Baghdad, he visited the Yarmouk hospital, which had been overwhelmed with casualties of the fighting. Looters had stripped many wards of even their most basic equipment.) Pool 21.4.03 - Baghdad Retired US Lieutenant General Jay Garner arriving at airport greeting troops Garner walking with staff of Yarmouk hospital 10:00:11 (On a tour of the northern Kurdish region, Garner met with prominent Kurdish leaders to discuss the future administration of the region.) Pool 22.4.03 - Sulaymaniyah, Iraq Jay Garner, Tim Cross, Massoud Barzani and Jalal Talabani holding hands at photo op 10:00:18 (Thirteen people were killed and 75 others injured after U.S. Army soldiers opened fire on Iraqi demonstrators in Fallujah. The soldiers claimed they opened fire after shots were aimed at them from the crowd. The protesters were objecting to the presence of U.S. forces in Iraq.) APTN 29.4.03 - Fallujah, Iraq Damaged car with bullet holes Wide shot of the entrance to Fallujah on the motorway 10:00:34 APTN 30.4.03 - Fallujah, Iraq Funeral procession - coffin being carried through crowd Various of US soldiers in defensive positions around building Close up of banner reading: "Sooner or later, US killers, we'll kick you out" 10:00:44 APTN 1.5.03 - Fallujah, Iraq Mid shot of banner outside American post reading "USA leave our country" Iraqi flag covered in blood outside hospital 10:00:57 (Coalition forces began to find shocking evidence of the brutality of Saddam Hussein's regime. Mass graves were found at sites across the country. By far the largest was the Al-Mahawil site near Babylon, where up to 15 thousand bodies were feared buried.) APTN 4.5.03 - Babylon, Iraq People at site of mass grave Remains, woman clapping in background Close ups of remains Woman holding photo of her missing son, Akil Hassanali 10:01:09 (Excavation teams found a further 2,200 bodies at a mass grave in Hillah, 100 kilometres (60 miles) south of Baghdad. Other major sites were found in Kirkuk, Basra, Muhammed Sakran and Najaf. Many of the victims died during the Shiite revolt against the Saddam Hussein government that followed the aftermath of the 1991 Gulf War.) APTN 14.5.03 - Hillah, Iraq Wide shot of crowd standing around earth mover digging up grave Various of women wailing with bags of remains Pile of remains 10:01:22 (In a victory for the United States, the U.N. Security Council in May approved a resolution empowering the United States and Britain to govern Iraq and use its oil wealth to rebuild the country. The resolution was passed by a 14-0 vote, with Syria - the only Arab nation on the council - absent.) UNTV 22.5.03 - New York, USA Mid shot of flags in front of Security Council Close up Security Council President Ambassador Munir Akram of Pakistan calling for vote Pan left, vote in favour 10:01:57 (Coalition forces faced growing opposition from Iraq's ethnic groups. In June, Sunni Muslims rallied in the streets of Baghdad, accusing U.S. troops of entering the city's Hothaifa bin al-Yaman mosque and taking money. The U.S. military denied the allegations, saying they'd merely been searching for weapons. Coalition forces were increasingly criticised for inflaming a volatile situation with their sometimes heavy-handed approach to maintaining security.) APTN 13.6.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Wide of protesters in street chanting with banners Wide of marchers chanting Protesters hold up banner of Koran Wide of protesters with tank and mosque 10:02:16 (More evidence of Saddam's opulent lifestyle was unearthed. At a farmhouse not far from Saddam's birthplace outside Tikrit, American troops unearthed a stash of his treasure valued at some 8 million U.S. dollars.) APTN 19.6.03 - Tikrit, Iraq Wide shot of Saddam palace US soldier carrying box of treasure in room inside Saddam's palace, puts box on desk Various of treasure being laid out on table Various of broach holding picture of Saddam Various shots of treasure 10:02:49 (The first meeting of the U.S. appointed Iraqi governing council met in July in what was hailed as the first step on the path to democracy. The council was made up of leaders from Iraq's diverse ethnic and religious groups. The panel was selected after two months of consultations and faced the difficult task of convincing the Iraqi people that it represented them. This was despite the fact the population never had a chance to vote on its members.) APTN 13.7.03 - Baghdad Wide shot exterior of building where meeting was held Entrance to building with security guard in front Wide interior of council seated around table in meeting room Mid shot Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani (on left) talking to Mohammed Bahr al-Uloum, cleric from Najaf Close up Ahmed Chalabi gesturing to council members Close up Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani SOUNDBITE: (English) Paul Bremer, US Administrator for Iraq "Once that constitution is approved by the Iraqi people, we'll have the place to hold elections for a sovereign government." 10:03:25 (Crowds of Iraqis gathered outside the mansion in Mosul where American soldiers killed Saddam Hussein's two eldest sons. Some of them were shouting in delight, others cursing in anger. Uday and Qusay Hussein were regarded as two of the cruelest men in Saddam's regime. For the coalition it was a major boost, evidence they were closing the net on Saddam Hussein. Supporters of the former leader promised retaliation.) APTN 23.7.03 - Mosul, Iraq Exterior of villa US soldier Window on villa damaged by gunfire and with smoke billowing Villa with smoke still billowing out Damaged side of house 10:03:47 DoD Still image corpse with full head of hair and beard of Qusay Hussein Still image corpse with shaved head and full beard showing facial injury Uday Hussein 10:03:59 APTN 25.7.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Wide shot of bodies of Qusay and Uday Hussein 10:04:05 APTN 23.7.03 - near Ramadi, Iraq Wide shot of Iraqi insurgents wearing masks SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Iraqi insurgent "If this news is true that Qusay and Uday are dead, we shall raise hell on Americans." Close up of man holding RPG Close up small child holding assault rifle 10:04:29 APTN 2.8.03 - Tikrit, Iraq Wide shot of burial site of Qusay and Uday Mourner approaches grave with a banknote with Saddam's image and glues it with mud to the grave Mourner with cap praying in front of mosque 10:04:41 (As the months passed, the death toll continued to rise as insurgents launched a series of attacks on a variety of targets throughout Iraq. A massive car bomb exploded outside the Jordanian Embassy in Baghdad in August, killing a dozen people and injuring over 50 more. Later in the month, another bomb hit the United Nations compound in Baghdad, killing Sergio Vieira de Mello, the head of U.N. operations in Iraq. He was among 23 people killed in the blast.) APTN 7.8.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Wide shot aftermath of bomb Fire burning outside embassy - pan to soldiers Burnt out car US soldiers standing on vehicle 10:04:58 APTN 19.8.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Wide shots of UN headquarters with smoke billowing out Burning cars 10:05:16 (International organisations were not the only target. Iraq's holiest Shiite shrine in Najaf was hit by a bomb killing 125 people including Shia cleric, Ayatollah Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim. Al-Hakim had only recently returned to Iraq after two decades of exile.) APTN 29.8.03 - Najaf, Iraq Mosque with damage from explosion Crowds of people surrounding wrecked car Various of rubble and damage 10:05:28 APTN 10.5.03 - Basra, Iraq Ayatollah Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim addresses crowd 10:05:35 (Friendly fire incidents only served to complicate relations between the coalition troops and the Iraqis they were meant to be helping. In September, an American patrol opened fire on an Iraqi police patrol by mistake. Nine people were killed including a Jordanian security guard. The U.S. military was forced to apologise for the incident, which was to trigger a new cycle of bloodshed in the country's most troubled region. The supposed "post-war" period was proving more costly in terms of lives than the war itself.) APTN 12.9.03 - Al-bu Al-wan, near Fallujah, Iraq Various exteriors of one of the Jordanian Hospital buildings at Al-bu Al-wan Cartidge cases from 40 mm grenade launcher lying in the foreground with building behind Various of locals shouting and dancing around burned out US "humvee" 10:05:56 APTN 13.9.03 - Fallujah, Iraq Various of coffins of Iraq policemen shot by US soldiers being carried through crowd 10:06:01 APTN 12.10.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Wide shot of scene of car bombing Close up injured man being taken away on police pick-up Stretcher being loaded into ambulance 10:06:20 (The Al Rasheed Hotel in central Baghdad was home to many Americans and seen as a symbol of the U.S.-led occupation. A rocket attack in October killed an American colonel and injured a further 18 people.) APTN 26.10.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Hotel Various of damaged hotel 10:06:39 (A dozen people were killed in an attack on the Red Cross complex in Baghdad, also in October. The attack led to calls for non-governmental organisations to pull out of Iraq as the situation became ever more dangerous. Most of those killed were Iraqi employees of the aid organisation.) APTN 27.9.03 - Baghdad, Iraq Various of smoke rising over city following suicide bombing attack on Red Cross building 10:06:58 (Fifteen U.S. soldiers died when a U.S. Chinook helicopter was shot down near Fallujah. It was one of the deadliest strikes against American troops since the start of the war. Public support for the war back home was rapidly eroding as more and more people began to ask the same question - was it all worth it?) APTN 2.11.03 - near Fallujah, Iraq Helicopter on ground Soldiers at site of crash Close up of crash site, pull out to wide of site 10:07:22 (SADDAM LOOKALIKES Saddam Hussein may still be in hiding, but his look-alikes were out in force in London in May as they took part in an open audition to play the former Iraqi leader. The candidates showed up at the Riverside Studios in west London - donning black berets, khaki flak jackets and black moustaches - in the hope of winning the part of one of the world's most wanted men in a new West End show. If one of Saddam's known body doubles had attended the audition, he would have done well. The actors clamouring to play the part included one woman and men - all much taller, smaller, fatter, thinner and paler than the real thing.) APTN 1.5.03 - London, UK Auditions Saddam Hussein look-alike contest Various of Saddam Hussein look-alikes walking through street Saddam Hussein look-alike waving, show director watching Saddam Hussein contestants posing for camera 10:07:52 (ITALIANS KILLED IN IRAQ Twenty-eight people were killed, including 19 Italians, when a suicide bomber blew up a truck full of explosives outside an Italian military base in Iraq in November. It was Italy's single worst military loss since World War II. The attack is likely to hasten calls for a speeded-up transition of power to Iraqis and a full pullout of Italian troops. Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi's government supported the U.S. led war in Iraq, sending troops to the region, despite the opposition of the majority of his people.) APTN 12.11.03 - Nasiriyah, southern Iraq Various of smoke following explosion outside Italian headquarters Various of injured people in hospital Various security following attacks 10:08:24 (SADDAM HUSSEIN CAPTURED) Pool Baghdad, 14 Dec 2003 SOUNDBITE: (English) Paul Bremer, US administrator: "Ladies and Gentlemen, we got him!" Wide shot showing journalists cheering, pulls into show Bremer looking close to tears, pulls out to wide shot SOUNDBITE: (English) Paul Bremer, US administrator: "Saddam Hussein was captured on Saturday, December 13 at about 8:30p.m. (17:30 GMT) local in a cellar in the town of Dour which is about 15 kilometres (9 miles) south of Tikrit" Map showing area where Saddam was found by coalition forces . US Military Video Location Unknown - 14 Dec 2003 Mute Various of hole where Saddam Hussein was found Various of Saddam Hussein undergoing medical checks Close-up of Saddam Hussein IRAQ 2004 10:10:26 (Iraq in January The presence of US-led Coalition forces in Iraq continued to cause widespread resentment among many Iraqis. The country remained the scene of on-going armed conflict between the foreign troops and groups of armed militants in several key regions, including Baghdad and in the broad region north of the capital, known as the Sunni Triangle, where support for the former regime of Saddam Hussein had been strongest. Militants carried out bomb, mortar or rocket attacks against Coalition troops or Iraqi civilians every few days in Baghdad. In response, US-led forces searched homes and communities in the city that were seen to offer the militants sympathy and support. In early January, Sunni Muslim demonstrators marched to protest against a raid by US soldiers and Iraqi troops from the newly formed Iraqi Civil Defence Force (ICDF) on the Ibn-Taymiyah mosque. Witnesses complained that the soldiers had handled them roughly and desecrated religious items. US commanders denied the accusations, but said they had seized explosives, guns and ammunition hidden at the mosque, and arrested 32 people believed to be non-Iraqi Arab militants.) APTN Baghdad - 2 January 2004 Various interior shots of Ibn-Taymiyah mosque Various shots of crowd protesting outside the Ibn-Taymiyah mosque 10:10:39 (The British Prime Minister Tony Blair travelled to Iraq and met some of the 10-thousand British troops stationed in and around the southern Iraqi city of Basra, a relatively peaceful region 550 kilometres (340 miles) southeast of Baghdad. It was his second visit to Iraq since the invasion. Blair, the key ally of US President George W. Bush in the Coalition, spoke publicly during his visit about the threat of weapons of mass destruction, although none had yet been found in Iraq, and described the Iraq War as a test case in a war against global repression and terrorism. The United States and Britain had cited Saddam Hussein's alleged stocks of chemical, nuclear and biological weapons as a justification for the war, but have come under criticism because no evidence of such weapons has been found. Blair also visited a new Iraqi police academy, where British and European civilian and military police are training Iraqi recruits.) APTN Basra - 4 January 2004 British Prime Minister Tony Blair shaking hands with soldiers British police training Iraqi police recruits 10:10:46 (Many United States citizens opposed their government's actions over Iraq and some went a long way to show their disapproval. A former US Marine and Gulf War veteran, Ken O'Keefe, travelled to Baghdad to burn his American passport in an act of defiance over the Iraq War. Standing in Firdous Square, where a bronze statue of Saddam Hussein was felled in April 2003 with the help of US Marines. O'Keefe said he had renounced his American citizenship, and called on American troops to put down their weapons and refuse service in Iraq. He argued that the US should pull out of Iraq without delay because no weapons of mass destruction had been found, and Saddam Hussein was no longer a threat.) APTN Baghdad - 7 January 2004 Former US Marine and Gulf War veteran Ken O' Keefe in Firdous Square, showing his US passport O' Keefe showing his hands O' Keefe burning his passport 10:11:02 (Tensions between Sunnis and Shiites worsened as the two communities competed for power following the collapse of Saddam Hussein's regime, which for decades had subjugated the Shiite majority. Outbreaks of ethnic or religious violence caused confusion as well as harm. In Baqouba, a religiously mixed city in a region dominated by Sunni Muslims, an explosion ripped through a busy street as Shiite worshippers were leaving a mosque after Friday prayers, killing five people and wounding dozens. Some witnesses to the explosion had claimed that a rocket fired from a US warplane had caused the blast. But Iraqi police suspected a car bomb, and on the same day a car bomb was defused before it could explode outside another Shiite mosque. Three days later a car bomb exploded outside an Iraqi police station in the city, killing three Iraqi policemen and two passers-by, and wounding 30 people.) APTN Baqouba - 9 January 2004 Tracking shot of burning car in front of mosque, people shouting and bodies on the ground Man wailing beside body on ground Wide shot of aftermath Baqouba - 14 January 2004 Wrecked police car on street Wall of station damaged by bomb Building with wrecked doorway, pull out to wide shot 10:11:37 (US troops continued to track down Iraq's former rulers. In January, US Paratroopers captured a Baath Party official and militia commander, Khamis Sirhan al-Muhammad, who was number 54 on the list of 55 most wanted figures from the Saddam regime. A US military spokesman said al-Muhammad had been arrested in the Ramadi area west of Baghdad.) APTN Baghdad - 14 January 2004 SOUNDBITE (English) US Army Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt, Coalition military spokesman (overlaid with picture of Khamis Sirhan al-Muhammad picture): "As a result of aggressive operations this week, the coalition announces the capture of Khamis Sirhan al-Muhammad." (The US-appointed civilian administration took steps to get rid of the remaining traces of Saddam's regime. Iraq's old bank notes bearing Saddam Hussein's portrait became obsolete after a three-month period to exchange them for a new currency. More than 10-thousand tons of old banknotes bearing the image of the ousted dictator were destroyed. Iraq's Central Bank announced that the value of the Iraqi dinar had risen by 25 percent since before the invasion, and that the new notes were harder to counterfeit.) APTN Baghdad - 15 January 2004 Medium shot of armed security outside the Central Bank building Close up of woman writing on dinar note Women packing-up old money Wide shot of money exchange Medium shot of teller and customers changing money (Iraqi newspapers printed new photographs of Saddam Hussein being held prisoner. The US had announced his capture on December 14 (2003), and the photographs dated December 13 showed him in handcuffs and being escorted by US and Iraqi soldiers. The first of the photographs was published by the al-Mu'thamar newspaper, owned by Ahmad Chalabi, a prominent member of the Iraqi Governing Council, who has since been accused by the US of spying for Iran. Chalabi has denied the allegations. Several Iraqis spoken to by APTN in Baghdad said they welcomed Saddam's incarceration.) APTN Baghdad - 15 January 2004 Men reading newspapers at news stand Men reading newspaper with photograph of Saddam 10:12:17 (Militant attacks on Coalition troops often took the form of roadside IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) -crude bombs triggered to explode when a convoy of vehicles passes by. The explosion of an IED in Baghdad was captured on camera after US soldiers spotted the device. A tactic of the militants was to place the devices where they could be easily seen, and then explode them when US troops tried to remove them. No US troops were hurt in the blast, but two Iraqi children were injured. Two days later, a car bomb exploded outside the main gate to the Coalition "Green Zone" headquarters in Baghdad, killing 18 people. The blast, apparently triggered by the driver of the car, occurred at about 8 am near the "Assassin's Gate" of Saddam Hussein's former Republican Palace complex, now used by the Coalition as its headquarters in Iraq. The gate is used by hundreds of Iraqis employed by the Coalition Provisional Authority, the formal name of the US-led occupation authorities, as well as US military vehicles. The Iraqi police force, seen by the Iraqi militants as allies of the Coalition forces, were frequently the target of attacks. In the northern city of Mosul, a car bomb exploded outside a police station, killing nine people and injuring 45 others. It had been payday at the station, on the day before the major Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, and the two-story building had been crowded with staff. A huge crater was gouged out of the ground by the blast. Bodies lay in the roadside, and stunned survivors were seen stumbling down the street, their clothing soaked in blood.) APTN Baghdad - 16 January 2004 US soldiers observing IED (Improvised Explosive Device) US soldiers inspecting explosive device, which explodes, pull out to wide shot as soldiers walk off, pan of scene Baghdad - 18 January 2004 Wide sot of bridge, tank in distance Wide shot of destroyed vehicles, plumes of black smoke rising from burned cars Mid shot of destroyed bus and car Mid shot of US soldiers, burning cars on the background Mosul - 31 January 2004 ALL LIVEWIRE VIDEO AS INCOMING Various fires Man with bloody head walking past camera Wide of fires at blast scene, zoom in to people helping injured man 10:13:08 (Iraq in February Kurdish communities in the north of Iraq were also targets of attacks by militants. Kurdish Peshmurga militia fighters had been part of the Coalition that toppled Saddam, and Iraqi Kurds had suffered repression under the dictator's regime. In Irbil, 200 kilometres north of Baghdad, twin suicide bomb attacks during the Eid holiday celebrations killed 56 people and injured more than 235. Two men, dressed as Muslim clerics but with explosives concealed beneath their clothes, blew themselves up in the offices of the two main Kurdish political parties allied to the United States, the KDP and its rival the PUK. Among the dead were many of the leaders of the two parties, who had gathered to greet crowds of ordinary Kurds on the first day of the four-day Eid-al-Adha (Feast of Sacrifice) holiday.) APTN Irbil - 2 February 2004 Wide of damaged Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) headquarters Inside views of damage including flags, firearms (In the south of the country, local people took up the grisly task of exposing the atrocities of the former regime. At least 50 bodies were found in a few days of digging at a mass grave discovered near Kifal, outside the southern Iraqi Shiite city of Najaf. Local people said the graves dated back to the 1991 Shiite uprising against Saddam after the Gulf War, which was brutally suppressed by Saddam's forces. Since the US-led invasion thousands of bodies have been found in mass graves in the mainly Shiite areas south of Baghdad.) APTN Kifal, near Najaf - 8 February 2004 Workers exhuming remains of bodies from the mass grave Row of bodies from grave Various shots of skulls (The heir to the British throne, Prince Charles, visited British troops in the southern city of Basra in early February. The prince flew in from Kuwait for a five-hour "morale-boosting" visit, during which he met members of the British Parachute Regiment at a tea party at one of Saddam's former palaces - now a British battalion headquarters. He also met the senior Coalition officials in Iraq, and Iraqi community leaders.) Pool Basra - 8 February 2004 Soldier with flag in background Prince Charles walking towards regiment Prince Charles awarding sword to soldier 10:13:48 (Militant suicide-bombers carried out attacks on Iraqis who were willing to work with the Coalition authorities, and the Coalition warned that such were likely to increase ahead of the handover to a new Iraqi government on 30 June. In the south of Baghdad, a truck packed with up to quarter of a tonne of explosives blew up at a police station where would-be recruits were lining up to apply for jobs. Hospital officials said at least 53 people had been killed and 50 injured. Iraqi police said the explosion was a suicide attack, carried out by a driver who detonated a bomb in a pickup truck as it passed by the station in a mainly Shiite neighbourhood. The explosion reduced parts of the station and nearby buildings to rubble. Hours after the attack, police fired guns in the air to disperse a crowd of local people angered by rumours that a US rocket had caused the blast. The next day, in central Baghdad, a suicide-driver blew up a car rigged with almost a quarter of a tonne of explosives outside a recruiting centre, where up to 300 of Iraqis were lined up to volunteer for the new Iraqi military. Iraq's deputy interior minister, Ahmed Ibrahim, said 47 people were killed and 50 injured, but that the attack would not "deter the people's march toward freedom.") APTN Baghdad - 10 February 2004 Crowds around and on top of the destroyed police station Wide shot of crowds around demolished car Interior shot of destroyed car, pan along it Baghdad - 11 February 2004 Tracking shot of US soldiers walking on the road, wreckage of vehicles on the ground Various shots of car wreckage, Iraqi police and US soldiers standing by Tracking shot of US soldiers, wreckage of vehicle (Coalition officials in Baghdad disclosed the military had intercepted a letter purportedly written by a top al-Qaida agent in Iraq, which it described as a "blueprint for terror." The letter reportedly asked al-Qaida's leadership for help in launching attacks against Iraqi Shiites Muslims. According to the letter, the goal of the attacks would be to foment civil war between Shiite and Sunni Muslims in order to undermine the Coalition and provisional Iraqi leadership. The Coalition said it believed the author of the letter was Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Palestinian-Jordanian suspected of links to al-Qaida and believed to be at large in Iraq. Al-Zarqawi had boasted of organizing 25 suicide previous attacks in Iraq. Following the release of the letter, the Coalition upped the reward for al-Zarqawi's capture to $10 million.) APTN Baghdad - 11 February 2004 Various shots of pages of the intercepted letter SOUNDBITE (English) Dan Senor, Coalition spokesman: "This is a blueprint for terror in Iraq. It outlines very clearly that the blueprint calls for unleashing civil war, Baghdad - 12 February 2004 New reward poster for ten million dollars 10:14:46 (The city of Fallujah, 60 kilometres west of Baghdad in the Sunni Triangle, has been a centre of resistance by Iraqi militants against the Coalition forces and their allies. In mid-February, militant gunmen launched a daylight assault on a police station that killed 19 people, most of them police. Around 25 attackers stormed the building, throwing hand-grenades and freeing prisoners from the cells, survivors said. The attackers then fought a gun battle with Iraqi security forces in the street outside the station, before escaping after freeing 75 prisoners. Iraqi security officials said 17 police officers, two Iraqi civilians and four of the attackers were killed, and that two of the dead attackers carried Lebanese passports. Thirty-seven people were reported wounded. One shop owner across the street from the compound said he and his neighbours had been warned not to open on Saturday morning because an attack was imminent. A week earlier, pamphlets signed by militant groups had been posted in Fallujah warning Iraqis not to cooperate with US forces and threatening "harsh consequences." Among the groups that signed the leaflets was Muhammad's Army, which US officials said appeared to be a group of former Saddam-era intelligence agents, army and security officials and Baath Party members.) APTN Fallujah - 14 February 2004 White car being driven as gunfire is heard street scenes, with gunfire heard (The Iraqi police in Baghdad arrested a former Baath Party chairman and one of 11 fugitives still at large from the US military's "most-wanted" list of 55 senior members of the Saddam regime. Mohammed Zimam Abdul Razaq was captured at one of his homes in western Baghdad and had not resisted arrest, officials said. Abdul-Razaq had been the Baath Party chairman in the northern provinces of Nineveh and Tamim, which include the city of Kirkuk. He was Number 41 on the US most-wanted list, and was pictured on the "Four of Spades" card in the playing-deck that the US military supplied to its soldiers to help them identify the regime's leadership. During a ceremony to present Abdul-Razaq to reporters, Iraq's deputy Interior Minister Ahmed Kadhum Ibrahim appealed for the most-sought after fugitive, Saddam's deputy Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, to surrender. The most senior fugitive who remains at large, he is pictured on the "King of Clubs" card in the US military playing-deck.) APTN Baghdad - 15 February 2004 Close-up Mohammad Zimam Abdul Razaq (centre, wearing head dress) Still shot of Abdul Razaq on Four of Spades card (Militant also targeted Iraqi oil installations, to undermine Coalition efforts to fund the new Iraqi administration and reconstruction programmes with oil revenue. Saboteurs had attacked pipelines in the oil-rich of the country. But in late February they attacked an oil pipeline south of Baghdad for the first time, blowing up the strategic Kirkuk-Baghdad-Basra connection and cutting off the flow from the northern oilfields to the export seaport terminal in southern Iraq. The destroyed section of pipeline was still burning the next day at Razaza, near the town of Karbala, 100 kilometres southwest of Baghdad.) APTN Near Karbala - 23 February 2004 Wide shot of smoke over desert landscape Wide shot of smoky landscape, then pan over charred ground 10:15:24 (Iraq in March After long negotiations at the urging of the Coalition nations, the political leaders of communities across Iraq agreed on an interim constitution. The agreement was reached nine days after the termination of a US deadline to the delegates. The impasse had strained relations between Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish leaders and had highlighted the power of Iraq's Shiite clergy. A coalition official said the document struck a balance between the role of Islam and the bill of individual rights and democratic principles. But a prominent Shiite cleric and Iraqi Governing Council member, Abdul Aziz al-Hakim, said it did not go far enough. He told thousands of supporters at a demonstration march that the Iraqi people needed to stick to their Islamic roots. Before an audience of prominent Iraqi and Coalition officials, the 25 council members signed the document on an antique desk once owned by King Faisal I, Iraq's first monarch. Council president Mohammed Bahr al-Ulloum called the signing a "historic moment, decisive in the history of Iraq." Ahmad Chalabi, leader of the US-backed Iraqi National Congress said that the signing of the document was a great day not only for Iraq, but also for Arabs, minorities and Muslims.) APTN Baghdad - 1 March 2004 Exterior Iraqi Governing Council building Wide shot of rally Rally participants perform traditional Shiite rituals Baghdad - 1 March 2004 SOUNDBITE: (English) Moafaq al-Rubaie, member of the Iraq Governing Council: 'Ladies and gentlemen, this is a birthday of a nation. Today, new Iraq was born " Baghdad - 8 March 2004 ceremony before signing Ahmed Chalabi, leader of the US-backed Iraqi National Congress signing document, then zoom in Baghdad - 8 March 2004 Close up of document, pull out to governing council standing for photo-op (Militant groups used bomb attacks to deepen the rift between Iraq's Sunni and Shiite Muslim communities. A coordinated series of explosions blasts struck major Shiite shrines in Karbala and Baghdad on the holiest day of the Shiite religious calendar, killing more than 115 people. In Karbala, 80 kilometres south of Baghdad, five blasts went off near two of the major shrines in Shiite Islam, hurling bodies in all directions and sending crowds of pilgrims fleeing in panic. Later reports said that suicide bombers had carried explosive-laden wooden-carts into the shrines and blown themselves up. The Ashoura festival, which marks the 7th century killing of Imam Hussein, is the most important religious period in Shiite Islam and drew hundreds of thousands of pilgrims from Iraq, Iran, Pakistan and other Shiite communities to the Iraqi shrines. In spite of the carnage, the, ceremonies marking the last day of Ashoura continued. This year was the first time in more than three decades that Iraq's Shiites had been free to openly mark the religious festival. Iraq Health ministry said 115 people had died in the Karbala bombings, and 70 killed at attack at the Kazimiya Shrine in Baghdad, a total of 185 dead. But a senior coalition official put the death toll at 117, with 85 killed in Karbala and 32 killed in Baghdad. The focus of Shiite anger was directed at the Coalition authorities. Some, including leading Shiite clerics, accused the US-led Coalition of not doing enough to protect the 10-day Ashoura ceremonies, while others vented resentment over the country's continuing insecurity. At the funerals for victims of the bombings the next day, angry mourners in Karbala burnt a replica US flag and shouted chants denouncing the United States, Israel, and "terrorists." Several thousand mourners joined the procession, taking the three bodies to the tombs of Imam Hussein and Imam Abbas for blessings before heading to the cemetery.) APTN Baghdad - 2 March 2004 Wide shot gold-domed mosque and crowds High wide shot of crowds in central Karbala, flash of explosion between two buildings, followed by boom Flames and people running in panic Wide shot of scene of blast, bloodstained puddle and bodies laid out Karbala - 3 March 2004 Angry crowds burning US flag at funeral procession 10:16:49 (In mid-March a car bomb destroyed the Hotel Jabal Lebanon in central Baghdad, killing at least 27 people and injuring more than 40 people. Local people said Americans, Britons, Egyptians as well as other foreigners were known to be staying at the hotel, making it a likely target for militant attacks. The hotel was a so-called "soft" target because it did have concrete blast barriers and other security measures of the kind that protect offices of the US-led Coalition and other buildings where Westerners live and work. The blast shook the nearby Palestine Hotel, where many foreign contractors and journalists are based.) APTN Baghdad - 17 March 2004 Long shot of mosque with black smoke billowing in background and traffic roundabout in foreground Close-up of blaze and billowing smoke Wide shot of fire with people in foreground (The Ashoura attacks and other militant efforts to provoke a split between Sunni and Shiite Muslims were opposed by many worshippers themselves. Crowds gathered after prayers in Baghdad's Adhamiya neighbourhood in a demonstration calling for unity between the two Islamic sects, carrying banners and chanting pro-unity slogans. Some of the marchers called on the Coalition to withdraw its troops from Iraq.) APTN Baghdad 19 March 2004 Various shots of Shiite demonstrators marching and chanting 'No to a divided Iraq' (Iraq's main oil pipeline to the Persian Gulf ruptured, spilling burning oil onto the desert sands south of Basra in late March. Local Iraqi officials said the break in the pipeline was caused by poor maintenance, and not by a militant attack. APTN showed footage of spilled pools of oil on fire and large clouds of black smoke billowing into the sky. No casualties resulted from the incident. Witnesses said the burning oil spill was about 4 kilometres long.) APTN Southern Iraqi desert, 90 kilometres south of Basra - 24 March 2004 Wide shot of huge plumes of black smoke and fire engines Various shot of flames and black smoke British soldiers walking on burned ground Burned ground, smoke in background (Although the Basra region had been relatively peaceful compared to the area west and north of Baghdad, there were outbreaks of unrest. British troops in Basra scuffled with rioters when soldiers tried to evict anti-Coalition activists from a government-owned building. Around 30 locals set fire to car tyres and threw stones at the troops who responded with rubber bullets and used tear gas to try to quell the crowd. Three Iraqis were injured.) APTN Basra - 29 March 2004 Smoke rising from ground from burning tyres and man throwing object at British troops High shot of burning tyres and rioters throwing stones at troops Rioters scuffling with soldiers, one rioter grabbing rifle from British soldier 10:17:53 (Iraq in April Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Baghdad in early April to protest against the closure of an Arabic newspaper owned by a Shiite cleric, Moqtada al-Sadr. Coalition authorities in Baghdad claimed the paper had incited violence against the occupying military forces. Days later, about five thousand members of the Mahdi Army, a Shiite militia proclaiming loyalty to al-Sadr, paraded in the Sadr City neighbourhood of Baghdad. Formerly called Saddam City, after the fall of the Iraqi regime the mainly Shiite district was renamed for Moqtada al-Sadr's father, Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, a leading Shiite cleric who was killed in ambush by Saddam's security forces in 1999.) APTN Baghdad - 2 April 2004 Mid shot of marchers Baghdad - 3 April 2004 Close up banner showing Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, Moqtada al-Sadr's father Al-Mahdi Army militia members marching Masked and uniformed children marching during demonstration (The unrest among al-Sadr's supporters boiled over into a violent uprising days later in the staunchly Shiite regions of Baghdad, Najaf, Nasiriyah and Amarah. In Baghdad, Al-Mahdi militia fighters killed eight US soldiers in fighting in the city. Thirty Iraqis reportedly died in the clash. One Salvadoran and one US soldier were killed in an attack on a Spanish military base in the holy Iraqi city of Najaf. The Salvadoran force was in Iraq under Spanish command as part of an international brigade of troops from Central America. The Spanish-led force would pull out of Iraq in May, citing an election promise made by the new Spanish government. Supporters of al-Sadr took over a police station and seized guns inside in Kufa, 11 kilometres north of Najaf. No police were in the station at the time. Protesters also took over a hospital, and groups of armed men gathered around the local mosque, waving flags and holding portraits of Moqtada al-Sadr and his father.) APTN Kufa - April 4, 2004 People waving flags and posters of Moqtada al-Sadr Armed guard on roof of mosque Najaf - April 4, 2004 Various shots of crowds running on street, UPSOUND explosions, gunfire Tracking shot of protesters running along road, UPSOUND automatic gunfire and some larger explosions (Moqtada al-Sadr was reported to have taken refuge in a mosque in Kufa, surrounded by armed supporters. The US administrator in Iraq, Paul Bremer, warned that al-Sadr had placed himself outside law by calling for attacks against Coalition and Iraqi forces. A force of 2500 US troops backed by tanks and heavy artillery was deployed outside the city on Tuesday on a mission to "capture or kill" al-Sadr. But Iraqi Shiite clerical leaders launched hurried negotiations aimed at averting a US assault on the city. After a week of negotiations, US forces remained stationed outside Najaf and Kufa, and al-Sadr remained defiant. He threatened suicide attacks against any Coalition troops that attacked his strongholds. But he condemned as "terrorism" a coordinated suicide-bomb attack two days earlier in the southern cities of Basra and Zubair that had killed 73 people, many of them Iraqi children.) APTN Kufa - 25 July 2003 Side shot of cleric Moqtada al-Sadr preaching at Kufa mosque Najaf - 13 April 2004 Wide of the Imam Ali shrine Kufa - 23 April 2004 Worshippers praying at Kufa mosque Various shots of outside mosque, with Mahdi Army militiamen holding AK-47 on guard 10:18:57 (The showdown with al-Sadr threatened to heighten tensions with Iraq's Shiite Muslim majority at a time when the US forces were burdened by an insurgency by militants groups in the Sunni Triangle. After the gruesome murder and mutilation of four civilian US security contractors in Fallujah in May, US officials warned of a massive retaliation and surrounded the city with more than a thousand US Marines and Iraqi troops. The besieging troops moved in against the insurgents in early April, sparking intense fighting in the streets of the city of 200-thousand people. The four-day assault included air strikes by US warplanes and attack helicopters on insurgent Iraqi positions, and more than 280 Iraqis were reported to have been killed. At least four US Marines were also reported killed. Local people accused the US of killing around 40 civilian worshippers when a bomb from an F16 warplane was used to demolish the wall of a mosque to allow US troops to enter.) US Pool Fallujah - 7 April 2004 Wide shot, zoom into injured marine getting out of tank Fallujah - 8 April 2004 Buildings and large black plumes of smoke Smoke in background with marine in foreground Marines firing mortar, UPSOUND mortar fire. Cobra attack helicopter flying overhead, firing ordnance, passes Blackhawk helicopter, minaret of mosque in background. APTN Fallujah - 7 April 2004 Pull-out from street to wide shot of mosque after daybreak Masked and armed fighters in street (After four days of heavy fighting in Fallujah, the Coalition halted its attack to allow residents to tend to the dead and wounded, and to let Iraqi government officials negotiate with the insurgents. But it was to be an uneasy ceasefire: just 90 minutes after the announcement, US marines were given orders to resume offensive operations after gunmen fired on them. Within days a fierce gun battle between US Marines and insurgents in the city had left one marine dead and seven others injured, and heavy fighting continued outside the besieged city and on the outskirts of Baghdad, 40 kilometres to the west. In the town of Abu Ghraib, just outside Baghdad, militants shot down a US Apache helicopter, killing its two crewmembers.) Pool Fallujah - 12 April 2004 Marines targeting position Marines shooting, UPSOUND gunfire Wide shot of buildings Marines firing into the city Various shot of marines firing 10:20:22 (Early in April, a group calling itself the "Mujahedeen Brigades" captured three Japanese hostages in southern Iraq. In a videotaped communiqué, the three hostages - two aid workers and a photojournalist - were shown being held at gunpoint. The kidnappers threatened to burn their captives alive unless Japan pulled its troops out of Iraq within three days. Despite public pressure in Japan, where many people had opposed the invasion of Iraq, Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi refused to meet the kidnappers demands, saying he wouldn't give in to terrorism. Japan had deployed about 1000 support troops in Iraq and the immediate region, including over 500 soldiers on a mission to purify water and rebuild infrastructure in southern Iraq. The three Japanese hostages were released after a week, following negotiations by Muslim clerics with their kidnappers. Four Italian men working as private security guards were kidnapped after they got into a taxi in Baghdad. Their captors released a video of the men holding up their passports, surrounded by masked gunmen who threatened to execute them unless the 3000 Italian troops and other Coalition forces pulled out of Iraq. Within two days the kidnappers released a second videotape, this time showing the grisly execution of one of the hostages and threatening to kill the others, one by one. Italy reacted with shock, but Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi refused to accede to the kidnappers' demands. Italy sought the help of an Iranian delegation to travel to Baghdad to secure the release of the hostages. Intelligence sources reported of a loose economy of kidnapping groups operating in Iraq, with criminal gangs reported to be taking hostages in the hope of selling them to militants fighting the Coalition. The Coalition authorities announced at this time that about 40 foreign hostages from 12 countries were being held in Iraq, and that the United States' Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had been called in to help. Some hostages were fortunate to escape without serious harm. Gary Teeley, a 37-year old British man working as a civilian engineer for Coalition forces in the southern city of Nasiriyah was abducted and held for six days by an Iraqi militant group, until he was released to Italian troops. Eight Ukrainian and Russian employees of a Russian energy company were also freed by their captors, a day after they were abducted from their residence in Baghdad. Seven Chinese citizens were also freed after being held for a day. They had been taken hostage in Fallujah after entering the country from Jordan, intending to set up a construction business in Iraq. A French television journalist was taken hostage in Iraq as he was filming a US military convoy under attack. Alexandre Jordanov was captured on the road south of Baghdad. Jordanov was held captive for four days, but was released after drawing a map of France to prove that he was not an Israeli agent. His production company said that Sunni Muslim clerics had helped negotiate his release.) APTN Unknown date and location PART MUTE Japanese hostages with captors Japanese hostages with captors MoD Pool Basra - 12 April 2004 Still shot of Gary Teeley shortly after being released APTN Baghdad - 13 April 2004 Various shots of hostages in garden AP Photos FILE: Unknown date and location Still shot of French journalist Alexandre Jordanov (Iraq's US-appointed interim government approved a new flag for the country, to replace the flag of the Saddam Hussein era. The old Iraqi flag had red and white bands across the top and bottom, with a white band between them with three green stars. During the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s, Saddam added the Arabic words "Allahu Akbar", Arabic for "God is greatest", to boost the religious credentials of his secular regime. The new flag was presented in Iraqi newspapers. The design was white, with two parallel blue strips across the bottom representing the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, and a yellow stripe between them representing Iraq's Kurdish minority. Above the stripes, a blue crescent represented Islam. But the new flag failed to become widespread or even common in Iraq, where the old flag was still preferred by most people in spite of its association with the Saddam regime. In the past, US administrators had quietly tried to alter the Iraqi flag by dropping the words "Allahu Akbar," but Iraqis refused to abide by the change.) APTN Baghdad - 26 April 2004 The new flag and emblem of the republic shown in a newspaper 10:20:51 (Iraq in May Photographs allegedly showing the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at the hands of US troops in the prison at Abu Ghraib near Baghdad caused outrage in Iraq and around the world, not least in the United States where the conduct of US forces was being kept under close scrutiny by the political opponents US President George W. Bush. The New Yorker magazine in the United States said it had obtained a U.S. army report that Iraqi prisoners were subjected to "sadistic, blatant and wanton criminal abuses" at the Abu Ghraib prison. Outside Abu Ghraib prison, Iraqis could often be seen waiting for any information about the fate of those held inside. In the wake of the abuse allegations, one man outside said that he had only recently been released and that the way he had been treated inside was humiliating. Other Iraqis freed from the prison held a news conference in Baghdad to describe what they said was physical and psychological torture they had suffered at the hands of their US army jailers. In response to the outcry, President George Bush pledged to demolish the prison, saying it had been a symbol of death and torture under Saddam Hussein and had now become "a symbol of disgraceful conduct by a few American troops who dishonoured our country and disregarded our values" and the US began a series of courts martial against the soldiers it said had perpetrated the prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib. A 24-year-old US military policeman, Specialist Jeremy C. Sivits, would be the first of seven US army reservists to face trial. Sivits, a member of the 372nd Military Police Company, was charged with conspiracy to maltreat subordinates and detainees, dereliction of duty for negligently failing to protect detainees from abuse, and cruelty and maltreatment of detainees. He pleaded guilty on May 19 and was sentenced to a year in prison.) APTN FILE: Abu Ghraib, near Baghdad - April 2003 Wide shot of Abu Ghraib prison APTN FILE: Abu Ghraib - May 2004 Pan across exterior of prison Agency Pool FILE: Abu Ghraib - May 2004 Various interior shots of prison APTN Abu Ghraib - 2 May 2004 SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) A'la al-Duleimi, recently released from Abu Ghraib prison: "They have treated us worse than the pictures showed on the television stations. They stripped us, beat us, they humiliated us." APTN Baghdad - 9 May 2004 Man showing a picture of hand injury, allegedly caused by torture at Abu Ghraib AP Photos Date and location unknown Still shot of US Army Specialist Jeremy Sivits from an undated family photograph Pool Washington DC, US - 10 May 2004 SOUNDBITE (English) George W. Bush, US President: "There will be a full accounting for the cruel and disgraceful abuse of Iraqi detainees. " US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld listening SOUNDBITE (English) George W. Bush, US President: "One basic difference between democracies and dictatorships is that free countries confront such abuses openly and directly." APTN Abu Ghraib - 14 May 2004 Various shots of a group prisoners getting off bus after being released from prison after questioning Prisoners queuing 10:22:01 (At the start of May, US and Iraqi troops besieging the southern city of Najaf moved in to break the resistance of the Shiite militia fighters holed up in the city. Calling themselves the al-Mahdi army, the militia fighters in Najaf and other Shiite strongholds of southern Iraq proclaimed loyalty to the rebel cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, who had called on Iraqis to resist the US-led occupation. US troops and armoured vehicles clashed with al-Mahdi gunmen near the centre of the holy city of Karbala near Najaf. Heavy fighting continued throughout the day, only hundreds of metres from the Imam Hussein and Imam Abbas shrines in the city' centre. Militants loyal to al-Sadr attacked British patrols and official buildings the cities of Amarah and Basra. In Amarah, gunmen attacked a military convoy, lightly wounding two British soldiers and sparking shootouts in several parts of the city. In Basra, hundreds of black-garbed al-Mahdi Army militia fighter gathered in the streets, attacking British patrols with machine guns and rocket launchers, and sparking skirmishes in several neighbourhoods. At least two Iraqis were killed and four British soldiers wounded.) APTN Najaf -- 2 May 2004 Wide shot of US soldier kneeling by humvee from across street, UPSOUND heavy gunfire US soldier kneeling by vehicle speaking on phone asking for support APTN Najaf - 7 May 2004 Various shot of al-Mahdi militia fighters taking positions on roofs, UPSOUND of gunshots Al-Mahdi militants carrying rifles running across a street Al-Mahdi militant holding rocket-propelled grenade launcher (RPG) APTN Amarah - 8 May 2004 Armed men and local children chanting support for Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr (A website purporting to represent an Islamic militant group posted a video clip that appeared to show the beheading of a US civilian in Iraq. Twenty-six year old Nick Berg had disappeared in Baghdad on April 9. His family said he was in Iraq as an independent businessman to help rebuild communication antennae. The website claimed Berg's killing was in revenge for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners by American soldiers at Abu Ghraib. The beheading caused outrage across the world, and particularly in Berg's native US.) APTN Washington DC - 12 May 2004 Various shots of newspaper headlines about beheading APTN New York City - 12 May 2004 Close-up of newspaper headlines reading: "Pure Evil" and "Savages" AP Photos Washington DC - 12 May 2004 Still shot photograph of Nick Berg (In Baghdad's Sadr City neighbourhood, US troops appealed to Iraqis to surrender any weapons in return for cash payments. Soldiers dropped leaflets as their convoy of humvees and armoured vehicles drove through the Shiite neighbourhood, requesting that local residents hand over any weapons to the Coalition. The mainly Shiite district had endured repeated night time incursions and bombardment by the US and Iraqi forces trying to root out militant supporters of the cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. Many locals responded by angrily tearing up the leaflets.) APTN Baghdad, 15 May 2004 Close up shot of leaflet reading: "For all Iraqis, Help us in achieving security by handing over your weapons in return for money. This program of purchasing weapons will start on Monday and will last for three days. Who ever hands over weapons will receive money. Illegal weapons are endangering your society." Locals tearing up leaflets 10:23:09 (Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer, a civil engineer educated in Saudi Arabia and the United States became Iraq's interim president, after America's preferred candidate, former foreign minister Adnan Pachachi, turned down the post. The interim Iraqi Governing Council had rejected Pachachi for the largely ceremonial office, saying the US was trying to force their choice. In a televised address after his appointment was announced, al-Yawer called on the United Nations to play a major role in "bringing full sovereignty back to Iraq." The Iraqi Governing Council decided to dissolve immediately following al-Yawer's appointment, rather than remain in office until the transfer of sovereignty. The next day the new Iraqi cabinet met for the first time in Baghdad, led by Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, an Iraqi Shiite. British-educated Allawi had been a prominent Iraqi opposition figure in exile during the Saddam years, and is known for his close ties to the United States State Department and the CIA.) APTN FILE: Iraq - unknown date Ghazi Mashal Ajil Al-Yawer seated Adnan Pachachi with soldiers APTN Baghdad - 1 June 2004 AUDIO AS INCOMING New Iraqi president, Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer addressing audience New Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi standing up to address audience Pool Baghdad - 2 June 2004 New Iraqi cabinet meeting for the first time (As thousands of Shiite followers of Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani took to the streets in Baghdad calling on the United Nations Security Council to approve the return of full sovereignty to Iraqis, the United States instead brokered a compromise at the UN that spoke of a "security partnership" between the interim Iraqi government and the US-led Coalition forces in the country. Under the compromise, Iraqi leaders would take control of the country's security forces on June 30, and thereafter Washington and Iraq's would cooperate on "sensitive offensive operations." But the deal stopped short of granting the Iraqis a veto over major offensives by Coalition troops. France, Germany and others had sought such a veto power for the Iraqis.) APTN Baghdad - 7 June 2004 Demonstrator marching and chanting for Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani Demonstrators holding up banners in support of Sistani and carrying his picture UNTV New York - 8 June 2004 NEAR MUTE United Nations Security Council voting on draft resolution about Iraqi sovereignty arrangements 10:24:05 (Al-Mahdi militia fighters loyal to Moqtada al-Sadr continued to skirmish with US troops in Baghdad's Sadr City district. Insurgents fired mortar rounds and rocket-propelled grenades at a police station housing US troops in Baghdad, triggering a gun battle with the soldiers inside. Later in the week, the crackle of gunfire rattled through the streets as small groups of black-clad militiamen fired machine guns, small arms and rocket-propelled grenades at US positions as Apache helicopters circled overhead. One militant was shot dead as he prepared to launch an RPG. Witnesses in Sadr City said the clashes began after Shiite fighters called out from a mosque loudspeaker for residents to close their shops and hide their cars because they feared a US attack.) APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 4/5 June 2004 Al Mahdi militants firing at US troops Militants firing at US troops US troops in trucks Militant firing rocket-propelled grenade launcher APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 10 June 2004 VIDEO QUALITY AS INCOMING **WARNING - SHOWS MAN BEING SHOT DEAD** Militant prepares to fire an RPG and is hit numerous times, tracer fire can be seen hitting him (Gunmen claiming to belong to a Islamist group released a video of four Turkish men from among seven Turkish contractors taken hostage in Iraq. The kidnappers demanded that Turkish companies end all business in Iraq and pull staff out of the country. The group said in the video that the men had been kidnapped because they were working for the Americans.) APTN Unknown date and location Gunmen claiming to belong to a Islamist group displaying four kidnapped Turks and reading statement, with close-ups of hostages' ID cards (Iraqi artists displayed works in Baghdad, speaking out about the US abuse of Iraqi prisoners in Abu Ghraib prison, and experiences of the US led occupation. An exhibition at the a gallery in a middle-class neighbourhood of northern Baghdad included photo collages of the abuse of the Abu Ghraib. But a sculpture of a crouching naked man, his hands tied and his head covered with a hood, was completed months before the Abu Ghraib abuse became public. "We knew what went on at Abu Ghraib," Abdul-Kareem Khalil, the artist said. "The pictures did not surprise me.") APTN Baghdad - 13 June 2004 Visitor looking at photo collages of Abu Ghraib abuse pictures with anti-American slogans Close-up on Abu Ghraib photos with anti-American slogans Tilt up to hooded head 10:24:52 (The US-led coalition transferred sovereignty to an interim Iraqi government two days before the scheduled date of 30 June, in a surprise move to avert a feared campaign of insurgent attacks to sabotage the symbolic step toward self-rule. Legal documents transferring sovereignty were handed over by US Governor Paul Bremer to chief justice Midhat al-Mahmood in a small ceremony attended by about a dozen Iraqi and Coalition officials, in a building inside the heavily-guarded Green Zone in Baghdad. Bremer had taken charge in Iraq about a year earlier. Two hours after the ceremony, he left Iraq on a US Air Force C-130 plane, accompanied by coalition spokesman Dan Senor and close members of his staff. There was little initial public reaction to the near-secret transfer ceremony, which was broadcast on Iraqi and Arabic satellite television stations, and no celebratory gunfire. The new interim Iraqi government was sworn in six hours after the handover ceremony. The Arab world voiced cautious optimism but maintained calls for the US military to leave the country quickly. Interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi delivered a sweeping speech sketching out some of his goals for the country, urging people not to be afraid of the "outlaws" fighting against "Islam and Muslims," and assuring them that "God is with us.") APTN Baghdad - 28 June 2004 Exterior of building with Iraqi flag UPSOUND (English) Paul Bremer, Coalition administrator in Iraq: "We welcome Iraq's steps to take its rightful place with equality and honour among the free nations of the world. Sincerely, L. Paul Bremer, ex-administrator of the Coalition Provisional Authority." Pool Baghdad - 28 June 2004 Senior members of Iraqi interim government entering swearing in ceremony Interim Iraqi president, Ghazi al-Yawer being sworn-in (MUTE) Iraqi interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi being sworn-in 10:25:37 (Iraq in July In July, a defiant Saddam Hussein appeared in court for the first time and rejected charges of war crimes and genocide. During In his first public appearance since he was captured seven months earlier, Saddam told the judge: "this is all theatre, the real criminal is Bush." Saddam was handcuffed when brought to the court but the shackles were removed for the 30-minute arraignment at Camp Victory, one of his former palaces on the outskirts of Baghdad. The seven broad charges against Saddam are the killing of religious figures in 1974; gassing of Kurds in Halabja in 1988; killing the Kurdish Barzani clan in 1983; killing members of political parties in the last 30 years; the 1986-88 "Anfal" campaign of displacing Kurds; the suppression of the 1991 uprisings by Kurds and Shiites; and the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. The trial is not expected to start until 2005. Eleven of the former dictator's top lieutenants appeared in court after Saddam, including former Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, the regime's best-known spokesman in the West, and Ali Hasan al-Majid, known as "Chemical Ali." US and Iraqi officials hope the trials in 2005 will help the country recover from years of tyranny, the US-led invasion and the insurgency that blossomed in its aftermath. But the new Iraqi government is due to step down after elections in January, and a second national ballot will be held later next year. That means national policy on prosecuting Saddam and his followers could change depending on the makeup of the next government. Iraqis poured into cafes to watch Saddam historic court appearance. Reaction was mixed in the capital, Baghdad. In the mainly Shiite cities of Karbala and Hilla, many people were jubilant that the country's former dictator had appeared in court. Iraq's Shiites had often suffered at the hands of his regime, and people spoken to APTN said they were seeing justice, at last. Supporters of Moqtada al-Sadr in the Shiite city of Kazimiya took to the streets after prayers, chanting pro-Sadr slogans and calling for the execution of Saddam. But there were expressions of support for Saddam from some quarters. A day after his appearance in court, hundreds of people took to the streets of the Iraqi town of Samarra in support of their former president. Samarra is around 100 kilometres (62 miles) north of Baghdad and is just south of Saddam's hometown, Tikrit.) Pool Baghdad - 1 July 2004 Wider shot of Saddam Hussein and judge SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Saddam Hussein, former Iraqi President: "Please allow me not to sign until the lawyers are present.'' Mid shot of Saddam Mid shot of judge Pool Baghdad, 1 July 2004 MUTE Mid shot of Saddam Hussein Close up of Saddam Pool Baghdad - 1July 2004 MUTE Tariq Aziz listening to judge in court Aziz's hands in shackles Aziz gestures to the judge Aziz signs his indictment papers Ali Hasan al-Majid (known as "Chemical Ali") talks to the judge Close up of al-Majid Taha Yassin Ramadan, former Iraqi vice-president listening to the judge APTN Baghdad, 1 July 2004 Various shots of Iraqis watching Saddam Hussein in court on television Saddam in court on the television screen Close up Saddam on screen APTN Karbala - 1 July 2004 SOUNDBITE (Arabic) vox-pop: "Where are you know Saddam? Where are you Saddam? This is the end of injustice. " APTN Kazimiya, Baghdad, 2 July 2004 Wide demonstrators chanting, "Long live Sadr, Saddam should be executed" Various of Shiite locals chanting A banner reading: ''Death to Saddam'' 10:27:59 (A militant group calling itself "The Holders of the Black Banners" threatened to murder seven foreigners - an Egyptian, three Kenyans and three Indians - taken hostage in Iraq. The group initially said they would behead one captive every 72 hours beginning on Saturday night if the Kuwaiti trucking company they worked for did leave Iraq, and their countries did not pull their citizens out of the country. They later issued a new set of demand, including the payment of compensation to the families of Iraqis killed fighting US troops in of Fallujah, but did not repeat the threat of beheading.) APTN Location Unknown, Date Unknown Amateur video of kidnappers calling themselves "The Holders of the Black Banners," and seven hostages (Tools of torture used by Saddam Hussein's son Odai to terrorise Iraqi athletes were displayed to the media at a Baghdad stadium a month before the start of the Olympic games in Athens. Odai, who ran Iraq's Olympic committee when his father ruled the country, was reported to have had athletes tortured if they did not perform well. US troops killed Odai along with his elder brother, Qusai, in 2003. The International Olympic Committee reinstated Iraq's national Olympic committee in February after it was suspended in early 2003, enabling Iraqi athletes to compete at the upcoming Athens Olympics.) APTN Baghdad - 25 July 2004 Man showing torture instrument, similar to an "iron maiden", casket with metal spikes on inside Rack of torture implements Various of iron torture head pieces Various of men demonstrating finger crushing torture instrument Various of men showing other torture instruments (A huge explosion detonated by a suicide attacker in a bomb-laden vehicle tore through central Baqouba in late July, killing 68 people and injuring scores more. The local chief of police said a suicide attacker had driven his car into a crowd of people gathered outside the station register for police jobs. At least 55 people were injured.) APTN Baqouba, Iraq - 28 July 2004 Various shots of police officers and emergency workers at scene 10:27:50 (Iraq in August In August, fighting rekindled between the Moqtada al-Sadr's supporters and Coalition troops, starting in Najaf and spreading to other Shiite areas. The Health Ministry said 19 Iraqis were killed and 111 wounded during fighting in Sadr City the first two days of the renewed fighting. The US military reported that 15 of its soldiers were wounded in four separate attacks in the same clashes. In Basra, an al-Sadr militant was killed and three others were injured after they ambushed a British patrol. There were no reported of British casualties. In Najaf, United States attack helicopters pounded militants hiding out in Najaf's cemetery. The US accused the militants of hiding in the cemetery, near the Najaf holy shrines, to avoid retaliation by US forces. Najaf hospital officials said the fighting had killed at least 13 civilians and wounded 58 others over two days. US forces reported they had killed up to 300 al-Mahdi militia fighters. Al-Sadr's aides blamed the United States for the clashes and called for a return to the truce. But the militia fighters continued to defy the Coalition troops and the Iraqi government. In the mainly Shiite city of Amarah, al Mahdi militia fighters seized four police stations and crowds of gunmen and locals gathered outside one station in a show of dissent. Al Mahdi militia gunmen openly patrolled the streets of Sadr City in Baghdad, shooting at any US troops they saw.) APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 5 August 2004 Al Mahdi militia fighters on the streets of Sadr City Various shots of militia fighters on street APTN Baghdad - 6 Aug 2004 Day shots, man on motorcycle with RPG on shoulder Night shots, various shots of militants crouched behind building, firing rifles Militant throwing object, loud explosion follows nearby APTN Najaf - 6 August 2004 Various shots of market stalls on fire Fire at market stalls APTN Amarah - 6 August 2004 Various shots of al Mahdi militants with guns chanting in front of police station APTN Baghdad - 7 Aug 2004 Al-Mahdi militant pointing rocket propelled grenade down street APTN Baghdad - 7 Aug 2004 Three shots of al-Mahdi militia fighters shooting down street at US soldiers, UPSOUND gunfire Pan of militants and child holding weapons 10:29:10 (Under tight security, Iraq's interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi made a brief visit to the war-shattered city of Najaf, calling on militants to lay down their weapons after days of fierce clashes with United States forces. Allawi said there were no plans to arrest al-Sadr, but he said there would be no negotiations with him until al-Sadr's militia laid down their arms. Days later al -Sadr appeared at a rare news conference in Najaf, saying he and his supporters would not lay down or leave their holy city. Heavy fighting continued in of Najaf as US forces tried once more to drive out al Sadr's supporters. Explosions and gunfire rattled the city, as the fighting continued around the vast cemetery near shrines) Najaf - 8 Aug 2004 Exterior of Imam Ali Shrine APTN Najaf - 9 Aug 2004 Moqtada al-Sadr walks into room APTN Najaf - 10 Aug 2004 Small boy carrying rocket launcher (On August 12. thousands of US troops and Iraqi soldiers launched a major assault on the Mahdi militia fighters in Najaf . Among the targets of the US assault was al-Sadr's residence in Najaf. Thick plumes of black smoke billowed into the sky after a US attack helicopter fired an unknown number of missile's at the residence. Al Sadr was not thought to be in the building at the time.) APTN Najaf - 12 Aug 2004 Plume of smoke rising over Najaf APTN Najaf - 12 Aug 2004 Mid shot of al-Sadr's house engulfed in smoke (Expectations had been running high mid August for a national conference in of Iraqi religious, political and civic leaders designed to move Iraq further along the road to democracy. The conference was to elect a 100-member national council to act as a watchdog over the interim government ahead of the elections scheduled for January. But the conference was beset by problems even as it got started, with some delegates threatening to walk out over the fighting between Shiite militants and US-led forces in Najaf. Al-Sadr's group had rejected the conference as undemocratic and refused to attend. The Association of Muslim Scholars, a religious group with links to insurgents, also said it would not attend because of the interim government's reliance on the US-led Coalition forces.) Pool Baghdad - 15 August 2004 VIDEO AS INCOMING Wide shot of conference SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Iyad Allawi, Iraqi Prime Minister "This event in Iraq's contemporary history is of great importance to peace loving countries. " Conference breaks and delegates move around Men begin chanting and waving their fists from the back of the conference room 10:29:52 (In Germany, Specialist Javal Davis admitted in court that he initially lied to a military investigator by saying he did not take part in the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Davis was one of seven junior-ranking US army reservists charged in the prison abuse scandal. Davis and the five other military police accused of abusing prisoners insisted they were following orders from military intelligence officers and civilian contractors.) APTN Mannheim - 24 Aug 2004 media going through security checks Pool Mannheim - 24 Aug 2004 Sketch of Specialist Javal Davis Court sketches of Judge Colonel James Pohl APTN Mannheim - 24 Aug 2004 Close up of US Army reservist Staff Sergeant Ivan Frederick and his wife Frederick, his wife and his lawyer 10:30:12 (Iraq in September In September, unidentified gunmen opened fire on a convoy carrying former Iraqi Governing Council member Ahmad Chalabi on Wednesday. The apparent assassination attempt wounded two of his bodyguards. Chalabi's convoy was attacked in southern Baghdad as he returned from the holy city of Najaf. Chalabi, a Shiite and a one-time Pentagon favourite who fell out of favour with the United States had returned to Iraq from Iran earlier face counterfeiting charges. A warrant issued by an Iraqi court accused him of counterfeiting old Iraqi dinars, which were removed from circulation after the ouster of Saddam Hussein last year. Chalabi denies the allegations, saying he collected the fake currency in his role as chairman of the Governing Council's finance committee.) APTN Baghdad - 1 Sept 2004 Vehicle that was carrying former Iraqi Governing Council member Ahmad Chalabi in convoy Damaged windscreen of vehicle APTN Baghdad - 1 Sept 2004 Chalabi's injured bodyguard in wheelchair Former Iraqi Governing Council member Ahmad Chalabi (Chalabi was among delegates to the Iraqi National Council that was formally sworn in a ceremony in a Baghdad convention centre amid a barrage of mortar attacks. A US military spokesman said at least two mortar rounds landed inside the heavily-fortified Green Zone that houses the convention centre, along with government offices and the US Embassy. The council is to act as a watchdog on the interim government until elections in January, and has the power to veto some government decisions with a two-thirds majority vote. The Council later elected Fuad Masoum, a Kurd, as its president.) Pool Baghdad - 1 Sept 2004 Council meeting Ahmad Chalabi shakes hands with Council member Various shots of Council members lined up waiting to be sworn in Council members swearing oath Mid shot of new National Council President Fuad Masoum speaking after being elected 10:30:53 (Saboteurs used explosives to blow up an oil pipeline at Riyadh, about 60 kilometres (40 miles) southwest of Kirkuk. The pipeline links oil fields near Kirkuk an oil refinery of Beiji. Two days later, fire-fighters struggled to put out the blaze caused by an explosive attack on a pipeline near Hartha, 30 kilometres (19 miles) north of Basra.) APTN Riyadh, near Kirkuk - 2 Sep 2004 Sign with smoke plume behind Close up black smoke rising from pipeline fire Silhouette of men spraying water on fire APTN Hartha - 4 Sep 2004 Wide of oil pipeline fire Pan of firemen spraying fire (Iraq's Defence Ministry announced that Saddam Hussein's former second-in-command, Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, had been arrested in Tikrit. But the lead turned out to be false, and DNA testing established that the arrested man was not al-Douri. Once the vice chairman of the Baath Party's Revolutionary Command Council, al-Douri was a long-time ally of Saddam. When Saddam was arrested in December, al-Douri (the King of Clubs card in the Pentagon deck of playing cards) became America's most wanted fugitive in Iraq. The US suspects him of funding and leading insurgent attacks against Coalition forces. In January, Coalition troops raided houses in Samarra and Tikrit as they searched for him. He remains at large, and the US has offered a $10 (m) million-dollar bounty for his arrest.) APTN Location unknown - recent Pack of card illustration of Izzat al-Douri APTN FILE: Baghdad - unknown date Al-Douri saluting at parade APTN Unknown location and date US poster advertising reward for al-Douri's capture APTN Tikrit - May 2004 Close of al-Douri's bombed out house 10:31:51 (After a period of comparative quiet, the Shiite stronghold of Sadr City in Baghdad was again the scene of violence as US and Iraqi forces clashed with militants loyal to Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. The clashes led into several days of heavy fighting that left 37 people dead, including two US soldiers, and more than 200 civilians injured.) APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 5 Sep 2004 Militant shooting around corner, other fighters with guns walk in alley Militant shooting from across street Militant throwing grenade Group of militants across street, pan to militant shooting around corner, pan back to group across street (US forces had pulled back from Fallujah after the three-week siege in April that left hundreds dead and devastated much of the city. Since then, the militants had tightened their grip on the city. In mid-September, US forces launched attacks in the Sunni insurgent stronghold of Fallujah and nearby villages, killing at least 30 people and wounding more than 40 others. Women and children were reported to have been among the victims. The US military said it was targeting allies of the Jordanian Islamist militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, and claimed intelligence showed that up to 60 suspected enemy fighters may have been killed. US-led forces carried out a further raids attacks on insurgent positions in Fallujah in October, backed by artillery and air-strikes, as they targeted they said were safe houses used by al-Zarqawi's terror network.) APTN Fallujah - September 16, 2004 injured being carried into hospital Girl being wheeled on hospital bed Children in hospital bed (In Baghdad, militant gunmen attacked and killed two Sunni Muslim clerics. Sheik Mohammed Jadoa al-Janabi and Sheik Hazem al-Zeidi were both killed with two days of each other, in each case as they left a mosque. Iraqi authorities said the killings were motivated by sectarian disputes.) APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 20 Sep 2004 Funeral procession for Sheikh Hazem al-Zeidi Funeral marchers with coffin on a car (In Najaf, Shiite Muslims commemorated the death of one of the country's most important Muslim clerics just over a year after he was assassinated. Ayatollah Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim was killed along with at least 85 others in August 2003 when a massive car bomb exploded outside the Imam Ali Mosque in Najaf. Heavy fighting in the city between militants and American forces in the previous weeks had prevented the commemoration taking place on the anniversary of the death. Baqir al-Hakim was a known proponent of Muslim unity. Marchers marking al-Hakim's death walked through the streets of Najaf holding banners reading: "No to sectarianism, yes to unity".) APTN Najaf - 23 Sep 2004 AUDIO AS INCOMING Marchers holding pictures of the late Ayatollah Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim 10:32:48 (Iraq's interim Prime Minister interim Iyad Allawi visited the United States in late September, where he met US President George W. Bush at the White House. After the meeting, President Bush warned that he expects insurgent violence in Iraq to escalate as the country moves toward elections scheduled for January. Even so, Allawi discounted the need for more foreign soldiers, yet called for more assistance to build up Iraqi government forces. Before meeting with Bush, Allawi told a joint meeting of Congress that Iraq was moving successfully past the war that ousted Saddam Hussein. He vowed that the elections would take place next year as scheduled, "because Iraqis want elections on time." On the second day of his two-day visit, Allawi spoke before the General Assembly of the United Nations and urged the world body to set aside differences over the legitimacy of war and help his country build a stable democracy. He said that that failure to do so would be a victory for terrorism. But his comments came just days after US Defence Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld suggested that parts of Iraq might have to be excluded from the elections because in January because of almost daily car bombings, kidnappings and other mayhem plaguing the country.) Pool Washington DC - 23 September 2004 US President George W, Bush and Iraqi President Iyad Allawi at rostrum Various shots of Allawi approaching podium to address joint meeting Various shots of members of Congress applauding SOUNDBITE (English) Iyad Allawi, Iraqi interim Prime Minister: "Elections will occur in Iraq on time in January because Iraqis want elections on time." 10:33:08 (Iraq in October Margaret Hassan, the director of the CARE International' charity in Iraq, was kidnapped on her way to work in Baghdad in late October. Hassan, an Irish-born woman married to an Iraqi man, Tahseen Ali Hassan, had lived and worked in Iraq for thirty years. Militants in Iraq had kidnapped more than 150 foreigners by this time, and many non-governmental organisations had withdrawn foreign staff because of the bombings and kidnappings. CARE suspended operations in Iraq on Wednesday after she was seized. Tahseen Ali Hassan said that he had not been contacted by the kidnappers and had no idea who was holding his wife. He urged the group to let her go, saying she was an Iraqi by marriage and had done nothing but help the country. In a series of video's released by her captors she was seen to be increasingly distraught, and pleaded with British Prime Minister Tony Blair to draw back British troops from Baghdad - a demand of the kidnappers. On November 16 her captors announced they had killed her, and released a video that they said showed her execution. US and Iraqi authorities later confirmed that Margaret Hassan had been killed.) APTN Baghdad - 20 May 2003 Exterior of CARE offices in Baghdad Mid shot of Margaret Hassan, CARE's director in Iraq APTN Baghdad - 21 Oct 2004 Tahseen Ali Hassan, husband of kidnapped aid worker Margaret Hassan, speaking to journalists Mid shot of Tahseen Ali Hassan (Followers of the rebel Shiite cleric radical cleric Moqtada al-Sadr trickled into police stations in Baghdad's Sadr City district to hand in weapons a deal seen as a key step toward ending weeks of fighting between US and Iraqi militiamen in the Shiite militant stronghold. Cash in US dollars was handed to militiamen after they turned in rocket propelled grenades and other weapons. Police said the rates ranged from five US dollars for a hand grenade to one-thousand US dollars for a heavy-calibre machine gun. But an Iraqi official said the militiamen were receiving cash as a "reward for their cooperation", not as compensation for the weapons turned in, and that some had refused to be paid. In return for taking back control of al-Mahdi militia areas, the government promised to start releasing detained al-Sadr followers, provided they didn't commit crimes, and to spend 500 million US dollars to rebuild Sadr City after the fighting.) APTN Sadr City, Baghdad - 11 Oct 2004 Various shots of masked Iraqi soldiers receiving weapons Official opening packet of US dollars Man counting cash Official handing cash to man Various shots of piles of weapons on the ground Weapons being taken out of the trunk of a car Iraqi policemen counting weapons laid out on the ground (The bodies of about 50 Iraqi Civil Defence Corps soldiers were found on a remote road in eastern Iraq, apparently the victims of a militant ambush as they were heading home on leave, Iraqi authorities said. The ICDC soldiers were on their way home when they were ambushed and killed about sundown Saturday on a road south of Baqouba, near the Iranian border. A government spokesman said the soldiers had been training in Kirkush military camp in Baladruz. Specialist private trainers and Coalition soldiers had been training new Iraqi army recruits at the camp, 90 kilometres north-east of Baghdad.) APTN Kirkush Army Base - 24 October Long shot of bodies on ground, tracking shot moving closer to bodies, tilt up to soldiers looking on APTN Iraqi desert, 150 kilometres east of Baghdad - 24 Oct 2004 Close-up of burned out minibus at the scene where the attack on soldiers reportedly occurred APTN FILE: Kirkush, unknown date Wide shot of recruits marching at the Kirkush camp APTN Baqouba - 24 October 2004 Wide shot of Iraqi National Guard (ING) checkpoint and cars driving past (In late October, the United Nations nuclear inspectorate, the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) reported that several hundred tonnes of explosives had gone missing from a former Iraqi military facility at Al-Qaqaa, near Youssifiyah, in an area rife with insurgent attacks. The IAEA Iraqis had told inspectors that the materials had been stolen and looted because of a lack of security at the installation. A story in The New York Times reported that the explosives had disappeared since the US-led invasion of Iraq the previous year. The IAEA had kept tabs on the so-called "dual use" explosives because they could also have been used to make detonators for nuclear weapons. The IAEA pulled out of Iraq just before the 2003 invasion and have not yet been able to return.) APTN Al-Qaqaa military installation - 25 October 2004 Exterior shot of Al-Qaqaa Travelling shot of Al-Qaqaa Gates of Al-Qaqaa APTN FILE: Al-Qaqaa military installation - early 2003 United Nations weapons inspectors go through gates of Al-Qaqaa Iraqi soldiers closing gates (In mid-October, a mass grave was near the village of Hatra in northern Iraq. Up to 300 bodies were initially thought to be buried in the grave, but US military experts estimated there could be up to 3000. The bodies were believed to be those of Kurds killed during Saddam's crackdown on Kurdish Iraqis in 1987 and 1988. The gassing of Kurdish villages in 1988 was one of the charges laid against the former dictator Saddam Hussein when he was arraigned on 1 July in Baghdad. The site at Hatra, unlike other sites discovered throughout Iraq, is to be preserved as a crime scene by the US military, with the evidence to be used in the trial against Saddam for crimes against humanity and other offences.) APTN Hatra, Iraq - 12 October 2004 Reporters looking at remains of bodies inside graves Pool Hatra, Iraq - 12 October 2004 Wide shot of burial pit Close up of skull in grave Pan of grave Close-up of remains 10:35:15 (Iraq Fallujah In mid November, up to 15-thousand US Marines and Iraqi troops began a major offensive into the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah. After three days of heavy fighting as they advanced through the city, the Marines reported that at least 71 militants had been killed, compared with 10 US troops and two Iraqi government soldiers. Some observers expressed concerns that the pace of the US advance in Fallujah indicated that some militants had left the city ahead of the offensive, which was widely heralded in news media reports. Fallujah, 60 kilometres west of Baghdad in the Sunni Triangle region, had emerged as a key centre of the Sunni Muslim insurgency that has stymied US efforts to secure Iraq and prepare for national elections scheduled for January. Many foreign militants, including the Jordanian born al-Qaida associate Abu Musaab al-Zarqawi, were reported to have holed up in Fallujah but there were further reports of them leaving before the US attack. The US military launched an investigation after videotape recorded by an embedded news journalist appeared to show a US Marine shooting dead an injured Iraqi militant.) Pool Fallujah, Iraq - 10 November 2004 UPSOUND machine gunfire from tank UPSOUND explosion with smoke billowing from mosque Tank crashing through wall Mid shot of US troops firing from window of building Pool Fallujah, Iraq - 10 November 2004 Marines emerging on the street, shouting audio of gunfire Mid shot of a soldier on the roof top shooting (filmed from the ground) Pool Fallujah, Iraq - 13 November 2004 US Marines walk inside mosque Close up of two Iraqis lying on floor, pan to show a marine firing at another Iraqi lying on the ground. Pool Fallujah, Iraq - 16 November 2004 View from humvee window driving through Fallujah 10:35:55 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 2 Dec 2004 (Series of mortar attacks) Baghdad Wide of smoke billowing AUDIO of explosions Al-Arasat neighbourhood, Baghdad Various of panic as AUDIO of explosions, people running down street, police run down Abu Nuwas street, central Baghdad Badly injured man sitting and in pain Smoke billowing at end of street Various of cars on fire Al-Sa'doun street, central Baghdad 'Al-Dar al-Bayda hotel' with blown out windows Various damage to 'Al-Dar al-Bayda hotel', including huge hole through the wall 10:36:49 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 3 Dec 2004 (At least six dead after explosion at police station) Various of fire seen through gate Various of vehicles on fire Longshot of scene 10:37:25 APTN Ramadi, Iraq - 2 Dec 2004 (Aftermath of attacks in Ramadi) Various of demolished al-Qatana police station Burned out car 10:37:45 AP Photos Unknown locations, dates (Navy investigates new set of alleged Iraqi prisoner photos) PLEASE NOTE APTN HAS NO WAY TO AUTHENTICATE THESE PICTURES IN SOME OF THE PHOTOS, FACES ARE BLACKED OUT UNKNOWN LOCATIONS/ UNKNOWN DATES STILL shows man lying on his back with a boot on his chest - face is blacked out STILL shows man with an automatic weapon pointed at his head and a gloved thumb jabbed into his throat - face is blacked out STILL shows man who appears to be a soldier sitting on a man, holding him down Web page showing large photo of what appears to be a soldier smiling while sitting on a man and several smaller images to the left STILL showing a man with eyes closed, group of men who appear to be soldiers surrounding him with gun pointed in face and someone taking more pictures of him in right hand of picture STILL of three men who appear to be soldiers surrounding a man with hood over head and in white garment STILL of bloodied man in underwear and two men around him, one with gun pointed STILL of man with blood on forehead and coming out of his mouth STILL of man lying on his back with shirt off and gun pointed at his chest STILL of men who appear to be soldiers standing over men lying down 10:38:44 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 4 Dec 2004 (Police station hit inside Green Zone killing six) Smoke rising at a distance, AUDIO: automatic gunfire Various of smoke rising behind building 10:39:05 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 5 Dec 2004 (Protest over fuel shortages, queues at filling station) People holding banner, man in foreground holding automatic rifle Men holding banner and Iraqi flag Various of long queues of cars waiting to buy petrol SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Vox pop, Man waiting for petrol: ''I have been lining up in queue since 0400 (0100 GMT) until now." (Question: "When do you expect to reach the petrol station?") Answer: "Perhaps, at six or seven pm (1500 or 1600 GMT ) or I won't be able to get petrol at all.'' 10:39:40 APTN Tikrit, Iraq - 5 Dec 2004 (Aftermath of insurgent attacks that killed at least 17) Sign reading "Tikrit Teaching Hospital" Soldiers outside morgue Various of corpses in morgue 10:39:51 APTN Various - 5 Dec 2004 (Mortar attack in Ramadi, oil pipeline burns near Beiji) Ramadi, Iraq Various of damaged shops and car SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Voxpop, resident of Ramadi: "This is the democracy of Mr. Ayad Allawi to give us during the day mortar shells and at night, bombs. Is this a democracy?" Close up of holes in a wall and woman sitting in the background Various of damaged shops Beiji, Iraq Various of thick smoke and flames 10:40:31 APTN Samara, Iraq - 6 Dec 2004 (Pipeline fire) Wide shot of thick black smoke rising from horizon Various shots of smoke and flames rising from pipeline 10:40:45 APTN Mosul, Iraq - 8 Dec 2004 (Church attacked in religiously divided northern city) US soldiers outside the targeted church Civilian car buried under debris Young boys walking on rubble and looking at damage Destroyed dome with damaged religious pictures 10:41:06 APTN Ramadi, Iraq - 11 Dec 2004 (US troops release more than 100 Iraqi detainees) Various of released prisoners holding their luggage and walking towards buses Released prisoner hugging his relative Released prisoner smiling at ING soldier from bus window Bus leaving 10:41:33 APTN Heet, Iraq - 12 Dec 2004 (Unknown gunmen ambushed and killed 10 Iraqis and injured two men about to join the Iraqi National Guard in Heet, west of Baghdad) Various of bodies being carried away Bloodied clothes on ground Body in casket 10:41:51 APTN Various -12/ 13 Dec 2004/FILE (Defence team says Saddam probably on hunger strike) Amman, Jordan - 13 December, 2004 SOUNDBITE (English) Issam Ghazawi, member of Saddam Hussein's defence team : (partly running underneath shot of Saddam Hussein undergoing medical checks - US MILITARY FILE) "We are sure that there is a hunger strike going on, fairly sure that eleven members are on hunger strike, but the President himself we are not sure about that, but we expect that he is." Tikrit, Iraq - 12 December 2004 Area near where former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was hiding before his capture Various of house where Saddam was hiding SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Iraqi (name not given) speaking as he stands in hole where Saddam was captured: "The people of Tikrit provided the hiding place for him here, but his relatives failed to give him shelter." Hole in which Saddam was found hiding 10:42:36 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 12 Dec 2004 Close up of picture of Saddam Hussein in newspaper (One-year anniversary of Saddam Hussein's capture) Wide of newspapers Men reading newspapers SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Sadiq Moussa, Vox pop: "God willing, the trial will be fair but Saddam Hussein doesn't need a trial. The people will judge him because they know what crimes he committed." Kirkuk, Iraq - 12 Dec 2004 SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Baba Ali Jabari, Security of Kurdistan Communist Party of Iraq: "It is a great occasion for the Iraqi people for all denominations and religions, they (referring to the Baath party) tortured a lot of people. People suffered a lot under Saddam's regime but now Saddam has been uprooted." 10:43:21 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 14 Dec 2004 (Seven killed, 13 wounded in Baghdad suicide attack) Helicopter over the city Various of US and Iraqi troops at the scene of the blast Burnt out vehicle at the scene Various of troops at the scene of blast 10:43:40 APTN Beiji, Iraq - 14 Dec 2004 (Pipeline between Beiji and Kirkuk burns after attack) Various of oil burning, plumes of smoke 10:44:06 APTN Basra/Baghdad, Iraq - 15 Dec 2004 (Candidates and voters register to vote in elections) Baghdad Various, Iraqi National Guard (ING) troops deployed on Sadoun Street where Palestine and Ishtar Sheraton are located Various, mosque and street Pool Iraq's interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi entering hall Allawi on stage with electoral candidates APTN Sadr City, Baghdad Sign reading''Voters Registration Centre'' People walking out of centre Poster for al-Sistani, top Shiite cleric Man with polling registration paperworkd Close shot, paperwork Basra People queueing to register Various, people registering to vote 10:45:05 APTN Baghdad, al-Jamaa neighbourhood, Iraq - Dec 16, 2004 (Insurgents ambushed and killed Iraqi Communication Undersecretary Qassim Muhawi) Damaged car interior with blood stains, convoy of the assassinated Communication Undersecretary at scene where the attack occurred Bloodstain in a second car, apparently the bodyguard's car 10:45:16 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - Dec 18, 2004 (Tariq Aziz's lawyer comments after visiting him) Exterior law office Sign for Badei Aref Izzat's office Set up of Badei Aref Izzat Cutaway SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Badei Aref Izzat, Lawyer: "The judges and investigators were appointed under the occupation. The penal law is under (the influence of ) the occupation. This is illegal. It will be legal only if this is legitimate government which create laws and courts. All these irregularities can described as a big scandal." 10:46:13 Iraqi Justice Ministry Location Unknown, December 18, 2004 ('Chemical Ali' in custody) Various of Ali Hassan al-Majid in handcuffs Ali Hassan al-Majid close-up of his face Shot of Ali Hassan al-Majid from behind Various Ali Hassan al-Majid seated with his hand on his cane Ali Hassan al-Majid appearing before an investigating magistrate Closeup of handcuffs Military police General Sultan Hashim Ahmad, Saddam's last defence chief Various of General Sultan Hashim Ahmad standing, wiping his face APTN Beirut, Lebanon - January 21, 2003 Various of Ali Hassan al-Majid inspecting the troops Various Ali Hassan al-Majid (left) seated with Lebanese president Emile Lahoud (right) 10:48:00 APTN Amman, Jordan - Dec 19, 2004 (Saddam Hussein's defence team interview) Journalists SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ziad al-Khasawneh, Jordanian lawyer, Spokesman for Saddam's defence committee: "The President, Saddam Hussein, assures us that he is still the official President of Iraq according to the law and the Iraqi national assembly and his government is the legitimate one. As Kofi Annan has announced the invasion has no legal basis and is against human rights. We believe in the law so that is why the (upcoming) elections are illegal. The security council resolution chapter 7 is cancelled by Kofi Annan's statement when he denied the existence of weapons of mass destruction and there is no justification for the invasion and the occupation." 10:49:05 APTN Karbala, Iraq - Dec 19, 2004 (Car bomb kills 13 at main bus station) Wide of bomb, fire in distance Police cars, pan to man gesticulating Wide of scene, police cars and fire engines Fire engine spraying water Wrecked car, ambulances 10:49:28 Pool Baghdad, Iraq - Dec 21, 2004 (UK PM in surprise visit, excerpt briefing with Allawi) Iraq's interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi walking along red carpet with British Prime Minister Tony Blair, inspecting honour guard and then meeting Iraqi officials, then the two prime ministers pose for handshake and enter building Blair and Allawi at podiums SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister: "Whatever people's feelings or beliefs about the removal of Saddam Hussein and the wisdom of that, there surely is only one side to be on in what is now very clearly a battle between democracy and terror. Blair and Allawi at podiums SOUNDBITE: (English) Ayad Allawi, Interim Iraqi Prime Minister: "And for the first time Iraqis feel the sense of liberty. It is a dream that is coming true. We don't expect forces assembled against us just to stand idle, to see this huge construction going ahead in a peaceful way. What you see now, insh'allah (God willing), will disappear in the very near future." 10:50:40 AP Photos Forward Operating Base Marez, Mosul, Iraq - 21 Dec 2004 (At least 22 people were killed and 50 wounded in an attack at a US and Iraqi base near Mosul) STILL: A hole in the roof of a tent lights smoke moments after an apparent militant mortar attack on a dining facility STILL - U.S. soldiers help a wounded comrade STILL - Workers and U.S. soldiers tend to the wounded STILL - U.S. Army Chaplain Eddie Barnett (far right) says a prayer with members of 276th Engineer Battalion 10:51:10 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 4 Jan 2005 (Suicide car bomb near ING barracks kill six) Scene after explosion, smoke, military personnel, AUDIO sirens Various of scene after explosion, smoke, military personnel 10:51:19 Insurgent Video Unknown location - 3 Jan 2005 (Insurgent video showing attack) n.b Overlaid with Arabic music Masked man places explosives in car Explosives in car Masked man attaches wires Van loaded with explosives Wide of road with traffic - explosion as US convoy passes Military at scene after blast Mid shot burning vehicle 10:52:05 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 4 Jan 2005/FILE (Gunmen assassinated Baghdad Governor Ali al-Haidari in an attack that also left six of his bodyguards dead.) Various of scene after the attack Various of damaged car with blood stains FILE: Al-Haidari speaking 10:52:41 APTN Hillah, Iraq - 5 Jan 2005 (A car bomb exploded outside a police academy south of Baghdad during a graduation ceremony, killing at least 20 people) Exterior of Babil (Babylon) Sports Club Close-up of Babil Sports Club logo Blood on ground Armed police in front of sports club, smouldering cars in background Various of truck with unexploded bombs in back Various of car wreckage 10:53:20 APTN Mosul region, Iraq - January 7, 2005 (A building intended for use as an election centre in the forthcoming vote, was blown up in a district of Mosul, northern Iraq) Wide shot of demolished building Various destruction to the building Insurgent Video Unknown location and date Various of a man with his face covered, preparing bombs Tracking shot from inside vehicle which is following a military vehicle, there is a large explosion very close to military vehicle 10:53:48 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 16 Jan 2005 (Interim PM tours Baghdad University ahead of elections) Sign in Arabic reading ''Baghdad University HQ'' Interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi entering cafeteria of students Various Allawi sitting with university students at cafeteria SOUNDBITE (English) Iraqi interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi ''I am meeting my students of Iraq and to announce to them few important steps that we have taken, including allocation of funds to send students to do further studies and scholarships abroad. I just signed a hundred (M) million dollars fund to support the grands and scholarships.'' 10:54:34 APTN London, UK - 17 Jan 2005 (Iraqis in various nations register to vote) Exterior Wembley stadium where Iraqi voters are registering Sign of registration/polling centre Group of people having their bags checked People at the tables registering Various people registering Close up passport of man registering 10:55:00 APTN Mosul, Iraq - 18 Jan 2005 (A Catholic archbishop kidnapped in Iraq was freed a day after he was seized near his church in Mosul) High wide shot of Archbishop Basile Georges Casmoussa being greeted by applauding well-wishers in office SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Archbishop Basile Georges Casmoussa: "They released me, because I was not the one they wanted. They were very kind with me." 10:55:26 APTN New York, USA - January 18, 2005 (Looted Baghdad artifacts returned to Iraq) SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Garcia, Department of Homeland Security Assistant Secretary: "Under operation Iraqi Heritage our investigators recovered roughly 1,000 artifacts and more than 39-thousand manuscripts. SOUNDBITE: (English) Samir al-Sumaidaie, Iraq's U.N. Ambassador "On behalf of the Iraqi government and its people, I wish to express our gratitude to the US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement for retrieving a stolen treasure from our rich heritage. Wide shot artifacts on table Various shots of men looking at artifacts Various, artifacts 10:56:10 APTN Oteifiyah neighbourhood, northern Baghdad, Iraq - 19 January 2005 (Car bomb explodes at Baghdad bank) Wide of scene Various wreckage of car bomb at scene Wrecked bicycle Bank Exterior zoom out 10:56:40 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 19 Jan 2005 (Alleged prisoner abuse by British soldiers in Basra) Various of men reading newspapers on sideway Iraqi newspaper ' Newspaper photo of British solider kneeling over Iraqi prisoner who is tied up on the ground Headline reading ''British forces commander says we will investigate into abuses.' AP Photos +++PLEASE NOTE: PICTURES CENSORED AT SOURCE+++ +++IMAGES REVIEWED BY BRITISH MILITARY CENSOR+++ Near Basra, - May, 2003 STILL: Photo showing British soldier photographed with detainee STILL: Photo allegedly showing Corporal Daniel Kenyon, top right, in the brown t-shirt, leaning over an Iraqi detainee STILL: Photo showing two naked Iraqi men STILL: Photo, detainee seated, British soldiers standing nearby with a stick STILL: Photo, British soldier standing next to detainee who is holding a box over his head 10:57:29 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 22 Jan 2005 (At least 7 killed, dozens wounded in attack on wedding) Wide shot of body being carried toward building by two men Covered body lying on side of the road Wide shot of building with crater in foreground Distraught man being comforted by two men Damaged car in foreground and men standing in background 10:58:04 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 26 Jan 2005 (Attacks on several schools due to be used as balloting centres) Baghdad, Bab al-Mu'dham neighbourhood Exterior of al-Markaziyah Preparatory School for Girls Shards of glass on classroom floor More damage seen from inside Baghdad, al-Amin neighbourhood Sign reading ''al-Firsan Preparatory School for Boys'' Various of damage from explosion in front of school façade 10:58:24 APTN Samawah, Iraq - 27 Jan 2005 (Allawi continues election campaign) Allawi greeting residents SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ayad Allawi, Interim Prime Minister of Iraq: "We are just days away from the elections, the dream for Iraqis will be achieved, God willing. Iraqis can finally decide their own future and choose their leaders." Allawi outside speaking to potential voters 10:58:58 Pool Various, Iraq - 29 Jan 2005 (The deployment of Iraqi troops on Baghdad streets was intensified on the eve of Iraq's first free election in half a century) Baghdad Various of Iraqi National Guards (INGs) and military vehicles at checkpoint Guards searching car Man being searched by guards APTN Sadr City Polling station with Iraqi soldiers guarding outside Men carrying ballot boxes Iraqi soldiers on balcony of building to be used as a polling centre Various of ballot boxes with armed soldier standing nearby Mosul Man reading leaflet "Avoid polling centres. Being close to them endangers your life because they are targets for the Mujahedeen (insurgents)." Pool Mosul Various of ballot boxes being delivered to polling station Iraqi forces outside polling station APTN Fallujah SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ala Hussein, Fallujah resident: "We are not going to vote because Fallujah has been destroyed and there is no electricity, water or security. The Iraqi National Guard fire at us 24 hours a day. So why should we vote? We don't have security or compensation." Tattered election poster on wall 11:00:16 Pool Baghdad, Iraq - 30 Jan 2004 (Iraqi president among first to cast vote in elections) Various of Iraqi President Ghazi al-Yawer voting Various of Abdul aziz Al-Hakim, Shiite cleric and leader of the key Shiite political organisation, the Supreme Council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, voting 11:00:55 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 30 Jan 2005 (Security and voting at polling stations in the Iraqi capital) Woman voter at polling booth List of candidates fixed on wall Woman voter putting finger in ink Woman voter putting vote in Ballot box Agency Pool SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Voxpop, Voter "I would like to be one of the first people to show up at the polling station to break the fear for people who are scared to vote. This is a new experience. In the past, we could only vote for one person, now we have choice, and hopefully, the winning candidate will not disappoint us." 11:01:40 Pool Sadr City, Baghdad - 30 Jan 2005 (Attacks on polling stations in Baghdad) People on street by cars damaged in explosion Paper covered in blood on street APTN Baqouba, Iraq - 7 Feb 2005 (15 killed in attack on police headquarters) Wider shot of scene with burnt out car Stretcher being carried past Burning debris 11:02:06 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 8 Feb 2005 (A suicide bomber blew himself up in a crowd of Iraqis outside an army recruitment center in Baghdad killing 21 other people and injuring 27 more.) Ambulances racing down street, bound for hospital after blast at recruitment centre AUDIO, gunfire and ambulance siren Various of dead bodies from blast in morgue Various of body bags next to ambushed car Baghdad, Iraq - 8 Feb 2005 (Assailants sprayed a politician's car with gunfire, killing two of the man's sons. The politician, Mithal al-Alusi, who heads the Nation party, escaped the ttack unhurt.) Blood inside ambushed car Iraqi politician, Mithal al-Alosi, being consoled by US soldier 11:02:43 APTN Basra, Iraq - Feb 9, 2005 (Journalist for Al Hurra and his son killed) Coffin with journalist's body in back of pick-up truck Coffin being carried into house Bullet holes in windscreen Bullet holes in door FILE: Still of al-Basri (left, pale blue shirt) taken from a panning shot 11:03:08 APTN Various - File (File of the leading candidates in the Iraqi national elections) Wide shot of Interim President Ghazi Ajeel al-Yawer sitting with officials Close up of al-Yawer Jalal al-Talabani, Head of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (Kurdish leader) enters conference Close up of al-Talabani Various of Ayad Allawi Interim Prime Minister, Head of Iraqi National Accord shaking hands with officials Various of Ibrahim al-Jaafari, Interim Vice-President and Head of Dawa party Various of Hussein al-Shahristani, Shiite candidate for United Iraqi Alliance (Shiite ticket), atomic scientist A'dil Abdul-Mahdi Shiite candidate, from the Supreme Council of the Islamic Revolution, current Finance Minister sitting in audience Various of Abdul-Aziz al-Hakim, Head of the supreme council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq and on the top of Shiite united Iraqi Alliance ticket Various of Adnan Pachachi, Head of the Gathering of Independent Democrats Various of Massoud Barazani, Leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party Various of Ahmad Chalabi Head of the Iraqi National Congress 11:06:25 Pool/APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 13 Feb 2005 (Candidates from Shiites win most votes) Setup shot of Electoral Commission official Doctor Farid Ayar and Doctor Adil Al Lami Al Lami announcing the list of the Iraq United Alliance list number 169 with number of voters more than four (m) million Various of people watching TV and TV showing the Electoral Commission officials announcing the results People watching TV SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ali Naji, voxpop: "The winning for the Iraqi united Alliance is a win for Iraqi people if this list serve the nation." SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Mohammad Sadiq, voxpop: "We wait from these people, whom we gave our votes, to build the new Iraq and secure services and especially security." 11:07:27 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 13 Feb 2005 (Shiite leaders comment on election results) SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ibrahim al-Jaafari, Iraqi Vice President: "I am pleased that the Iraqi people put their trust in this list (the Iraqi United Alliance) and it will be added to the rest of the lists to work side by side to put the Iraqi people first. I expect that this list will take its role to serve the Iraqi nation and play an important role in the Parliament to set constitution and government and solve the persistent, pending issues facing Iraq's society." People slapping their chests at the Hussein Memorial, celebrating the election results Abdel-Aziz al-Hakim, cleric who heads Iraq's largest political group, the Shiite Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq 11:08:08 APTN Kirkuk, Iraq - 13 Feb 2005 (Kurds celebrate strong showing for their parties in Iraq's elections) Various men dancing next to wall Kurdish flag Man with poster and men dancing in background 11:08:21 APTN Baghdad, Iraq - 22 Feb 2005 (Shiites choose Al-Jaafari as PM candidate) Newspapers on the ground Set up senior figures of the United Iraqi Alliance SOUNDBITE: (English) Ahmad Chalabi, member in the United Iraqi Alliance "The United Iraqi Alliance unanimously chose Dr. Ibrahim al-Jaafari to be the prime minister of Iraq. We decided that unity is more important than winning and we proceeded in this direction and I think it is a great result for Iraq and for the Alliance " Cutaway of al-Jaafari speaking to the journalists SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ibrahim al-Jafaari : "The security issue will be our top priority because it is important in itself it is and will reflect on the economy as a whole and other matters, so the security issue will get priority to resolve the situation. " 11:09:18 APTN Najaf, Iraq - 25 Feb 2005 (Nine foreign suspected insurgents arrested by Iraqis) Police cars entering base Blindfolded prisoners being taken from vehicles Various, blindfolded prisoners with security Tape Ends 11:09:39