ALCOHOL & DRUGS
INK BLOT SPLATTERED ON WHITE
CRIMINAL DETECTOR (aka COSH)
Cramlington, Northumberland. <br/> <br/>Demonstration of a new device which marks criminals with indelible dye. <br/> <br/>Various shots of a man walking out of a bank with a briefcase. He puts a "truncheon like instrument" ( a "cosh") into his pocket. A thief makes a grab for the briefcase and runs off down the street with it. Our man runs after him and launches a stream of indelible dye at the man's back. The dye launcher is called "the criminal detector". It is pretty cheesy, even for 1956. <br/> <br/>Another man apprehends the robber and struggles with him. As he is pushed towards the camera we see splattered ink on the back of his Macintosh.
EBC-307 Beta SP
THE WORLD OF CLOSE-UP (CU) (?)
SIMPSON TRIAL/ FUHRMAN MAY PLEAD THE FIFTH (08/24/1995)
MARK FUHRMAN MAY PLEAD THE 5TH AMENDMENT, AND FORENSICS EXPERT HENRY LEE SAYS SAYS THERE IS EVIDENCE OF A SECOND KILLER.
INK TAG
00:00:00:00 CU&apos;s theft deterrent &apos;Color Tags&apos; attach to cloth in clothing store. (new tags explode &amp; splatter &amp; ruin clothes w ink stain when they are removed by shoplifters) ...
Jamaica Cricket 2 - Pakistani team departing for Montego Bay after members were fingerprinted
NAME: JAM CRICKET 2 20070322I TAPE: EF07/0348 IN_TIME: 10:17:41:15 DURATION: 00:03:13:10 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Kingston - 22 Mar 2007 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: ++SOUND AS INCOMING++ 1. Pakistani team member Yasir Arafat holding boarding pass for plane to Montego Bay 2. Armed policeman outside hotel 3. Pakistan team members eating in the hotel lobby 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Talat Ali, Pakistan team manager: "we're run down, the boys are in bad condition everything is....this morning in the newspaper, the stories, speculations, you know, the police needs to clear up all this. They should give an official statement." 5. Pakistani team coach parked outside hotel, zoom out, pan right to soldiers 6. Ali showing his hands, fingerprint ink-stained UPSOUND (English): "My hands are feeling itchy." Reporter's Q: "Did they say anything about why they've decided to fingerprint members of the team?" Ali: "You tell me" Reporter: "We've no idea." 7. Jamaican Deputy Police Commissioner Mark Shields walks through lobby of hotel 8. Team members in lobby, zoom in 9. Press waiting for Pakistani team to emerge from fingerprinting room 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Talat Ali, Pakistan team manager: "OK gentlemen I just want to make a brief statement. The impression created is that Pakistan team is the suspect and they are being interviewed. That is not correct. We are being interviewed obviously. They're a lot of other people who've also being interviewed and we were interviewed first because we're to leave for Montego Bay and that is the reason why we were interviewed first. Impression created by the media is that Pakistan team is the only suspect. This is not true. We have spoken to the police they have been interviewing other people and they will continue to interview other people. Our interviews are over and we will be heading for Montego." 11. Pan of room where fingerprinting took place 12. Close-up on ink cleaning liquid and tissues on table STORYLINE: Jamaican police investigating the death of cricket coach Bob Woolmer fingerprinted Pakistani team members on Thursday at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston. Armed police were stationed inside and outside the hotel, where forensics experts earlier looked for evidence in Pakistani team coach Woolmer's 12th-floor room. Team manager Talat Ali held up his hands to show ink on his fingers as he left a room after being fingerprinted. Ali said the media was creating the wrong impression that the Pakistani team were suspects in the investigation. "Impression created by the media is that Pakistan team is the only suspect. This is not true. We have spoken to the police they have been interviewing other people and they will continue to interview other people. Our interviews are over and we will be heading for Montego," he said. Jamaican Deputy Police Commissioner Mark Shields said taking fingerprints was normal police procedure and that no members were considered suspects. The team then flew to Montego Bay, on the western side of the island. The 58-year-old Woolmer, was found unconscious in his blood- and vomit-splattered hotel room in Jamaica on Sunday, a day after his team's upset loss to Ireland on St. Patrick's Day sealed Pakistan's ouster from the tournament. He was later declared dead at a hospital. Shields, a former Scotland Yard detective, told reporters on Thursday the death is still considered suspicious but has not been classified a homicide. The death of the coach has caused a sensation in the world of cricket.