DEPORTATION REACTION
BACKGROUND MATERIAL FOR A CS ON REACTIONS TO THE ISRAELI GOVERNMENT DECISION TO DEPORT OVER FOUR HUNDRED MEMBERS OF THE PALESTINIAN MILITANT GROUP HAMAS. 00:30:38 CLIPS OF ISRAELI PEACE ACTIVISTS WORKING TELEPHONES AND COMPUTER TERMINALS IN THEIR OFFICE IN JERUSALEM. INTV W/ AN ACTIVIST WHO DECLARES THE DEPORTATIONS A GROSS VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS. CI: WAR: ARAB / ISRAELI CONFLICT.
Interview with Michael Oren pt 2
Interview with Michael Oren, his service in the Army, the Six Day War, events after and up to the present, the training of suicide bombers and Palestinian rejection of peace moves.,00:00:58>>> MICHAEL OREN:,The Palestinians have three narratives. There's a narrative they use with the outer world, outside the Middle East, particularly the Europeans, which is Imperialism, racism, occupation, the Zionist enemey. They have the narrative that they use with Israeli's which is [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,The Palestinians have three narratives. There's a Pal - there's a narrative that they use for the outside world, and particularly with the Europeans, which complains about Israeli Imperialism, and Colonialism, and occupation. Then there's the Pal - there's the narrative they use with Israeli's. There's the narrative of the peace, the brave, forget about the bombing, let's sit down and talk and ____ negotiation. Then there's the internal Palestinian narrative, which says, we are going to continue this war until we destroy this state, just as ____ destroyed The Crusaders, date, a thousand years ago. And we must never, ever give up the arms struggle. All three narrative are being espoused at the same time. , INTERVIEWER:,One of the grievances that seems justified is (Inaudible) justice, particularly the so called, the so called (Inaudible), who came in and he just kicked out the Palestinian refugees and now (Inaudible). ,00:02:24>>>MICHAEL OREN:,Well, historically, it's true that a certain number of Palestinians were evicted by Israeli forces through the 1948 war. But a very small percentage, relatively overall number of Palestinian refugees, about 750,000 Palestinians fled Palestine in the 1948 War. Of that, about 20,000 were evicted from secure, from areas that were considered vital security areas to the Israeli Army. And it was felt that, at the time, in retrospect, that certain questions could be raised about that, in 1948, when it was felt, even by people like Ben-Guiron and by Itzhak Rabin. That maintaining the Palestinian presence, in those particular areas, would have presented a mortal threat to the nation state of Israel. But even in the overall picture, relatively few Palestinians were actually deported from the area. They fled. They fled after their own leadership, they fled. And Palestinian society, for all sorts of interesting, social, historical reasons, collapsed, in the face of - which really wasn't particularly poignant Israeli pressure, collapsed. , INTERVIEWER:,Today there are all these trappings of occupation checkpoints. (Inaudible) checkpoints and blockades, and there's Israeli reoccupations in the ____. It sure looks like occupations (Inaudible). Today occupation is back? ,00:03:53>>>MICHAEL OREN:,Occupation is back because the Palestinians wanted it back. They wanted - the Palestinian terrorists wanted Israel to reoccupy these areas so that they could achieve their stated goals in the - in the ____. The stated goals in the ____ was to internationalize the conflict. To create a situation where the international community would intervene, as an international force here. And that would mean that the Palestinians get their state without paying any price for it. They wouldn't have to recognize the State of Israel. It would be de facto creation of a Palestinian State here, by the International Force. Moreover the Palestinians could continue their arms struggle, by firing over the heads, or from behind the backs of this International force. And Israel wouldn't be able to strike back. It was a perfect scenario. ,And the greatest danger that Israel faces, comes when people said, we have to impose an international force to stop the fighting. That is, we'll give Arafat precisely what he set out to achieve. And in his struggle, in initiating violence, back in September of 2000, and maintaining it ever since, and it will not lead to peace in the Middle East because it laid the foundation for the next war, and it will be far far bloodier than anything that's going on right now. , INTERVIEWER:,Would you call today's military presence a reoccupation, or is it that a defensive measures taken in reaction to a war that terror launched? ,00:0511>>>MICHAEL OREN:,I don't think that Israeli forces are reoccupied in The West Bank. Nobody wants to reoccupy Nablus, at least very few people want to reoccupy Nablus, or the other cities that Pal - that Israeli forces have now entered. I think an overall majority of Israeli's want to see Israeli boys pull back to their own defensive borders, away from these centers of terror. Once the terrorist threat is there. We're not doing this because we enjoy doing it, because we love doing it, we're doing this because this is what we need to do to survive, to make sure that our children and our families get to walk the streets safely. Simple as that. ,00:05:50>>>,Now, I think that Israeli society has made tremendous strides toward recognizing the existence of the Palestinian people, to recognizing that the Palestinians have suffered from their pasts, and Israeli - a majority of Israeli's would like to help alleviate that suffering direct ___ in some way. And we recognize even that the Palestinian people have a legitimate claim to part of the land that we consider a historical and spiritual homeland. ,Our problem is that we can't find almost anybody on the Palestinian side who says the same thing about us. Who says that there even is a Jewish people, or that the Jewish people suffered a holocaust, or that the Jewish people have a historic claim to this land. Yasser Arafat, at Camp David, said to President Clinton, Jews in Jerusalem? Jews have no claim in Jerusalem. There was never a temple in Jerusalem. There was never a Jewish State that had its capital in Jerusalem. You're saying this to a man who was a - had a religious, Baptist, upbringing - comes as a big surprise to him. But this is very typical. The Holocaust denial was extremely evasive in Palestinian, and the Arab world, in general. And we just don't see the Palestinians get that and go, okay I recognize that there is that Jewish people, and that the Jewish people have a legitimate claim. We're willing to share the land. I just don't see it. , INTERVIEWER:,Any connection to what Israel is now doing, in response to (Inaudible)? Any parallel between American war and ___? ,00:07:23>>>MICHAEL OREN:,I think power - is there a parallel between American war and power, and the Israeli war on terror? Certainly there is a parallel in that the terrorist are basically the same terrorists. They come from the same ideology. They come from the same cultural background. They come out of the same civilization. So we're confronting exactly the same enemy. Israel, to use the expression, only Americans - Israel is running interference with the United States on terror. If Israel wasn't here to absorb much of the blow of Islamic radical terror, that terror would be striking at the heart of the United States, with far greater veracity than it has. Israel is, to use another metaphor, it's Fort Apache - the front line. If that front line falls, far more Americans will be in danger. ,00:08:06>>>,On the other hand, the United States is a super power. The United States can do things that the State of Israel cannot do. America can send B52 bombers, and carpet bomb, entire areas controlled by the Taliban. They can blow up mountain range of Bora Bora. We cannot flatten the Palestinian city. We cannot shoot artillery into downtown Nablus, or into Hebron. ,I guarantee that if buses were blowing up on American streets, the American people would insist on unleashing the full force of the American army to protect them. And no American president would remain in office a week unless he took those measures. We cannot do that. , INTERVIEWER:,Israeli and Jewish (Inaudible)- ,00:08:55>>>MICHAEL OREN:,Well, Jerusalem would certainly be a holy city to Islam. But it is clearly also the third holiest city to Islam. And historically, it has been proven that the importance of Jerusalem, to Moslems, has been an immediate reflection of the importance of Jerusalem - firstly to Jews, and then to Christians. Whenever there's been a strong emphasis, first by Christians and then by Jews on Jerusalem, Moslems respond by also elevating the holy status of Jerusalem in Islam. There is only one religion in the world for which Jerusalem is the first and really only city, and that is for Jews. , INTERVIEWER:,What about the (Inaudible) Israel's occupation of Jerusalem (Inaudible)? ,00:09:42>>>MICHAEL OREN:,I can't accept the notion that claim - put forth by certain Palestinian spokesmen, that where Israel's occupation of Jerusalem is the core of the conflict. Again, going back to Camp David, Israeli Prime Minister, Ehud Barak, offered to redefine Jerusalem. And the Palestinians rejected the offer. They didn't even come back with a counter offer. And instead, began a war of terror against Israel. So Jerusalem was not the issue for Palestinians, at Camp David. , INTERVIEWER:,You've spoken a lot about Palestinian (Inaudible) tone today, the holocaust and 9/11, and stuff like that. Can you give just one or two examples of where you get the evidence for that? ,00:10:22>>>MICHAEL OREN:, If you open up - if you open up to - if you talk to Palestinians, if you open up Palestinian text books, you watch the Palestinian authorities TV station, you see a systematic denial; a). of an existence of the ____ Jewish people, and b). that Jewish people have any historical connection to this land, and c). last, that Jewish people ever suffered in their existence. The holocaust denial. Tremendous overall holocaust denial throughout the entire Middle East. ,There are conferences that are held on holocaust denial, that can only be held in the Middle East. They're held in Beirut. One was even held, recently in Aman. It's quite extraordinary. , INTERVIEWER:, Do you harbor any hope? ,00:11:08>>>MICHAEL OREN:,Strangely enough, as a historian, I do harbor hope. Because I see the Middle East situation from a historical context, from a historical perspective. You have to remember that 150 years ago, in Europe, only 150 years ago, European leaders decided the Congress of Vienna - let me start again. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,As a historian, I have a historical perspective on the prospects for peace in the Middle East, and therefore I'm optimistic. Let's recall Europe, for example. IT was only 200 years ago, less than 200 years ago, the Congress of Vienna, in 1815, the European states decided the normal relationship between European states should be one of peace and not one of war. A revolution of conflict. Only 60 years ago, Europeans were still slaughtering one another by the millions. So, if someone said to me whether 50, 60 years from now, the Middle East would be at peace, well I'd refer back to the European context. Today is almost inconceivable that France and Germany would be at war with one another, or Spain and England. Inconceivable. And it wasn't that long ago, from a historical perspective. ,00:12:23>>>,So, I tend to cut the Middle East some historical slack. Especially since today events are proceeding in a faster rate than they did in the past, because of technology and communications. I believe, however, that peace will not be instantaneous. I am not a believer in peace now, as much as I'd like to seek peace, now. And I think that peacemakers, on the American side, on the Israeli's side, particularly on the Arab side, have been approaching peace from just the opposite direction. They assume that peace can be approached from the top down. That you can get dragged - an Israeli leader - an Arab leader - into a back room and browbeat them into signing a piece of paper, and then throw a lot of money at them and make them feel good about haven signed a piece of paper, and declare that peace has been achieved. That's how this would percolate down into the masses. ,It doesn't happen that way. Peace has to grow. It has to sprout from the bottom up. You have to provide the subsoil for that type of growth. That subsile [SIC] - that subsoil is democracy, is freedom, its rights - rights for women, rights for children, freedom of expression and assembly. Once you have these basic rights, and because democracies historically, rarely go to war with one another, then you have the basis for a durable and long lasting peace in the Middle East. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:13:46>>>,Every time I hear that Israel is accused of being an aparthide state, I physically cringe. First of all, because people don't remember South African aphartide. That was a system in which people of color were not allowed to use the same rest rooms as white people, were not allowed to ride the same transportation, were not represented in government. And to make that comparison with the State of Israel is ludicrous and extreme. ,Any Palestinian can walk into any restaurant. Any Palestinian can use any rest rooms that I use, and they can also serve in my government. In South Africa, they did not have 9, 10 black Africans serving in their Parliament, in apartide. Today we have Palestinian Arabs who serve in Israeli's Parliament, in Knesset. And they openly espouse Palestinian Nationalism. So that comparison is completely, completely spurious. ,00:14:38>>>,There is, however, a situation of apartide. And that is in the Palestinian areas. I live in West Jerusalem. I live on what we call the Israeli side of the 67' border. But I'm very close to the border. And right, several hundred meters down the road from me is a Palestinian village. Any member - any resident of that Palestinian village can walk into my neighborhood. They actually do. They bring in their sheep. All right? They graze at our local park. But were I to walk down the street, several hundred meters into that Palestinian village, I would not emerge alive. I would not only be killed, I would be mutilated within seconds. That's apartide. That's the separation. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,00:15:45>>>MICHAEL OREN:,There's no question, Israel has, has, has unilaterally declared a ceasefire, five times. And has abided by that ceasefire fastidiously, five times. Each time the Palestinians have responded to that Israeli gesture with a terrorist bomb. There's no cycle of violence. Israel could stop the violence, today, this second, and the Palestinian violence would continue to escalate, because Palestinians would get the impression that they're winning the war, that Israel is finally buckling. So they knew they would renew their terrorism and then double it. , INTERVIEWER:,Now, as we see the level of violence escalating, and the numbers of people, most recently, double suicide bombing, a number of people getting killed. But it's not only the kind of explosives they're using, but they're trying to contaminate the explosives with biological effect. ,00:16:48>>>MICHAEL OREN:,In the use of human beings as bombs, has been elevated to almost an art form in the Palestinians. It's almost at the point of religious veneration. We now have had photographs of babies, Palestinian babies dressed up as suicide bombers. Palestinians had gathered in Gaza Stadium, 70,000, to witness a reenactment of a bus bombing, complete with artificial limbs thrown in the air and blood. At Palestinian West Bank University, they create an exhibition that recreated the Sabarro bombing, in which 20 Israeli's, or 14 Israeli's were killed, complete with limbs - severed limbs and blood splattered on the walls, so people could come and look at this and hear it. At Palestinian summer camps, children dress up as suicide bombers and parade. It's in their education. And suicide bombers, themselves, had achieved almost diabolical inventedness in their attempt to blow up Jews. In one of the earlier explosions - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS],00:18:13>>>,The Palestinian zeal perpetrates terrorist attacks to use human beings as the agents of those attacks. Efforts have really reached diabolical dimensions. One of the more vicious bombings at a night club, or at a discotheque with teenagers, two years ago, (Inaudible) in Tel Aviv was discovered afterwards that the Israeli youngsters who had managed to survive the bombing, but were previously wounded by pieces of metal that were carried on the bodies of Palestinian suicide bombers. That they had contracted Hepatitis C - a lethal disease. And it turned out that the Palestinian bombers, themselves, were infected with this disease. A piece of their flesh had penetrated Israeli youngsters. And that the assumption among the Israeli - among Israeli security apparatus, was that the Palestinian bombers had been chosen specifically because they were effected with Hepatitis C, or the possibility also that they had been injected and infected with Hepatitis C prior to the bombing. So not only were they human suicide bombers, they were also human suicide biological weapons. , INTERVIEWER:, Is there anything that we didn't cover that you wanted to touch upon here? ,00:19:44>>>MICHAEL OREN:, Yeah, one thing. One thing. In Israel, today, we have a very robust and outspoken democratic society. We're also ____elections today, and there's tremendous talk of whether Israel has pursued all possible paths peace. Whether there is a diplomatic option, or whether we should all simply build a wall, and hide behind it. And of the very strong opinion that Israel is in a war, a war not unlike America's war against terror. Right now, just as there is no partner to negotiate with the Americans, there is no partner to negotiate with the Israeli's, and that we have to see this war through. It's a cruel, attractive war of ____. We have to see it through. There is no option. And that's a cruel calculus. There really is no way around it. I'm assuming that we can win this war. And by winning this war, ultimately, the benefits will accrue not only to the State of Israel, but also with Palestinian people in the Arab world. But I don't think this war is in their interests. And by persevering to the end, I think we can embark on the first steps toward peace. , INTERVIEWER:,You think there can be other successful democracies in this region? ,00:21:00>>>MICHAEL OREN:,I believe there can be other successful democracies in this region. But it's a process. I don't think it can happen overnight. I don't think it can be purposed by an outside power. I think the United States can do much to promote the spread of democracy in the Middle East, but it cannot impose democracy. , INTERVIEWER:,A hundred years from now, what did you foresee for the Jewish people, the State of Israel, where will we be? ,00:21:48>>>MICHAEL OREN:, A hundred years from now? You know, I'm a historian and I have enough trouble predicting the past. But if I were to take a huge gamble and look down the road. I can see the State of Israel, that it's living in peace with its neighbors, interacting on many levels; culturally, economically, academically with its neighbors. The state of Israel that has found its place among nations, with security and with dignity. , INTERVIEWER:,And if the Palestinian issue were resolved, to the minimal satisfaction of both sides, would that - what's the word - alleviate the hatred - ameliorate the hatred that exists throughout the Arab world for the State of Israel? ,00:22:38>>>MICHAEL OREN:,No. I think that while it may - that a solution to the Palestinian problem would contribute to peace between Israel and the Arab world. It is only the contribution. It is not the whole. Because the roots of the Arab/Israel conflict go very deeply and they lead back to the essential problems in the Arab world. It's a failed area of the world. It's an area that's not succeeding on every - by any criteria; not economically, not socially, not politically. And the roots of that failure are the same roots of Arab resentment against the west, and Arab hatred in the State of Israel. , The Arab/Israeli conflict cannot end until the Arabs resolve a conflict among themselves. Remember, in the Middle East, where almost every state, including the Arab states, are technically or actively at war with most of their neighbors most of the time. That's not because of the Arab/Israeli conflict. The Arabs have to learn first to accept themselves, and then ultimately they'll accept us as well. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,END OF INTERVIEW
BUSH/PEACE TALKS
PRESIDENT BUSH SAYS ISRAEL'S EXPULSION OF NEARLY 400 PALESTINIANS CAN'T HELP THE MIDEAST PEACE PROCESS. IN A STATEMENT AFTER MEETINGS WITH MIDEAST PEACE NEGOTIATORS, BUSH SAID ALL SIDES MUST KEEP TALKING AND AVOID ACTIONS SUCH AS EXPULSIONS. HE DIDN'T MENTION ISRAEL BY NAME, BUT HIS COMMENTS WERE CLEARLY AIMED AT ISRAEL'S MOVE TODAY TO SEND SUSPECTED MUSLIM ACTIVISTS TO LEBANON. BUSH SAID A SETTLEMENT IN THE LONG ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT IS CLOSE. AND HE SAID HE'S CONFIDENT THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION WILL WANT TO KEEP THE TALKS GOING. AUDIO TRACK A THE WEATHER MATCHED THE MOOD OF THE PARTICIPANTS AS THE PEACE TALKS CAME TO AN END, AT LEAST FOR THE REST OF THE BUSH PRESIDENCY. AT THE WHITE HOUSE, ISRAEL'S PLANNED DEPORTATION OF 400 PALESTINIANS CAST A PALL OVER A SERIES OF FAREWELL COURTESY CALLS ON THE MAN WHO STARTED THE PEACE PROCESS: SOUHEIL CHAMMAS/OVAL OFFICE 1/10:11:12/RUNS :06 "IN ITSELF, DEPORTATION IS BAD. AND UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES IT WILL ADVERSELY AFFECT THE PEACE PROCESS, I REGRET TO SAY." AUDIO TRACK B THE PRESIDENT APPARENTLY AGREES. EXPRESSING HIS STRONG OBJECTIONS TO THE ISRAELI GOVERNMENT. AND AFTER THE MEETINGS, ISSUING A STATEMENT UGING ALL SIDES "AVOID REACTIONS SUCH AS DEPORTATIONS THAT RISK COMPLICATING THE SEARCH FOR PEACE." BUT THE ISRAELI NEGOTIATORS INSISTED THE DEPORTEES ARE THE OBSTACLES TO PEACE: ELYAKIM RUBENSTEIN/ISRAELI STAKEOUT/11:54:04/RUNS :14 "IT IS NOT A STEP THAT WE WOULD HAVE LIKE TO TAKE. ITS A STEP THAT WE HAD TO TAKE. THESE TERRORISTS ARE NOT JUST AFTER THIS OR THAT PART OF THE PEACE PROCESS, THEY ARE AFTER THE EXISTANCE OF ISRAEL." AUDIO TRACK C THAT ATTITUDE IS A SYMBOL OF HOW FAR APART THE TWO SIDES REMAIN. THIRTEEN MONTHS AFTER PRESIDENT BUSH AND THEN-RUSSIAN PRESIDENT GORBACHEV OPENED THE TALKS IN MADRID, THE PARTICIPANTS STILL DON'T TRUST EACH OTHER. AND LITTLE SUBSTANTIVE HAS BEEN ACCOMPLISHED: JOYCE STARR/INTERVIEW/14:44:12/RUNS :06 "THEY'VE BEEN TALKING FOR OVER A YEAR AND THEY'RE GETTING MORE AND MORE ANGRY AT EACH OTHER, ACTUALLY. YOU DON'T SEE ANY SPURT OF GOOD WILL AMONGST THE PLAYERS." AUDIO TRACK D GIVEN THAT, THE END OF THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION IS A CONCERN TO ALL. THE FEAR IS THAT WHATEVER PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE WILL BE LOST WITHOUT CONTINUED STRONG AMERICAN INVOLVEMENT. WITH OR WITHOUT HIM, THE PRESIDENT URGED THEM TO KEEP TALKING: GEORGE BUSH/OVAL OFFICE 2/10:57:04/RUNS :15 "I WANT TO ASSURE YOU OF OUR DETERMINATION TO TRY TO BRING THESE TO, AS FAR ALONG AS WE CAN WHILE WE'RE HERE. AND I'M CONFIDENT THAT OUR SUCCESSORS WILL WANT TO SEE THIS PROCESS ACTIVELY AND VIGOROUSLY CONTINUE." AUDIO TRACK E IN LITTLE ROCK, PRESIDENT-ELECT CLINTON PLEDGED THAT HE DOES: BILL CLINTON/LITTLE ROCK/ " I'M GOING TO DO EVERYTHING I CAN WITH THE NEW SECRETARY OF STATE AND WITH OTHERS TO KEEP THIS PROCESS GOING." AUDIO TRACK F BUT ITS UNCLEAR HOW MUCH TIME MR. CLINTON, PLEDGED TO CONCENTRATE ON DOMESTIC AFFAIRS, WILL HAVE TO SPEND ON A PROCESS WITH LITTLE HOPE OF IMMEDIATE REWARD. STANDUPPER AND GIVEN THE HISTORY OF MIDDLE EAST PEACE EFFORTS, IT DOESN'T APPEAR THE PARTIES WILL MAKE MUCH PROGRESS UNLESS THE U-S IS INVOLVED. MIKE MCKEE, AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
DN-LB-563 Beta SP
Universal International News
Interview with Mitchell Bard pt 3
Interview with Mitchell Bard about the history of the Israeli Palestinian situation and negotiations.,INTERVIEWER:,What conditions have to be in place before you feel there can be hope for peace? ,02:52:02>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,Before there can be serious negotiations between Israel and Palestinians, there are going to have to be reforms in Palestinian authority. I think President Bush has got it exactly right. There has to be an end to the violence, you have to have a change in leadership, you have to have Democratic elections, transparent institutions, and a way that the moderate voices can come forward and have some real power in decision making. Whether the problem is that the moderate voices that you see and hear on American TV all the time, are not the people who have any authority in the Palestinian authority, itself. So, until there is that kind of reform, which the president has called for in his June speech, it's really unlikely that Israel will have anybody to negotiate, in terms of getting peace in - [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,02:53:09>>>,The President of The United States has it exactly right in his proposals for moving the peace process forward, and calling for the reform of the Palestinian authority, a change in leadership. Until that happens, until you have transparent institutions, until you have democratic elections, the opportunity for moderate voices to be heard and to have positions of power, it's really unlikely that there will be a negotiating partner for the Israelis. To have a broader peace in the Middle East, is a much more difficult undertaking, because you are going to need a reform of Islam; a change in the views of the radical members of the fundamentalist community who believe in this motion of a Jihad, the end of the Jewish State, and the reconstitution of an Islamic Empire. Unless the most authentic versions of Islam, where this isn't viewed as the end goal are the more common place, are the ones that are supported in the Arab communities, it's going to be very difficult to have a comprehensive peace in the region. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,02:55:35>>>,Frequently you hear the charge that Israel is an expansionist power. Well it's remarkable that it's probably the only expansionist power in history that's consistently withdrawing from territory, and tried to reduce the size of its borders, which we saw with the 56' war, when Israel withdrew from territory captured from Egypt. We saw it again in 1967, after the war when Israel withdrew from the Sinai exchange for peace with Egypt. We saw it after the peace with Jordan, when Israel gave up some of the territory in Jordan. And, in fact, if you look at the territories were captured after the 67 war, roughly 92% of that territory has already been returned to Arab Partners For Peace. So that really, even if Israel were to withdraw from 100% territory, we're talking about only a small percentage, about 8% that's still in dispute. So, there really is a lot of territory involved in the negotiating process. , ,INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians claim, hey, nine years after Oslo and still no state, and there's settlements abound. So maybe war is the only hope.,02:56:56>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,The Palestinians had a great opportunity through Oslo, to create an independent Palestinian state. They had certain obligations which they agreed to in a treat that they signed. And the problem is they failed to live up to them. That they didn't renounce terror, they didn't stop the violence, they didn't collect the illegal weapons, they didn't take a number of steps that were required, that they agreed to. They promised, themselves, in the Oslo Report, to make it possible to create an independent Palestinian state. And even half of that, they were given other opportunities in subsequent agreements, and in particular in negotiations with President Clinton, and Israeli Prime Minister Barak, to have a Palestinian state which would have been on at least 95% of the West Bank, 100% of The Gaza Strip. It would have given them a capitol in East Jerusalem. It would have lead to the dismantling of more than a hundred settlements in the West Bank. All of the things that most Israelis thought that the Palestinians were fighting for. But they rejected those proposals. So, there are other options. ,02:58:11>>>,You hear frequently, people saying, they are turning to terror because of poverty, or because they have no other option. Well, the fact is they have other options. Here's one, negotiations. Go back to the negotiating table, end the violence. Another option is, nonviolence. It worked for Martin Luther King, it worked for Gandhi. Why haven't the Palestinians chosen that option? They simply made the strategic decision that terror would be their best opportunity for advancing their agenda to - at the very minimum, creating the Palestinian state in the West Bank. But ultimately, many of them hope to create one that replaces Israel. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , , INTERVIEWER:,Let's talk about the Intifada. Was - what was the catalyst for that? Was there a catalyst? ,02:59:47>>> ,MITCHELL BARD:,There was no particular catalyst for the latest uprising in the Palestinians, in terms of a single incident. It was a strategic decision that the Palestinians made over the course of many months. And really crystallized after the negotiations failed between Yasser Arafat and Ehud Barak, and Bill Clinton, to use violence in a more extreme and prolific manner to try to move their agenda forward. The Palestinians have blamed the visit of Ariel Sharon to the Temple Mount, for the violence. But, in fact, the violence had started before this. ,And there really was no reason why a visit by an Israeli, during normal visiting hours, should have lead to an uprising which now has lasted more than two years. In fact, an independent commission led by an American, George Mitchell, found that Sharon's visit was not the cause of the uprising. It's really been a prolonged campaign, by the Palestinian authority, to try to force Israel to make concessions that they couldn't win at the bargaining table. , INTERVIEWER:,Why has this Intifada become so much more violent than the previous one in the 80's? They were, by and large - they were just throwing rocks. Now they're blowing, blowing people up. It's much become snipers and drive-by shootings, and all sorts of ways it escalated. ,03:01:32>>>, MITCHELL BARD:,The uprising, in the last two years, has been more violent than the earlier uprising in the 80's, for a number of reasons. First of all, the original uprising was pretty violent and there were suicide bombings back - as far back as that original uprising. But what's changed is the growing influence of the Islamic fundamentalists and their terror groups, which have placed a premium on martyrdom and the belief that by committing terrorist attacks, suicide bombings, you can go to paradise; a wonderful place in the hereafter. That, that wasn't as much the case in the earlier uprising. Also, the Palestinians believe that a precedent had been set when the - his ball of terrorists in Lebanon had mounted sufficient terrorist attacks on the Israeli military forces in Southern Lebanon to, in their view, force Israel to unilaterally withdraw. And that was seen as a precedent, and, by most of the Arab world, as a sign of Israeli weakness. That if you simply inflicted high enough casualties on Israel, that it would withdraw. ,03:02:40>>>,And there has been a belief, up till now, that if the Palestinian terrorist could inflict sufficient casualties on the Israeli civilian population, that the Israeli government would also unilaterally withdraw from the West Bank, and give the Palestinians everything that they wanted. They miscalculated because the West Bank isn't the same as Southern Lebanon. The Israeli citizens aren't willing to, simply, unilaterally withdraw with nothing to gain by it. And that they are willing to fight the terror wherever it is, and from whomever it comes, and despite the belief of the Palestinians that they're weak. , ,INTERVIEWER:,In some people, some of the peace - the peace mix in Israel, feel that, that's what should happen. Israelis should just pull out unilaterally. What do you think would happen? ,03:03:59>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,One option for Israel, to unilaterally withdraw, has become increasingly popular among the public. Not only with the left in Israel, but increasingly with the right. As the recognition has set in that there is no Palestinian partners to negotiate with, the unilateral withdraw is risky. Because it would involve sending a message to the Arab world that Israel may be driven back by violence, and it also would give the Palestinians a state on their side of the border, which would now be closer to the population of the industrial centers of Israel to threaten them. Israel wouldn't have its forces, in the territories, in place in order to perform counter intelligence, counter terrorism operations. ,03:04:54>>>,On the other hand, Israel isn't weak. Israel currently controls much of the West Bank, in an effort to protect the population. And if it chose to withdraw in the future, it wouldn't be doing so because it was driven out by terror, it would be doing so because it chose to do so, because it was in its own best interest. And it may be that once a fence is built along the new border, that Israel will be able to defend it, to use whatever measures are necessary to fight whatever terror might remain. But the hope would be that once Israel withdrew, to some new line, that a Palestinian state would emerge, and then it would be in their interest to keep the peace, then, rather than provoke Israel to return to the West Bank. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,03:05:56>>>,If the opportunity presented itself to, simply, place peace on their referendum, and ask Palestinians what they would like to do, if they would be prepared to live in peace next to Israel, I think, in all likelihood, you would see a majority vote to do just that; to have a Palestinian state living in peace beside Israel. But I think you would find the same on the Israeli side. In fact, that's been the case in Public Opinion Polls for years, in Israel. That there's a willingness to accept a Palestinian state that would live in peace beside Israel. The divisions come when you start getting into more of the details of what the state would look like, where it would be, what would happen to Jews living on one side of the border. But, Palestinian people, I believe, as is the case with the Israeli people, would really like to have peaceful lives. The problem on the Palestinian side has been a leadership that hasn't had the courage to make compromises and to be willing to accept a Palestinian state that would be in a part of the West Bank, and all of the Gaza Strip, living next to Israel instead of replacing Israel. , , INTERVIEWER:, Speculate, for a moment, if you will, if there was some analogous situation in a Western country, the United States, or England, or France, or Italy, or Spain - if there was the kind of civil unrest and disobedience that was going on, and the scale of what was going on in the Middle East, what would happen? ,03:07:34>>> ,MITCHELL BARD:,If the United States or another western power was faced with a kind of terrorism and unrest that Israel has been faced with over the last two years, I think you would expect a very harsh response. Much more serious, probably, than even Israel has been forced to use to protect its population. You've seen it already in the United States, since September 11th, when we were attacked just once on a single day. Albeit it was a very horrible day. The United States went to war against a country thousands of miles away. And we launched repeated attacks against terrorist targets as far away as Yamen, when we thought that we had the opportunity to kill, either people prepared to commit terrorist attacks against us, or who were in the past involved in terrorist attacks. ,So, for Israel, which is suffering, at least on a casualty basis, the equivalent of September 11th, almost every few weeks, the pressure is enormous to take very harsh measures to try to protect the civilian population. You sometimes hear people try to compare Israel's counter terrorist attacks with the Palestinian's acts of terror. And it's a really obscene kind of analogy, as though you were comparing an arsonist with a firefighter. When the arsonist, like a terrorist, sets the fire and then the firefighter comes in to put out the fire, you wouldn't say that the firefighter was morally equivalent to the arsonist. And yet, people have tried to suggest that when Israel fights against terror, it somehow is doing a similar kind of act as the terrorist themselves. It's simply not the case. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,You often have this game played, of numbers, where people say that more Palestinians have been killed, than Israelis, and therefore the Palestinian side is suffering more. Or that Israel is doing the same types of things as the Palestinians. And it's really not a question of numbers. It's a question of acts and intentions. That Israel doesn't set out to intentionally kill any civilians. In fact, it goes out of its way to try to prevent civilian casualties. There are numerous examples of how Israel has taken extreme measures, in some cases, to put its own soldiers at risk, rather than put more civilians in danger. And it's a tragedy when civilians are killed in any kind of counter terrorist attack. And Israel does everything possible to avoid it. ,On the other side, Palestinians are intentionally targeting civilians. That's the whole purpose of the terrorist, to try to kill as many civilians as possible. So it's a very difficult situation for Israel to defend itself against, because the terrorist, themselves, purposely hide among civilian populations. The civilians, themselves, are willing to shield terrorists, often. And the United States, and other countries have faced similar problems. The United States went after terrorists in Afghanistan, and inadvertently bombed a wedding, and killed dozens of civilians. It wasn't their intent, but no one is trying to compare the U.S. action, in going after the Al Qaeda, with the Al Qaeda terrorist, themselves. , INTERVIEWER:, Why is Israel, or the Israelis being held for such a double standard, when (Inaudible)? ,03:11:33>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,Israel sometimes seem to be held to a double standard. And Israelis, themselves, hold themselves to a higher standard. They do not want to kill any civilians. They believe in what they call the purity of arms, to have an army that operates in as moral a way as possible. And, unfortunately, especially in the media, there's a tendency to find fault with every Israeli action, not to make the kinds of distinctions between the act of terror and the counter terrorist. And you see, over and over again, a reference to Israel killing people when they are not setting out to kill anyone, whereas, the Palestinians, the terrorists, are deliberately targeting civilians. That's their whole purpose of their attacks. But it's very difficult for a liberal democracy, an open democracy like Israeli, to use the kinds of methods that might be more effective in a totalitarian state. ,For example, in Syria, when the president, then of Syria in 1982, had a problem with Moslem Fundamentalist Terrorists, he didn't arrest anybody, he didn't just kill the terrorists, he destroyed an entire city. He killed 20,000 people to put an end to his problems. Yasser Arafat has his own way of dealing with terrorism, or at least his opponent. And that is to arrest them, try them, and kill them. Sometimes he skips the first two steps and just strings them up on lamp posts. Israel doesn't do that. Israel seeks to arrest people and to try them. And there's a very big difference between that approach and that pursued by the Palestinians. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , , INTERVIEWER:,The notion of a suicide bomber is unfathomable and unheard of in history. You know, the kamikazes, and suicide bombers (Inaudible). Kamikazes, you know, they go after military targets and so forth. How does this kind of thing happen? ,03:13:20>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,I wish there was a good explanation for suicide bombing. I don't think there is. It's an immoral and inexcusable act. We want to try to come to some analysis, understanding of why this might happen becomes, in part, from the belief of fundamentalist Moslems. And if they commit these acts in the name of Allah, that this will bring them some reward in the hereafter. That there are some people who, simply, are doing it because they believe it will advance their political cause. And by killing as many Israelis as possible, and especially civilians, it will inflict such a high cost on Israeli public. That they will demand their - that their leaders make some political concessions. And (Inaudible) seriously miscalculated, because Israeli people had just the opposite reaction that they, they hardened by these, these atrocities, and have supported their leader's efforts to take very tough measures to prevent these kinds of terrorist attacks. , , INTERVIEWER:,It's been said that Yasser Arafat is not a partner for peace. Is Ariel Sharon a partner for peace? Is he capable of making peace in Palestine? ,03:14:37>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,You often hear people criticize Ariel Sharon, and suggest that he is an obstacle, that he's unwilling and uninterested in peace. I think the basic answer is to test it. Test it. If you believe he is the butcher, the bake, the candlestick make who has done all of these terrible things, you have to put him to the test and say, we're going to stop the violence on the Palestinian side, we're going to sit at the negotiating table, we're going to talk about ways for us to live side by side in peace. ,And if Sharon does not respond to that, if Sharon does not present a peace proposal in response, everybody in the world will agree that he's an obstacle of peace. He will be criticized by everyone. And the people who will be most critical will be the Israeli public, themselves. And they'd throw him out of office in a second. Because the Israeli public is desperately seeking peace. And they're looking for a sign, on the Palestinian side, that they are committed to peace. So that if there is a genuine effort to live in peace, to end the violence, you're going to see, I believe, Ariel Sharon, respond with a positive response as he has already in presenting peace proposals in advance of the end of violence. Simply saying that, we can't negotiate those proposals until the terror stops. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,03:16:35>>>,The United States has a key role to play. The United States has a key role to play in the Middle East, in the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians, in particular. And it is the only country that is respected by both sides. Other nations like the Europeans and the UN, really have little to contribute, because they've historically been so one-sided in their support of the Palestinians, and in opposition to Israel, that it's very difficult for them to play kind of a positive role in Israel. The United States is always seen, by both sides, as an honest broker. And its main role is to support the negotiations between the two parties, so that they can directly negotiate between themselves. The United States can't come up with a peace plan that will be acceptable to all. In fact, the history is that whenever the United States proposes its own plan, it's rejected usually by both sides. So, the United States has to support the direct negotiation between the parties. It has to provide the diplomatic and financial, economic support, to allow Israel to feel that it can take risks for peace. That involves economic aide, it involves military aide, in terms of political support, so that Israelis will feel that when they sit down at the bargaining table, they can afford to make tough choices like withdrawing to parts of a territory, and not put their society at risk. , INTERVIEWER:,Why aren't the Arab governments, in their vast (Inaudible) resources to approve the, the plight of the Palestinians - ,03:19:38>>>, MITCHELL BARD:,The Arab states have long paid lip service to the Palestinian cause, but if you look, historically, at what they've actually done, it's been very little. They've confined Palestinian refugees to camps, they've often deported them from their borders, as in the case of Kuwait, after the Gulf War - deported hundred's of thousands of Palestinians, and hardly a word was said by anyone. The fact is that a Palestinian cannot become a citizen of any Arab state, except for Jordan. And even Jordan doesn't allow it anymore. There is very little sympathy for the Palestinians, beyond the politic rhetoric. There is support, however, for terrorist attacks. Saudi Arabia held a telethon to support the Palestinian terrorists, earlier in 2002. And Saddam Hussein, we know, supports the Palestinian terrorists by providing up to $25,000 for their families. So, in terms of providing financial incentives to terrorists, in terms of political statements, they've been very supportive. But in terms of doing anything to actually help their plight, they've done very little. , , INTERVIEWER:,The Palestinians say that the media is run by the Jewish ____ Establishment, and the - a lot of Jews, or some Jews say that the media is biased, pro-Palestinian. ,03:21:06>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,If there's one subject on which, probably, Palestinians and Israelis, and American Jews, and Arab Americans all agree, it's that the media is biased. Although each side thinks it's more biased against them. I think that if you look, objectively, at it, there's certainly a bias. And it would be, most likely, toward the Palestinian and Arab side, and for some good reasons. The main reason is that Israel is an open, liberal democracy. ,And if you want to read criticism of Israel, all you have to do is open any Israeli newspaper, any day of the week, and you'll read criticism galore of Israeli policies. But you won't read similar kinds of criticism of the Arab countries, because those are all totalitarian dictatorship's, that mostly control their own press. Or you won't see a Peter Jennings, or a Dan Rather, or a Tom Brokaw reporting Live from Riydah, Saudi Arabia, or Damascus, Syria, or Cairo, Egypt. Those societies aren't talking to them. So that, you're not going to see the negative side of most of the Arab states in the media. Whereas, in Israel it's very easy for a reporter to get negative information, or to give a negative report. So, to that degree, there is a built in kind of biased that makes it very difficult for Israel to get even handed coverage. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,03:23:21>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,The United States has a unique relationship with Israel, that goes back many decades, even before the State of Israel existed, to relationship between the American people and political leaders, and early Zionists. Because of the belief in the return of the Jewish people to their homeland, because of values that the two nations share, democracy, openness, freedom of speech, freedom of press, and other freedoms, a shared Judeo, Christian heritage, also a shared interest. That the United States and Israel share a view of the importance of Middle East stability, and a fight against those forces that are opposing western democracy, such as communism, during the days of the Cold War, and radical fundamentalism, today. Also, threats like Saddam Hussein, who pose a danger, not just to Israel but to the region and to the United States, by extension, because of its weapons of mass destruction. So that there is a longstanding and important alliance that cements the peoples of the United States and Israel, and helps guide the relationships between them, through good times and in bad. , , INTERVIEWER:,Please go through your myths and facts, your top ten, as it relates to this (Inaudible). [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] ,03:25:33>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,We often hear people say that the Jews suddenly showed up one day in Palestinian and stole the land from the native population. There's a misunderstanding about the long history of the Jewish people, with the land of Israel, dating back to the view of observant Jews, and promised by God to Abraham, and simply historical, political terms, the presence of the Jewish people for a ____ the land of Israeli. And in political terms, in the existence of a Jewish state, that existed for hundred's of years, before foreign conquerors drove the Jews out of the territory. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] , , INTERVIEWER:,The notion of refugee, I mean the term refugee, to my understanding, was redefined solely for the Palestinians, and for their status which doesn't apply to any other refugees before, you know, 1948 and since. Is that true? ,03:27:32>>>,MITCHELL BARD:,I don't know the answer. I know what you're talking about, but I can't answer it. [OFF CAMERA COMMENTS] One of the key issues in the negotiations is the status of Jerusalem. And it's important to look at Jerusalem from a variety of perspectives. If you think about it, this really demonstrates how the Arab/Israeli conflict is not about politics, alone, it's really geography, it's politics, it's history, it's religion. It's all of those things wrapped up into one. And it really is a microcosm of the entire Arab/Israeli conflict, because in Jerusalem, if it was just a political issue, you would simply say, most of the Jews live on one side, and most of the Arabs live in East Jerusalem, we draw a line in between, that's it, we're done, we settle it. But you can't do that. Why? , Well, because the Pope in Rome says, I want to sit in Jerusalem because of the trip to the Holy Sepulchre, and Christian holy sites. And you have the Mullahs in Iran, saying, no we want to stay in Jerusalem because of the Al AksaMosque (Inaudible). You have Jews in Chevy Chase, Maryland, say, no we want to stay in Jerusalem because of the western wall, the holiest spot in Judaism. All of those places are literally on top of each other. The Temple Mounts literally on top of them, the Western Wall, and the Church of The Holy Sepulchre around the corner. How do you divide those up? You can't really do it. There's also the history involved. Israel saw what happened when foreign powers controlled Jerusalem. From 48', to 1967, Jordan controlled Jerusalem. They desecrated the Jewish holy places, Jews weren't allowed to visit the Western Wall, or the other holy places. Even Israeli Christians weren't allowed to visit. The Jordanians desecrated the Mount Olive Cemetery, and other holy spots, and Israelis aren't going to allow that to happen again. You hear all the time, people say, well Jerusalem has to be free and accessible to people of all faiths. Well, that's only been true once in history, since Israel captured the city in 1967. Now it is free and accessible to all. ,03:29:47>>>,So, the question is, can you reach a solution in which Jerusalem is shared? Where Palestinians can have their demand for Jerusalem as a capitol, and Israel can have its demand ____ its own unified capitol. Perhaps, Ehud Barak offered one solution, that is to give Arab East Jerusalem to the Palestinian state. But most Israelis, as well as the Palestinians themselves, rejected that idea. Most Israelis thought that was going too far, and Palestinians thought it didn't go far enough. Another proposal was to give a suburb of Jerusalem, called Abu Dis, to the Palestinians and make that their capitol. They could say, our capitol is in Jerusalem. They wouldn't have to say Abu Dis. And the Israelis would keep the rest of Jerusalem for themselves. It's not perfect but it's a compromise; that the Israelis would keep what they really care about, the old city and the new city, the Palestinians would still have a capitol in Jerusalem. It's risky though, because even though Abu Dis is a suburb and it's not far from Jerusalem, it's literally a stone throw away, and would be threatening. , From the Palestinian perspective, it's not perfect either, because they prefer to see the flag of Palestinian flying over the Temple Mount in the Old City. But it's a conceivable compromise. So, Jerusalem is one issue of which all of the various aspects of the conflict all come together as one, and show how difficult it is to resolve peacefully.[OFF CAMERA COMMENTS RE: WATER] [END OF INTERVIEW
02/16/72 C0024055 / COLOR AMMAN, JORDAN: ARABS DEPORTED BY ISRAELIS FROM ISRAELI - OCCUPIED TERRITORY:
02/16/72 C0024055 / COLOR AMMAN, JORDAN: ARABS DEPORTED BY ISRAELIS FROM ISRAELI - OCCUPIED TERRITORY: LNC 30709 "JORDAN PROTEST" SHOWS: GV AMMAN: RED CROSS HQ: DEPORTEES SEATED OUTSIDE RED CROSS OFFICES: RED CROSS FLAG: DEPORTEES IN RED CROSS YARD: JORDAN PREMIER AL LAWZY VISITS DEPORTEES: AL - LAWZY TALKING WITH DEPORTEES: AL LAWZY TALKS TO DEPORTEES WHO CHEER HIM: AL LAWZY ADDRESSING DEPORTEES 4S: (SHOT 2/14 - 15/72 45FT) PALESTINE - REFUGEES & GUERRILLAS DEPORTATION & EXTRADITION REFUGEES - ISRAEL (OCCUPIED JORDAN) FLAGS - RED CROSS ISRAEL - ARAB DISPUTE JORDAN - AMMAN RED CROSS - GENERAL (AL) LAWZY, XX UPITN / 45 FT / 16 COL / POS / R40125
Middle East Deportation - 21 Palestinians appeal against deportation
TAPE: EF02/0615 IN_TIME: 22:12:43 DURATION: 1:42 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Various - 21 July 2002 SHOTLIST: Jerusalem 1. Exterior Supreme court 2. People walking into court Tel Aviv 3. Lawyer Leah Tsemel, who is representing the Palestinians who Israel is threatening to deport to Gaza 4. SOUNDBITE ( English) Leah Tsemel, lawyer for Palestinian families: "We went to the Supreme Court in order to prevent the possible step of deportation of innocent people. The only reason for such a deportation is the biological connection between the relatives and the suiciders themselves. Such a connection cannot justify deportation." 5. Tsemel walking away Jerusalem 6. Interior shot of the office of Meir Sheetrit, Israeli Minister of Justice 7. SOUNDBITE ( English) Meir Sheetrit, Israeli Minister of Justice: "The idea of thinking about the possibility of deporting families of terrorists to Gaza, which is deporting not expelling, is checked and put only under the condition that those families had been supportive to the suicide bomber from their own family. If they knew about it, and they are proved that they knew about it and didn't prevent it, then let me give the legitimacy to do such a deporting to Gaza. And we believe that such a steps maybe will be a very strong warning against those suicide bombers and maybe would prevent them from committing suicide." 8. Israeli flag Ramallah 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Saeb Erekat, Palestinian Cabinet Minister: "On the deportation of people from occupied area to another occupied area, from occupied area to another area: in accordance with the fourth Geneva convention, article 49 of 1949, this is a war crime." 10. Erekat walks away STORY-LINE: Lawyers representing 21 West Bank Palestinians who the Israeli government wants to deport to Gaza petitioned the Israeli Supreme Court on Sunday morning to prevent the deportation. At the moment the threatened deportation is only a proposal - the Israeli cabinet was debating it on Sunday. But many lawmakers and ministers are in favour, saying the move would perhaps serve to prevent future attacks. The 21 Palestinians are male relatives of the latest suicide bombers, at the settlement of Emmanuel and in Tel Aviv. The Haaretz newspaper reported on Sunday Prime Minister Ariel Sharon would accept a ruling by Attorney General Elyakim Rubinstein that relatives of suicide bombers can only be deported if it is proven they were involved in the attacks. The families represented by Leah Tsemel are claiming that Israel's idea to deport them to the Gaza Strip is a war crime, the view held by the Palestinian Authority. On Saturday, the Arab League secretary-general Amr Moussa joined Amnesty International, the UN Secretary-General, and Israeli and Palestinian human rights groups in saying that forced deportation would violate international law. The White House has also criticised the proposal.
HAMAS DEPORTATIONS
TEL AVIV, ISRAEL FEED EDIT MASTERS DEAN REYNOLDS VO ON THE ISRAELI GOVERNMENT DEPORTATION OF 418 MEMBERS OF THE PALESTINIAN MILITANT GROUP HAMAS. 18:06:20 NBC MATERIAL. SLATE. 18:14:26 NIGHT SHOTS OF BUSES CARRYING THE BLINDFOLDED AND HANDCUFFED DEPORTEES LEAVING THE GAZA STRIP. INTV CLIP W/ ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER YITZHAK RABIN. CLIPS OF HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS ARRIVING AT THE ISRAELI SUPREME COURT TO APPEAL THE DEPORTATION ORDER. LS OF THE BUSES STALLED AT THE LEBANESE BORDER. REYNOLDS SU. GRAINY SHOTS OF A PALESTINIAN RIGHTS DEMONSTRATION. INTV CLIP W/ PALESTINIAN JOURNALIST RADWAN ABU AYASH. NIGHT SHOTS OF THE BUS CONVOY ENTERING THE NORTHERN SECURITY ZONE. 18:16:15 SLATE. REFEED W/ NATURAL SOUND. MORE REYNOLDS SU. JORDANIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TELEVISION NEWSCAST MATERIAL INCLUDING SHOTS OF KING HUSSEIN MEETING W/ PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH AT THE WHITE HOUSE, MORE FTG OF THE DEPORTEE BUS CONVOY AND THE ISRAELI SUPREME COURT APPEAL AND CLIPS OF JORDANIAN DELEGATE TO THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE TALKS ABDEL SALAM AL MAJALI POSING FOR A PHOTO OP W/ BUSH IN THE OVAL OFFICE, PALESTINIAN DELEGATE HAIDAR ABDEL-SHAFI SPEAKING W/ REPORTERS OUTSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE AND SYRIAN DELEGATE MUWAFFAK ALLAF POSING FOR A PHOTO OP W/ BUSH. 18:28:35 ISRAELI ENGLISH LANGUAGE TELEVISION NEWSCAST MATERIAL INCLUDING CS ON THE DEPORTATION APPEAL. 18:34:49 SLATE UNTIL THE END. CI: CIVIL RIGHTS: PALESTINIANS, ISRAEL. DEMONSTRATIONS: PALESTINIAN RIGHTS. US RELATIONS: JORDAN. WAR: ARAB / ISRAELI CONFLICT.
THE WHITE HOUSE
OVAL OFFICE PHOTO OPPORTUNITY W/ SYRIAN DELEGATES. 10:20:25:11 LEBANESE AMBASSADOR SOUHEIL CHAMONAS BRIEFS THE PRESS IN THE WHITE HOUSE DRIVEWAY ON THE LEBANESE DELEGATIONS MEETING W/ BUSH. HE COMMENTS ON THE DEPORTATION OF OVER 400 PALESTINIANS FROM ISRAEL TO SOUTHERN LEBANON. CHAMONAS RESPONDS TO QUESTIONS IN ARABIC. 10:24:55:00 WS EXT OF THE WHITE HOUSE. VS AS A LIMOUSINE ARRIVES AND JORDANIAN DELEGATES GET OUT AND ENTER THE WHITE HOUSE. 10:42:29:00 SYRIAN DELEGATE MUWAFFAK ALLAF RESPONDS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT HIS MEETING W/ BUSH. 10:59:00:00 ALLAF MEETS W/ BUSH IN THE OVAL OFFICE AND COMMENTS ON THE DEPORTATION OF OVER 400 PALESTINIANS. 11:05:03:00 EXT OF THE WHITE HOUSE DRIVEWAY. CI: US RELATIONS: LEBANON. US RELATIONS: SYRIA.
THE WHITE HOUSE
COVERAGE OF DELEGATES TO THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE TALKS AT THE WHITE HOUSE. 11:05:16:10 WS OF A US MARINE HONOR GUARD OUTSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE. 11:12:11:00 PALESTINIAN DELEGATE HAIDAR ABDEL SHAFI EXITS THE WHITE HOUSE AND BRIEFS THE PRESS ABOUT THE DELEGATIONS MEETING W/ PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH. HE SAYS THEY DISCUSSED THE PEACE NEGOTIATIONS W/ ISRAEL AND THE DEPORTATION BY ISRAEL OF OVER 400 PALESTINIANS TO SOUTHERN LEBANON. HE RESPONDS TO QUESTIONS IN ARABIC. 11:15:55:00 GRAPHICS. 11:16:46:00 BUSH MEETS W/ PALESTINIANS IN THE OVAL OFFICE. THE DELEGATES COMMENT ON THE DEPORTATIONS. GRAPHICS. TIGHTER CU OF BUSH AND THE PALESTINIANS. 11:19:50:00 GRAPHICS. 11:22:58:13 BUSH MEETS W/ ISRAELI AMBASSADOR ZALMAN SHOVAL, DELEGATE ELYAKIM RUBINSTEIN AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE ISRAELI DELEGATION IN THE OVAL OFFICE. 11:24:31:00 GRAPHICS. CUT REFEEDS. 11:26:50:00 WS OF THE WHITE HOUSE DRIVEWAY. 11:50:58:00 ISRAELI DELEGATES TALK W/ THE PRESS IN THE WHITE HOUSE DRIVEWAY ABOUT THE MEETING. THEY COMMENT ON THE DEPORTATIONS AND THE PEACE NEGOTIATIONS. RUBENSTEIN CALLS THE DEPORTEES TERRORISTS. HE ALSO RESPONDS TO QUESTIONS IN HEBREW. 12:00:37:11 VS AS THE DELEGATES DEPART IN LIMOUSINES. 12:02:00:00 GRAPHICS. CI: CONFERENCES: MIDEAST PEACE. US RELATIONS: ISRAEL. US RELATIONS: PALESTINIANS. WAR: ARAB / ISRAELI CONFLICT.
ISRAEL
17:03:50:00 CS VO INCOMPLETE ON THE ISRAELI GOVERNMENT DEPORTATION OF OVER 400 PALESTINIANS TO LEBANON. A JUDGE TELLS THE PRESS THE DEPORTEES HAVE TO BE SENT TO A SECURE COUNTRY. VS OF ISRAELI ARMY OFFICERS SPEAKING W/ A JUDGE. PRIME MINISTER YITZHAK RABIN SAYS THE DEPORTEES ARE ALREADY IN LEBANON. VS OF ANTIGOVERNMENT DEMONSTRATORS OUTSIDE A COURTHOUSE. VS OF MASKED PALESTINIANS DEMONSTRATING IN THE ISRAELI OCCUPIED TERRITORIES. SU REYNOLDS. REFEED. CI: HUMANKIND: DEPORTEES, PALESTINIAN. WAR: ARAB / ISRAELI CONFLICT.
ARREST OF PALESTINIAN AMERICANS
05:43:00:00 CS VO DEAN REYNOLDS ON THE ARREST IN ISRAEL OF PALESTINIAN AMERICANS. PHOTOS OF THE AMERICANS ON THE FRONT PAGES OF AN ISRAELI NEWSPAPER. OFF AIR VIDEO FROM ISRAELI TELEVISION. A MILITARY OFFICER READS A STATEMENT ABOUT THE ARREST AT A PRESS CONFERENCE. VS OF DEPORTED PALESTINIANS PRAYING. AN ISRAELI SOLDIER POINTS TO A HOLE UNDER A BORDER FENCE ALONG THE GAZA STRIP. VS OF SUPPORTERS OF THE PALESTINIAN AMERICANS DEMONSTRATING OUTSIDE THE US EMBASSY. SU REYNOLDS. REFEEDS. CI: WAR: ARAB / ISRAELI CONFLICT.
GAZA: HAMAS CONDEMN DEPORTATION OF LEADERS
TAPE_NUMBER: EF99/1304 IN_TIME: 07:40:35 - 10:17:21 LENGTH: 01:25 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: Arabic/Nat The militant Islamic group Hamas has condemned as illegal Jordan's move to deport four of its jailed leaders to Qatar. The spiritual leader and founder of Hamas, Sheik Ahmed Yassin, said the deportations flouted international and Jordanian laws. But Jordanian officials say the men departed willingly as part of a deal brokered by Qatar that also included pardons for 21 other Hamas activists accused of illegal political activities in the kingdom. Jordan's government says the expulsions were coordinated in advance between King Abdullah and the Emir of Qatar, Hamad bin Khalifah al-Thani. But Sheik Yassin has condemned the move. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) "These people are Jordanian citizens. The deportation is against international law and regulations and against the Jordanian law. I believe that such an act is against the Palestinian cause and against the rights of the Palestinians to defend themselves." SUPERCAPTION: Sheik Ahmed Yassin, Hamas Spiritual leader The Hamas activists had been arrested in a crackdown launched in August after Jordan came under pressure from the United States, Israel and the Palestinians to restrain the group. Hamas is the most active Palestinian group opposed to peace accords with Israel. In the last decade, it's conducted anti-Israeli attacks that have killed scores of people. A government statement read over state television said Jordan would not tolerate the presence of any Hamas offices on Jordanian soil. Jordanian officials said the four Hamas leaders left willingly to Qatar as part of a deal brokered by the Gulf emirate. But two of the leaders said they had been forced to go. Aides to Prime Minister Abdur-Ra'uf Rawabdeh said the deal includes keeping Hamas offices in Jordan closed and barring group members who remain in Jordan from any Hamas activities. Rushdy Khouly, one of the freed men who was allowed to remain in Jordan, said he and the others refused to sign a pledge to refrain from political activities in the kingdom. Sheik Ahmed Yassin said he was unaware of any deal. He believes the United States is behind the expulsions. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) "It's the same old American way. It's the same system that was used against the P-L-O (Palestinian Liberation Organisation) and Jordan and Lebanon and Tunisia and Yemen, because the United States does not want Israel to live worried and in conflict. They want Israel to live in stability and security and of course all at the expense of the Palestinian people and at the expense of all Palestinian holy sites and Jerusalem." SUPERCAPTION: Sheik Ahmed Yassin, Hamas Spiritual leader After being ousted from Jordan, Hamas now has few platforms left in the Arab world. The group has a presence in Iran, Syria and Lebanon, but enjoys limited freedom of action. Qatar's mediation was a face-saving measure for Jordan, which feared a trial would agitate Jordan's predominantly Palestinian population. The Jordanian government had arrested the Hamas members on charges of practising illegal organisational activities, bypassing the law and threatening the country's security and stability. SHOTLIST: XFA Gaza, November 22 1999 1. Set up shots of Sheik Yassin watching TV with deportee Khaled Mashal 2. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sheik Ahmed Yassin, Hamas Spiritual leader 3. Cutaway Sheik Yassin 4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sheik Ahmed Yassin, Hamas Spiritual leader 5. Sheik Yassin watching TV?
Iraq Iranians - More than 140 Iranians deported for illegal entry
NAME: IRQ IRANIANS 141004N TAPE: EF04/1016 IN_TIME: 10:56:50:09 DURATION: 00:01:38:02 SOURCES: APTN DATELINE: Kut, 13 Oct 2004 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Pan of Iranian deportees sitting on the floor, guarded by Iraqi police 2. Pull out of some Iranian deportees standing up 3. Iraqi policeman giving a glass of water to an Iranian woman 4. Iraqi officials and police at the school where Iranians deportees were gathered 5. Iranian diplomat Mohammed Omran (with glasses and grey coat) shaking hands with Iraqi officials 6. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Mohammed Omran, Iranian diplomat: "I thank my Iraqi brothers for their efforts to release these prisoners. They were only visitors to the shrine Imam Ali (Shiite shrine in Karbala).'' 7. Pan Iranians sitting, waiting for buses 8. Iraqi police officer calling Iranians by name 9. Wide of Iranian deportees holding their bags heading to buses 10. Various of Iranians with their luggage running to buses 11. Iranian women, one carrying child heading to buses 12. Pan of Iranians queuing to embark the bus 13. Iranian deportees inside the bus 14. Pan of one bus leaving STORYLINE: Iraqi officials have deported 147 Iranians from the city of Kut in the eastern border province of Wasit, (190km south of Baghdad) police said Wednesday. Police spokesman Othaman Kadhim said the deportees, including three women and one child, had illegally entered Iraq from neighbouring Iran. But Iranian diplomat Mohammed Omran who supervised the deportation, said they were pilgrims who intended to visit the Shiite holy shrine of Imam al-Hussein in Karbala. Iraq's Defence Minister Hazim al-Sha'lan has repeatedly accused Iran of interfering in Iraq's internal affairs by sending militiamen to fight alongside Iraqi insurgents against Iraqi and US troops, an accusation which was denied by Iranian authorities.
Palestine:
ISSUE_NO = 435 NO_OF_ITEMS = 11 ITEM_NO = 8 DESCRIPTION : Stern measures are taken to suppress Arab terrorism. CARD_FILE = 5738 CARD_TITLE : Stern Measures Are Taken To Suppress Arab Terrorism SHOT_LIST : Aerial shot over Palestine - Jerusalem. Shot of Arab agitators in the streets. Crowd shots. British police with machine guns keep guard on top of building. British leave church after service. Sir Arthur Wauchope in charge in full dress walks past camera with others. General Dill leaves church. Shot of Mayor of Jerusalem Dr. Faradi ??? (deported). Shots of the Mufti (deprived of offices). Shots of the Mosque of Omar. Royal Sussex troops marching on parade. Armoured cars of the RAF on patrol in desert. SOUND : Commentator KEYWORDS : British Empire; Israel; Indigenous People; Civil Disturbances; Munitions and Armaments; Military - Active; Personalities - Armed Forces; Personalities - Politicians; Field Marshal Sir John Dill; Buildings, Landmarks and Monuments; Religion and superstition; Personalities - Local Government; Haj Amin al-Husseini, Mufti of Jerusalem; Airforce - Active; Personalities - Religious MATERIAL : Neg 1097 Comb Dupe Negative 06349 LENGTH_SHOT = 108 DATE_SUBD = 00/00/0000
Libya Rebels
AP-APTN-1830: Libya Rebels Saturday, 4 June 2011 STORY:Libya Rebels- REPLAY Rebels comment on al-Obeidi's deportation, deny ties with Israel LENGTH: 01:22 FIRST RUN: 1330 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Arabic/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 691727 DATELINE: Benghazi - 4 June 2011 LENGTH: 01:22 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++CLIENTS NOTE : AUDIO AS INCOMING++ SHOTLIST: 1. Leader of Libya's National Transitional Council, Abdul Jalil, walking towards podium 2. Cutaway of media 3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abdul Jalil, Libyan National Transitional Counci (NTC): "She arrived last night in Benghazi (referring to Iman el-Obeidi, who said she was gang-raped by government troops) and after we heard what she had to say, we are trying to investigate how she was deported from Qatar. There is a demand from an international organisation of asylum seekers that she should be given asylum or could be an asylum seeker in the US and we will try to expedite that process". 4. Cutaway of journalist writing in note book 5. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abdul Jalil, Head of National Transitional Council "On what Mr. Bernard L?vy who has said, with regard to the intention of the National Council to build diplomatic relations with the so-called state of Israel, the National Council denies these claims and has no intention of doing so". 6. Cutaway of cameraman 7. Abdul Jalil leaving news briefing 8. Journalists packing up STORYLINE: Libya's National Transitional Council pledged on Saturday to help Iman el Obeidi, who claimed at an outburst in a Tripoli hotel last March that she had been gang-raped by government troops, in seeking political asylum, possibly in the US. She was deported on Thursday from Qatar where she had sought refuge and was flown to Benghazi, the Libyan rebels' stronghold, apparently against her will. Abdul Jalil, leader of the National Transitional Council told journalists that an investigation is under way into why she was forced to leave Qatar. "There is a demand from an international organisation of asylum seekers (referring to the UN High Commission for Refugees) that she should be given asylum or could be an asylum seeker in the US," he said. "We will try to expedite that process". A UN official, speaking in Geneva, said that Iman el-Obeidi was taken from her Qatar hotel against her will. He said she is a recognised refugee and her deportation violated international law. A US State Department official described the deportation as "a breach of humanitarian norms". At the same news conference, Abdul Jalil denied reports on Thursday that the NTC was ready to 'build diplomatic relations with Israel." "The National Council denies these claims and has no intention of doing so," He said. It followed claims from the French philosopher/ journalist Bernard-Henri L?vy that the Libyan rebels were ready to recognise Israel - unlike Muammar Ghadhafi - and that he had "passed the message on" to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu's office confirmed the meeting with L?vy but did not comment on the discussion. "The prime minister likes to meet intellectuals," a spokesperson said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-04-11 1430EDT
Middle East Deportation 3 - WRAP Relatives of Palestinian suspect deported, reax Arafat & Israel
TAPE: EF02/0749 IN_TIME: 23:38:30 DURATION: 3:55 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Various - 4 Sep 2002 SHOTLIST: Beit El, West Bank 1. Wide view of Israeli soldier at Israeli military post 2. Mid view of Israeli police post 3. Mid view of soldiers patrolling checkpoint 4. Pull out from United Nations vehicle to sign reading: "Military Court" 5. Mid view of Israeli jeep and car carrying Intisar Ajouri 6. Close up of mother of Ali Ajouri inside the car 7. Mid view of children and relatives in back of car 8. Mid view of Israeli soldier asking car to leave Beit El, West Bank 9. Israeli police vehicles leaving the checkpoint Erez crossing, Israeli border with Gaza 10. Mid view of the Israeli police convoy arriving at Israeli checkpoint 11. Long view of Israeli police convoy parked at checkpoint 12. Wide view of the convoy at the Israeli checkpoint 13. Long view of Israeli police at the checkpoint 14. Mid view of convoy leaving the checkpoint 15. Mid view of convoy arriving at Israeli compound 16. Wide view of compound gates closing Gaza City, Gaza Strip 17. Wide shot of Intisar and Kifah Ajouri entering press conference 18. Intisar and Kifah Ajouri seated talking to press 19. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Kifah Ajouri: "They blindfolded us and pushed us on the ground, we couldn't see anything, then they put us in tanks and drove us miles away to Netzarim, a red (dangerous) zone and then they just left us there." 20. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Intisar Ajouri: "I'll go to the Red Cross and the whole international community, objecting to the decision and asking them to let me go back home, which is my right." 21. Exterior of the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights Ramallah, West Bank 22. Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Moeller's car arriving at Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's offices 23. Moeller shakes hands with chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat and enters offices 24. Various of Arafat and Moeller at meeting table 25. Arafat and Moeller shake hands over table 26. Moeller and Arafat walk on podium outside 27. SOUNDBITE (English) Per Stig Moeller, Danish Foreign Minister: "The proposals of the European Union are how to quickly, as you say, quickly bring the peace process back on track. There's a limit to what people can endure and it's obvious that the Palestinian people is close to that limit. That's why we have created this process where we combine the call for election with the vision about the two states side by side living in peace." 28. Press 29. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Yasser Arafat, Palestinian Leader "This deportation is a crime against humanity, it is against all international laws" 30. Arafat and Moeller walk away from press Tel Aviv 31. Israeli Defence Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer enters room with Moeller 32. Cameraman 33. SOUNDBITE (English) Binyamin Ben Eliezer, Israeli Defence Minister: "From my position I can tell you that I will do everything in order to stop the terror and try to channel it to the proper table, to the proper place where we can solve the problem and this is the table (points to table in room in foreign ministry) where we are working for that. Our thanks again." 34. Moeller and Ben Eliezer shake hands STORYLINE: Israel on Wednesday expelled two Palestinians from the West Bank to the Gaza Strip - a move hailed by the military as a deterrent against suicide bombings and condemned by human rights groups as a violation of international law. Intisar and Kifah Ajouri are the brother and sister of an explosives expert who dispatched two suicide bombers to Tel Aviv. The pair were driven in a convoy of jeeps and prison vans from two Israeli prisons to a military base in the West Bank where they bid farewell to relatives. The army evaded the media and Palestinian officials by dropping the pair off at a gas station not far from the Jewish settlement of Netzarim in the northern part of the Gaza Strip. They later held a press conference at the offices of a human rights organisation in Gaza city where Intisar Ajouri said he would continue to fight to return home. Kifah Ajouri described being told to leave the Israeli tank near at a Palestinian fig farm and having to walk half a kilometer to reach the nearest house. Israel's Supreme Court paved the way for the expulsions on Tuesday. It decided in a landmark ruling that the military could force relatives of Palestinian terror suspects out of the West Bank, as long as it proved they posed a security threat. The court ruled that Intisar and Kifah Ajouri helped their brother, Ali Ajouri, dispatch two suicide bombers to Tel Aviv on July 17. Three foreign workers and two Israelis were killed in the attack. PLO chairman Yasser Arafat condemned the expulsion, saying that it violated international law. He was speaking after a working lunch with Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Moeller. Moeller is believed to be promoting a European peace initiative which would bring about the establishment of a Palestinian state by the end of 2005. Earlier in the day, Israel's Defence Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer met the top Danish diplomat at his office in Tel Aviv. Denmark currently hosts the rotating EU Presidency and Moeller's visit is intended to focus on European attempts to bring about new progress in the Middle East peace process.
UK Qatada
AP-APTN-1830: UK Qatada Monday, 12 November 2012 STORY:UK Qatada- Government fury as radical preacher wins appeal against deportation LENGTH: 02:52 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Arabic/Natsound SOURCE: SKY/PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT STORY NUMBER: 866670 DATELINE: London - 12 Nov 2012/ File LENGTH: 02:52 SHOTLIST: ++4:3++ SKY - NO UK/AL JAZEERA ENGLISH/BLOOMBERG FILE: Location unknown - December 1999 1. Various of Omar Mahmoud Mohammed Othman, also known as Abu Qatada, during interview ++16:9++ PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT - NEWS USE ONLY. STRICTLY NOT TO BE USED IN ANY COMEDY/SATIRICAL PROGRAMMING OR FOR ADVERTISING PURPOSES. ONLINE USE PERMITTED BUT MUST CARRY CLIENT'S OWN LOGO OR WATERMARK ON VIDEO FOR ENTIRE TIME OF USE. NO ARCHIVE London, UK 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Theresa May, British Home Secretary: "Earlier today the special immigration appeals commission upheld Abu Qatada's appeal against his deportation. I hardly need to tell the house that the government strongly disagrees with this ruling. Qatada is a dangerous man, a suspected terrorist, who is accused of serious crimes in his home country of Jordan. The British government has obtained from the Jordanian government assurances not just in relation to the treatment of Qatada himself, but about the quality of the legal processes that would be followed throughout his trial. We will therefore seek leave to appeal today's decision." ++4:3++ SKY - NO UK/AL JAZEERA ENGLISH/BLOOMBERG FILE: Location unknown - December 1999 3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abu Qatada, radical Islamist cleric: (Responding to question: Do you support people who carry guns and carry bombs in other countries?) "I am with those who want to make a change happen in our countries." 4. Close of Qatada's hand ++16:9++ PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT - NEWS USE ONLY. STRICTLY NOT TO BE USED IN ANY COMEDY/SATIRICAL PROGRAMMING OR FOR ADVERTISING PURPOSES. ONLINE USE PERMITTED BUT MUST CARRY CLIENT'S OWN LOGO OR WATERMARK ON VIDEO FOR ENTIRE TIME OF USE. NO ARCHIVE London, UK 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Theresa May, British Home Secretary: "Mr Speaker it is deeply unsatisfactory that Abu Qatada has not already been deported to Jordan. Successive governments have tried to remove him since December 2001. He has a long-standing association with al-Qaida. British courts have found that he provides a religious justification for acts of violence and terror. In Jordan he has been tried and found guilty in absentia of planning to attack western and Israeli targets. It is also deeply unsatisfactory that the European Court of Human Rights continues to move the goalposts for governments trying to deport dangerous foreign nationals. The court has long-standing case law in relation to article three of the European Convention, prohibiting torture and inhuman or degrading treatment and successive British governments have secured deportation with assurance agreements with other governments, so deportations can proceed in accordance with the law." ++4:3++ SKY - NO UK/AL JAZEERA ENGLISH/BLOOMBERG FILE: Date/Location unknown 6. Qatada walking into house 7. Wide of building 8. Qatada coming out of doorway ++16:9++ PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT - NEWS USE ONLY. STRICTLY NOT TO BE USED IN ANY COMEDY/SATIRICAL PROGRAMMING OR FOR ADVERTISING PURPOSES. ONLINE USE PERMITTED BUT MUST CARRY CLIENT'S OWN LOGO OR WATERMARK ON VIDEO FOR ENTIRE TIME OF USE. NO ARCHIVE London, UK 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Theresa May, British Home Secretary: "Mr Speaker, notwithstanding the fact that I still believe the European Court's judgement ruling was wrong, I also believe that we have obtained from the Jordanian government the information and assurances that would allow us to deport Qatada in compliance with that ruling and the law. That is why we disagree with today's decision, that is why we are seeking leave to appeal. The Government has been doing everything it can to get rid of Abu Qatada and we will continue to do so." ++16:9++ SKY - NO ACCESS UK/BLOOMBERG/AL JAZEERA ENGLISH FILE: London - 17 APRIL 2012 10. Various of Abu Qatada being arrested by UK Border Agency officers and taken away in a car (officers' faces obscured) STORYLINE: A radical Islamist cleric described by prosecutors as a key al-Qaida operative in Europe cannot be deported from Britain to Jordan to face terrorism charges, judges ruled on Monday, in the latest twist in a protracted legal saga. Britain's government has been attempting since 2001 to expel radical preacher Abu Qatada, who has previously been convicted in his absence in Jordan of terrorist offences related to two alleged bomb plots. Home Secretary Theresa May struck back on Monday, saying the government "strongly disagrees" with the ruling and believes Judge John Mitting "applied the wrong legal test" in ruling in Abu Qatada's favour given assurances from the Jordanians over his trial and treatment. "Qatada is a dangerous man, a suspected terrorist, who is accused of serious crime in his home country of Jordan," she told British lawmakers. "The Government has been doing everything it can to get rid of Abu Qatada and we will continue to do so." Though the country's Home Office said it intended to appeal against the decision, Mitting granted the cleric bail and said he would be freed from prison on Tuesday, despite a claim from a government lawyer that he poses a major security threat. Abu Qatada, a Palestinian-born Jordanian cleric whose real name is Omar Mahmoud Mohammed Othman, was convicted in Jordan over terror plots in 1999 and 2000, and he will face a retrial if deported there from Britain. Britain's government has insisted it has won assurances from Jordan over how Abu Qatada's case would be handled, including from Jordan's King Abdullah II, who met with Cameron last week, but judges said there was a real risk that evidence obtained through torture would be used against the cleric. In the ruling, Britain's Special Immigration Appeals Commission, which handles major terrorism and deportation cases, said it was not convinced that Jordan would guarantee Abu Qatada a fair trial. It endorsed the January ruling of the European Court of Human Rights, which said that "not only is torture widespread in Jordan, so too is the use of torture evidence by its courts." The British government will press for the most restrictive bail conditions possible for Abu Qatada, according to the Home Office with May calling the decision "deeply unsatisfactory." "He has a longstanding association with al-Qaida, British courts have found that he provides a religious justification for acts of violence and terror. In Jordan he has been tried and found guilty in absentia of planning to attack western and Israeli targets," May said. Prosecutors in British and Spanish courts have previously described Abu Qatada as a senior al-Qaida figure in Europe who had close ties to the late Osama bin Laden. British government lawyers have previously accused him of links with Zacarias Moussaoui, the only person charged in the United States over the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and with shoe bomber Richard Reid. Audio recordings of some of the cleric's sermons were found in a flat in Hamburg, Germany, used by some of the September 11 hijackers. Authorities first attempted to deport Abu Qatada in 2001, and then detained him in 2002 under anti-terrorism laws which at the time allowed suspected terrorists to be jailed without charge. Though he was released in 2005 when the unpopular law was overturned, the cleric was kept under surveillance and arrested again within months to be held in custody pending his deportation to Jordan. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-11-12-12 1855GMT
Peru Jordanians - Smuggling ring suspects handed to US
NAME: PER JORDANIANS 021004N TAPE: EF04/0974 IN_TIME: 10:30:27:19 DURATION: 00:02:30:11 SOURCES: CANAL N/ POLICE VIDEO DATELINE: Lima - 1 Oct 2004/ Recent RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: Police Video September 23, 2004 1. Various of Jordanian men (who had paid money to accused smugglers) entering police station in airport 2. Wide shot of Jordanians being filmed by police July 17, 2004 3. Zoom out of alleged people smuggler Ismael Asaifini Tha'Er Omran waiting in airport 4. Various of alleged people smuggler Ismael Asaifini Tha'Er Omran leaving airport CANAL N October 1, 2004 5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Javier Reategui, Peruvian Interior Minister: "This is an international mafia which is bringing Arabs from abroad via Peru. In Peru they falsify documents and enter the United States with a visa. We have discovered that around 200 have left from Peru (for the US). It is an important number, but the most dangerous thing is that some of them could be linked to al-Qaida and that is where the United States has been involved directly in the plan because it could affect them directly." Police Video September 23, 2004 6. Still photographs of three Iraqi-born, naturalised US citizens accused of masterminding smuggling operation 7. Still photograph of Ismael Asaifini Tha'Er Omran 8. Pan of Lima international airport 9. Jordanians being deported from Peru STORYLINE: Police in Peru claimed Saturday to have smashed a people smuggling ring responsible for transporting more than 200 illegal immigrants from the Middle East to the United States. A Jordanian man accused of running the operation was deported to the United States. Three other Jordanians, who had each paid the accused smugglers between 15 and 20-thousand US dollars were arrested on 23 September in Lima on visa violation charges and sent home, Peru's Interior Ministry said on Friday. Interior Minister Javier Reategui told reporters that around 200 people passed through Peru en route to the US. Reategui said: "The most dangerous thing is that some of them could be linked to al-Qaida." Officials said US investigators detected the ring last year and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers and Peruvian authorities started tracking its movement about eight months ago. The man deported to the United States, 34-year-old Ismael Asaifini Tha'Er Omran, arrived in Peru from the Netherlands in June, the Interior Ministry said. Omran allegedly worked with customers who arrived from various Middle Eastern countries. Officials said other stopover points included Bolivia and Ecuador. Omran was handed over to US authorities on 8 September - the same day a US federal grand jury indictment was unsealed in Washington charging three Iraqi-born, naturalised US citizens from Michigan of masterminding the operation. According to the indictment, beginning in early 2001, the smugglers used an Arab-language magazine in the Detroit area and a travel agency in Jordan to recruit people from Iraq and Jordan who wanted to enter the United States. In exchange for thousands of dollars, the alleged conspirators would provide those being smuggled with visas allowing them to enter a South American country. From there, they would be brought to the United States in exchange for even more money, the indictment said.
Middle East Arafat Wrap - WRAP Arafat's supporters rally round after Israeli threats to remove him
TAPE: EF03/0826 IN_TIME: 22:59:37 DURATION: 4:04 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Various, 13 Sept 2003 SHOTLIST: Ramallah, West Bank 1. High shot of large group of students marching into compound 2. Chanting girls 3. Chanting male students waving Palestinian flags 4. Overhead pan round crowd of students 5. Yasser Arafat blows kisses and gives victory sign to crowd from window of his office 6. Wide shot Arafat at window, cheering crowd underneath 7. Arafat waves to crowd 8. Long shot down table at meeting 9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic): Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat : "I call in front of you, on the Israeli people, in the name of the Palestinian people and the Arab nation, come and let us make peace together." 10. Pull-in to Arafat 11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic): Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat: "I am saying today, we are standing in front of the most difficult moment since signing the Oslo agreement, 1993." 12. Pull-out from demonstrator with flag to wide overhead of crowd outside Yasser Arafat's office 13. Arafat holding the arm of author and leading peace activist, Uri Avneri 14. Pull-out from close-up of Arafat talking during meeting with Arab ambassadors 15. Rear shot Arafat talking to ambassador 16. Mid shot Arafat with Palestinian Prime Minister-designate Ahmed Qureia (Abu Ala) sat on his right - Arab-Israeli Knesset member Ahmed Tibi (with microphone) on his left during meeting the Arab-Israeli Knesset members 17. Wrecked cars above 'human shield' camp for Arafat supporters outside office 18. Men at camp 19. Arafat posters and others suspended outside tent Hebron, West Bank 15. Overhead shot of demonstrators on road 16. Man carried on shoulders of another, using megaphone to lead chanting 17. Mid shot of same 18. Wide shot of Palestinian youths throwing stones 19. Youths throwing stones, burning rubbish in foreground 20. Israeli soldier shooting into air from rooftop 21. Israeli soldiers patrolling 22. Child crying, sheltering at side of road, old woman holding chest Jenin, West Bank 23. Pan along exterior of The Arab American University Nablus, West Bank 24. Pan, mid shot of crowd 25. Masked Fatah members holding up Arafat portrait STORYLINE: A day of mass public displays on the West Bank in support of Yasser Arafat started Saturday with a rally by thousands of school children outside his sandbagged office in Ramallah. It was another show of support for the beleaguered Palestinian leader in the face of dire threats from Israel. The students clapped and cheered for Arafat. "In our souls and our blood we defend Abu Ammar," they said, using Arafat's nom de guerre. Arafat briefly came to front steps of his office and corrected them: "In our souls and our blood we defend Palestine, Palestine, Palestine." A beaming Arafat saluted the children and went back inside. The Ministry of Education asked teachers in Ramallah to bring students to Arafat's office on Saturday, which is normally a full day of classes. On the 10th anniversary of the signing of the Oslo (peace) Accords, Arafat shortly afterwards urged Israel to return to peace talks. In a speech in front of foreign diplomats, Arafat urged pressure on Israel to end its killings of militant leaders and stop settlement-building in the West Bank and Gaza. After the school children had departed, further crowds amassed. Arafat's hectic round of meetings and discussions with groups sympathetic to his plight, also continued. He hosted talks with peace activists, ambassadors from Arab nations and Arab-Israeli Knesset members. Palestinian Prime Minister-designate Ahmed Qureia (Abu Ala) also participated. In Hebron, clashes erupted between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian youths Saturday midday. The violence occurred shortly after a march in the city in support of Arafat. Youths threw stones at soldiers. Some took positions on the roof of a nearby building, from where shots were fired into the air. In Jenin and Nablus, hundreds more people marched in a show of solidarity with Arafat. Israeli leaders decided Thursday to "remove" Arafat whenever they choose. The vaguely-worded decision - made after 15 Israelis were killed this week in two suicide bombings - leaves open several options, including deporting Arafat, capturing him or killing him.
Middle East Wrap - Reactions to Erez meeting, suspect in court
TAPE: EF02/0724 IN_TIME: 23:23:46 DURATION: 3:30 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Ramallah, Jerusalem - 27 August 2002 SHOTLIST: Ramallah, West Bank, August 27, 2002 1. Exterior shot of Yasser Arafat's office 2. Palestinian cabinet ministers entering 3. Wideshot of cabinet meeting 4. Closeup of Arafat sitting 5. Various of meeting 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Saeb Erekat, Palestinian cabinet minister "Concerning the non-implementation of the Gaza Bethlehem (plan), the whole concept was to have the Israeli government withdraw its forces from the occupied Palestinian areas and commiserate with this the Palestinian Authority would resume its responsibilities. Unfortunately, the Israeli government chose the path of more incursions, more occupations, assassinations, demolition of homes, collective punishments. We've seen discussion going on in Israel to deport families, to deport families from the West Bank together, to demolish homes in a collective punishment unprecedented, tightening the closure on the siege, imposing more curfews and I believe all of this is aimed to undermine any efforts that we aim to revive the peace process." Jerusalem, August 27, 2002 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jonathan Peled, Israeli Foreign Ministry "The meeting in Erez and the meetings which will follow are all part and parcel of the ongoing effort to keep talking, to keep the momentum alive, to try to rebuild confidence and mutual trust with the Palestinians with no timetable being set. That means that progress will be made according to results on the ground and as long as we can keep talking and keep a positive atmosphere in the talks, I think that we are making, even if it's a small step, we're still making small steps in the right direction." 8. Wideshot of court house 9. Wael Kassem being escorted by policemen into the court room 10. Judges entering room 11. Various of Wael Kassem sitting in court room STORYLINE: Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat met his cabinet on Tuesday in Ramallah to discuss the outcome of a security meeting between Israelis and Palestinians the previous night at Erez crossing in the Gaza strip. During the evening meeting, Israel stressed its commitment to the "Gaza and Bethlehem first" plan, and promised a further easing of restrictions in Bethlehem and in Gaza. The move would allow Palestinians to go into Israel, ease restrictions on merchandise and allow teachers to move freely to prepare for the new school year. The Palestinian Cabinet was also briefed on new U-S demands for changes in the Palestinian electoral system that are widely seen as a means of sidelining Yasser Arafat. For now, Palestinian parliamentary and presidential elections are tentatively set for January. Despite a dip in Arafat's popularity, his re-election as Palestinian Authority president seems assured, since no serious challenger has emerged. The United States has called for a new Palestinian leadership and wants to move Arafat to a ceremonial post. The United States wants the Palestinians to hold parliamentary elections first, have parliament choose a prime minister and only then prepare for a presidential vote, said a senior Palestinian official who spoke on condition of anonymity. In a separate development, seven Israeli Arabs were arrested Monday as suspected accomplices in a suicide bombing that killed nine people, heightening concern of a growing alliance between Israel's Arabs and Palestinian militants. The man authorities believe to be the head of the East Jerusalem cell, Wael Kassem, was brought in front of a Jerusalem court Tuesday to be remanded in custody. Last week, police arrested four Arab residents of East Jerusalem on suspicion of carrying out several bombings, including a July 31 blast at the Hebrew University cafeteria that killed nine, including five Americans.
Middle East Expulsion - Palestinian expelled to Gaza, Sharon meeting
TAPE: EF03/1005 IN_TIME: 00:57:48 DURATION: 1:38 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: 10 Nov 2003 SHOTLIST: Gaza 1. Kamal Idris walking in to greet Abdel Razek Majaide, head of public security in the Gaza Strip 2. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Abdel Razek Majaide, Head of Public Security in the Gaza Strip: "This procedure carried out by the Israeli army is an additional pressure on the Palestinian Authority, this deportation of people from place to place." 3. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Kamal Idris, Expelled Palestinian: Question: "How do you feel about being deported to Gaza, have they achieved some kind of punishment?" "Yes, it's possible they have achieved that." Q: "What do you think of this move?" "It is an aggression, like the other moves. Just a new step." 4. Idris being escorted away Jerusalem 5. Wide shot of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon walking into room 6. Sharon shaking hands with Italian Parliament speaker Pier Ferdinando Casini. 7. Exterior of Prime Minister's offices as car drives out STORYLINE: The Israeli military on Monday expelled a Palestinian from the West Bank to Gaza, saying he was involved in attacks against Israelis. A military statement said Kamal Idris was a member of a Palestinian cell that carried out attacks in the Hebron area. The military said the expulsion was meant to prevent his involvement in further attacks. Palestinian security officials said Idris was dropped off by soldiers in an isolated area near a main Gaza Strip junction. Last year the Israeli military tried to expel relatives of convicted militants from the West Bank to Gaza as a deterrent measure, but the Israeli Supreme Court rejected that, limiting expulsion only to those involved directly in violence. Up to now, the court has allowed the military to expel only three Palestinians from the West Bank to Gaza. The three were accused of being accomplices to suicide bombings. One of them was said to have sewn belts to be fitted with explosives and strapped to attackers' bodies. The military statement said the court had rejected Idris' appeal against the expulsion order. The Palestinian Centre for Human Rights condemned Idris' expulsion, calling it a violation of international law and a war crime. Human rights lawyers complain that Israel expels suspects without trial or presenting evidence against them. To many Palestinians, expulsion from their land, even to an area under Palestinian control, is a punishment more severe than imprisonment. Idris had been held in an army detention centre, and the army said it was forced to expel him because he could not be tried without revealing intelligence sources. Idris would be forced to remain in Gaza for two years, Palestinian security officials said. Security officers picked him up and took him to a building in Gaza City that has been used in the past to house Palestinians expelled by Israel. On October 14, the Israeli military issued expulsion orders against 15 Palestinians, the largest number yet. The orders are in the appeals process.
Jordan Syria
AP-APTN-1830: Jordan Syria Saturday, 1 September 2012 STORY:Jordan Syria- Jordan, UN appeal for 700 million US dollars to aid Syrian refugees LENGTH: 02:11 FIRST RUN: 1730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Arabic/English/Natsot SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 856980 DATELINE: Amman - 1 Sep 2012 LENGTH: 02:11 SHOTLIST 1. Wide of Jordanian Planning Minister Jafaar Hassan (blue tie) and Information Minister Sameeh Maaytah entering news conference 2. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Jafaar Hassan, Jordanian Planning Minister: "The numbers of Syrian refugees who entered Jordan until today and stay are around 177-thousand Syrian citizens, around 140-thousand living in Jordanian cities and villages." 3. Mid of reporters 4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Jafaar Hassan, Jordanian Planning Minister: "The expected costs of the camp (Zaatari refugee camp) according to this joint appeal, with the capacity of 80-thousand refugees are around 150 million (US) dollars, in addition to that 16 million dollars to run it." 5. Cutaway of media 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees' (UNHCR) representative in Jordan: "I can't speak about what is going inside Syria other than to say I cannot see one positive indicator that would lead me to believe that the numbers are going to be reduced." 7. Wide of news conference 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees' representative in Jordan: "Unfortunately the needs are increasing at a faster rate than the support we're getting, so we are always losing." 9. Cutaway of cameras 10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sameeh Maaytah, Jordanian Information Minister: "We say to the world, we are very clear, they (Syrian refugees) are our brothers, they are our families, they came seeking safety, seeking life demands among crises they suffer, we open our houses, hearts and borders for them, and present everything we can, but the world must stand with them and with us, because Jordan is one of the Syrian crisis' victims, an economic, political, and security victim." 11. Wide of press conference 12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sameeh Maaytah, Jordanian Information Minister: "There were no deportations (of refugees involved in riots at Zaatari camp). As the head of UNHCR mentioned, they've returned to their country. But Jordan is firm, our priority is the safety of Jordanian borders, our priority is the safety of Jordanian people, our priority is the safety of the Jordanian state and its stability. After that, our priority is to give full support to our brothers (referring to Syrian refugees)." 13. Wide of news conference STORYLINE: Jordan and the UN refugee agency issued an urgent call to international donors on Saturday for 700 (m) million (US) dollars to help handle the rapidly rising number of Syrian refugees seeking safe haven in the country. Jordanian Planning Minister Jafaar Hassan said the money would be used to assist 240-thousand refugees and other Syrians in Jordan. He said they were an added drain on the country's already overburdened water and energy resources. Some five thousand Syrians crossed into Jordan in a 24-hour period earlier this week. More than 180-thousand Syrians are now currently sheltering in Jordan. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees' (UNHCR) representative Andrew Harper said "many more Syrians" are expected to follow. "I cannot see one positive indicator that would lead me to believe that the numbers are going to be reduced," he told reporters in Amman. Harper said he and the Jordanian authorities anticipated they would also have to open other tent camps, if the influx continues as they have witnessed of late. Jordan's first Zaatari tent city now hosts 25-thousand refugees. Aid workers at the camp say the rapid influx is making it difficult to fully provide even basic services to new arrivals. Harper said the needs were growing faster than funds were being received. Unrest at the Zaatari camp prompted threats on Tuesday from Prime Minister Fayez Tarawneh to deport some 200 refugees rioting in protest over the camp's poor conditions. Police said 28 officers were wounded in the riot, one of them with a fractured skull. Many of the refugees have said they find the harsh environment in the camp - set on a parched, treeless stretch of land - a struggle, citing the constant dust storms, snakes and scorpions. But Information Minister Sameeh Maaytah told the press conference that "there were no deportations." He added: "Our priority is the safety of the Jordanian state and its stability. After that, our priority is to give full support to our brothers (referring to Syrian refugees)." Harper added that 1,700 Syrian refugees had returned home over the course of the conflict, and that all those who did, went "voluntarily." He said authorities were continuing to improve Zaatari camp, saying: "It's not perfect, but it's all we got." 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Middle East Schalit - Barak, Hamas reax, newspapers, as prisoner swap talks enter critical phase
NAME: MEA SCHALIT 20091222I TAPE: EF09/1194 IN_TIME: 10:21:01:16 DURATION: 00:02:25:09 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION/Ch 2 DATELINE: Various, 22 Dec 2009 RESTRICTIONS: See Shotlist SHOTLIST: CH 2 - NO ACCESS ISRAEL Rishon Letzion, central Israel 1. Mid of Ehud Barak, Israeli Defence Minister, entering school for news conference 2. Mid of students in audience 3. SOUNDBITE: (Hebrew) Ehud Barak, Israeli Defence Minister: "The Israeli government, and certainly we who sent him (captured Israeli soldier, 23-year-old Gilad Schalit), the chief of staff and I, view the utmost ethical and command obligation, to make any reasonable and possible move in order to bring Gilad home, not at any price, but any possible and reasonable move to bring him home." 4. Mid of student audience 5. Wide of news conference AP TELEVISION Gaza City, Gaza Strip 6. Mid of Ahmed Bahar, Hamas member and Deputy Parliament Speaker in Gaza, entering news conference 7. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Ahmed Bahar, Hamas member and Deputy Parliament Speaker in Gaza: "This deal has various aspects, and the resistance is working on them. But I can tell you that the ball is in the Israelis' court because of their stubbornness in not accepting the conditions of our brothers in the resistance." AP TELEVISION Jerusalem 8. Wide exterior of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's office 9. Mid of sign at entrance to premier's office 10. Mid of man reading newspaper in coffee shop 11. Close of newspaper headline reading (Hebrew): "Israel: Yes, with conditions," man flipping through newspaper covering the proposed Israeli prisoner swap deal with Hamas, swapping 1,000 Palestinians for Schalit 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Daniel Marda, Israeli, vox pop: "I would not like to be in the shoes of Netanyahu making this decision. The fact is that he (Schalit) was a soldier in the IDF (Israel Defence Force). He was sent by the country and the country should bring him back. If there are other options I would hope someone is thinking of them, but if in the end the only solution is releasing murderers with blood on their hands then I guess that that's the price we have to pay." 13. Wide of Jerusalem Post headline reading (English): "Schalit deal likely to be approved, 'Post' told" 14. Close of headline reading (English): "Defence officials warn against releasing terrorists to West Bank" 15. Close pan of newspaper with photograph showing Noam Schalit, Gilad's father, standing next to repeated images of his son STORYLINE: Israeli Defence Minister Ehud Barak told a group of Israeli students on Tuesday that securing the release of captured Israeli soldier Gilad Schalit was of the utmost priority but could not come "at any price." Barak, speaking to students in Rishon Letzion, said he felt a personal responsibility towards bringing home the 23-year-old held by Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip, but said that Israeli demands, including a number of Palestinian prisoners that Israel wants deported as part of a proposed swap, would have to be met. Israeli leaders are under immense domestic pressure to resolve the case of 23-year-old Sergeant Gilad Schalit, who was captured in a 2006 cross-border raid. Hamas views Schalit as an vital bargaining chip for political and possibly economic gain. Speaking in Gaza, Hamas' Deputy Parliament Speaker Ahmed Bahar said that "the ball was in the Israelis' court." Intense talks among Israel's top Cabinet ministers and security chiefs had raised hopes that a deal was close, but there were signs that differences remained. On Tuesday, Israeli media reported that Israel had delivered a response to Hamas demands for the release of one-thousand Palestinians, a number of whom were involved in attacks, many others who are held without formal charges. Without identifying sources, the reports said Israel would approve a swap if Hamas agreed to the deportation of some prisoners. An Israeli government official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorised to release details of the talks, said the question of whether certain prisoners would return to the West Bank or be deported was "clearly" an issue. A Palestinian official said that in addition to seeking to deport about 100 prisoners, Israel was refusing to free seven of those who it said were involved in violent attacks on Israelis, including those who planned bombings. The Hamas government was holding its weekly meeting later on Tuesday, and the deal was expected to be on the agenda. Prisoner exchanges are controversial in Israel because some officials say they might encourage more hostage taking, while others in Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Cabinet do not want any deal to appear to give in to Hamas. But many Israelis have taken the plight of Schalit to heart and fervently want him freed, criticising the government for failing to bring the 23-year-old home. Hamas hopes a prisoner exchange would ease the crippling Israeli and Egyptian blockade, on one border, of impoverished Gaza, which has prevented the coastal territory from rebuilding after Israel's punishing offensive there a year ago. Israel severely tightened access to Gaza after Schalit's capture. It then sealed off the territory, home to 1.5 (m) million Palestinians, to all but humanitarian aid after Hamas seized power the following year. Hamas has tried to lower the number of prisoners who could be exiled, but has said it was up to individual prisoners whether they would accept deportation. Prisoners have near-iconic status in Palestinian society because nearly every family has had relatives in Israeli jails, so Hamas' stock could soar if it can claim credit for the largest prisoner release in years.