Live from the municipal market - "market confidences"
RFO
SOCIAL ISSUES
ACTIVE SENIORS AND MORE ACTIVE SENIORS, ALSO ACTIVE MIDDLE-AGED PEOPLE, AND SOME FAMILY SCENES Very 1980s animated joggers, old people in white lawn bowling, playing chess in the park, playing billiards, faces Seniors boarding bus, seniors on bus, woman singing, THE AGING OF NORTH AMERICA Egyptian hieroglyphics, statue with eerie eyes ;B/W bearded mystic praying on mtn top, B/W mustachioed man twiddling prayer beads, Indian potter making bowl, street scene ;Roman statue, illumination, royal sarcophagus, 1890s ground-breaking ceremony, B/W man sawing log, Mennonite woman spinning ;Auto traffic, nurse helping old man walk, crowded sidewalk, Aerial tidy suburb, B/W table full of newborn babies baby boom ;B/W little league baseball game, kid tumbles, color 1950s home movies woman carrying little girl, kids fishing on dock ;Home movie little girl with baby doll, kids sitting in tree, 1950s crowded sidewalk, dancing, beauty pageant, peds & traffic Ken Dyckwald on 'Good Morning America' & 'Merv Griffin Show', couple walking in park with dog, Dyckwalk t/h ;Small informal business meeting, slide projector, aerobics class, endurance test, old man riding bicycle, seniors square dancing DJs phonograph, man calls square dance, old faces in audience, Dyckwald on how low average lifespans used to be... Three people dying at the ages 100, 45 and 2 would be an average lifespan of 49. Low average lifespans reflect infant mortality. People in medical research laboratory- some wearing space suits, man having endurance test on t treadmill, having chest x-ray EKG monitor, couple raising sail, sailing, woman pushing child on swing, woman looking at beach while kid plays in sand ;Three generations walking in park, mother & baby sitting on blanket, nuclear family walking in city, advertisements ;TV commercials, Linda Evans at award ceremony, Ronald & Nancy Reagan in audience, magazine article on the artificial heart; Woman conducting adult choir, seniors in audience, senior couple ice skating, senior woman learning to ice skate More clips from tv commercials & shows, people playing tennis in gym, Dyckwald on 'AM' talk show ;Kids on playground, golfers, playing tennis, aqua-aerobics class, old man on treadmill, having physical exam, doing sit-ups People warming up for marathon, running marathon, group doing tai chi, Dyckwald typing on P.C., families at park ;Woman putting on glove, THE GOLD MEDAL YEARS, Asian woman fencing, white kitty cat peeking thru fence ;Middle-aged woman using exercise bike in garden, old man windsurfing, black man bowling, woman sculling ;Woman sketching in park, shirtless man reading on park bench, clock tower, quiet street scenes, man reading in barbershop Old radio next to hair tonics, old client comes in to see old barber, Japanese doll in case Woman sewing, boxer warming up, man boxing at camera, bearded windsurfer he's fun to listen to... Inspecting sail, man sounds air horn, windsurfing competition, fencing competition, sculling competition, bowling competition; Sketching competition...art class, woman teaching fencing class, boxer jumping rope, junk in backyard, old man cleaning up, ends with him trying to explain some gizmo he uses for a table saw
ITN FEED
NDS. CR:68. VS OF A CLEAN UP OPERATION UNDERWAY IN PAKISTAN, FOLLOWING A DISASTER. VS OF DESTROYED HOMES AND DEAD LIVESTOCK. CR:92. JAPANESE VO. VS JAPANESE SOLDIERS CONDUCT MILITARY EXERCISES. CR:117. VS OF CHINESE OFFICIALS. A WOMAN ADDRESSES A BANQUET. PRIME MINISTER ZHAO ZIYANG GREETS DIGNITARIES. CHAIRMAN OF THE CENTRAL MILITARY COMMISSION, DENG XIAOPING, ATTENDS THE THEATRE. CR:150. HIGHLIGHTS FROM A FROG RACE IN SOUTH AFRICA. CR:176. VS OF A MEETING BETWEEN FOREIGN MINISTERS FROM 12 WESTERN EUROPEAN AND 9 LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES IN COSTA RICA. CR:200. VS LEBANESE CIVILIANS RUN FOR COVER AT THE SOUND OF GUNFIRE. CR:215. RUSSIAN CS ON THE COMPLETION OF A RAILWAY IN THE SOVIET UNION. CR:233. VS OF MOSLEMS IN PRISON CELLS (STANDING ROOM ONLY) IN EGYPT. CR:258. CS VO VS POLICE CONFISCATE A CACHE OF WEAPONS ABOARD A VESSEL, DESTINED FOR THE IRA (IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY) IN IRELAND. CUTS OF THE ARMS SMUGGLERS IN POLICE CUSTODY. CR:282. CS VO MONTAGE OF SHOTS AS QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND PRINCE PHILIP ARRIVE AT AND VISIT TORONTO, CANADA. CR:310. VS OF A PILOT READYING HIS NEWFANGLED, ONE MAN PROPELLER AIRCRAFT. VS OF HIS FLIGHT. BARS. SLATE. CI: PERSONALITIES: ZHAO ZIYANG. PERSONALITIES: DENG XIAOPING. PERSONALITIES: ELIZABETH, QUEEN. PERSONALITIES: PHILIP, PRINCE. ODDITIES: FROG RACE. WAR: LEBANON. JUSTICE: ARRESTS. AVIATION: PLANES, COMMERCIAL.
DN-ZLB-023 Beta SP
UNIVERSAL NEWSREELS
CONTEMPORARY STOCK FOOTAGE
CLOUDS, SKIES, BUSINESS SHOTS, VACATION LOCALES, AMERICAN TOWNS, THE GREAT OUTDOORS, FAMOUS PEOPLE OF 1900'S, CITY LIFE; DX EXT CU lamppost w/clouds, sun shining through dark cumulus stratus clouds (great shot), full moon in the daytime; DX EXT FS fair weather cumulus clouds, TL cumulus nimbus clouds, MS BLDG w/cirrus clouds in BG, TL day moon in clouds; DX EXT FS TL storm clouds gathering, cirrus / cumulus mix, WS cumulo nimbus clouds w/palm trees, cumulo nimbus stormy clouds; DX EXT WS TL mountain & clouds, altocumuls sunset, distant clouds, sunset - altostratus, dusk - dark stratocumulus, nimbus; DX EXTFS windy cirrus clouds, yellow clouds, business suits walking in L.A., WS commercial jet take off; DX EXT MS man on cell phone, FS man in suit walking out of building, Sacramento State Capitol BLDG ; DX EXT CU red light Z-OUT to PEDS crossing street downtown L.A., metro subway takes off, Z-IN transmission tower; DX EXT WS power plant, FS traffic jam, lear jet landing, molten metal, EST DX New York NYC SKYLINE, WS train station, AERIAL LA DOWNTOWN; DX EXT LSHOT top of high rise, MS business people crossing street, CU women handshake, INT FS business women at desk; DX EXT LSHOT construction foreman, woman walking in ocean-Tahiti, snorkel man, outrigger-Hawaii, tropical poolside; DX EXT dad & son on surfboard, fisherman, scuba divers, couple hugging in ocean Tahiti, Hawaiian tidal pool, sailboat; DX EST WS tropical huts elevated, diver w/fish & camera,sunset in paradise, couple riding horseback on beach, boat on lake; DX EXT recreational vehicle, RV goes over bridge, raft in river, rowboat in rapids, sailboat on lake, children on swing set, Middle East City tower; DX EXT FS PEDS on China street, church in Tahiti, AERIAL tropical beach & huts, INT FS European church, log cabin, cathedral; DX EXT WS Alaskan dock & sky, European city dusk, Spanish clock tower, China dancers, India sunset, tour boat, Netherlands bridge; DX EXT Z-OUT EST Vietnam city, double decker bus, EST Cairo river, Jerusalem street, FS tropical island, China sword woman; DX EXT FS white farm house, gothic high school, PEDS sidewalk, parade, flags on street, hamburger stand, museum, covered bridge; DX EXT FS horse & carriage, Main street, quiet sidewalk, corner store, girl in window, train depot, city hall, EXT bowling alley; DX EXT FS store window, WS windmill, old house, bridge, Amish buggy, town hall, park, PED crossing, store front, abandoned house; DX EXT FS bailing hay, houses, fishing, old BLDGS, diner, church, fast food place, lake w/trees, outdoor symphony, fireworks; DX EXT WS country highway, ferryboat, red church, horse country, tractor, shed & windmill, abandoned shed, rock wall; DX EXT brick ruins, Joshua Tree sunset, crow on rock, waving wheat, snow patch, fast stream, tall pines along river; valley stream, colored desert sky, Z-OUT to EST desert, caribou w/sprinklers in BG, water trestle bridge, country church, CU horse in stall looking at camera; cactus canyon angle, tree on hilltop, Joseph Stalin, Eisenhower, McCarthy, American flag, Rosenberg, Olympics - Jesse Owens; Edison, Albert Einstein, Wright Bros, Nazi march, Hitler, JFK, Coolidge, Clarence Darrow, Charles Lindbergh, Hoover, Teddy Roosevelt; DX EXT Japanese Summit, Churchill, Fidel Castro, JFK & Cuban missile crises, Woodrow Wilson, planter in window, clean street, roller blader; NX WS gas station, theater entrance, diner front, CU nx night street/L.A., restaurant, NX 1950's style drive-in diner, Mel's Drive In! sidewalk cafe; NX police car - action, night aerobics, BLDG lobby, yellow room, front step X walk, fountains, NX BLDGs, taxi, bus passing by; NX WS city bus passes by, NX LA SKYLINE, pigeons, city street (casual), urban river, NYC SKYLINE, federal BLDG; DX Capitol w/flowers, cityscape w/NYC APTS, World Trade Center, NJ turnpike, NYC SKYLINE, LA laundromat, street X-ing (casual LA); DX jet (not moving), CA beach, AERIAL Dodger Stadium, breakwall fisherman catching a fish (San Diego); NX POV FS Hollywood Blvd, LS crowd, EST roller coaster, AERIAL track homes tract houses (subdivison) Aerial horrible new cookie cutter houses in the middle of the desert, disgusting, sharp contrast between lush green lawns & surrounding desert, humans meddling with nature ;
ALASKA JAPAN ECONOMY
ORIG. COLOR SOF / MAG. A ROLL:(1050') CUT STORY: VO WORDHAM. SU WORDHAM. LA MITSUBISHI CORP. BUILDING (MODERN, GLASS OFFICE BUILDING). SHOT OF JAP. GIRL IN OFFICE BEHIND DESK. PEOPLE GETTING OFF JAPAN AIRLINE. EXCELLENT SHOT OF MOON LIGHT ON BODY OF WATER IN B.G. TREES & HOMES IN DARKNESS IN F.G. SKY & WATER BEAUTIFULLY LIT. H.A. PAN OF ANCHORAGE IN DAY LIGHT. MS FISHING BOATS IN DOCK. SU MAN CLEANING FISH. TRAVELING SHOT (SHORT) OF PINES. BEAUTIFUL DUSK SHOT, SKY RED, OF SUN SETTING (WATER IN F.G.). H.A. OF HARBOR ACTIVITY, (GOOD) WOMAN PACKING CLEANED FISH (FILLETS) INTO SMALL BOXES W / JAPANESE WRITING ON THEM. SHOTS OF BOXES STACKED. MEN THROWING FISH FROM BIN INTO LARGE BOX. SIDE OF BUILDING B & B FISHERIES, INC. NICE SHOT ACROSS WATER OF HARBOR PARTIALLY ENVELOPED IN FOG. MAGNIFICIENT SEQUENCE, APPREX 300 FT. OF SUNSETS. SHOT OF SUN YELLOW AGAINST ORANGE FILLING ALMOST ENTIRE SCREEN. YELLOW-RED SUN IN RED H.G., MOON LIGHT & SUN LIGHT OVER WATER AT NIGHT. CU'S OF SKY'S & SKY & WATER. VERY FINE. SHOT OF FISHING BOAT ON WATER AT NIGHT. CU JAPAN AIRLINE INSIGNIA. CU JAPAN A.L. INFO BOARD. JAPAN PLANES ON RUNWAY. EST. MITSUBISHI BUILDING. STREET SCENES ANCHORAGE. J.A.L. BEING LOADED, LANDING, TAXIING, DEPLAN- ING. H.A.'S ANCHORAGE. CI: TRANSP: WATER: FISHING. INDUSTRIES: FISHING. GEOLOGY: TREES. GEOLOGY: SUNSET. BLDGS: DOCKS & PIERS ANCHORAGE, ALASKA. AVIATION: PLANES DISEMBARKING. GEOLOGY: HARBOR. GEOLOGY: FOG. GEOLOGY: SKY. AVIATION: PLANES: COMMERCIAL: AIRLINES. STREETS: CITIES: U. S. ANCHORAGE. GEOLOGY: NIGHT. U. S. RELATIONS: JAPAN.
Japan: Bank: Central bank decides to guide down interest rates
TAPE_NUMBER: EF01/0287 IN_TIME: 23:50:23 LENGTH: 02:49 SOURCES: All APTN except shots 7 = TV TOKYO RESTRICTIONS: FEED: SCRIPT: Eng/Jap/Nat XFA Amid growing cries of alarm about Japan's economic woes from both at home and abroad, the central bank decided on Monday to guide down interest rates to near zero and nip the dangers of deflation. While it stopped short of directly cutting interest rates, the Bank of Japan decided at a policy board meeting to take other measures called "quantitative easing", such as increasing the money supply and buying up government bonds, that will end up having the same effect. The Bank of Japan said that it will no longer target a specific level of interest rates but also said that the latest policy decision would have the effect of pushing interest rates back to zero - a policy it had abandoned last August. Hopes for an easier monetary policy had been growing in political and business circles, as worries about the future of the Japanese economy have sent stock markets in Tokyo and New York plunging. B-O-J Governor Masaru Hayami has long tried to resist such pressure, saying that counting on monetary policy to achieve economic growth would not work without taking care of the massive bad-debt problem weighing on the nation's banks. Hayami has also pushed for wider reforms - such as helping to ease government regulations and encouraging new types of businesses - as a better way to resolve Japan's problems. But the recent spate of bad news about Japan's economy and the damaging effects they have had on Wall Street last week have prodded the central bank to reverse course. Over the past week, political leaders and some banks have shown more resolve to deal with the bad-debt problem, which many view as being at the crux of Japan's decade-long economic slowdown. Another danger facing Japan is deflation, a situation in which prices continue to fall, threatening to start a downward spiral that pulls down income and profits. When the Bank of Japan decided last summer to end the near-zero interest rate policy that it began in 1999, it had said there were no dangers of deflation. But last Friday, the government announced the Japanese economy had entered a state of deflation for the first time since the end of World War II. The decision from the Bank of Japan comes at a time when Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori is in Washington to meet with U-S President George Bush. What would come of those talks is questionable, given that Mori is expected to step down as early as next month. Mori, one of Japan's least popular prime ministers, has been plagued by gaffes and scandals, and public dissatisfaction has been growing over his apparent inability to boost the economy. Some analysts remained skeptical whether anything the Bank of Japan could do would bring about quick recovery unless commercial banks start Japan on a clean slate by wiping out their bad loans. On the Tokyo Stock Exchange, the benchmark 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average, which had surged earlier in the day on hopes for lower interest rates, closed down 0.34 percent. SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) "Once the interest rate is zero, we cannot cut the rate any further. Whereas with this measurement, we can increase money supply when it is needed and we leave the adjustment of the interest rate to the market. We adjust the money supply while monitoring the amount of reserve. Now, we are moving from a qualitative to quantitative measurement. One could call it a sort of quantitative easing measurement." SUPER CAPTION: Masaru Hayami, Governor of the Bank of Japan SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) "It is necessary to dissolve bad debts issue and to conduct a reform of the financial system and the manufacturing industry so as to make this financial easing policy activate at its utmost and to return to the sustainable economic recovery track." SUPER CAPTION: Masaru Hayami, Governor of the Bank of Japan SOUNDBITE: (English) "It's very important that the bank appears now to operate zero interest rates in a manner different to what it did last time. If it simply went back to the zero policy it probably would have been looked upon very poorly by the markets. But the fact that it does intend to increase liquidity through a quantitative easing and that it does have a qualitative inflation target, that is to say it intends to hold its zero policy until it can turn the deflationary trend around, that is quite important." SUPER CAPTION: Matthew Poggi, Economist, Lehman Brothers Japan SHOTLIST: Tokyo, Japan - 19 March 2001 and File APTN - 19 March 1. Wide shot of Masaru Hayami, Governor, Bank of Japan, walking in 2. Cutaway of reporters 3. Mid shot of Hayami at press conference 4. SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) Masaru Hayami, Governor of the Bank of Japan APTN - File 5. Various shots of Yen printing APTN - 19 March 6. SOUNDBITE: (Japanese) Masaru Hayami, Governor of the Bank of Japan TV Tokyo - File 7. Aerial shot of Bank of Japan APTN - 19 March 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Matthew Poggi, Economist, Lehman Brothers Japan 9. Various shots of Tokyo Stock Exchange?
Myanmar Ford
AP-APTN-0930: Myanmar Ford Tuesday, 30 April 2013 STORY:Myanmar Ford- Car maker Ford announces entry into Myanmar market LENGTH: 02:32 FIRST RUN: 0730 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Eng/Burmese/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 889555 DATELINE: Yangon - 30 April 2013 LENGTH: 02:32 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ++CORRECTION PLEASE NOTE THE US AMBASSADOR'S NAME IS JOSEPH MITCHELL++ SHOTLIST 1. Various of Yangon streets during rush hour 2. Various of news conference with Ford Motor Company representatives and local partners 3. Mid of cameraman, with Ford logo in background 4. Mid of US Ambassador to Myanmar Joseph Mitchell 5. Wide of news conference 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dave Westerman, Regional manager for Ford Asia Pacific: "I guess we took a lead in a bid off of the US government and their call for American businesses to invest here in Myanmar. We've had great support from the US embassy and we felt it was a leading American, US business, it was important for us to kind of lead that call for investment in the country." 7. Cutaway of hands 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dave Westerman, Regional manager for Ford Asia Pacific: "I look after the emerging markets in Asia Pacific for Ford Motor Company. There is 21 of them and they all have their different challenges and situations to deal with. And some that are here in Myanmar or what we face in the Cambodia or in the Laos, in the East Timor and all the emerging markets where we do business. So there is a lot of those." 9. Pan from sign at a local second hand car dealer to cars 10. Close of second hand cars 11. SOUNDBITE (Burmese) Zaw Zaw, Second hand car dealer: "Most of the people in Myanmar prefer Japanese and European cars because they are cheaper and they need less fuel. American cars will be more expensive and will use more fuel. I think customers will like Japanese cars more." 12. Various of workers repairing and cleaning second hand cars STORYLINE Ford Motor Company announced its entry into Myanmar on Tuesday, saying it plans to open the nation's first sales and service showroom for new vehicles by August. Myanmar's vehicle market has been stunted by decades of international sanctions and strict import controls put in place by the military junta that ruled for nearly 50 years, handing out import licenses to a few favoured tycoons. Unlike companies in Europe and Australia, Ford must negotiate a lingering web of US sanctions against Myanmar. The European Union this month joined Australia in eliminating its financial sanctions, leaving the US as the only country with restrictions on conducting business in Myanmar. The United States has suspended, but not rescinded, most sanctions, and maintains a targeted list of blacklisted companies and individuals. Some US businesses say the ambiguity about sanctions and onerous reporting requirements puts them at a competitive disadvantage. David Westerman, a regional manager for Ford Asia Pacific, said the current sanctions don't present too much of a hurdle for Ford. "We took a lead ... off the US government and their call for American businesses to invest here in Myanmar," he said. "It was important for us to kind of lead that call for investment in the country," Westerman added. Today most vehicles on the road are used Japanese cars. Ford's new cars are premium vehicles in a place where most people buy used cars. Westerman said initial demand will likely be mainly for commercial vehicles, but the company plans to introduce a full range of cars, trucks and SUVs by year's end. Its starting line-up includes the Ford Ranger truck and Taurus sedan. Zaw Zaw, a 44-year-old used car dealer in Yangon, said Ford will have a hard time overcoming consumer preference for affordable, fuel-efficient Japanese cars. "American cars will be more expensive and will use more fuel," he said. "I think customers will like Japanese cars more." Ford must not only figure out what customers want, but also train people to service their vehicles and work with the government as it establishes regulations for new cars. Ford has hired around 50 people for its Yangon operations and plans to expand across the country. Ford has no immediate plans to open assembly or manufacturing plants. Myanmar is the poorest country in Southeast Asia. Ford joins PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, GE, Caterpillar and Danish brewer Carlsberg, which have all signed distribution deals in Myanmar as rapid political and economic reforms transform the country from pariah state to investor darling. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-04-30-13 1037GMT
US Hybrid Cars - Scientists urge push for less polluting hybrid car technology
TAPE: EF03/0010 IN_TIME: 04:25:50 / 07:38:03 DURATION: 2:37 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Los Angeles, California, USA, January 3, 2003 SHOTLIST: 1. Wide shot of hybrid car rally outside the Los Angeles Convention Centre 2. Mid shot of hybrid cars lined up outside convention centre 3. Close shot of hybrid car logo 4. Close shot of woman putting sign on hybrid car 5. Close shot of woman in hybrid car, tilt down to close shot of sign 6. Close shot of another sign on hybrid car 7. Tilt down from convention centre to hybrid car. 8. Mid shot of hybrid cars 9. Close shot of sign on windshield. 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Wegner, hybrid car owner: "Well....economy. I mean absolutely, I mean if you need an incentive that's the best incentive. I mean, the amount that I'm saving in gas on this car, compared to like an SUV (sport utility vehicle), is making the payments. So it's like a car for free." 11. Tilt down from convention centre to Union of Concerned Scientists banner. 12. Close shot of license plate. 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jason Mark, Clean Vehicles Programme director, Union of Concerned Scientists: "The hybrids are without a doubt here and now and ready to go. Folks are spending a lot of money investing in fuel-cell vehicles, which are sort of what most people agree are the technology to replace the internal combustion engine of today. But the hybrid vehicles are an excellent bridge. They're the technology that for the next couple of decades is really going to get us to that big scale fuel cell future." 14. Wide shot of Honda hybrid car display at the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show. 15. Close shot of Honda hybrid car display sign. 16. Wide shot of Honda fuel cell vehicle. 17. Close shot of Honda fuel cell vehicle. 18. Close shot of Honda fuel cell car display. 19. Mid shot of Toyota Prius hybrid car. 20. Close shot of Toyota Prius engine. 21. Wide shot of Ford display showing PZEV low-emissions vehicle. 22. Close shot of PZEV exhaust pipe. 23. Close shot of PZEV. 24. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jason Mark, Clean Vehicles Programme director, Union of Concerned Scientists: "The bottom line is that foreign automakers are making the case that not only can you capture market share and be very profitable, you can also bring green technologies to market. Detroit has got to get on board if they're going to be selling cars in this century, later in this century." 25. Mid shot of hybrid car rally. STORYLINE: The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) says its time for major car makers to build more cars that pollute less and use less fuel. A new study by the environmental group says US automakers could boost fuel efficiency and cut pollution by using hybrid technologies. Members of the Union were in Los Angeles Friday, joined by local owners of hybrid cars urging automakers to offer more hybrid models. They met outside the city's convention center where major auto makers are gathering for the annual Greater Los Angeles Auto Show. Hybrid cars combine a fuel-efficient gas burning engine and an electric motor to power vehicles. The UCS study says cars and trucks could reach an average fuel efficiency of 60 miles per gallon by the end of the next decade if automakers use the best available hybrid technologies. Many of the local hybrid car owners on hand for the rally drive some of the first available models of their kind, from Toyota and Honda. The Toyota Prius, Honda Insight and Honda Civic models at the rally use versions of hybrid engine technology. The Prius, for example, has an electric motor that takes over for the gas-powered engine at lower speeds. The battery for the electric motor is recharged by the the gas engine. The cars produce fewer polluting gases and also average between 40 and 50 miles per gallon of gas. Both Toyota and Honda have been the only car companies selling hybrid cars for several years. Toyota alone has sold more than 120,000 since it introduced the Prius in 2000. Honda sells its two-seat Insight and a hybrid version of its four-door Civic, with plans to roll out other hybrid models over the next few years. Beyond the hybrid concept, Honda is developing a fuel cell car powered by hydrogen. The Japanese automaker says their FCX model is the first fuel cell car to receive a government certification for commercial use. And US automakers are starting to pay attention to this small but growing segment of the auto market. Ford Motor Company has announced plans to launch a hybrid version of its Escape sport utility vehicle next year. At the LA auto show, Ford also introduced the PZEV concept: a car designed to produce extremely low emissions. General Motors is also gearing up to produce hybrid powered versions of its sport utility vehicles and pick-up trucks. Chrysler also plans to produce its first hybrid pick-up truck later this year. But company officials are down playing hybrids, saying they're not a viable long-term commercial alternative. Jason Mark at the Union of Concerned Scientists says hybrid technology is a viable bridge to fuel-cell powered cars that could some day replace the gas-burning engine.
OBAMA SPEECH ON ENERGY P1
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA DELIVERS REMARKS ON ENERGY AT GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY - STIX 11:35:53 Obama enters 11:36:09 thank you so much. Thank you everybody. 11:36:29 it is wonderful to be back at Georgetown. We've got a number of acknowledgements. 11:38:21 I want to start with a difficult subject.I love coach Thompson. I love his dad and the great tradition that they had. And it turned out VCU was pretty good 11:38:57 We meet here at a tumultuous time for the world. In a matter of months, we've seen regimes toppled and democracy take root across North Africa and the Middle East. We've witnessed a terrible earthquake, catastrophic tsunami and nuclear emergency batter a strong ally and the world's third largest economy. And we've led an international effort in Libya to prevent a massacre and maintain stability throughout the broader region. 11:39:48 As Americans, we are heartbroken by the lives that have been lost as a result of these events. We are moved by the thirst for freedom in many nations, as well as the strength and perseverance of the Japanese people. And of course, it's natural to feel anxious about what all this means for us. 11:40:50 One area of particular concern has been the cost and security of our energy..middle east, japan. In an economy that relies on oil, rising prices at the pump affect everybody - workers and farmers; truck drivers and restaurant owners. Businesses see it hurt their bottom line. Families feel the pinch when they fill up their tank. For Americans already struggling to get by, it makes life that much harder. It hurts. I fyou're somebody who works in a relatively hard. But here's the thing - we've been down this road before. Remember, it was just three years ago that gas prices topped $4 a gallon. Working folks haven't forgotten that. It hit a lot of people pretty hard. But it was also the height of political season, so you had a lot of slogans and gimmicks and outraged politicians waving three-point-plans for two-dollar gas - when none of it would really do anything to solve the problem. Imagine that in Washington. 11:43:21 The truth is, of course, was that all these gimmicks didn't make a bit of difference. When gas prices finally fell, it was mostly because the global recession led to less demand for oil. Now that the economy is recovering, demand is back up. Add the turmoil in the Middle East, and it's not surprising oil prices are higher. And every time the price of a barrel of oil on the world market rises by $10, a gallon of gas goes up by about 25 cents. 11:44:16 The point is, the ups and downs in gas prices historically are temporary. When you look at the long-term trends, though, there will be more ups than downs. That's because countries like India and China are growing at a rapid clip. And as two billion more people start consuming more goods, and driving more cars, and using more energy, it's certain that demand will go up a lot faster than supply. 11:45:14 So here's the bottom line - there are no quick fixes. Anyone telling you differently isn't telling you the truth. And we will keep on being a victim to shifts in the oil market until we get serious about a long-term policy for secure, affordable energy. We're going to have to think long term, which is why I came here to talk to young people here at Georgetown. Because you have more of a stake in getting our energy policy right than anyone. 11:46:05 We've known about the dangers of our oil dependence for decades. Nixon knew. Presidents and politicians of every stripe have promised energy independence, but that promise has so far gone unmet. I've talked about reducing America's dependence on oil when I was running for president, and I'm proud of the historic progress we've made over the last two years towards that goal. But we've also run into the same political gridlock and inertia that's held us back for decades. 11:46:57 That has to change. 11:47:03 We cannot keep going from shock to trance on the issue of energy security, we can't rush to propose action when gas prices rise, then hit the snooze button when they fall again. The United States of America cannot afford to bet our long-term prosperity and security on a resource that will eventually run out. Not anymore. We can't afford the cost to our economy, our country, and our planet is so high. Not when your generation needs us to get this right. It is time to do what we can to secure our energy future. 11:48:10 and today, I'm setting a new goal: one that is reasonable, achievable, and necessary. When I was elected to this office, America imported 11 million barrels of oil a day. By a little more than a decade from now, we will have cut that by one-third. That is something that we can achieve. We can cut our oil dependence by a third. 11:48:47 I set this goal knowing that imported oil will remain an important part of our energy portfolio for quite some time. And when it comes to the oil we import from other nations, obviously we have to look at neighbors like Canada, Mexico, and Brazil, which recently discovered significant new oil reserves, and with whom we can share American technology and know-how as they develop those resources 11:49:41 But our best opportunities to enhance our energy security can be found in our own backyard. And we boast one critical, renewable resource the rest of the world cannot match: American ingenuity. American ingenuity. American know how. 11:50:05 To make ourselves more secure - to control our energy future - we will need to harness that ingenuity. It is a task that won't be finished by the end of my presidency, or even the next. But if we continue the work that we have already begun over the last two years, we won't just spark new jobs, industries and innovations; we will leave your generation and future generations a country that is safer, healthier, and more prosperous. 11:50:45 Today, my Administration is releasing a Blueprint for A Secure Energy Future that outlines the comprehensive national energy policy we've pursued since the day I took office. And here at Georgetown, I'd like to talk in broad strokes about how we will secure that future. Meeting this new goal of cutting our oil dependence depends largely on two things: finding and producing more oil at home, and reducing our dependence on oil with cleaner alternative fuels and greater efficiency. 11:51:28 This begins by continuing to increase America's oil supply.. Last year, American oil production reached its highest level since 2003. And for the first time in more than a decade, oil we imported accounted for less than half the liquid fuel we consumed. So that was a good trend 11:52:22 To keep reducing that reliance on imports, my Administration is encouraging offshore oil exploration and production - as long as it's safe and responsible. I don't think anyone's forgotten what happened year when we had to deal with the largest oil spill in our history. I know the people of the Gulf Coast haven't. What we learned from that disaster helped us put in place smarter standards of safety and responsibility - for example, if you're going to drill in deepwater, you've got to prove that you can actually contain an underwater spill. That's just common sense. And lately we've been hearing people saying that the obama admin has been putting restrictions on offshore drilling.I don't know about you, I don't have amnesia. I remember those things. And I think it's important to prevent something like that to happen again 11:53:55 Today, we're working to expedite new drilling permits for companies that meet these standards. Since they were put in, we've approved 39 new shallow water permits; and we've approved an additional 7 deepwater permits in recent weeks. When it comes to drilling onshore, my Administration approved more than two permits last year for every new well that the industry started to drill. So any claim that my Administration is responsible for gas prices because we've "shut down" oil production might make for a useful political sound bite - but it doesn't track with reality. If you're going to dill offshore, you've got to have a plan.and I don't think there is anybody that disputing that's the right thing to do 11:54:56 moreover, we are pushing the oil industry to take advantage of the opportunities they already have. Right now, the industry holds tens of millions of acres of leases where it's not producing a drop - sitting on supplies of American energy just waiting to be tapped. That's why part of our plan is to provide new and better incentives that promote rapid, responsible development of these resources. We're also exploring and assessing new frontiers for oil and gas development from Alaska to the Mid- and South Atlantic states. Because producing more oil in America can help lower oil prices, create jobs, and enhance our energy security. But we've got to do it in the right way 11:55:55 even if we decrease our oil consumption - it's not the long-term solution to our energy challenge. America holds only about two percent of the world's proven oil reserves. And even if we drilled every drop of oil out of every one of those reserves, it still wouldn't be enough to meet our long-term needs. All of this means one thing: the only way for America's energy supply to be truly secure is by permanently reducing our dependence on oil. We have to find ways to boost our efficiency so that we use less oil. We have to discover and produce cleaner, renewable sources of energy with less of the carbon pollution that threatens our climate. And we have to do it quickly. 11:57:20 In terms of new sources of energy, we have a few different options. The first is natural gas. As I mentioned earlier, recent innovations have given us the opportunity to tap large reserves - perhaps a century's worth - in the shale under our feet. Now, we have to make sure we're doing it safely, without polluting our water supply. And that's why I'm asking my Energy Secretary, Steven Chu, to work with other agencies, the natural gas industry, states, and environmental experts to improve the safety of this process. I don't know if you've heard, but he's got a Nobel Prize for physics, after all. He actually deserved his nobel prize. And this is the kind of thing he likes to do for fun on the weekend.I'm going to embarrass him further, you know last year when we were trying to figure out how to close th gap.essentially designed the cap that ultimately worked 11:59:34 But the potential for natural gas is enormous. It's actually an area of broad bipartisan agreement. Last year, more than 150 Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle proposed legislation providing incentives to use clean-burning natural gas in our vehicles instead of oil. They were even joined by T. Boone Pickens, a businessman who made his fortune on oil. So I ask them to keep at it and pass a bill that helps us achieve this goal. 12:00:34 Another substitute for oil that holds tremendous promise is renewable biofuels - not just ethanol, but biofuels made from things like switchgrass, wood chips, and biomass. If anyone doubts the potential of these fuels, consider Brazil. Already, more than half - half - of Brazil's vehicles can run on biofuels. And just last week, our Air Force used an advanced biofuel blend to fly an F-22 Raptor faster than the speed of sound. In fact, the Air Force is aiming to get half of its domestic jet fuel from alternative sources by 2016. And I'm directing the Navy and the Departments of Energy and Agriculture to work with the private sector to create advanced biofuels that can power not just fighter jets, but trucks and commercial airliners. 12:02:06 So there's no reason we shouldn't be using these renewable fuels throughout America. That's why we're investing in things like fueling stations and research into the next generation of biofuels. Over the next two years, we'll help entrepreneurs break ground on four next-generation biorefineries - each with a capacity of more than 20 million gallons per year. And going forward, we should look for ways to reform biofuels incentives to make sure they meet today's challenges and save taxpayers money. As we replace oil with fuels like natural gas and biofuels, we can also reduce our dependence by making cars and trucks that use less oil in the first place. After all, 70 percent of our petroleum consumption goes to transportation. And so does the second biggest chunk of most families' budgets. That's why one of the best ways to make our economy less dependent on oil and save folks more money is simply to make our transportation more efficient. 12:03:58 we went through 30 years when we didn't raise fuel efficiency standards on cars.30 years of lost time. Last year, we established a groundbreaking national fuel efficiency standard for cars and trucks. Our cars will get better gas mileage, saving 1.8 billion barrels of oil over the life of the program. Our consumers will save money from fewer trips to the pump - $3,000 on average over time. And our automakers will build more innovative products. Right now, there are even cars rolling off assembly lines in Detroit with combustion engines that can get more than 50 miles per gallon. Going forward, we'll continue working with automakers, autoworkers and states to ensure that the high-quality, fuel-efficient cars and trucks of tomorrow are built right here in America. This summer, we'll propose the first-ever fuel efficiency standard for heavy-duty trucks. And this fall, we'll announce the next round of fuel standards for cars that builds on what we've done. To achieve our oil goal, the federal government will lead by example. The fleet of cars and trucks we use in the federal government is one of the largest in the country. That's why we've already doubled the number of alternative vehicles in the federal fleet, and that's why, today, I am directing agencies to purchase 100% alternative fuel, hybrid, or electric vehicles by 2015. And going forward, we'll partner with private companies that want to upgrade their large fleets. We've also made historic investments in high-speed rail and mass transit, because part of making our transportation sector cleaner and more efficient involves offering Americans - urban, suburban, and rural - the choice to be mobile without having to get in a car and pay for gas. Still, there are few breakthroughs as promising for increasing fuel efficiency and reducing our dependence on oil as electric vehicles. Soon after I took office, I set a goal to have one million electric vehicles on our roads by 2015. We've created incentives for American companies to develop these vehicles, and for Americans who want to buy them. New manufacturing plants are opening over the next few years. And a modest, $2 billion investment in competitive grants for companies to develop the next generation of batteries for these cars has jumpstarted a big new American industry. Soon, America will be home to 40 percent of global manufacturing capacity for these batteries. And that means jobs. But to make sure we stay on the road to this goal, we need to do more - by offering more powerful incentives to consumers, and by rewarding the communities that pave the way for adoption of these vehicles. 12:10:06 turns out electric cars run on electricity. And even if we reduce our oil dependency, a smart, comprehensive energy policy requires that we change the way we generate electricity in America - so that it's cleaner, safer, and healthier. And by the way - we also know that ushering in a clean energy economy has the potential to create an untold number of new jobs and new businesses - jobs that we want right here in America. Part of this change comes from wasting less energy. Today, our homes and businesses consume 40 percent of the energy we use, costing us billions in energy bills. Manufacturers that require large amounts of energy to make their products are challenged by rising energy costs. That's why we've proposed new programs to help Americans upgrade their homes and businesses and plants with new, energy-efficient building materials like lighting, windows, heating and cooling - investments that will save consumers and business owners tens of billions of dollars a year, free up money for investment and hiring, and create jobs for workers and contractors. And just like the fuels we use, we also have to find cleaner, renewable sources of electricity. Today, about two-fifths of our electricity comes from clean energy sources. But I know that we can do better than that. In fact, I think that with the right incentives in place, we can double it. That's why, in my State of the Union Address, I called for a new Clean Energy Standard for America: by 2035, 80 percent of our electricity will come from an array of clean energy sources, from renewables like wind and solar to efficient natural gas to clean coal and nuclear power. Now, in light of ongoing events in Japan, I want to say another word about nuclear power. America gets one-fifth of our electricity from nuclear energy. It has important potential for increasing our electricity without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. But I'm determined to ensure that it's safe. That's why I've requested a comprehensive safety review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to make sure that all of our existing nuclear energy facilities are safe. We'll incorporate those conclusions and lessons from Japan in designing and building the next generation of plants. And my Administration is leading global discussions towards a new international framework in which all countries operate their nuclear plants without spreading dangerous nuclear materials and technology. A Clean Energy Standard will broaden the scope of clean energy investment by giving cutting-edge companies the certainty they need to invest in America. In the 1980s, America was home to more than 80 percent of the world's wind capacity, and 90 percent of its solar capacity. We owned the clean energy economy. But today, China has the most wind capacity. Germany has the most solar. Both invest more than we do in clean energy. Other countries are exporting technology we pioneered and chasing the jobs that come with it because they know that the countries that lead the 21st century clean energy economy will be the countries that lead the 21st century global economy. 12:16:43 I want America to be that nation. I want America to win the future. A Clean Energy Standard will help drive private investment. But government funding will be critical too. Over the past two years, the historic investments we've made in clean and renewable energy research and technology have helped private sector companies grow and hire hundreds of thousands of new workers. I've visited gleaming new solar arrays among the largest in the world, tested an electric vehicle fresh off the assembly line, and toured once-shuttered factories where they're building advanced wind blades as long as a 747 and the towers to support them. I've seen the scientists searching for that next big energy breakthrough. And none of this would have happened without government support. 12:18:09 I understand we have a tight fiscal situation, it's fair to ask how we'll pay for all of it. As we debate our national priorities and our budget in Congress, we have to make tough choices. We'll have to cut what we don't need to invest in what we do need. Unfortunately, some want to cut these critical investments in clean energy. They want to cut our research and development into new technologies. They're even shortchanging the resources necessary to promptly issue new permits for offshore drilling. These cuts would eliminate thousands of private sector jobs, terminate scientists and engineers, and end fellowships for researchers, graduate students and other talent we desperately need for the 21st century. 12:19:08 we are already paying a price for our inaction. Every time we fill up at the pump; every time we lose a job or a business to countries that invest more than we do in clean energy; when it comes to our air, our water, and the climate change that threatens the planet you'll inherit - we are already paying that price. These are the costs we're already bearing. And if we do nothing, that price will only go up. At a moment like this, sacrificing these investments would weaken our energy security and make us more dependent on oil, not less. That's not a game plan to win the future. That's a vision to keep us mired in the past. And I will not accept that outcome for the United States of America. 12:20:10 I want to close by speaking directly to the students -- who will be writing America's next great chapter - the students gathered here today. The issue of energy independence is one that America has been talking about since before your parents were your age. On top of that, you go to school in a town that, for a long time, has suffered from a chronic unwillingness to come together and make tough choices. Because of all this, you'd be forgiven for thinking that maybe there isn't much we can do to rise to our challenges. But everything I have seen and experienced with your generation convinces me otherwise. I believe it is precisely because you have come of age in a time of rapid and sometimes unsettling change - born into a world with fewer walls, educated in an era of information, tempered by war and economic turmoil - that you believe, as deeply as any of our generations, that America can change for the better. We need that. We need you to dream big. We need you to summon that same spirit of unbridled optimism, that bold willingness to tackle tough challenges and see those challenges through that led previous generations to rise to greatness - to save democracy, to touch the moon, to connect the world with our own science and imagination. 12:22:13 That is what America is capable of. That's what you have to push America to do. and it will be you to push it. And it is that very history that teaches us that all of our challenges - all of them - are within our power to solve. 12:22:44 I don't want to leave this challenge for future presidents. I don't want to leave it for my children. And I do not want to leave it for yours. Solving it will take time and effort. It will require our brightest scientists, our most creative companies, and, most importantly, all of us - Democrats, Republicans, and everyone in between - to do our part. But with confidence - in America, in ourselves, and in one another - I know it is a challenge we will solve. 12:23:13 Thank you. God Bless You, and God Bless the United States of America.
OBAMA SPEECH ON ENERGY P2
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA DELIVERS REMARKS ON ENERGY AT GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY - STIX 11:35:53 Obama enters 11:36:09 thank you so much. Thank you everybody. 11:36:29 it is wonderful to be back at Georgetown. We've got a number of acknowledgements. 11:38:21 I want to start with a difficult subject.I love coach Thompson. I love his dad and the great tradition that they had. And it turned out VCU was pretty good 11:38:57 We meet here at a tumultuous time for the world. In a matter of months, we've seen regimes toppled and democracy take root across North Africa and the Middle East. We've witnessed a terrible earthquake, catastrophic tsunami and nuclear emergency batter a strong ally and the world's third largest economy. And we've led an international effort in Libya to prevent a massacre and maintain stability throughout the broader region. 11:39:48 As Americans, we are heartbroken by the lives that have been lost as a result of these events. We are moved by the thirst for freedom in many nations, as well as the strength and perseverance of the Japanese people. And of course, it's natural to feel anxious about what all this means for us. 11:40:50 One area of particular concern has been the cost and security of our energy..middle east, japan. In an economy that relies on oil, rising prices at the pump affect everybody - workers and farmers; truck drivers and restaurant owners. Businesses see it hurt their bottom line. Families feel the pinch when they fill up their tank. For Americans already struggling to get by, it makes life that much harder. It hurts. I fyou're somebody who works in a relatively hard. But here's the thing - we've been down this road before. Remember, it was just three years ago that gas prices topped $4 a gallon. Working folks haven't forgotten that. It hit a lot of people pretty hard. But it was also the height of political season, so you had a lot of slogans and gimmicks and outraged politicians waving three-point-plans for two-dollar gas - when none of it would really do anything to solve the problem. Imagine that in Washington. 11:43:21 The truth is, of course, was that all these gimmicks didn't make a bit of difference. When gas prices finally fell, it was mostly because the global recession led to less demand for oil. Now that the economy is recovering, demand is back up. Add the turmoil in the Middle East, and it's not surprising oil prices are higher. And every time the price of a barrel of oil on the world market rises by $10, a gallon of gas goes up by about 25 cents. 11:44:16 The point is, the ups and downs in gas prices historically are temporary. When you look at the long-term trends, though, there will be more ups than downs. That's because countries like India and China are growing at a rapid clip. And as two billion more people start consuming more goods, and driving more cars, and using more energy, it's certain that demand will go up a lot faster than supply. 11:45:14 So here's the bottom line - there are no quick fixes. Anyone telling you differently isn't telling you the truth. And we will keep on being a victim to shifts in the oil market until we get serious about a long-term policy for secure, affordable energy. We're going to have to think long term, which is why I came here to talk to young people here at Georgetown. Because you have more of a stake in getting our energy policy right than anyone. 11:46:05 We've known about the dangers of our oil dependence for decades. Nixon knew. Presidents and politicians of every stripe have promised energy independence, but that promise has so far gone unmet. I've talked about reducing America's dependence on oil when I was running for president, and I'm proud of the historic progress we've made over the last two years towards that goal. But we've also run into the same political gridlock and inertia that's held us back for decades. 11:46:57 That has to change. 11:47:03 We cannot keep going from shock to trance on the issue of energy security, we can't rush to propose action when gas prices rise, then hit the snooze button when they fall again. The United States of America cannot afford to bet our long-term prosperity and security on a resource that will eventually run out. Not anymore. We can't afford the cost to our economy, our country, and our planet is so high. Not when your generation needs us to get this right. It is time to do what we can to secure our energy future. 11:48:10 and today, I'm setting a new goal: one that is reasonable, achievable, and necessary. When I was elected to this office, America imported 11 million barrels of oil a day. By a little more than a decade from now, we will have cut that by one-third. That is something that we can achieve. We can cut our oil dependence by a third. 11:48:47 I set this goal knowing that imported oil will remain an important part of our energy portfolio for quite some time. And when it comes to the oil we import from other nations, obviously we have to look at neighbors like Canada, Mexico, and Brazil, which recently discovered significant new oil reserves, and with whom we can share American technology and know-how as they develop those resources 11:49:41 But our best opportunities to enhance our energy security can be found in our own backyard. And we boast one critical, renewable resource the rest of the world cannot match: American ingenuity. American ingenuity. American know how. 11:50:05 To make ourselves more secure - to control our energy future - we will need to harness that ingenuity. It is a task that won't be finished by the end of my presidency, or even the next. But if we continue the work that we have already begun over the last two years, we won't just spark new jobs, industries and innovations; we will leave your generation and future generations a country that is safer, healthier, and more prosperous. 11:50:45 Today, my Administration is releasing a Blueprint for A Secure Energy Future that outlines the comprehensive national energy policy we've pursued since the day I took office. And here at Georgetown, I'd like to talk in broad strokes about how we will secure that future. Meeting this new goal of cutting our oil dependence depends largely on two things: finding and producing more oil at home, and reducing our dependence on oil with cleaner alternative fuels and greater efficiency. 11:51:28 This begins by continuing to increase America's oil supply.. Last year, American oil production reached its highest level since 2003. And for the first time in more than a decade, oil we imported accounted for less than half the liquid fuel we consumed. So that was a good trend 11:52:22 To keep reducing that reliance on imports, my Administration is encouraging offshore oil exploration and production - as long as it's safe and responsible. I don't think anyone's forgotten what happened year when we had to deal with the largest oil spill in our history. I know the people of the Gulf Coast haven't. What we learned from that disaster helped us put in place smarter standards of safety and responsibility - for example, if you're going to drill in deepwater, you've got to prove that you can actually contain an underwater spill. That's just common sense. And lately we've been hearing people saying that the obama admin has been putting restrictions on offshore drilling.I don't know about you, I don't have amnesia. I remember those things. And I think it's important to prevent something like that to happen again 11:53:55 Today, we're working to expedite new drilling permits for companies that meet these standards. Since they were put in, we've approved 39 new shallow water permits; and we've approved an additional 7 deepwater permits in recent weeks. When it comes to drilling onshore, my Administration approved more than two permits last year for every new well that the industry started to drill. So any claim that my Administration is responsible for gas prices because we've "shut down" oil production might make for a useful political sound bite - but it doesn't track with reality. If you're going to dill offshore, you've got to have a plan.and I don't think there is anybody that disputing that's the right thing to do 11:54:56 moreover, we are pushing the oil industry to take advantage of the opportunities they already have. Right now, the industry holds tens of millions of acres of leases where it's not producing a drop - sitting on supplies of American energy just waiting to be tapped. That's why part of our plan is to provide new and better incentives that promote rapid, responsible development of these resources. We're also exploring and assessing new frontiers for oil and gas development from Alaska to the Mid- and South Atlantic states. Because producing more oil in America can help lower oil prices, create jobs, and enhance our energy security. But we've got to do it in the right way 11:55:55 even if we decrease our oil consumption - it's not the long-term solution to our energy challenge. America holds only about two percent of the world's proven oil reserves. And even if we drilled every drop of oil out of every one of those reserves, it still wouldn't be enough to meet our long-term needs. All of this means one thing: the only way for America's energy supply to be truly secure is by permanently reducing our dependence on oil. We have to find ways to boost our efficiency so that we use less oil. We have to discover and produce cleaner, renewable sources of energy with less of the carbon pollution that threatens our climate. And we have to do it quickly. 11:57:20 In terms of new sources of energy, we have a few different options. The first is natural gas. As I mentioned earlier, recent innovations have given us the opportunity to tap large reserves - perhaps a century's worth - in the shale under our feet. Now, we have to make sure we're doing it safely, without polluting our water supply. And that's why I'm asking my Energy Secretary, Steven Chu, to work with other agencies, the natural gas industry, states, and environmental experts to improve the safety of this process. I don't know if you've heard, but he's got a Nobel Prize for physics, after all. He actually deserved his nobel prize. And this is the kind of thing he likes to do for fun on the weekend.I'm going to embarrass him further, you know last year when we were trying to figure out how to close th gap.essentially designed the cap that ultimately worked 11:59:34 But the potential for natural gas is enormous. It's actually an area of broad bipartisan agreement. Last year, more than 150 Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle proposed legislation providing incentives to use clean-burning natural gas in our vehicles instead of oil. They were even joined by T. Boone Pickens, a businessman who made his fortune on oil. So I ask them to keep at it and pass a bill that helps us achieve this goal. 12:00:34 Another substitute for oil that holds tremendous promise is renewable biofuels - not just ethanol, but biofuels made from things like switchgrass, wood chips, and biomass. If anyone doubts the potential of these fuels, consider Brazil. Already, more than half - half - of Brazil's vehicles can run on biofuels. And just last week, our Air Force used an advanced biofuel blend to fly an F-22 Raptor faster than the speed of sound. In fact, the Air Force is aiming to get half of its domestic jet fuel from alternative sources by 2016. And I'm directing the Navy and the Departments of Energy and Agriculture to work with the private sector to create advanced biofuels that can power not just fighter jets, but trucks and commercial airliners. 12:02:06 So there's no reason we shouldn't be using these renewable fuels throughout America. That's why we're investing in things like fueling stations and research into the next generation of biofuels. Over the next two years, we'll help entrepreneurs break ground on four next-generation biorefineries - each with a capacity of more than 20 million gallons per year. And going forward, we should look for ways to reform biofuels incentives to make sure they meet today's challenges and save taxpayers money. As we replace oil with fuels like natural gas and biofuels, we can also reduce our dependence by making cars and trucks that use less oil in the first place. After all, 70 percent of our petroleum consumption goes to transportation. And so does the second biggest chunk of most families' budgets. That's why one of the best ways to make our economy less dependent on oil and save folks more money is simply to make our transportation more efficient. 12:03:58 we went through 30 years when we didn't raise fuel efficiency standards on cars.30 years of lost time. Last year, we established a groundbreaking national fuel efficiency standard for cars and trucks. Our cars will get better gas mileage, saving 1.8 billion barrels of oil over the life of the program. Our consumers will save money from fewer trips to the pump - $3,000 on average over time. And our automakers will build more innovative products. Right now, there are even cars rolling off assembly lines in Detroit with combustion engines that can get more than 50 miles per gallon. Going forward, we'll continue working with automakers, autoworkers and states to ensure that the high-quality, fuel-efficient cars and trucks of tomorrow are built right here in America. This summer, we'll propose the first-ever fuel efficiency standard for heavy-duty trucks. And this fall, we'll announce the next round of fuel standards for cars that builds on what we've done. To achieve our oil goal, the federal government will lead by example. The fleet of cars and trucks we use in the federal government is one of the largest in the country. That's why we've already doubled the number of alternative vehicles in the federal fleet, and that's why, today, I am directing agencies to purchase 100% alternative fuel, hybrid, or electric vehicles by 2015. And going forward, we'll partner with private companies that want to upgrade their large fleets. We've also made historic investments in high-speed rail and mass transit, because part of making our transportation sector cleaner and more efficient involves offering Americans - urban, suburban, and rural - the choice to be mobile without having to get in a car and pay for gas. Still, there are few breakthroughs as promising for increasing fuel efficiency and reducing our dependence on oil as electric vehicles. Soon after I took office, I set a goal to have one million electric vehicles on our roads by 2015. We've created incentives for American companies to develop these vehicles, and for Americans who want to buy them. New manufacturing plants are opening over the next few years. And a modest, $2 billion investment in competitive grants for companies to develop the next generation of batteries for these cars has jumpstarted a big new American industry. Soon, America will be home to 40 percent of global manufacturing capacity for these batteries. And that means jobs. But to make sure we stay on the road to this goal, we need to do more - by offering more powerful incentives to consumers, and by rewarding the communities that pave the way for adoption of these vehicles. 12:10:06 turns out electric cars run on electricity. And even if we reduce our oil dependency, a smart, comprehensive energy policy requires that we change the way we generate electricity in America - so that it's cleaner, safer, and healthier. And by the way - we also know that ushering in a clean energy economy has the potential to create an untold number of new jobs and new businesses - jobs that we want right here in America. Part of this change comes from wasting less energy. Today, our homes and businesses consume 40 percent of the energy we use, costing us billions in energy bills. Manufacturers that require large amounts of energy to make their products are challenged by rising energy costs. That's why we've proposed new programs to help Americans upgrade their homes and businesses and plants with new, energy-efficient building materials like lighting, windows, heating and cooling - investments that will save consumers and business owners tens of billions of dollars a year, free up money for investment and hiring, and create jobs for workers and contractors. And just like the fuels we use, we also have to find cleaner, renewable sources of electricity. Today, about two-fifths of our electricity comes from clean energy sources. But I know that we can do better than that. In fact, I think that with the right incentives in place, we can double it. That's why, in my State of the Union Address, I called for a new Clean Energy Standard for America: by 2035, 80 percent of our electricity will come from an array of clean energy sources, from renewables like wind and solar to efficient natural gas to clean coal and nuclear power. Now, in light of ongoing events in Japan, I want to say another word about nuclear power. America gets one-fifth of our electricity from nuclear energy. It has important potential for increasing our electricity without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. But I'm determined to ensure that it's safe. That's why I've requested a comprehensive safety review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to make sure that all of our existing nuclear energy facilities are safe. We'll incorporate those conclusions and lessons from Japan in designing and building the next generation of plants. And my Administration is leading global discussions towards a new international framework in which all countries operate their nuclear plants without spreading dangerous nuclear materials and technology. A Clean Energy Standard will broaden the scope of clean energy investment by giving cutting-edge companies the certainty they need to invest in America. In the 1980s, America was home to more than 80 percent of the world's wind capacity, and 90 percent of its solar capacity. We owned the clean energy economy. But today, China has the most wind capacity. Germany has the most solar. Both invest more than we do in clean energy. Other countries are exporting technology we pioneered and chasing the jobs that come with it because they know that the countries that lead the 21st century clean energy economy will be the countries that lead the 21st century global economy. 12:16:43 I want America to be that nation. I want America to win the future. A Clean Energy Standard will help drive private investment. But government funding will be critical too. Over the past two years, the historic investments we've made in clean and renewable energy research and technology have helped private sector companies grow and hire hundreds of thousands of new workers. I've visited gleaming new solar arrays among the largest in the world, tested an electric vehicle fresh off the assembly line, and toured once-shuttered factories where they're building advanced wind blades as long as a 747 and the towers to support them. I've seen the scientists searching for that next big energy breakthrough. And none of this would have happened without government support. 12:18:09 I understand we have a tight fiscal situation, it's fair to ask how we'll pay for all of it. As we debate our national priorities and our budget in Congress, we have to make tough choices. We'll have to cut what we don't need to invest in what we do need. Unfortunately, some want to cut these critical investments in clean energy. They want to cut our research and development into new technologies. They're even shortchanging the resources necessary to promptly issue new permits for offshore drilling. These cuts would eliminate thousands of private sector jobs, terminate scientists and engineers, and end fellowships for researchers, graduate students and other talent we desperately need for the 21st century. 12:19:08 we are already paying a price for our inaction. Every time we fill up at the pump; every time we lose a job or a business to countries that invest more than we do in clean energy; when it comes to our air, our water, and the climate change that threatens the planet you'll inherit - we are already paying that price. These are the costs we're already bearing. And if we do nothing, that price will only go up. At a moment like this, sacrificing these investments would weaken our energy security and make us more dependent on oil, not less. That's not a game plan to win the future. That's a vision to keep us mired in the past. And I will not accept that outcome for the United States of America. 12:20:10 I want to close by speaking directly to the students -- who will be writing America's next great chapter - the students gathered here today. The issue of energy independence is one that America has been talking about since before your parents were your age. On top of that, you go to school in a town that, for a long time, has suffered from a chronic unwillingness to come together and make tough choices. Because of all this, you'd be forgiven for thinking that maybe there isn't much we can do to rise to our challenges. But everything I have seen and experienced with your generation convinces me otherwise. I believe it is precisely because you have come of age in a time of rapid and sometimes unsettling change - born into a world with fewer walls, educated in an era of information, tempered by war and economic turmoil - that you believe, as deeply as any of our generations, that America can change for the better. We need that. We need you to dream big. We need you to summon that same spirit of unbridled optimism, that bold willingness to tackle tough challenges and see those challenges through that led previous generations to rise to greatness - to save democracy, to touch the moon, to connect the world with our own science and imagination. 12:22:13 That is what America is capable of. That's what you have to push America to do. and it will be you to push it. And it is that very history that teaches us that all of our challenges - all of them - are within our power to solve. 12:22:44 I don't want to leave this challenge for future presidents. I don't want to leave it for my children. And I do not want to leave it for yours. Solving it will take time and effort. It will require our brightest scientists, our most creative companies, and, most importantly, all of us - Democrats, Republicans, and everyone in between - to do our part. But with confidence - in America, in ourselves, and in one another - I know it is a challenge we will solve. 12:23:13 Thank you. God Bless You, and God Bless the United States of America.
OBAMA JAPAN PM JOINT PRESSER
FTG OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA HOLDS A PRESS CONFERENCE WITH PRIME MINISTER NODA OF JAPAN Monday, April 30, 2012 TRANSCRIPT: Joint Press Conference with President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda SLUG: 1400 WH JAPAN STIX RS37 83 AR: 16X9 DISC#679 NYRS: 5114 (Note: The prime minister's remarks are provided through interpreter.) 14:15:56 walk in PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Please be seated. 14:16:05 Good afternoon, everybody. It is a great pleasure to welcome Prime Minister Noda of Japan, and one of America's closest allies in the Asia-Pacific region but also around the world. And of course one of the reasons that we enjoy such a strong alliance between our nations is because it's rooted in the deep friendship between our peoples. I've felt it in my own life during my visits to Japan, including as a young boy, and we've seen that friendship on display very profoundly over the past year. Last month we marked the first anniversary of the great east Japan earthquake and tsunami and nuclear crisis that followed. All across Japan, people stopped and stood in silence at 2:46 p.m., the moment that the earth shook. Mr. Prime Minister, on behalf of the American people, I want to say, to you and the people of Japan, we continue to stand with you as well. We stand with Japan in honoring the lost and the missing -- 19,000 men, women and children who will never be forgotten. We stand with you as you rebuild -- what you, Mr. Prime Minister, have called the rebirth of Japan. And we stand with Japan in the Asia-Pacific and beyond, because even as it has focused on the hard work at home, Japan has never stopped leading in the world. It is a great tribute to the Japanese people and to leaders like Prime Minister Noda. 14:17:44 I'm told that over the past year many Japanese have found strength in what they call "kizuna," the bonds of solidarity between friends and neighbors, bonds which cannot be broken. And Mr. Prime Minister, the same could be said of the bonds between the United States and Japan, and today we welcome you in that spirit. As president, I've worked to strengthen the ties between our two nations since my first days in office. And when Prime Minister Noda and I first met last September, we agreed to modernize our alliance to meet the needs of the 21st century. And Mr. Prime Minister, I want to thank you for the personal commitment that you've brought to this effort. You've called the alliance with the United States Japan's "greatest asset," and in our work together, we've seen your trademark determination and humility. In fact, during our discussions today, the prime minister compared his leadership style to that of a point guard in basketball. He may not be the flashiest player, but he stays focused and gets the job done. He's brought that same sense of teamwork to our partnership, and it's helped make this visit a milestone in the history of our alliance. I'm proud to announce that we have agreed to a new joint vision to guide our alliance and help shape the Asia Pacific for decades to come. This is part of the broader effort I discussed in Australia last year in which the United States is once again leading in the Asia Pacific. 14:19:06 First, we recognize that the U.S.-Japan alliance will remain the foundation of the security and prosperity of our two nations, but also a cornerstone of regional peace and security. As such, we reviewed the agreement that our governments reached last week to realign American forces in Japan. This reflects our effort to modernize America's defense posture in the Asia Pacific with forces that are more broadly distributed, more flexible and more sustainable. At the same time it will reduce the impact on local communities like Okinawa. Second, our joint vision commits us to deepening our trade and investment. We're already among each other's top trading partners and our exports to Japan and Japanese companies here in the U.S. support more than 1 million American jobs. But there's more we can do, especially as we work to double U.S. exports. So I appreciate the prime minister updating me on his reform efforts in Japan, including liberalizing trade and playing a leading role in Asia Pacific's economy. We instructed our teams to continue our consultation regarding Japan's interest in joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would benefit both our economies and the region. And we agreed to deepen our cooperation on nuclear safety, clean energy and cybersecurity to enhance our economic competitiveness. Third, our joint vision lays out the future we seek in the Asia- Pacific: a region where international rules and norms are upheld, where nations contribute to regional security, where commerce and freedom of navigation is not impeded and where disputes are resolved peacefully. 14:20:46 As such, we continue our close consultations on the provocative actions of North Korea, which are a sign of weakness and not strength and only serve to deepen Pyongyang's isolation. And we discussed the changes under way in Burma and how our two nations can both reward progress there while encouraging more reforms that improve the lives of the Burmese people. 14:21:10 Fourth, our joint vision reaffirms our role as global partners bound by shared values and committed to international peace, security and human rights. For example, our nations are the largest donors in Afghanistan. As we plan for the NATO summit in Chicago and the next phase of the transition in Afghanistan, Japan is planning for a donor conference to sustain development there. I also want to take this opportunity to commend the prime minister and Japan for showing such strong leadership with regard to Iran's nuclear program. The regime in Tehran is now feeling the economic screws tighten, and one of the reasons is that countries like Japan made the decision to reduce oil imports from Iran. And this is just one more example of how despite challenging times at home, Japan has continued to serve as a model and a true global leader. 14:22:02 Finally, our joint vision commits us to deepening the ties between our peoples. This includes new collaborations between our scientists, researchers and entrepreneurs to foster innovation, and it includes new exchanges that will bring thousands of our young people together, including high school students, to help Japanese communities rebuild after last year's disasters. So again, Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for helping to revitalize our extraordinary alliance so that we enjoy even greater security and prosperity for both our countries. And I once again want to salute the people of Japan for the strength and the resilience and the courage that they've shown during this past year. More than ever, the American people are proud to call you a friend, and honored to call you an ally. 14:22:51 And before I turn it over to the prime minister, I just want to warn the American press that the prime minister once considered himself a journalist, and instead he became a Judo expert. He is a black belt. (Laughter.) So if you get out of line, I've got some protection here. Mr. Prime Minister. 14:23:20 PRIME MINISTER YOSHIHIKO NODA: (Interpreter in progress) -- to thank President Obama for the warm welcome and hospitality, as I know how busy he is with official duties. I had a very good exchange of views with the president today on bilateral relations between Japan and the United States, the situation in the Asia-Pacific region, and various and global challenges, among others. We were able to confirm from broader perspectives the present-day significance of the Japan-U.S. alliance and where the Japan-U.S. relations should be headed in the longer -- in the longer term. The president just now spoke about U.S. support. And I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you for all the unsparing support given by government and people of the United States, starting with Operation Tomodachi conducted by U.S. forces at the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake of last year. 14:24:28 Yesterday I met with the bereaved families of Taylor Anderson, who unfortunately passed away, but who took care of children until the very last moment following the Great East Japan Earthquake. Also, I met with representatives of the Fairfax County search-and-rescue team who, immediately following the earthquake, deployed in the district -- the most affected region to help the people. So I was able to see -- meet myself with these true friends of Japan. Now, I've always held the conviction that our bilateral alliance is the linchpin of Japan's diplomacy. Having had conversations with my -- with U.S. friends yesterday only renews my conviction that Japan-U.S. alliance must be unchangeable and, in fact, be unshakable. Now, as -- (inaudible) -- such conviction, I am particularly gratified that we're able to announce today the Japan-U.S. shared vision -- (inaudible) -- spells out that -- (inaudible) -- Japan and the United States will -- (inaudible) -- peace and prosperity, not only in the Asia-Pacific -- (inaudible) -- by making full use of their respective capabilities -- (inaudible) -- as well. 14:26:26 (Inaudible) -- the president of the DPRK. In other words, major opportunities and challenges exist side by side in the region. To cope with such conditions, we are determined, as spelled out in the shared vision, to realize the new U.S. forces realignment plan in accordance with the Security Consultative Committee, or 2+2, in joint statement released the other day, and to step up bilateral security and defense cooperation in a creative manner. We also need to work with regional partners and to build a multilayered network that is open and comprehensive and built on international rules, utilizing such frameworks as trilateral dialogues among Japan-U.S.-ROK and Japan-U.S.-Australia, the East Asia Summit and the APEC. From this point of view, we shall also cooperate with China, which is an important partner. It is also important that Japan and the United States cooperate to promote necessary rules-making in the areas of nontraditional threats such as terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and piracy as well as human security and peace-building and (civil ?) assistance, ocean, space and cyberspace. 14:27:38 In the economic area, we shall deepen bilateral economic ties and fortify the growth and prosperity of two countries through their promotion of economic integration in the Asia-Pacific region. And to this end, both our countries will work on regional trade and investment rules-making, with a view to building an FTOP, or the free trade area of the Asia-Pacific. From this vantage point as well, we shall advance in consultations with a view to participating in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. The common -- the -- the shared vision also calls for further strengthening of the energy cooperation, and we discussed in our meeting today expanding L&G exports from the United States to Japan. Last, but not the least, as stated in the shared vision, it is important to boost exchanges among next-generation youth in the interest of the future of the Japan-U.S. alliance. We will further step up people-to-people exchanges among youth through such endeavors as Japan's -- (inaudible) -- project and U.S. Tomodachi Initiative. Japan-U.S. alliance has reached new heights. Together with President Obama, I shall firmly advance these steps. I thank you. PRESIDENT OBAMA: So we've got the two question on each side. We're going to start Laura McGuinness of Reuters. Q: President Obama, could you confirm whether the blind Chinese dissident, Cheng Guangcheng (ph), is under U.S. protection in Beijing? And how do you foresee that situation being resolved? Would the United States grant him asylum if he asked for it? And Prime Minister Noda, how likely do you think it is that North Korea will carry out a third nuclear test? How would Japan respond to such a test, and what would you like the U.S. to do to respond? 14:29:32 PRESIDENT OBAMA: Obviously I'm aware of the press reports on the situation in China, but I'm not going to make a statement on the issue. What I would like to emphasize is that every time we meet with China, the issue of human rights comes up. It is our belief that not only is that the right thing to do because it comports with our principles and our belief in freedom and human rights, but also because we actually think China will be stronger as it opens up and liberalizes its own system. We want China to be strong and we want it to be prosperous, and we're very pleased with all the areas of cooperation that we've been able to engage in. But we also believe that that relationship will be that much stronger and China will be that much more prosperous and strong as you see improvements on human rights issues in that country. 14:30:45 I know it wasn't directed at me, but I'll just make a quick statement around North Korea. This was a topic of extensive discussion between myself and Prime Minister Noda. Our consultation throughout the failed missile launch was, I think, reflective of how important our alliance is, not just to our two countries but to the region as a whole. And what I've tried to do since I came into office, to make sure that North Koreans understand that the old pattern of provocation that then gets attention and somehow insists on the world purchasing good behavior from them -- that that pattern is broken. And what we've said is, is that the more you engage in provocative acts, the more isolated you will become, that stronger sanctions will be in place, the more isolated you will be diplomatically, politically and commercially. And so although we can't anticipate and I don't want to hypothesize on what might happen in the coming months, I think Pyongyang is very clear that the United States, Japan, South Korea, other countries in the region are unified in insisting that it abide by its responsibilities, abide by international norms, and that they will not be able to purchase anything from further provocative acts. 14:32:24 PRIME MIN. NODA: With regard to North Korea, between myself and President Obama earlier, we -- with regard to the so-called launch of satellite, the missile launch, we share the view that it undermines the efforts of the various countries concerned to achieve the resolution through the dialogue. Now in the latest round of missile launch, they also conducted a nuclear test, which means that there is a great possibility they will conduct a nuclear test. And I believe the international community as all together will need to call for restraint on the part of DPRK. And more specifically, I believe the measures incorporated in the recent U.N. Security Council chairman's statement need to be complied with. And among Japan, the U.S. and Korea, as well as China and Russia, we need to communicate with each other fully and also stress that China's role continues to be very important and cooperate with China while also maintaining close coordination with the United States. And we share this view with President Obama. And let me ask Mr. Imaichi (ph) of TBS from Japan to ask a question. Q: (Through interpreter.) Imaichi (ph) with TBS television. And I have a question for both President Obama and Prime Minister Noda. How do you regard the Futenma relocation issue in the context of this joint statement, although you did not refer specifically to Futenma relocation? And the interim report on U.S. Forces-Japan realignment -- that leaves this question open to some extent. And what do you think of the possibility that the if the Marine station ultimately will be relocated to a place other than Henoko, as agreed to between Japan and the United States? 14:34:46 PRIME. MIN. NODA: It may -- now it is most meaningful that in the two-plus-two joint statement, as well as the summit meeting today, that we were able to confirm that our two countries will cooperate in the context of a deepening bilateral alliance towards the realization of the optimum U.S. force posture in the region and the reduction of the burden on Okinawa. And we'll continue to work for an early resolution of this issue by taking in account the development of the -- (development to date ?). 14:35:18 PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, the -- as the prime minister just noted, we think that the realignment approach that's being taken is consistent with the security interests of both Japan and the United States. We think we've found an effective mechanism to move this process forward in a way that is respectful of the situation in Okinawa, the views of residents there, but also is able to optimize the defense cooperation between our two countries and the alliance that's the linchpin not just of our own security but also security in the region as a whole. So we're confident that we can move forward with a -- an approach that realigns our base posture or our deployments but also is continuing to serve the broad-based interests of our alliance as a whole. And I want to thank publicly Prime Minister Noda for having taken such a constructive approach to an issue that has been lingering in our bilateral relationship for quite some time. Christi Parsons. Q: Thank you, Mr. President. We're coming up on the one-year anniversary of the killing of bin Laden. I wonder if you would share some thoughts on that anniversary. And I also wanted to mention that your likely opponent says anybody would have made that call, even Jimmy Carter. So I'm curious to see what you would say about that. And Mr. Prime Minister, if I may, on the same topic, you mentioned the international fight against terrorism in your opening remarks, and I wonder if you could reflect on president Obama's record here, and if you think from an international perspective the U.S. is playing it right in marking this anniversary or if you think you might advise against excessive celebration. 14:37:16 PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, let me make a couple of points. First of all, Christi, I hardly think that you've seen any excessive celebration taking place here. I think that people -- the American people rightly remember what we as a country accomplished in bringing to justice somebody who killed over 3,000 of our citizens. And it's a mark of the excellence of our intelligence teams and our military teams, a political process that worked. And I think for us to use that time for some reflection, to give thanks to those who participated, is entirely appropriate, and that's what's been taking place. 14:38:41 As far as my personal role and what other folks would do, I'd just recommend that everybody take a look at people's previous statements in terms of whether they thought it was appropriate to go into Pakistan and take out bin Laden. I assume that people meant what they said when they said it. That's been at least my practice. I said that I'd go after bin Laden if we had a clear shot at him, and I did. If there are others who have said one thing and now suggest they'd do something else, then I'd go ahead and let them explain it. 14:39:14 PRIME MIN. NODA: President Obama has been standing at the very forefront in the fight against terrorism, and I hold him in very high regard for that. Although bin Laden has been killed, terrorism has not been rooted out. And I think continued efforts will be needed. In cooperation with the United States, we also would like to continue with our efforts against terrorism. I think forms of terrorism are becoming very diverse, amongst them cyberterrorism, for example. And -- (inaudible) -- between Japan and United States, not just in -- (inaudible) -- in the space and ocean -- (inaudible) -- also decide to cooperate in cybersecurity as well. So inclusive of all of these, Japan and United States shall work together to root out terrorism of all sorts. Let me call upon Takaaki-san (ph) of Mainichi Shimbun. Q: (Through interpreter.) I'm Takaaki (ph) with Mainichi newspaper, and I would like to ask a question for Prime Minister Noda and President Obama. There is no direct reference to China in this joint statement. What sort of exchange of views did you have on China in the context of working for stability in the Asia-Pacific connected with their advances in the oceans and also military buildup? I wonder what sort of interlocution you had on this subject. 14:40:48 PRIME MIN. NODA: Let me answer first. As you correctly pointed out, the shared vision does not refer to any specific country. But we recognize China as a major partner in the region and, in our exchange of views, both of us, in fact -- in fact, confirmed that -- (inaudible) -- China's development is an opportunity, it's -- for the international community, for Japan and for the Asia-Pacific. Now, I explained in the meeting to President Obama that when I visited China last December, I broached to Chinese leaders my six- point initiative, including confidence building and cooperation in the East China Sea in order to further advance our mutually beneficial relationship based on common strategic interests and that I'll work steadily to implement this. I also told the president that I wished to realize a strategic dialogue among Japan, U.S. and China. Now, EAS last year, we were of the view that it was a success and, of course, ASEAN countries also part of the discussions, that we need to seek a rules-based response or behavior from the Chinese and we had these exchange(s) of views. 14:42:13 PRESIDENT OBAMA: Yeah, I -- I think that I've said in the past and firmly believe that we welcome a -- a peacefully rising China. And we have developed a very important strategic and economic dialogue with China. We think what they've accomplished in terms of lifting millions of people out of poverty is good for its own sake, and it's also potentially good for the world and for the region. As Prime Minister Noda and I noted, we do believe that as China continues to grow, as its influence continues to expand, that it has to be a strong partner in abiding by international rules and norms -- whether those are economic norms, like respecting intellectual property; whether these are norms of dispute resolution, so in -- in maritime disputes ensuring that small countries and large countries are both respected in international fora in resolving these issues -- that across the board, we want China to be a partner with us in a set of international rules and norms that everybody follows. And I think as China makes that transition from a developing country into a major power, that it will see that over the long term it is in its interests as well to abide by these rules and norms. And so all of our actions are not designed to in any way contain China, but they are designed to ensure that they are part of a broader international community in which rules, norms are respected, in which all countries can prosper and succeed. 14:44:11 Thank you very much, everybody. 14:44:16 handshake
HOUSE ENERGY SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING WITH SECRETARY CHU 0930
House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing with Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy and Gregory Jaczo, Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission 09:36:30 [ GAVEL ] >WE'LL CALL THE HEARING TO 09:36:34 ORDER THIS MORNING. THE TITLE OF TODAY'S HEARING IS 09:36:38 THE FISCAL YEAR 2012 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY 09:36:45 COMMISSION BUDGETS. AND WE CERTAINLY EXTEND A WARM 09:36:51 WELCOME TO SECRETARY STEVEN CHEW, SECRETARY OF THE U.S. 09:36:54 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. MR. SECRETARY, WE APPRECIATE 09:36:57 YOU'RE BEING WITH US TODAY VERY MUCH. 09:36:59 AND WE LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR TESTIMONY. 09:37:02 WE ALSO HAVE WITH US ON THE SECOND PANEL, THE HONORABLE 09:37:07 GREGORY JASCO, CHAIRMAN OF THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION. 09:37:14 CIRCUMSTANCES HAVE CERTAINLY CHANGED SINCE WE DECIDED TO HAVE 09:37:17 THIS HEARING. AND WITH THE EVENTS TAKING PLACE 09:37:22 IN JAPAN, WE ALL WANT TO EXTEND OUR VERY BEST WISHES AND 09:37:25 THOUGHTS TO THE PEOPLE OF JAPAN. AND AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAGEDY, 09:37:31 AND WILL CERTAINLY BENEFIT TODAY FROM THE INSIGHTS OF DR. CHU AND 09:37:42 DR. JASCO ON THIS MATTER. OBVIOUSLY NUCLEAR ENERGY PLAYS A 09:37:46 VITAL ROLE IN THE ENERGY NEEDS OF OUR COUNTRY TODAY. 09:37:49 AND IT POIS ROUGHLY 20% OF ALL ELECTRICITY GENERATED IN 09:37:53 AMERICA. COUNTRIES LIKE FRANCE AND JAPAN 09:37:55 HAVE AN EVEN GREATER PERCENTAGE OF ELECTRICITY PRODUCED FROM 09:38:00 ENERGY. AND WE RECOGNIZE THE IMPORTANCE 09:38:02 WHEN WE TALK ABOUT ENERGY, ALSO, OF THE SAFETY ASPECT OF THAT AS 09:38:08 WELL. AND WHILE I DIDN'T REALLY INTEND 09:38:10 TO TALK A LOT ABOUT NUCLEAR ENERGY TODAY, THERE ARE SO MANY 09:38:17 POINTS RELATING TO OUR COUNTRY AS IT PERTAINS TO NUCLEAR ENERGY 09:38:23 TODAY. THE STORAGE ISSUE, YUCCA 09:38:29 MOUNTAIN, WHAT'S HAPPENING THERE. 09:38:31 THE 106 NUCLEAR PLANTS AROUND THE COUNTRY. 09:38:34 AND THE LOCATION ON THOSE SITES OF THE WASTE MATERIAL INSTEAD OF 09:38:37 GOING TO YUCCA MOUNTAIN. THE PERMITTING PERIOD, ROUGHLY 09:38:42 TEN YEARS TO GET A PLANT PERMITTED. 09:38:48 IN OTHER COUNTRIES, IT'S LESS THAN THAT. 09:38:50 BUT AS WE'VE LEARNED, JUST IN THE LAST FEW DAYS FROM WHAT 09:38:54 HAPPENED IN JAPAN, WE CAN EXPECT UNEXPECTED EVENTS TO OCCUR. 09:39:01 AND WE HAVE TO MARKIZE SAFETY. I FOR ONE DO NOT BELIEVE THAT WE 09:39:06 CAN MEET OUR FUTURE DEMANDS OF ENERGY WITHOUT NUCLEAR PLAYING A 09:39:10 VITAL ROLE IN THAT. SO MR. SECRETARY, WE ARE GOING 09:39:15 TO LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR TESTIMONY. 09:39:17 I KNOW THAT THERE WILL BE A LOT OF QUESTIONS FOR YOU. 09:39:20 AND AT THIS TIME, I WOULD RECOGNIZE FOR HIS OPENING 09:39:24 STATEMENT, MR. RUSH OF ILLINOIS. I WANT TO THANK YOU, MR. 09:39:28 CHAIRMAN. I WANT TO THANK MR. SECRETARY 09:39:33 CHU AND CHAIRMAN, MR. SECRETARY CHU FOR BEING HERE TODAY. 09:39:37 I UNDERSTAND WE HAVE CHAIRMAN JASCO COMING IN A LITTLE LATER. 09:39:41 BEFORE I GIVE ME THOUGHTS ON THE NUCLEAR SITUATION IN JAPAN AS 09:39:44 YOU HAVE, MR. CHAIRMAN, I WOULD LIKE TO BRING ATTENTION TO THE 09:39:48 DRASTIC CUTS THAT HAVE BEEN PROPOSED BY MY REPUBLICAN 09:39:52 COLLEAGUE, UNDER HR 1. SECTION 3001. 09:39:57 OF HR 1, WOULD RESCIND ALL UNOBLIGATED RECOVERY ACT FUNDS. 09:40:05 AND THESE CUTS WOULD DIRECTLY IMPACT CRUCIAL JOB-CREATING 09:40:11 RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS UNDER THE LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM. 09:40:15 AT LEAST 26 JOB-CREATING PROBLEMS ACROSS THE COUNTRY FROM 09:40:20 CALIFORNIA TO ILLINOIS, MICHIGAN TO NEW YORK, AND OREGON TO TEXAS 09:40:25 WOULD BE AFFECTED BY THESE PROPOSED CUTS. 09:40:28 IN ALL, PROJECTS WITH NEGOTIATING TERM SHEETS OF $12.5 09:40:33 BILLION IN LOAN GUARANTEES THAT WOULD CREATE OVER 28,000 09:40:39 CONSTRUCTION JOBS AND OVER 5,000 PERMANENT JOBS ARE AT STAKE. 09:40:44 THE REPUBLICAN PROPOSAL WOULD BASICALLY PUT ALL OF THE DOE 09:40:48 LOAN GUARANTEE FUNDING INTO ONE CATEGORY, AND THAT CATEGORY IS 09:40:53 NUCLEAR ENERGY. AND WHILE I'M A SUPPORTER OF 09:40:57 NUCLEAR ENERGY, I BLS BELIEVE WE MUST INVEST IN RENEWABLE ENERGY 09:41:03 PROJECT THAT WOULD GENERATE AUR FROM SOLAR, WIND, THERMAL, 09:41:09 BIOMASS AND ETHANOL AS MANY OF THESE PROJECTS DO. 09:41:12 MR. CHAIRMAN, MY STATE OF ILLINOIS OBTAINS 47% OF ITS 09:41:17 ELECTRICITY FROM NUCLEAR. ONE OF THE HIGHEST IN THE 09:41:20 NATION. I PERSONALLY BELIEVE THAT 09:41:23 NUCLEAR MUST BE PART OF ANY PORTFOLIO OF RENEWABLE ENERGY 09:41:27 SOURCES THAT WILL MOVE THIS NATION FORWARD. 09:41:31 HOWEVER, AS FAR AS THE EVENTS UNFOLDING IN JAPAN ARE 09:41:34 CONCERNED, MY ADVICE FOR THE NUCLEAR ENERGY INDUSTRY, MOVE 09:41:38 HERE AND IN JAPAN, AND ELSEWHERE, WOULD BE TO BE AS 09:41:42 TRANSPARENT AS POSSIBLE. TRANSPARENCY IS REALLY THE KEY 09:41:47 WORD. THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, THE PEOPLE 09:41:50 AROUND THE WORLD ARE LOOKING FOR TRANSPARENCY. 09:41:53 THEY WANT TO BELIEVE IN THE NUCLEAR ENERGY. 09:41:55 AND I THINK IT IS UP TO US AND OTHERS TO MAKE THAT HAPPEN. 09:41:58 WE MUST MAKE SURE THAT WE ARE HONEST WITH THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 09:42:01 ABOUT EXACTLY WHAT WE KNOW, AND ALSO WHAT WE DO NOT KNOW. 09:42:06 MR. CHAIRMAN, AND MR. CHAIRMAN, I LOOK FORWARD TO DISCUSSING 09:42:09 THIS MORE IN-DEPTH DURING THE DISCUSSIONS WITH SECRETARY CHU 09:42:15 AND CHAIRMAN JASCO, THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN, AND WITH THAT I 09:42:19 WANT TO RECOGNIZE -- MR. WAXMAN. I YIELD BACK THE BALANCE OF MY 09:42:31 TIME. MR. BUSH, THANK YOU FOR YOUR 09:42:33 COMMENTS, I NOTICED YOU HAD ABOUT TWO MINUTES LEFT ON YOUR 09:42:35 OPENING STATEMENT. I HAD ABOUT TWO MINUTES LEFT ON 09:42:38 MY OPENING STATEMENT AND I WAS LOOKING SO FORWARD TO WHAT 09:42:43 YOU'VE SAID THAT I NEGLECTED TO RECOGNIZE MY FRIEND, MR. 09:42:55 SHIMKUS. WHO IS NOW RECOGNIZED FOR TWO 09:42:57 MINUTES. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN, 09:42:59 WELCOME, MR. SECRETARY. WE ALWAYS LIVE IN INTERESTING 09:43:01 TIMES AND THIS IS ANOTHER ONE. THIS IS A D.O.E. BUDGET HEARING. 09:43:08 AND OF COURSE, BUDGETS ARE ALL THE RAGE, SIZE OF GOVERNMENT 09:43:12 SPENDING. YOUR BUDGET REQUEST IS $29.5 09:43:21 BILLION. ABOUT A 12% INCREASE FROM FISCAL 09:43:23 YEAR 2010. SO A LOT OF QUESTIONS WILL BE 09:43:28 OBVIOUSLY THAT'S NOT GOING TO HAPPEN. 09:43:30 WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO PRIORITIZE. 09:43:32 AND WE'RE GOING TO SEE WHAT WORKS AND GO THROUGH THE LIST 09:43:35 AND MAKE SURE WE'RE FUNDING THE PRIORITIES. 09:43:39 BUT NOWHERE IN AMERICA IS ANYONE EXPECTING US TO INCREASE THE 09:43:44 SIZE OF GOVERNMENT AND FED AGENCIES BY 12%. 09:43:48 AS I SAID IN ANOTHER HEARING, BE PREPARED FOR 2008 SPENDING 09:43:53 LEVELS OR, SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED AMOUNT. 09:43:56 SO THAT'S AN ISSUE. HAVING SAID THAT, WE WANT TO YOU 09:44:02 KNOW, APPLAUD AND THE WORK AND WANT TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT AS 09:44:07 MR. RUSH SAID, I'M FROM ILLINOIS ALSO, THE NUCLEAR POWER 09:44:11 INDUSTRY. MAKE SURE IT'S SAFE. 09:44:12 THERE ARE INTERESTING ISSUES GOING ON WITH YOUR LOAN 09:44:15 GUARANTEES THAT WE WANT TO KEEP PURSUING THE THREE FACILITIES 09:44:19 THAT ARE MOVING FORWARD. WHILE WE STILL HAVE TO ADDRESS, 09:44:27 A NUCLEAR WASTE PORTFOLIO. AND WE'VE GOT TO GET SERIOUS 09:44:29 ABOUT ADDRESSING THIS ISSUE. I'LL TALK ABOUT IT MORE IN MY 09:44:32 QUESTIONS. BUT FOR THE PRESENT, TO HAVE A 09:44:35 BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION THAT EXCLUDES ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT 09:44:38 YUCCA MOUNTAIN IS, IS A FRAUD. SO I THINK YOU PROBABLY HAD SOME 09:44:47 WRITINGS IN THE PAST THAT ALSO ADDRESSED THE IMPORTANCE OF 09:44:52 YUCCA MOUNTAIN. MY TIME IS EXPIRED, MR. 09:44:54 CHAIRMAN, I YIELD BACK. I RECOGNIZED GENTLEMAN FROM 09:44:58 CALIFORNIA, THE RACHKING MEMBER FOR HIS OPENING STATEMENT. 09:45:10 DURING THE LAST YEAR, WE'VE HAD WAKEUP CALL AFTER WAKEUP 09:45:17 CALL, WARNING US WE NEED A NEW ENERGY POLICY. 09:45:20 LAST APRIL, A COAL MINE EXPLOSION IN WEST VIRGINIA 09:45:23 KILLED 29 MINERS, IT WAS THE WORST COAL DISASTER IN 40 YEARS. 09:45:27 THAT SAME MONTH, DEEPWATER HORIZON EXPLODED IN BP'S MOCONDO 09:45:36 WELL, OIL WAS GUSHING INTO THE GULF FOR THREE MONTHS. 09:45:40 NOW THE OIL IS $100 A BARREL BECAUSE THE MIDDLE EAST IS IN 09:45:43 TURMOIL. AND JAPAN FACES POTENTIAL 09:45:45 NUCLEAR MELTDOWNS AT ITS DAMAGED REACTORS. 09:45:50 WE DON'T KNOW YET WHETHER JOIP WILL BE ABLE TO AVOID 09:45:53 CATASTROPHIC RELEASE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS. 09:45:56 WE DON'T KNOW WHAT THE FULL IMPACT WILL BE. 09:46:02 BUT WE SHOULD BE INVESTIGATING THE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS OF 09:46:06 THE U.S. FIFLTS. IT SHOULD BE OBVIOUS WE NEED A 09:46:11 NEW ENERGY POLICY THAT PROMOTES CLEAN, SAFE AND AFFORDABLE 09:46:14 ENERGY. WE NEED MORE VEHICLES THAT RUN 09:46:16 ON ELECTRICITY, NATURAL GAS AND RENEWABLE FUELS. 09:46:19 WE NEED MORE WIND AND SOLAR POWER AND WE NEED MORE ENERGY 09:46:23 EFFICIENCY. INSTEAD, WHAT WE HAVE GOTTEN 09:46:25 FROM THE REPUBLICAN-CONTROLLED HOUSE IS PARTISANSHIP. 09:46:30 AND AN ASSAULT ON CLEAN ENERGY, THE REPUBLICAN BUDGET FOR THIS 09:46:34 YEAR, HR 1, WOULD SLASH D.O.E.'S ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE 09:46:43 ENERGY BUDGET BY 35%. IT WOULD COMPLETELY ELIMINATE 09:46:47 ASSISTANCE TO LOW-INCOME FAMILY WHO IS WANT TO WEATHERIZE THEIR 09:46:51 HOMES OR SAVE ENERGY AND LOWER THEIR UTILITY BILLS. 09:46:55 AND THE REPUBLICAN BUDGET WOULD WIPE OUT D.O.E.'S ABILITY TO 09:46:58 AWARD LOAN GUARANTEES TO WORTHY RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS. 09:47:02 THIS WOULD COST US THOUSANDS OF JOBS. 09:47:07 SOME OF THESE LOAN GUARANTEES, HAVE RECIPIENTS JUST WAITING TO 09:47:12 CLOSE THE DEAL AND NOW THERE WILL BE NO MONEY LEFT FOR THEM. 09:47:15 WHETHER IT'S A SOLAR PROJECT IN CALIFORNIA, A WIND TURBINE PLANT 09:47:20 IN IDAHO, A GEOTHERMAL PROJECT, THE LIST GOES ON. 09:47:27 ALL OF THESE PROJECTS AND ALL OF THESE JOBS ARE ON THE REPUBLICAN 09:47:32 CHOPPING BLOCK. YESTERDAY WE DEBATED A BILL AND 09:47:34 THE REPUBLICANS SAID WE'RE FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE, ENERGY POLICY. 09:47:39 BUT THAT'S NOT WHAT IS IN THEIR BUDGET. 09:47:42 THE REPUBLICAN BUDGET WOULD RESCIND $25 BILLION OF THE $47 09:47:45 BILLION IN LOAN GUARANTEE AUTHORITY PROVIDED BY CONGRESS 09:47:48 IN 2009. THE BILL WOULD PRESERVE THE 09:47:53 ENTIRE $18.5 BILLION IN LOAN GUARANTEES FOR NEW NUCLEAR 09:47:58 REACTORS A $2 BILLION AVAILABLE FOR URANIUM ENRICHMENT 09:48:08 PROJECTS WHILE LEAVING $1.5 BILLION. 09:48:11 THIS IS NOT AN ALL OR THE ABOVE STRATEGY, THIS IS AN ALL-NUCLEAR 09:48:17 STRATEGY. IN CHAIRMAN, INSTEAD OF SPENDING 09:48:19 OUR TIME DEBATING PARTISAN LEGISLATION THAT DENIES SCIENCE 09:48:22 AND GUTS THE CLEAN AIR ACT, WE SHOULD BE WORKING TOGETHER TO 09:48:27 ENCOURAGE CLEAN ENERGY INVESTMENTS THAT WILL CREATE 09:48:31 JOBS IN THE U.S. IT SHOULD NOT TAKE A NUCLEAR 09:48:35 MELTDOWN TO MAKE US FACE REALITY. 09:48:37 WE URGENTLY NEED A NEW ENERGY POLICY AND I HOPE THE TESTIMONY 09:48:42 TODAY FROM SECRETARY CHU AND CHAIRMAN JASCO WILL HELP POINT 09:48:48 THE WAY. I ASK UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO 09:48:53 SUPPLEMENT THE RECORD THE EFFECTS OF THE ECONOMY ON CLEAN 09:48:57 ENERGY JOBS. WITHOUT OBJECTION. 09:49:00 I YIELD NOW TO MR. GREEN. THE GENTLEMAN IS RECOGNIZED. 09:49:03 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN, FOR HOLDING THE HEARING TODAY ON THE 09:49:07 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSIONS FY 12 09:49:12 PROPOSED BUDGET. I WANT TO THANK SECRETARY CHU 09:49:15 AND CHAIRMAN JASCO, FOR TAKING TIMT TO APPEAR BEFORE OUR 09:49:20 COMMITTEE. I KNOW YOU BOTH ARE EXTREMELY 09:49:22 BUSINESSES IN WORKING WITH JAPAN TO ASSIST THEM WITH THEIR 09:49:26 CURRENT SITUATION. OUR THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS ARE 09:49:28 WITH THE PEOPLE OF JAPAN AND I HOPE THE UNITED STATES CAN 09:49:31 ASSIST THEM IN THEIR TIME OF NEED. 09:49:33 THIS IS TRULY A DEVASTATING DISASTER AND THEY NEED AS MUCH 09:49:36 ASSISTANCE FROM AROUND THE WORLD, SO THEY CAN RECOVER. 09:49:39 AS A MEMBER OF CONGRESS WHO REPRESENTS ONE OF THE LARGEST 09:49:44 ENERGY-PRODUCING AREAS IN THE COUNTRY, AN AREA OF THE COUNTRY 09:49:46 THAT ALSO HAS PERMITS PENDING BEFORE THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT 09:49:50 AND BUDGET FOR CONSTRUCTION OF NEW NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS, I'M 09:49:54 INTERESTED IN THE TESTIMONY OF OUR WITNESSES TODAY. 09:49:57 IN 2008, OUR NATION PRODUCED OVER 800 BILLION KILOWATT HOURS 09:50:03 FROM NUCLEAR POWER. JAPAN PRODUCED 245 BILLION. 09:50:06 WE NEED TO STEP BACK AND TAKE A BREATH AND SEE WHAT WE NEED TO 09:50:09 DO PRODUCE CLEAN, ELECTRICITY SAFELY AND AT A REASONABLE COST. 09:50:14 I KNOW THAT'S OUR BOTTOM LINE AND WE NEED TO DO THAT. 09:50:19 PARTICULARLY WITH WHAT HAPPENED IN JAPAN. 09:50:22 I HOPE SECRETARY CHU AND CHAIRMAN JACZKO CAN UPDATE US ON 09:50:26 THE CURRENT SITUATION IN JAPAN AS WELL AS GIVE US INFORMATION 09:50:30 ON THE FY-12 BUDGET AND HOW CONGRESS CAN TAKE THE 09:50:34 LEADERSHIP. WITH THAT, I YIELD BACK MY TIME. 09:50:39 MR. WAXMAN. I DON'T KNOW IF WE'RE 09:50:44 RESERVING ANY BALANCE OF TIME BUT WE'VE EXHAUSTED OUR SPEECHES 09:50:47 FOR THE OPEN. AT THIS TIME I RECOGNIZE 09:50:50 MR. UPTON FOR HIS OPENING STATEMENT. 09:50:52 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. WELCOME, MR. SECRETARY. 09:50:56 GIVEN ALL OF THE ENERGY CHALLENGES THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 09:51:00 FACE, THIS HEARING ON DEO AND THE NRC 12 BUDGETS WOULD HAVE 09:51:05 BEEN AN IMPORTANT ONE EVEN IF IT WAS HELD BEFORE THE TRAGEDY IN 09:51:09 JAPAN. GIVEN THE UNFOLDING EVENTS THERE 09:51:12 AND THE IMPACT ON SEVERAL NUCLEAR REACTORS, TODAY'S HEAR 09:51:17 TAKES ON ADDED SIGNIFICANCE. THE MIDST OF A TRAGEDY UNFOLD 09:51:22 HOUR BY HOUR, WE NEED TO ALLOW TIME FOR REFLECTION AND LEARN 09:51:27 FROM THEIR MISTAKES. THIS IS ESPECIALLY TRUE WHEN IT 09:51:31 COMES TO PROPOSALS THAT MAKE PERMANENT CHANGES BASED ON 09:51:35 INCOMPLETE INFORMATION. WE WILL BE HAVING A NUMBER OF 09:51:37 HEARINGS ON THIS ISSUE AS DETAILS UNFOLD AND WE WELCOME 09:51:40 YOUR PARTICIPATION. THIS COMMITTEE IS GOING TO HEAR 09:51:43 THE FACTS AS SOON AS THEY BECOME AVAILABLE. 09:51:46 THAT IS FOR SURE. FOR ME, I LIVE 15 MILES FROM TWO 09:51:50 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS SO THE SAFETY OF U.S. NUCLEAR 09:51:53 FACILITIES IS NOT AN ISSUE I'VE EVER TAKEN LIGHTLY. 09:51:56 I'M NOT STRAIN FROM MY SUPPORT FOR SAFE, NUCLEAR ENERGY IS A 09:52:00 VITAL COMPONENT OF AMERICA'S PRESENT AND FUTURE ENERGY MIX. 09:52:03 IT IS JUST AS IMPORTANT TO DISPEL OVERSTATED FEARS AS IT IS 09:52:07 TO DISCUSS LEGITIMATE CONCERNS. I KNOW WE CAN BEGIN THE PROCESS 09:52:10 OF DOING BOTH. THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S 12 09:52:13 BUDGET IS $29.5 BILLION, AN INCREASE OF ALMOST 12%, $3 09:52:20 BILLION FROM CURRENT LEVELS. I SEE AREAS WHERE FUNDING IS 09:52:24 EXCESSIVE AND PERHAPS OTHERS WHERE IT IS INSUFFICIENT. 09:52:26 SPENDING EVEN FOR LAUDABLE GOALS LIKE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OR 09:52:30 DEVELOPING AFFORDABLE ENERGY SOURCES NEEDS TO BE SCRUTINIZED 09:52:35 FOR EFFECTIVENESS. WE HAD A LARGE SCALE REAL WORLD 09:52:38 TEST OF THE MERITS OF THROWING A LOT OF MONEY AT NICE SOUNDING 09:52:42 ENERGY PROJECTS IN THE 2009 STIMULUS. 09:52:45 THE PROGRAM WAS GENEROUS WITH AMERICAN PEOPLE'S TAX DOLLARS, 09:52:49 BUT A SERIES OF DOE INSPECT GENERAL REPORTS ON SPENDING FOR 09:52:54 HOME AND BUILDING WEATHERIZATION PROJECTS FOUND SIGNIFICANT 09:52:58 FLAWS. IN OTHER AREAS, I BELIEVE THE 09:53:00 BUDGET IS INAPPROPRIATELY CHEAP. THIS IS ESPECIALLY THE CASE WITH 09:53:04 REGARD TO FOSSIL FUELS. WISHFUL THINKING ABOUT MAGIC 09:53:08 BULLET ALTERNATIVES IS NOT GOING TO HEAT AND COOL OUR HOMES AND 09:53:11 POWER THE BUSINESSES THAT PROVIDE THE JOBS THAT AMERICA 09:53:14 WANTS. THE REALITY IS WE STILL NEED 09:53:17 FOSSIL FUELS AND WILL CONTINUE TO DO SO FOR THE FORESEEABLE 09:53:21 FUTURE. I DON'T BELIEVE THIS REALITY IS 09:53:23 REFLECTED IN THE BUDGET WHICH CALLS FOR A 44% DECLINE IN 09:53:28 FUNDING. THAT ALONG WITH THE PRESIDENT'S 09:53:30 SUPPORT FOR RAISING TAXES ON DOMESTIC BE OIL AND NATURAL GAS 09:53:35 PRODUCERS IS INDICATIVE FOR A HOSTILITY TO DOMESTIC FOSSIL 09:53:41 FUEL PRODUCTION. BLOCKING YUCCA MOUNTAIN IS PENNY 09:53:44 WISE AND POUND FOOLISH, CONSIDERING WE'VE SPEND $13.5 09:53:49 BILLION AND THE NEED ULTIMATELY TO FIND A REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR 09:53:53 WASTE. INSTEAD, PREVENTING THE NEED FOR 09:53:57 INTERIM STORAGE IS ONE WAY OF REDUCING RISK FROM NUCLEAR 09:54:00 ENERGY AND REDUCING RISK IS A MAJOR PART OF THE ENERGY 09:54:04 DISCUSSIONS MOVING FORWARD. THIS COMMITTEE WILL LOOK LONG 09:54:08 AND HARD AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN NOW MORE THAN EVER THE POLITICALLY 09:54:13 BASED POLICIES MUST END. AMERICA DEMANDS SAFE, COMMON 09:54:17 SENSE SOLUTIONS AND I YIELD THE BALANCE OF MY TIME TO CHAIRMAN 09:54:21 EMERITUS, MR. BARTON. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 09:54:24 I CONCUR WITH YOUR STATEMENT. WE WELCOME THE DISTINGUISHED 09:54:28 SECRETARY OF ENERGY AND THE DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN FROM THE 09:54:32 NUCLEAR REGULATORY AGENCY. I WAS A WHITE HOUSE FELLOW FOR 09:54:36 JAMES V. EDWARDS. IT'S GOOD TO HAVE THE SECRETARY 09:54:39 OF ENERGY HERE. OBVIOUSLY, WE WANT TO TALK ABOUT 09:54:43 THE BUDGET AND A BIG PART OF THE BUDGET IS GOING TO BE THE $36 09:54:46 BILLION LOAN GUARANTY PROGRAM FOR NUCLEAR ENERGY, BUT IN LIGHT 09:54:50 OF WHAT'S HAPPENED IN JANUARY, WE'RE OBVIOUSLY GOING TO BE 09:54:54 INTERESTED IN YOUR COMMENT ABOUT THE SAFETY AND THE NRC'S SAFETY 09:54:58 OF OUR EXISTING NUCLEAR REACTORS AND THE NEW REACTORS BEGINNING 09:55:03 TO BE PERMITTED AND HOPEFULLY BUILT IN OUR NATION. 09:55:06 I CONTINUE TO BE A STRONG SUPPORTER OF NUCLEAR ENERGY, AND 09:55:11 I HOPE THAT YOU AND THE PRESIDENT ALSO CONTINUE TO DO 09:55:17 SO. I NOTICED YOUR SUPPORT FOR A 09:55:18 CLEAN ENERGY STANDARD. I'M NOT SURE, MR. SECRETARY, 09:55:21 THAT WE NEED ANY KIND OF ENERGY STANDARD FOR AMERICA. 09:55:26 BUT I THINK MYSELF AND OTHERS MAY BE WILLING TO LOOK AT IT. 09:55:30 OBVIOUSLY, IT DEPENDS ON WHAT THE DEFINITION OF CLEAN IS. 09:55:33 I THINK ANY DEFINITION SHOULD INCLUDE CLEAN COAL, NUCLEAR AND 09:55:39 NATURAL GAS. WITH THAT, I YIELD BACK TO THE 09:55:42 CHAIRMAN OR YIELD BACK TO THE SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIRMAN. 09:55:45 THANK YOU VERY MUCH, MR. BARTON. 09:55:48 BECAUSE OF THE FACT THAT MR. RUSH DID NOT USE ALL OF HIS 09:55:52 TIME AND HAD TWO MINUTES LEFT, I AM GOING TO RECOGNIZE MR. RUSH 09:55:55 FOR AN ADDITIONAL TWO MINUTES. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 09:56:00 MR. CHAIRMAN, I YIELD TWO MINUTES TO MR. MACKIE. 09:56:04 THANK YOU, MR. RUSH. RIGHT NOW, A FEW DOZEN BRAVE 09:56:08 SOULS ARE FIGHTING A NUCLEAR MELTDOWN WITH WATER TRUCKS. 09:56:12 WE SEND OUR PRAYERS TO THOSE HEROES AND TO THE PEOPLE OF 09:56:17 JAPAN. THE EFFECTS OF THIS DISASTER 09:56:19 HAVE RIPPLED THROUGH THE WORLD, CHINA, VENEZUELA AND OTHER 09:56:24 COUNTRIES ARE SHUTTING DOWN OLDER PLANTS AND SCRAPPING PLANS 09:56:27 FOR NEW ONES. WE TOO NEED A SEISMIC SHIFT IN 09:56:32 OUR APPROACH TO NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY. 09:56:34 I FEAR WE ARE NOT MOVING FAST ENOUGH TO TAKE THESE IMPORTANT 09:56:38 STEPS. JUST YESTERDAY, THE DEPARTMENT 09:56:40 OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ANNOUNCED IT WOULD STUDY THE 09:56:43 DISTRIBUTION OF POTASSIUM IODINE PILL THAT'S BEING DISTRIBUTED TO 09:56:50 U.S. MILITARY PEOPLE AND JAPANESE PEOPLE IN THE REGION. 09:56:53 IT HAS BEEN 32 YEARS SINCE THE COMMISSION THAT INVESTIGATED 09:57:00 THREE MILE ISLAND RECOMMENDED IT. 09:57:02 IT'S BEEN TEN YEARS SINCE THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 09:57:06 BEGAN MAKING POTASSIUM IODINE AVAILABLE WITHIN TEN MILES OF A 09:57:11 NUCLEAR REACTOR. IT'S BEEN NINE YEARS SINCE THIS 09:57:13 COMMITTEE PASSED MY LAW TO EXPAND THE DISTRIBUTION ZONE OF 09:57:19 THESE PILLS FROM TEN MILES TO 20 MILES AWAY FROM THE REACTOR. 09:57:22 IT HAS BEEN SEVEN YEARS SINCE THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 09:57:26 ENDORSED ITS USE, AND YET TWO ADMINISTRATIONS HAVE IGNORED THE 09:57:30 LAW. WE DON'T NEED TO STUDY THESE 09:57:32 PILLS TO KNOW THAT THEY CAN PREVENT CANCER. 09:57:36 I BELIEVE THAT THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION SHOULD 09:57:40 IMMEDIATELY IMPLEMENT MY LAW FROM SEVEN YEARS AGO, HAVING IT 09:57:47 BE DISTRIBUTED WITHIN A 20 MILE R 09:57:54 RADIUS. OUR ECONOMY CRUMBLED BECAUSE 09:57:56 WALL STREET TOOK HIGH RISK INVESTMENTS AND TRANSFORMED THEM 09:58:01 INTO SAFE LOOKING BOBDS. AS THEUNDER LYING SUB PRIME 09:58:05 LOANS DEFAULTED, THESE TURNED INTO TOXIC ASSETS THAT NOBODY 09:58:10 WANTED, SO PRESIDENT BUSH CREATED THE TOP PROGRAM. 09:58:16 JUST LIKE A TOXIC ASSET, LITERALLY AND FINANCIALLY 09:58:20 GUARANTIED BY THE FEDERAL TAXPAYERS, IF SOMETHING GOES 09:58:24 WRONG. THE INDUSTRY WILL BE OKAY 09:58:26 FINANCIALLY, THE TAXPAYERS WILL BE LEFT. 09:58:29 WE HAVE ALREADY KNOWN WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE TAXPAYER HAS TO 09:58:31 PICK UP THE TAB WHEN THINGS GO WRONG. 09:58:35 WE SHOULD BE VERY CAREFUL FROM THIS MOMENT ON. 09:58:37 THANK YOU, MR. MARKEY. AT THIS TIME, SECRETARY CHU, WE 09:58:42 RECOGNIZE YOU FOR YOUR OPENING STATEMENT. 09:58:44 LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR TESTIMONY. THANK YOU, CHAIRMAN 09:58:49 WHITFIELD, THANK CHAIRMAN UPTON, RANKING MEMBER WAXMAN, 09:58:52 MR. BARTON, MR. DINGO, I DON'T SEE IS HERE AND ALL THE MEMBERS 09:58:59 OF THE COMMITTEE. THANK YOU FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO 09:59:02 DISCUSS THE PRESIDENT'S FISCAL 10:00 10:00:00 INCLUDING DETECTERS, EQUIPMENT USED TO PROVIDE ASSESSMENTS OF 10:00:03 CONTAMINATION ON THE GROUND. IN TOTAL THE DOE TEAM INCLUDES 10:00:07 39 PEOPLE WITH MORE THAN 1700 POUNDS OF EQUIPMENT. 10:00:11 THE DEPARTMENT IS MONITORING ACTIVITIES THROUGH THE NUCLEAR 10:00:14 INCIDENT TEAM. AS EMPLOYING ASSETS TO PROVIDE 10:00:19 ONGOING PREDICTIVE MODELING E CAPABILITIES BASED ON A VARIETY 10:00:26 OF SCENARIOS. THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SHOULD HAVE 10:00:27 FULL CONFIDENCE THAT THE UNITED STATES HAS A RIGOROUS SAFETY 10:00:29 REGULATION IN PLACE TO ENSURE THAT OUR NUCLEAR POWER IS 10:00:33 GENERATED SAFELY AND RESPONSIBLY. 10:00:35 INFORMATION IS STILL COMING IN ABOUT THE EVENTS UNFOLDING IN 10:00:38 JAPAN, BUT THE ADMINISTRATION IS COMMITTED TO LEARNING FROM 10:00:42 JAPAN'S EXPERIENCE AS WE WORK TO CONTINUE TO STRENGTHEN AMERICA'S 10:00:46 NUCLEAR INDUSTRY. SAFETY REMAINS AT THE FOREFRONT 10:00:49 OF OUR EFFORT TO RESPONSIBLY DEVELOP AMERICA'S ENERGY 10:00:53 RESOURCES. WE WILL CONTINUE TO INCORPORATE 10:00:55 THE BEST PRACTICES AND LESSONS LEARNED IN THAT PROCESS. 10:00:58 TO MEET OUR ENERGY NEEDS, THE ADMINISTRATION BELIEVES WE NEED 10:01:03 TO RELY ON A DIVERSE SET OF ENERGY SOURCES INCLUDING 10:01:06 RENEWABLES LIKE WIND AND SOLAR, NATURAL GAS, CLEAN COAL AND 10:01:10 NUCLEAR POWER. WE LOOK FORWARD TO A CONTINUED 10:01:13 DIALOGUE WITH CONGRESS IN MOVING THAT AGENDADA FORWARD. 10:01:15 I WOULD LIKE TO TURN TO THE BUDGET NOW. 10:01:19 PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS A PLAN TO WIN THE FUTURE BY OUTINNOVAING 10:01:25 THE REST OF THE WORLD WITH WHILE AT THE SAME TIME ADDRESSING THE 10:01:29 DEFICIT. THE PRESIDENT'S BUDGET MAKES 10:01:31 TOUGH CHOICES AND CUTTING IN MANY AREAS WHILE RES RECOGNIZING 10:01:35 WE MUST INVEST IN STRATEGIC AREAS THAT WILL CREATE JOBS AND 10:01:40 STRENGTHEN COMPETITIVENESS. TO THAT END, PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS 10:01:45 CALLED FOR INVESTMENT IN CLEAN ENERGY DEPLOYMENT. 10:01:48 HE PROPOSED A BOLD BUT ACHIEVABLE GOAL OF GENERATING 10:01:56 80% OF CLEAN ENERGY BY 2035. CLEAN LONG TERM SIGNAL TO 10:02:02 INDUSTRY TO BRING CAPITAL OFF THE SIDELINES AND INTO THE CLEAN 10:02:06 ENERGY SECTOR. THE GOVERNMENT DOES NOT NEED TO 10:02:08 PICK FAVORITES. THE MOST COMPETITIVE CLEAN 10:02:10 ENERGY SOURCES WILL WIN IN THE MARKETPLACE. 10:02:14 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BUDGET REQUESTS A $29.5 MILLION BUDGET. 10:02:20 DEFENSE ARE RELATED ACTIVITIES, CLEANING UP THE WAR SITES 10:02:26 ACCOUNT FOR HALF OF THAT BUDGET. THE OTHER HALF WHICH INCLUDES 10:02:29 ENERGY AND SCIENCE PROGRAMS ARE CRITICAL, NATIONAL SECURITY IN 10:02:33 ADDITION TO ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS. 10:02:36 THROUGH ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS WILL SAVE MONEY FOR 10:02:38 CONSUMERS BY SAVING ENERGY. IN ADDITION, THE BUDGET SUPPORTS 10:02:42 THE RESEARCH AND DEPLOYMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY AND THE 10:02:47 ADVANCEMENT OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES 10:02:51 AND HELPS REDUCE OUR DEPENDENCE ON OIL BY DEVELOPING THE JEKS 10:02:56 GENERATION OF BIOFUELS. THE BUDGET SUPPORTS LOANS FOR 10:03:02 RENEWABLES AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGIES. 10:03:04 NUCLEAR ENERGY HAS AN IMPORTANT ROLE TO PLAY IN OUR ENERGY 10:03:08 PORTFOLIO. THE BUDGET REQUESTS UP TO 36 10:03:10 BILLION IN LOAN GUARANTY AUTHORITY TO HELP DEPLOY A NEW 10:03:14 GENERATION OF AMERICAN NUCLEAR REACTORS. 10:03:20 THE BUDGET INVESTS IN BASIC AND APPLIED RESEARCH AND KEEPS US ON 10:03:24 A PATH OF DOUBLING FUNDING FOR THESE SCIENTIFIC AGENCIES 10:03:28 INCLUDING THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE. THE BUDGET INVESTS 550 MILLION 10:03:34 IN ENERGY, THE ADMINISTRATION ALSO SEEKS AN ADDITIONAL 100 10:03:37 MILLION FOR RB AS PART OF THE PRESIDENT'S WIRELESS INNOVATION 10:03:41 AND INFRASTRUCTURE INITIATIVE. THIS INVESTMENT WILL ALLOW RBE 10:03:46 TO CONTINUE THE PROMISING EARLY STAGE RESEARCH PROJECTS THAT AIM 10:03:49 TO DELIVER GAME CHANGING CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES. 10:03:55 ANOTHER KEY PIECE OF OUR RESEARCH EFFORT IS THE ENERGY 10:03:57 INNOVATION HUBS. THE HUBS BRING TOGETHER OUR 10:03:59 NATION'S TOP SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS TO ACHIEVE SIMILAR 10:04:02 GAME CHANGING GOALS. WE ARE A CONCENTRATED EFFORT 10:04:05 OVER A LONGER TIME IS NEEDED TO ESTABLISH INNOVATION LEADERSHIP. 10:04:11 THE BUDGET REQUESTS $146 MILLION TO SUPPORT THREE EXISTING HUBS 10:04:17 AND TO ESTABLISH THREE NEW HUBS. THE BUDGET SUPPORTS THE ENERGY 10:04:20 RESEARCH FRONTIER CENTERS WORKING TO SOLVE SCIENTIFIC 10:04:25 PROBLEMS BLOCKING CLEAN ENERGY DEVELOPMENT. 10:04:28 TO REACH OUR ENERGY GOALS, WE MUST TAKE A PORTFOLIO APPROACH, 10:04:32 PURSUING SEVERAL RESEARCH STRATEGIES THAT HAVE PROVEN TO 10:04:34 BE SUCCESSFUL IN THE PAST. THIS IS NOT A SICHEN SINK 10:04:39 APPROACH. THIS WORK IS BEING COORDINATED 10:04:41 WITH A 360 DEGREE VIEW OF HOW THE PIECES FIT TOGETHER. 10:04:49 IN ADDITION TO STRENGTHENING OUR ECONOMY, THE BUDGET REQUEST ALSO 10:04:54 STRENGTHENS OUR SECURITY BY PROVIDING $11.8 BILLION FOR THE 10:04:59 NATIONAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION. 10:05:01 THE DEPARTMENT IS MINDFUL OF OUR RESPONSIBILITY TO THE TAXPAYER. 10:05:07 WE'RE CUTTING BACK IN MULTIPLE AREAS INCLUDING ELIMINATING 10:05:11 UNNECESSARY FOSSIL FUEL. WE'RE FREEZING SALARIES FOR 10:05:18 HARD-WORKING LABORATORY SITE AND FAST CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEES. 10:05:22 THE UNITED STATES FACES AA CHOICE TODAY. 10:05:24 WILL WE OUTCOMPETE THE REST OF THE WORLD OR WILL WE FALL 10:05:27 BEHIND? TO LEAD THE WORLD IN CLEAN 10:05:29 ENERGY, WE MUST ACT NOW. CAN'T AFFORD NOT TO. 10:05:32 THANK YOU NOW AND I'M PLEASED TO ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY 10:05:37 HAVE. THANK YOU, SECRETARY CHU. 10:05:40 BECAUSE OF THE EVENT IN JAPAN, AND CHERNOBYL AND THREE MILE 10:05:58 ISLAND, IT'S MY UNDERSTANDING THAT THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC 10:06:05 ENERGY AGENCY HAS A RADIOLOGICAL EVENT SCALE. 10:06:10 ON THAT SCALE, THE EVENT THAT OCCURRED IN JAPAN WAS AT A LEVEL 10:06:14 FOUR. IT'S MY UNDERSTANDING THAT THREE 10:06:19 MILE ISLAND WAS A LEVEL FIVE, WHICH, ACCORDING TO THE 10:06:23 INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY WOULD HAVE BEEN MORE 10:06:26 SERIOUS THAN EVEN WHAT IS IN JAPAN IS THE INFORMATION THAT I 10:06:30 HAVE. MY QUESTION IS I READ AN ARTICLE 10:06:34 RECENTLY ABOUT THREE MILE ISLAND AND IT SAID THAT A PERSON 10:06:38 STANDING AT THE PROPERTY LINE OF THREE MILE ISLAND DURING THAT 10:06:41 EVENT WOULD HAVE RECEIVED A DOSE OF RADIATION EQUIVALENT TO 10:06:45 BETWEEN A CHEST X-RAY AND A CAT SCAN. 10:06:52 MY QUESTION, AS A LAYMAN, THAT DOES NOT SOUND LIKE A LOT OF 10:06:58 EXPOSURE, PARTICULARLY WHEN YOU CONSIDER THIS WOULD BE A LEVEL 10:07:01 FIVE. I WAS JUST CURIOUS, ARE YOU 10:07:04 AWARE OF THAT KIND OF EXPOSURE AT THREE MILE ISLAND OR DO YOU 10:07:07 HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THAT? 10:07:11 MY KNOWLEDGE OF THREE MILE ISLAND ACTUALLY COMES FROM AN 10:07:15 NRC REPORT THAT WAS ISSUED. I DON'T KNOW EXACTLY WHEN BUT 10:07:19 LATER AFTER THE ANALYSIS HAD BEEN DONE. 10:07:21 WHAT I REMEMBER IS WITHIN A 20 MILE OR SO RADIUS, THAT THE 10:07:26 AVERAGE EXPOSURE OF THOSE PEOPLE CLOSEST TO THREE MILE ISLAND WAS 10:07:31 A VERY SMALL FRACTION OF BACKGROUND RADIATION. 10:07:34 COULD HAVE BEEN ON A SCALE OF 1% OR LESS. 10:07:36 THAT'S WHAT I RECALL. YOU KNOW, I THINK THAT'S 10:07:40 IMPORTANT THAT WE TALK ABOUT THAT, BECAUSE OBVIOUSLY, SAFETY 10:07:44 IS AN IMPORTANT ISSUE. WE DON'T WANT THE AMERICAN 10:07:48 PEOPLE TO BE PANICKED ABOUT ANY OF THIS. 10:07:52 DID YOU HAVE AN ADDITIONAL COMMENT YOU WERE GOING TO MAKE? 10:07:56 YES, I DO. I THINK THE EVENTS UNFOLDING IN 10:08:01 JAPAN INCIDENTS ACTUALLY APPEAR TO ME MORE SERIOUS THAN THREE 10:08:07 MILE ISLAND. TO WHAT EXTENT, WE DON'T KNOW. 10:08:10 AS THEY'RE UNFOLDING VERY RAPIDLY ON AN HOUR BY HOUR, DAY 10:08:13 BY DAY BASIS, THERE ARE CONFLICTING REPORTS. 10:08:16 WE DON'T REALLY KNOW IN DETAIL WHAT'S HAPPENING. 10:08:19 THIS IS ONE OF THE REASONS WHY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, THE 10:08:23 NRC ARE THERE. WE HAVE BOOTS ON THE GROUND, 10:08:26 DETECTERS IN THE GROUND, NOT ONLY TO HELP ASSIST JAPANESE 10:08:30 POWER COMPANY AND JAPANESE GOVERNMENT, BUT FOR OUR OWN SAKE 10:08:35 TO KNOW WHAT IS REALLY HAPPENING DIRECTLY THROUGH OUR OWN 10:08:39 INSTRUMENTS. THE U.S. GOVERNMENT IS 10:08:40 OFFERING ANY AND ALL ASSISTANCE THAT HAS BEEN REQUESTED? 10:08:43 THAT IS CORRECT. NOW, JUST TO TOUCH ON YUCCA 10:08:49 MOUNTAIN FOR A MOMENT, IT'S MY UNDERSTANDING THAT THE 10:08:51 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OR THE U.S. GOVERNMENT HAD ENTERED INTO 10:08:53 CONTRACTS WITH THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN THE U.S. TO TAKE THEIR 10:08:58 WASTE MATERIAL FROM THE OPERATION OF THEIR REACTORS AND 10:09:02 BECAUSE YUCCA MOUNTAIN HAS NOT BEEN COMPLETED, THAT LAWSUITS 10:09:06 WERE EVENTUALLY FILED BY THE INDUSTRY AGAINST THE FEDERAL 10:09:10 GOVERNMENT FOR VIOLATION OF THAT CONTRACT. 10:09:13 IS THAT THE CASE? THAT IS THE CASE. 10:09:16 DO YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF JUDGMENTS AGAINST THE 10:09:20 U.S. GOVERNMENT IS AS OF TODAY? I DON'T EXACTLY RECALL. 10:09:26 THERE HAVE BEEN SOME JUDGMENTS. THEY'RE CERTAINLY NONTRIVIAL. 10:09:35 THESE ARE SETTLEMENTS SO THAT THE MONEY COULD BE USED BY THE 10:09:39 INDUSTRY TO HELP STORE THE WASTE ON THEIR OWN SITES. 10:09:42 I DON'T KNOW IF MY INFORMATION IS CORRECT, BUT I'VE 10:09:45 BEEN TOLD IT WAS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF 10 OR $12 10:09:48 BILLION IN JUDGMENTS ALREADY. DOES THAT SOUND IN THE 10:09:52 NEIGHBORHOOD TO YOU? I DON'T KNOW. 10:09:57 IT'S CERTAINLY OVER A BILLION. I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY STAFF IS. 10:10:00 WE CAN FOLLOW UP. WE'LL GET YOU THE EXACT 10:10:04 NUMBER. I'M ASSUMING THIS IS AN 10:10:06 ONGOING LEGAL ACTION BECAUSE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN NOT BEING 10:10:10 COMPLETED. IS THAT CORRECT? 10:10:11 NOT SPECIFICALLY YUCCA MOUNTAIN NOT BEING COMPLETED. 10:10:15 IT'S A LEGAL ACTION IN THE SENSE THAT WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO 10:10:21 PROVIDE FOR THE STORAGE OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE AND AS WE EXCEED 10:10:27 THAT, WHAT HAPPENS IS, AND THE NRC HAS DETERMINED THAT DRY CAST 10:10:31 STORAGE AT THE SITE IS A SAFE PROCEDURE FOR AT LEAST A HALF 10:10:37 CENTURY, BUT WE WILL BE STILL OBLIGATED TO REIMBURSE THE 10:10:40 COMPANIES. WE DON'T HAVE THE CAPABILITY 10:10:42 TO TAKE CARE OF IT RIGHT NOW. EXACTLY. 10:10:44 MY LAST QUESTION, THIS WOULD JUST NOT BE A QUESTION BUT ASK 10:10:48 FOR INFORMATION. WOULD YOUR STAFF BE ABLE TO 10:10:50 PROVIDE ME INFORMATION ON THE DOLLAR VALUE OF LOANS, LOAN 10:10:56 GUARANTIES AND/OR GRANTS THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MAY BE 10:11:01 MAKING FOR WIND AND SOLAR PROJECTS IN THE U.S. 10:11:04 YES, WE WOULD BE ABLE TO. IN THE SENSE OF THE ONES WE'VE 10:11:09 OFFERED CONDITIONAL COMMITMENTS OR HAVE CLOSED. 10:11:11 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME, I RECOGNIZE THE 10:11:14 GENTLEMAN FROM ILLINOIS FOR FIVE MINUTES. 10:11:17 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. MR. SECRETARY, IT'S GOOD TO SEE 10:11:21 YOU AGAIN BEFORE THE COMMITTEE. I'M GOING TO GET MY QUESTION 10:11:30 ABOUT JAPAN ASKED AND OVER WITH. FIRST QUESTION I HAVE. 10:11:40 AS FAR AS SECURITY, CAN YOU ASSURE THE MEMBERS OF THIS 10:11:48 COMMITTEE, THE AMERICAN PUBLIC THAT WHAT HAPPENED IN JAPAN 10:11:56 CANNOT HAPPEN HERE IN AMERICA AT ANY OF OUR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS? 10:12:03 WE ARE GOING TO BE LOOKING VERY, VERY CLOSELY AT THE EVENTS 10:12:07 HAPPENING IN JAPAN AND TAKE THOSE LESSONS AND YOU CAN BE 10:12:12 ASSURED THAT WITH THE NRC LEADING, BUT THE DEPARTMENT OF 10:12:19 ENERGY PROVIDING ANY ASSISTANCE TO LOOK AGAIN AT THE CURRENT 10:12:22 EXISTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS AND ANY THAT ARE BEING 10:12:25 CONSIDERED FOR DESIGN, TO LOOK VERY HARD AND SEE HOW ONE CAN, 10:12:31 IF POSSIBLE, UPGRADE THE SECURITY. 10:12:34 WE DON'T BELIEVE THERE IS ANY DANGER, BUT IN ANY INCIDENT LIKE 10:12:41 THIS, WHEN THERE ARE TRULY UNFORTUNATE EVENTS LIKE WHAT 10:12:44 WE'RE SEEING IN JAPAN, WHAT WE DO IS WE LOOK AND LEARN FROM 10:12:49 THAT. THIS IS TRUE OF ALL THE 10:12:52 TECHNOLOGY, TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES, ENERGY TELLING 10:12:55 KNOWLEDGES, YOU NAME IT. WE WILL BE LOOKING VERY 10:12:58 CAREFULLY AND GATHERING WHATEVER LESSONS THAT CAN BE LEARNED FROM 10:13:01 THAT DOUBLE DISASTER OF THE FOURTH LARGEST EARTHQUAKE IN 10:13:05 RECORDED HISTORY AND HUGE TSUNAMI, SO WE WILL TAKE THOSE 10:13:10 LESSONS AND APPLY THEM TO ALL THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES WE HAVE 10:13:14 IN THE UNITED STATES, NOT ONLY EARTHQUAKES, BUT VIOLENT STORMS, 10:13:20 EVERYTHING. ANYTHING THAT COULD AFFECT THEM. 10:13:23 I'VE BEEN TOLD, MR. SECRETARY, THAT AS FAR AS 10:13:30 NATURAL DISASTERS, THAT IT WOULD BE FAIRLY DIFFICULT TO HAVE 10:13:40 REPEATED WHAT HAPPENED IN JAPAN HAPPEN HERE IN AMERICA AS FAR AS 10:13:46 NATURAL MANMADE DISASTERS. I'VE ALSO BEEN TOLD THAT OUR 10:13:48 NUMBER ONE THREAT TO OUR NUCLEAR FACILITIES IS TERRORISM. 10:13:56 THAT IS REALLY WHAT WE SHOULD ALSO KEEP OUR SHARP EYE ON, THE 10:14:02 THREATS OF TERRORISM TO OUR NUCLEAR FACILITIES. 10:14:06 CAN YOU EXPOUND ON WHAT THE LEVEL OF ACTIVITY AT THE DOE AND 10:14:11 YOU HAVE COMMITTED AND WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR COUNTERING ANY 10:14:20 TERRORISTIC ATTACK THAT MIGHT WIND UP HAVING THE SAME RESULTS 10:14:24 OR EVEN DIFFERENT RESULTS? WELL, ALL THE CIVILIAN 10:14:25 NUCLEAR FACILITIES ARE TASKED TO HAVE VERY HIGH SECURITY 10:14:33 MEASURES. I CAN CERTAINLY VOUCH FOR THE 10:14:36 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR FACILITIES. 10:14:38 THEY HAVE EXTRAORDINARILY HIGH S 10:14:42 SECURITY MEASURES. I WOULD RATHER SAY WHETHER 10:14:46 TERRORISM OR NATURAL DISASTERS IS HIGHER OR LOWER, WE AT THE 10:14:51 NRC ARE VERY FOCUSED ON ACTUAL LIE PREVENTING EITHER FROM 10:14:57 HAPPENING. I'M GOING TO SHIFT THE 10:15:01 DIRECTION. SECTION 1425 OF HR-1, THE 10:15:05 REPUBLICAN PROPOSED CONTINUED RESOLUTION PLAN WILL RESCIND 25 10:15:08 BILLION OF THE 47 BILLION IN DOE'S LOAN GUARANTY PROGRAM 10:15:13 UNDER TITLE 17 WHICH INCLUDES FUNDING FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY AND 10:15:16 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS. CAN YOU SPEAK ON THE IMPACT OF 10:15:21 CUTTING FUNDS FOR RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY UNDER THE DOE 10:15:27 PROGRAM? HOW IMPORTANT IS IT THAT WE 10:15:30 INVEST IN RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY? 10:15:32 YES, IN OUR BUDGET REQUEST, WE ASK FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDS TO 10:15:36 HELP 170 FIVE LOAN GUARANTIES BUT EXPANDED AUTHORITY SO WE CAN 10:15:42 INVEST IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGIES AS WELL, BECAUSE 10:15:45 ENERGY NOT USED IS MONEY SAVED, ENERGY SAVED. 10:15:51 WITHOUT THAT ADDITIONAL LOAN GUARANTY AUTHORITY, MANY OF 10:15:57 THE PROJECTS THAT WOULD ALSO HELP UNLEASH PRIVATE CAPITAL AND 10:16:00 BRING THAT OFF TO THE SIDELINES WE'RE AFRAID WOULD NOT GO 10:16:04 FORWARD. THAT WOULD MEAN SIGNIFICANT 10:16:06 DECREASE IN THE JOB CREATION GOING FORWARD. 10:16:11 THAT WOULD MEAN -- IT WOULD REALLY SETBACK WHAT WE'RE TRYING 10:16:14 TO DO BOTH IN STARTING OUR ECONOMY AND ALSO, QUITE FRANKLY, 10:16:20 IN HAVING DEVELOPMENT SOURCE THAT WOULD GIVE A SIGNAL TO 10:16:24 INDUSTRIES IN THE UNITED STATES TO BE DEVELOPING THESE NEW 10:16:29 SOURCES. WE WANT TO GIVE THAT SIGNAL 10:16:31 BECAUSE IT'S A COMPETITIVE WORLD OUT THERE. 10:16:33 THERE'S GOING TO BE A RACE IN WHO DEVELOPS THESE TECHNOLOGIES 10:16:38 THAT WILL BE ABANDONED WORLDWIDE. 10:16:40 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME, I RECOGNIZE THE 10:16:43 GENTLEMAN FROM MICHIGAN FOR HIS QUESTIONS. 10:16:47 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. I HAVE A NUMBER OF QUESTIONS AND 10:16:50 I'LL ABIDE BY THE FIVE MINUTE RULE. 10:16:53 I MUST SAY THAT I HAVE THE SAME COMPLAINT WITH YOU AS I MAY HAVE 10:16:57 WITH YOUR PREDECESSORS, AT LEAST I THINK I HAVE A COMPLAINT WITH 10:17:01 YOU. THAT IS FROM TIME TO TIME, WE 10:17:04 HEAR THE DEPARTMENT GIVE ITS ESTIMATES AND AT LEAST WHEN I 10:17:08 HEAR THEM, I WONDER IF WE'RE NOT GOING TO HIT THEM BY THE END OF 10:17:13 THE WEEK AND NOT BY MEMORIAL DAY. 10:17:15 LAST WEEK, I HEARD A NATIONAL REPORT THAT THE DEPARTMENT WAS 10:17:20 INDICATING THAT THEY THOUGHT GAS PRICES WOULD BE $3.70 BY 10:17:27 MEMORIAL DAY. THE PARTICULAR GAS STATION I WAS 10:17:29 PASSING THAT DAY GOING INTO THE OFFICE FROM NORTHERN VIRGINIA 10:17:33 WAS ALREADY AT $3.89. IT'S HIGHER THAN THAT IN A LOT 10:17:37 OF PLACES AROUND THE COUNTRY. "USA TODAY" HAD A HEADLINE, MUST 10:17:42 BE ABOUT A MONTH AGO, WILL GAS PRICES HIT $5 BY THE 4th OF 10:17:50 JULY. I LOOK AT THE ESTIMATES SHOWING 10:17:52 AS WE ALL KNOW, WE GET A THIRD OF OUR OIL FROM THE GULF, A 10:17:57 QUARTER OF A MILLION BARRELS LESS PER DAY THAN WE WERE 10:18:03 GETTING A NUMBER OF MONTHS AGO. WHEN YOU LOOK AT '09-12, THE DOE 10:18:11 INDICATES WE'RE GOING TO GET 450 MILLION BARRELS LESS PER DAY IN 10:18:15 '12 THAN WE GOT IN '09. AS ONE THAT BELIEVES IN SUPPLY 10:18:19 AND DEMAND. I SEE ALASKA HAS CONTINUED 10:18:23 DECLINES IN PRODUCTION. WHERE DO YOU THINK WE REALLY 10:18:27 WILL BE? THIS WAS AGAIN, BEFORE LIBYA, 10:18:29 BEFORE EGYPT, BEFORE ALL THE DIFFERENT THINGS WERE HAPPENING 10:18:32 IN THE MIDDLE EAST. WHERE DO YOU THINK WE'RE GOING 10:18:35 TO BE IN GAS PRICES, SOMETHING ON EVERY CONSUMER'S OR EVERY 10:18:40 HOUSEHOLD'S MIND ACROSS THE COUNTRY? 10:18:43 WELL, THERE'S AN OFFICIAL EIA PREDICTION AS YOU MENTIONED. 10:18:49 THEY MUST BE CAREER BUREAUCRATS. 10:18:54 THEY'RE THERE WHETHER IT'S REPUBLICAN OR DEMOCRATIC 10:18:57 ADMINISTRATION. IT'S ACTUALLY AN INDEPENDENT 10:18:59 ARM. IT IS? 10:19:00 IT'S INDEPENDENT OF ANY POLITICAL INFLUENCE, BUT IN ANY 10:19:07 CASE, CERTAINLY THE GAS PRICES IN WASHINGTON, D.C. ARE HIGHER 10:19:10 THAN THE AVERAGE IN THE COUNTRY. THE GAS PRICES IN CALIFORNIA. 10:19:13 I SEE THOSE SAME PRICES IN .MICHIGAN. 10:19:17 THEY WERE $3.80 THIS WEEK IN MICHIGAN. 10:19:19 I DON'T KNOW WHAT THE GAS PRICES ARE GOING TO BE THIS 10:19:24 SUMMER. THE MEAN PROJECTION IS $3.70 AS 10:19:28 YOU SAID. THERE ARE LARGE UNCERTAINTIES. 10:19:31 WE DON'T REALLY KNOW. I DON'T HAVE ANY BETTER CRYSTAL 10:19:37 BALL THAN YOU DO ON THAT. IN TERMS OF THE OIL PRODUCTION 10:19:44 IN THE UNITED STATES, AGAIN, THERE'S FIRST YOU WERE TALKING 10:19:50 ABOUT THE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WHAT'S GOING 10:19:53 TO BE PROJECTED. I BELIEVE YOU WERE TALKING ABOUT 10:19:56 THIS IS WHAT WAS HAPPENING BECAUSE THERE WAS A SUSPENSION 10:20:01 FOR AWHILE IN THE DEEP WATER EXPLORATION, THE OIL PRODUCTION 10:20:05 IN THE GULF HAS CONTINUED. THE SHALLOW WATER EXPLORATION 10:20:09 HAS CONTINUED, BUT THE DEEP WATER PERMITTING HAS BEGUN 10:20:13 AGAIN. IF YOU LOOK AT THE ACTUAL 10:20:15 PRODUCTION LEVELS, THEY'RE DOWN FROM THE PROJECTION FROM ONLY 10:20:19 FOUR OR FIVE MONTHS AGO AND THEY'RE DOWN AGAIN, ACCORDING TO 10:20:23 THE NUMBERS FROM THE TREND LINE FROM '09 TO '12. 10:20:28 THE ACTUAL FACT -- I DON'T WANT TO FOCUS JUST ON THE GULF. 10:20:32 IF YOU LOOK AT THE TOTAL OIL PRODUCTION, THERE ARE SOME 10:20:36 UNCERTAINTIES BUT WE'RE SEEING INCREASED PRODUCTION IN THE 10:20:40 CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND WE'RE EXPECTING TO SEE INCREASE 10:20:42 IN OIL PRODUCTION FROM SHALE ROCK. 10:20:47 AGAIN, IT'S UNCERTAIN HOW MUCH THAT WILL GROW, BUT IT'S A 10:20:52 COUPLE 100,000 BARRELS A DAY PRODUCTION. 10:20:54 IT COULD INCREASE TO OVER A MILLION BARRELS A DAY IN THE 10:20:57 NEAR FUTURE. AGAIN, WE DON'T KNOW. 10:20:59 IT'S THE TOTAL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES WE'RE ALSO 10:21:02 LOOKING AT. IN MY REMAINING TIME, LET ME 10:21:05 ASK TWO QUESTIONS. I KNOW YOU'VE BEEN IN CONTACT 10:21:11 WITH YOUR COUNTERPARTS IN JAPAN. IS THERE ANYTHING THEY HAVE 10:21:15 ASKED FOR WE HAVE NOT DONE? TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, 10:21:19 NO. THEY HAVE ACCEPTED OUR HELP IN 10:21:21 TERMS OF THE SERVICES, THE AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTERS, 10:21:25 THINGS OF THAT NATURE. WE ARE CONTINUING TO OFFER THEM 10:21:29 HELP AND THEY ARE ACCEPTING IT. I JUST NOTE TOO, I KNOW I 10:21:33 SAID MILLION. I MEANT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS IN 10:21:36 MY DECLINING PRODUCTION. I SAID 450 MILLION. 10:21:41 I ADDED THREE ZEROS. LAST QUESTION AND MY TWO 10:21:46 SECONDS. A NUMBER OF US SENT YOU A LETTER 10:21:48 BACK IN FEBRUARY ASKING QUESTIONS ABOUT THE NUCLEAR 10:21:51 WASTE POLICY ACT. IF YOU COULD TAKE A LOOK AT THE 10:21:54 LETTER AND GIVE US A RESPONSE. THAT WOULD BE TERRIFIC. 10:21:59 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME I RECOGNIZE THE 10:22:01 GENTLEMAN FROM CALIFORNIA FOR HIS QUESTIONS, FIVE MINUTES. 10:22:06 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. MR. SECRETARY, AFTER CHERNOBYL, 10:22:14 MANY SAID SUCH AN EVENT WOULD NOT HAPPEN IN THE UNITED STATES 10:22:17 BECAUSE THE SOVIET UNION'S SECTOR WAS NOT AS ADVANCED AS 10:22:21 OUR OWN. THERE WAS TRUTH TO THAT. 10:22:24 THE CHERNOBYL PLANT WAS NOT DESIGNED WITH MANY OF THE 10:22:28 SAFEGUARDS WE HAVE IN THE UNITED STATES BUT JAPAN IS A HIGHLY 10:22:35 DEVELOPED COUNTRY. IT'S TECHNOLOGICALLY 10:22:39 SOPHISTICATED. THERE IS MUCH CONCERN THAT A 10:22:42 SIMILAR ACCIDENT COULD OCCUR HERE IN THE UNITED STATES. 10:22:44 HOW DO YOU RESPOND TO THAT CONCERN? 10:22:47 FIRST I WOULD AGREE WITH YOU, THE REACTOR IN CHERNOBYL WAS A 10:22:52 DIFFERENT DESIGN. IT HAD POINTS OF INSTABILITY. 10:22:56 IT HAD NO CONTAINMENT VESSEL. WE ARE LOOKING VERY CAREFULLY AT 10:23:00 WHAT IS HAPPENING IN JAPAN BECAUSE AS YOU SAY, THEY'RE 10:23:04 USING MORE ADVANCED DESIGNS. A NUMBER OF THE REACTORS IN THE 10:23:10 UNITED STATES HAVE SIMILAR DESIGNS AND WE'RE GOING TO LOOK 10:23:13 AT WHAT WENT WRONG IN TERMS OF THIS DOUBLE BARRELED WHAMMY OF 10:23:18 THIS HUGE, HUGE EARTHQUAKE AND HUGE TSUNAMI AND LOOK TO OUR 10:23:23 REACTORS AGAIN AND LEARN AS MUCH AS WE CAN SO WE CAN, IF NEEDED, 10:23:29 IMPROVE THE SAFETY. BY IF NEEDED WHAT I REALLY MEAN 10:23:32 IS WE'RE ALWAYS INCREASING THE SAFETY OF OUR REACTORS. 10:23:35 NOT ONLY OUR REACTORS BUT THE SAFETY OF ALL OUR INDUSTRIAL 10:23:39 SYSTEMS. MR. SECRETARY, TWO DAYS AGO, 10:23:44 A NUMBER OF US WROTE TO CHAIRMAN UPTON, WHITFIELD AND STERNS 10:23:49 REQUESTING THAT OUR COMMITTEE INVESTIGATE AND HOLD HEARINGS 10:23:52 ABOUT THE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS OF NUCLEAR POWER 10:23:58 PLANTS IN THE UNITED STATES. DO YOU THINK WE SHOULD 10:23:59 INVESTIGATE THE ISSUES? I THINK THAT WILL NATURALLY 10:24:03 OCCUR ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE EVENTS THAT OCCURRED IN JAPAN. 10:24:06 WE WILL LOOK BACK AS WE LEARNED WHAT HAPPENED AND APPLY THOSE 10:24:10 LESSONS WHERE NEEDED TO ALL OF OUR NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS. 10:24:15 THAT WILL BE A NATURAL CONSEQUENCE. 10:24:16 NATURAL CONSEQUENCE FOR EVERYBODY TO LOOK AT IT, BUT 10:24:19 QUITE FRANKLY, I THINK WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY IN CONGRESS, NOT 10:24:23 JUST YOU IN YOUR POSITION, BUT WE IN THE CONGRESS, FOR OUR 10:24:28 OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIVE PURPOSES SINCE WE WRITE THE 10:24:32 LAWS. LET ME ASK YOU ABOUT THE LAWS 10:24:33 WE'RE IN THE MIDDLE OF WRITING. WE'RE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT OUR 10:24:37 ENERGY POLICY. IN THE REPUBLICAN ENERGY POLICY 10:24:39 SEEMS TO BE DEPENDING ON COAL, OIL AND NUCLEAR POWER. 10:24:45 THAT IS WHAT THEY LOOK TO FOR THE FUTURE. 10:24:50 IN FACT IT'S BEEN THE PAST. WE DO HAVE A PROBLEM OF CLIMATE 10:24:54 CHANGE, BECAUSE OF THE CARBON AND OTHER GREENHOUSE GASES. 10:24:57 WE DO HAVE A PROBLEM NOW THAT SO MUCH OF ALL OF OUR EGGS ARE IN 10:25:03 THE NUCLEAR BASKET. WHEN WE LOOK AT THE REPUBLICAN 10:25:08 BUDGET, THEY ARE PUTTING IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS OF 10:25:13 INVESTMENT AND THOUSANDS OF CONSTRUCTION PERMANENT JOBS ARE 10:25:17 ALL GOING TO NUCLEAR, BUT THEY'RE RESCINDING A LOT OF YOUR 10:25:21 BUDGET TO DEAL WITH OTHER THINGS THAT ARE CLEAN AND RELIABLE AND 10:25:25 SAFE, SUCH AS RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY. 10:25:31 JUST TO DRAMATIZE THIS ISSUE, THE REPUBLICANS ON -- 10:25:37 REPUBLICANS WOULD RESCIND 25 BILLION OF THE 47 BILLION IN 10:25:41 LOAN GUARANTY AUTHORITY THAT WAS PROVIDED TO YOU IN 2009. 10:25:45 BUT THEY WOULD PRESERVE $20.5 BILLION IN LOAN GUARANTIES FOR 10:25:51 NUCLEAR ENERGY WHILE LEAVING ONLY 1.5 BILLION FOR ALL OTHER 10:25:56 TECHNOLOGIES. THEY SAY FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE 10:25:59 STRATEGY. THAT'S AN ALL NUCLEAR STRATEGY 10:26:02 TO ME. IN THE TIME, I WOULD LIKE YOU TO 10:26:06 EXPLAIN WHY IT'S SO IMPORTANT FOR AMERICA TO BE LOOKING AT 10:26:10 THESE OTHER PROJECTS AS WE DEVISE OUR ENERGY STRATEGY TO 10:26:14 MOVE US AWAY FROM DEPENDENCE ON OIL AND COAL AND MAYBE EVEN 10:26:19 NUCLEAR FOR YOUR FUTURE? CERTAINLY. 10:26:22 IF YOU LOOK AT WHAT'S GOING TO BE HAPPENING IN THIS CENTURY, WE 10:26:27 BELIEVE, FOR EXAMPLE, THAT THE PROSPECT OF SOLAR POWER COMING 10:26:32 DOWN IN PRICE, THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY THINKS WITHIN IN 10:26:37 DECADE, THE COST OF SOLAR GENERATION OF ELECTRICITY WILL 10:26:41 BE CUT IN HALF. WE HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF WORK 10:26:45 GROUPS AND WE THINK IT'S VERY POSSIBLE THAT BY THE END OF 10:26:48 THIS -- NOT CENTURY, BUT BY THE END OF THIS DECADE, IT CAN 10:26:55 PERHAPS BE CUT TO 25% OF WHAT IT IS TODAY. 10:26:58 THEY WILL BE COMPETITIVE IF WE MAKE INVESTMENTS IN THEM. 10:27:01 IT WILL BE VERY COMPETITIVE AND REALIZING THAT THERE IS A 10:27:05 HIGH PROBABILITY, REASONABLE PROBABILITY THAT SOLAR ENERGY 10:27:11 COULD BE COMPETITIVE WITH FOSSIL FUEL BY THE END OF THIS 10:27:14 DECADE -- NUCLEAR ENERGY IS NOT 10:27:17 COMPETITIVE UNLESS THE GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIZES IT, ISN'T 10:27:25 THAT CORRECT? AT THE MOMENT, I THINK 10:27:29 NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLES DO NEED HELP, BUT GOING FORWARD, WE'RE 10:27:33 TRYING TO FIGURE OUT A PLAN WHERE NONE OF THOSE WILL NEED 10:27:37 SUBSIDY. GENTLEMAN'S TIME IS EXPIRED. 10:27:40 AT THIS TIME, I RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN FROM ILLINOIS FOR FIVE 10:27:42 MINUTES. THANK YOU. 10:27:44 AGAIN, MR. SECRETARY, WELCOME. I'VE GOT A LOT OF QUESTIONS. 10:27:47 I'M GOING TO TRY TO GO, NOT DISRESPECTFUL BUT GET THROUGH MY 10:27:51 LIST. I'LL SAY TO THE CHAIRMAN 10:27:54 EMERITUS. THAT'S WHY COAL WILL STILL BE 10:27:56 KING, BECAUSE IT ADDRESSES THE MARKET ISSUES AND COAL WILL HAVE 10:28:00 A MAJOR ISSUE IN OUR PORTFOLIO FOR YEARS TO COME. 10:28:03 JUST AN ISSUE, I HAD A VISIT BY A BATTERY TECHNOLOGY GUY WHO 10:28:07 SAID HE WAS LAUGHED OUT OF YOUR BATTERY OFFICE. 10:28:10 MY CONCERN IS THAT THE DOE MAY BE SO BIG AND ALREADY HAVE A 10:28:18 DESIGN BELIEF ON BATTERY TECHNOLOGY THAT IF SOMEONE COMES 10:28:21 WITH SOMETHING NEW, THEY'RE NOT GOING TO GET A GOOD HEARING. 10:28:24 CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS LATER ON AND VISIT WITH THIS? 10:28:27 SURE. IF WE'RE GOING TO DO 10:28:30 RESEARCH, WE DON'T WANT TO HAVE, BECAUSE WE PUT BILLIONS OF 10:28:33 DOLLARS INTO ONE SECTOR, IF A NEW ENTRY COMES IN THAT MAY 10:28:36 OFFER MORE, WE WANT TO GIVE THEM A FAIR HEARING. 10:28:40 CAN YOU DEFINE CLEAN? WELL, WE CAN START WITH WHAT 10:28:45 WE ALL RECOGNIZE TRADITIONAL POLLUTE APTS, SULFUR DIOXIDE, 10:28:51 MERCURY, PARTICULATE MATTER. ALSO INCLUDES CARBON DIOXIDE. 10:28:56 THAT'S GOOD, BECAUSE A LOT OF PEOPLE WILL NOT ADD THAT. 10:29:00 THEY'LL SAY CLEAN BUT THEY WON'T ADDRESS THE CO 2 ISSUE. 10:29:04 JUST A MESSAGE, WAXMAN MARKEY FAILED BECAUSE THE PUBLIC 10:29:14 DECIDED TO NOT PRICE CARBON. WE HAD THAT ARGUMENT YESTERDAY. 10:29:18 WE HAVE A BILL MOVING THROUGH THE FLOOR OF THE HOUSE THAT WILL 10:29:24 START ADDRESSING THE EPA, BUT WE NEED ANOTHER APPROACH. 10:29:28 I WOULD SAY ENERGY SECURITY IS A BETTER WAY TO BRING BOTH SIDES 10:29:32 TOGETHER THAN PRICING CARBON. DOE WAS ESTABLISHED IN WHAT? 10:29:37 1977? AROUND THAT TIME, 75. 10:29:39 OUR RELIANCE ON IMPORTED CRUDE OIL WAS WHAT PERCENT AT 10:29:44 THAT TIME? I'M GOING TO TAKE A WILD 10:29:46 STAB, SOMETHING AROUND 25%. I THOUGHT MAYBE 35. 10:29:50 WHAT IS IT TODAY? IT'S ABOUT 50, 51%. 10:29:53 CAN WE SAY THAT WE'VE MADE ANY GREAT STRIDES BY HAVING THE 10:29:59 DOE HERE OVER 25 YEARS? NO. 10:30:02 IN FACT A LITTLE WHILE AGO, IT WAS CLOSE TO 60%. 10:30:04 THANK YOU. THAT IS A POINT. 10:30:09 FUTURE GEN 2.0, IS THAT REALLY BUSH GEN 1.0? 10:30:15 NO. LET ME EXPLAIN. 10:30:17 I FOLLOW FUTURE GEN A LOT. FUTURE GEN WAS A NEW COAL FIRED 10:30:21 PLANT THAT WOULD GO TO HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY AND A RESEARCH 10:30:26 CENTER. BUSH TUBED IT. 10:30:28 SAID LET'S GAS FIE COAL IN EXISTING PLANS AND CCS. 10:30:34 ISN'T THAT WHAT FUTURE GEN 2.0 IS? 10:30:37 NO. IT WAS A GASIFICATION CAPTURE 10:30:41 AND STORAGE. USING HYDROGEN TURBINES? 10:30:44 YES, GAS TURBINES MOSTLY. MY POINT IS, JUST FOR 10:30:50 CLARITY, WHEN RETROFITTING MORIDOSHA WITH CURRENT 10:30:57 TECHNOLOGY, GASIFICATION, THAT REALLY WAS THE BUSH PLAN. 10:31:01 THAT IS WHAT BODMAN WAS MOVING TO DO, IS THAT CORRECT? 10:31:04 CERTAINLY, THE TAKING OF A COMMERCIAL SCALE POWER PLANT, 10:31:09 CAPTURING THE CARBON DIOXIDE AND SEQUESTERING IT WAS A BUSH PLAN. 10:31:14 THIS IS SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT BECAUSE IT'S BURNING IN AN 10:31:18 OXYGEN ATMOSPHERE. I GOT THE ANSWER I NEEDED. 10:31:22 WE WANT TO DECREASE RELIANCE ON IMPORTED CRUDE OIL. 10:31:27 SENATOR OBAMA JOINED SENATOR BUNTING TO PUSH A CODE OF LIQUID 10:31:32 LEGISLATION THROUGH THE SENATE. WHAT IS THE DOE'S POSITION? 10:31:37 WE THINK IT'S SOMETHING TO LOOK AT. 10:31:40 THERE'S NEW COAL TO LIQUID TECHNOLOGIES. 10:31:44 NEW ONES THAT ARE MORE EFFICIENT. 10:31:47 WE HAVE TO CAPTURE THE CARBON DIOXIDE, THE EXCESS CARBON 10:31:52 DIOXIDE IN THOSE TECHNOLOGIES. THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF 10:31:56 SCIENCES, AMERICA'S ENERGY FUTURE, HAS ISSUED A REPORT 10:31:58 LOOKING AT THE MIXTURE OF COAL PLUS BIOMASS GASIFICATION 10:32:05 METHODS TO CREATE LIQUIDS WITH CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE. 10:32:08 IT'S MY UNDERSTANDING THE CARBON FOOTPRINTS IS LOWER THAN 10:32:11 CRUDE OIL REFINERIES IN THAT DESIGN? 10:32:13 SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER. ONCE YOU EXCEED 30% OF BIOMASS, 10:32:18 IT ACTUALLY BECOMES NEGATIVE. LAST QUESTION IS ONE OF THE 10:32:23 RISKS IN JAPAN IS THAT ONE OF THE DECOMMISSIONED OR OFFLINE 10:32:28 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS HAD A STORAGE POOL THAT WENT DRY, IS 10:32:31 THAT CORRECT? WE DON'T KNOW. 10:32:33 AT LEAST THAT'S WHAT THE INDUSTRY REPORTS ARE. 10:32:38 THERE ARE SO MANY CONFLICTING REPORTS. 10:32:39 LET ME MAKE THIS POINT AND I'LL BE DONE. 10:32:42 THERE ARE 11 POOLS WITHIN 40 MILES OF DOWNTOWN CHICAGO. 10:32:47 WOULDN'T IT MAKE SENSE TO HAVE ONE CENTER LOCATION FOR STORAGE 10:32:51 OF HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE LIKE YOU IDENTIFIED IN YOUR REPORT 10:32:56 WHEN OR THE LAB DIRECTOR, WHEN YOU SAID LICENSING OF YUCCA 10:33:00 MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY HAS A LONG RANGE RESOURCE WITH ONE OF THE 10:33:04 FINDINGS. WE'RE TALKING ABOUT TWO 10:33:05 DIFFERENT THINGS. IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR SITE, 10:33:08 IMMEDIATELY AFTER YOU TAKE OUT THE RODS AND PUT THEM IN, YOU 10:33:11 NEED TO PUT THEM IN WATER POOLS. THAT IS A VERY SHORT TERM 10:33:15 STORAGE. YUCCA MOUNTAIN IS A LONG TERM. 10:33:18 FOLKS ARE HOLDING NUCLEAR WASTE POOLS THINK IT'S LONG M 10:33:28 TERM. GENTLEMAN'S TIME IS EXPIRED. 10:33:29 RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN FROM TEXAS FOR FIVE MINUTES. 10:33:30 MR. SECRETARY, IN THE LINE OF QUESTIONING, WE HAD A LOT OF 10:33:36 QUESTIONS, MEMBERS TALKING ABOUT SOLAR AND WIND. 10:33:39 DOES EITHER SOLAR OR WIND HAVE THE POTENTIAL IN THE NEXT TEN 10:33:44 YEARS OF EVER BECOMING A STABILIZED BASE LOAD LIKE COAL 10:33:48 OR NUCLEAR OR NATURAL GAS? IT DEPENDS ON THE DEVELOPMENT 10:33:52 OF ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES ALONG WITH THAT. 10:33:57 YOU KNOW THEY'RE VARIABLE. WHEN THE SUN STOPS SHINING 10:34:02 THEY'RE NO LONGER GENERATING ELECTRICITY. 10:34:05 IT WOULD HAVE TO DEPEND ON THAT. BEFORE THAT HAPPENS, I THINK IT 10:34:08 CAN GO TO A REASONABLE FRACTION OF OUR ELECTRICITY USE. 10:34:13 ISLAND COUNTRIES LIKE IRELAND HAVE 20% WIND COUPLED WITH 10:34:18 FOSSIL FUEL. IS THERE ANY COUNTRY IN THE 10:34:22 WORLD, I KNOW DENMARK HAS LED, WHAT IS THE PERCENTAGE OF WIND, 10:34:28 FOR EXAMPLE IN DENMARK? IT'S A LITTLE OVER 20. 10:34:31 20, 25%. IT'S COUPLED INTO A MASSIVE GRID 10:34:35 AND SO IRELAND IS A BETTER EXAMPLE BECAUSE THEY HAVE TO BE 10:34:39 SELF SUFFICIENT. WITH OUR GRIDS, WE HAVE IT 10:34:43 MUCH MORE DIFFICULT. BECAUSE TEXAS IS OUR OWN AND OF 10:34:46 COURSE THE EAST AND WEST COAST. LET ME ASK YOU ANOTHER QUESTION. 10:34:51 THE ADMINISTRATION HAS PROPOSED REPEALING NUMEROUS SUBSIDIES ON 10:34:55 FOSSIL FUELS. ONE HAS BEEN PART OF THE U.S. 10:34:59 CODE SINCE 1926. ANOTHER HAS CREATED AND 10:35:04 MAINTAINED U.S. JOBS. I'M CONCERNED ABOUT THIS BECAUSE 10:35:06 INCREASING COSTS FOR DOMESTIC INDUSTRY WOULD JEOPARDIZE BOTH 10:35:10 SMALL BUSINESS JOBS BUT INCREASE OUR RELIANCE ON FOREIGN SOURCES 10:35:15 OF ENERGY. WOULD YOU AGREE THAT INCREASING 10:35:18 COSTS FOR DOMESTIC PRODUCTION MAY IMPACT OUR ABILITY TO 10:35:22 ADDRESS CLIMATE CHANGE BECAUSE WE FAIL TO PROVIDE NATURAL GAS 10:35:25 WHICH IS CLEANER BURNING AS A BRIDGE, WHATEVER WE HAVE, 10:35:29 WHETHER IT'S NUCLEAR, SOLAR, WHATEVER, TO MEET OUR SHORT TERM 10:35:34 CARBON REDUCTION GOALS THAT WE HOPE TO HAVE WHILE PROVIDING 10:35:38 AFFORDABLE AND RELIABLE SUPPLIES FOR ENERGY FOR AMERICAN 10:35:41 CONSUMERS? I WOULD SAY BASED ON WHAT'S 10:35:43 BEEN HAPPENING IN SHALE GAS AND THE LOWER GAS PRICES AND THE 10:35:47 ANTICIPATION FOR THE NEXT DECADE, POSSIBLY TWO DECADES, 10:35:51 NATURAL GAS PROVIDES WILL BE LOW, THERE WILL BE A NATURAL 10:35:56 MOVE TOWARDS GAS, BUT I WOULD ALSO SAY UTILITY COMPANIES AND 10:36:01 POWER GENERATORS ARE AWARE THAT YOU STILL WANT A DIVERSE SET OF 10:36:05 ENERGY SOURCES. I KNOW WHAT COULD HURT US ON 10:36:09 OUR NATURAL GAS SUCCESS IN OUR COUNTRY. 10:36:11 WE PAY ACTUALLY LESS PER MCF THAN ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE WORLD 10:36:17 FOR NATURAL GAS BECAUSE OF OUR SUCCESS. 10:36:20 EITHER TAX INCREASES OR LIMITATION ON HYDRO FRACCING 10:36:25 COULD ELIMINATE THAT, SO I WOULD CAUTION YOU. 10:36:29 TO JUMP START THE DOMESTIC NUCLEAR ENERGY, YOUR BUDGET 10:36:36 REQUESTS 36 BILLION. HOW MANY PROJECTS DO YOU THINK 10:36:39 WE WOULD BE ABLE TO SUPPORT WITH THAT, EVEN WITH THE TRAGEDY 10:36:43 THAT'S HAPPENED IN THE LAST FEW DAYS. 10:36:45 DO YOU STILL THINK WE OUGHT TO GO FORWARD AFTER TAKING A 10:36:51 BREATH, FOR EXAMPLE AND SAYING OKAY, WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO 10:36:53 DIFFERENT? DO YOU STILL THINK WE NEED TO GO 10:36:54 FORWARD AND EXPAND NUCLEAR POWER IN OUR COUNTRY? 10:36:56 FIRST I AGREE WITH YOU. I THINK BASED ON THE EVENTS IN 10:37:00 JAPAN, WE NEED TO LOOK HARDER AT THESE PROJECTS AND GUARANTEE 10:37:05 THAT THEY CAN GO FORWARD IN A SAFE WAY. 10:37:08 TO YOUR SPECIFIC QUESTION OF THE $36 BILLION, WE BELIEVE SHOULD 10:37:11 BE ABLE TO FUND SOMETHING LIKE SIX TO EIGHT PROJECTS THAT THE 10:37:19 LOAN GUARANTIES COULD GET SIX TO EIGHT PROJECTS GOING, THEN WE 10:37:24 BELIEVE IF THEY CAN PROCEED AND BE BUILT ON TIME, ON SCHEDULE, 10:37:30 THERE WOULD BE ENOUGH CONFIDENCE THAT THE PRIVATE SECTOR SHOULD 10:37:35 BE ABLE TO PICK THAT UP. OKAY. 10:37:38 IN THE PRESIDENT'S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS, HE HAD A GOAL OF 10:37:41 CLEAN ENERGY SOURCES TO ACCOUNT FOR 80% OF AMERICAN'S 10:37:46 ELECTRICITY BY 2035. IF WE SHOULD DOWN OUR EXPANSION 10:37:50 OF NUCLEAR POWER LIKE WE DID AFTER THREE MILE ISLAND AND 10:38:04 CHERNOBYL? WE ARE 40% CLEAN BY THIS 10:38:08 DEFINITION WHERE YOU ACCOUNT FOR NATURAL GAS COMBINED CYCLE 10:38:11 NATURAL GAS GIVING HALF CREDIT, BUT I THINK WE WILL NEED 10:38:16 CERTAINLY A LARGE INCREASE IN WIND AND SOLAR. 10:38:19 WE WILL NEED CLEAN COAL AND I BELIEVE WE WILL NEED TO HAVE 10:38:23 SOME FRACTION COMING FROM NUCLEAR. 10:38:27 I WAS SURPRISED AND I KNOW ENERGY INFORMATION INSTITUTE, 10:38:31 MR. CHAIRMAN, LET ME -- I WAS SURPRISED AT THE BILLIONS OF 10:38:36 KILOWATT HOURS COMPARED TO JAPAN. 10:38:43 IN MY AREA IN HOUSTON, WE'RE FLAT, WE DON'T HAVE THE OPTION 10:38:48 FOR HYDRO POWER LIKE THE WEST COAST AND OTHER AREAS. 10:38:51 WE HAVE TO LOOK AT NATURAL GAS AND NUCLEAR AND COAL. 10:38:54 THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE. I RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN 10:38:59 FROM TEXAS, MR. BARTON, FOR FIVE MINUTES. 10:39:04 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. IN LIGHT OF WHAT'S HAPPENED IN 10:39:08 JAPAN, I WOULD LIKE TO HEAR WHAT YOU BELIEVE PRESIDENT OBAMA'S 10:39:13 POSITION IS ON NUCLEAR POWER GENERALLY IN THE UNITED STATES? 10:39:16 DOES HE STILL SUPPORT A REBIRTH OF NUCLEAR POWER AND 10:39:22 CONSTRUCTION OF NEW PLANTS? CAN YOU GIVE US YOUR BEST 10:39:25 ESTIMATE OF WHAT HIS POSITION IS? 10:39:29 I THINK THE PRESIDENT AND THE ADMINISTRATION BELIEVES THAT WE 10:39:32 HAVE TO BE LOOKING VERY CLOSELY AT THE EVENTS IN JAPAN. 10:39:35 AS WE SAID BEFORE, WE HAVE TO APPLY WHATEVER LESSONS THAT CAN 10:39:40 BE AND WILL BE LEARNED FROM WHAT HAS HAPPENED AND IS HAPPENING IN 10:39:44 JAPAN WITH THOSE LESSONS WOULD THEN BE APPLIED TO FIRST LOOK AT 10:39:48 OUR CURRENT, EXISTING FLEET OF REACTORS TO MAKE SURE THEY CAN 10:39:52 BE USED SAFELY AND ALSO TO LOOK AT HOW AS ONE PROCEEDS FORWARD, 10:39:59 ANY LESSONS LEARN CAN BE APPLIED. 10:40:03 IT WOULD BE PREMATURE TO SAY ANYTHING OTHER THAN WE WILL USE 10:40:06 THIS OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN AS BEST WE CAN. 10:40:10 CONSIDER CAREFULLY HOW TO GO FORWARD. 10:40:13 I'M NOT SURE WHAT YOU JUST SAID. 10:40:15 OKAY. DOES THE PRESIDENT SUPPORT 10:40:18 NEW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONSTRUCTION IN THE UNITED 10:40:22 STATES? THE PRESENT BUDGET IS WHAT IT 10:40:27 IS. WE'RE ASKING FOR LOAN 10:40:29 GUARANTIES. THE PRESENT BUDGET IS ALSO 10:40:34 CALLING FOR SMALL MODULE REACTORS. 10:40:37 THAT POSITION HAS NOT BEEN CHANGED. 10:40:39 THAT'S A YES? THAT'S A YES. 10:40:40 THAT'S WHAT I WANTED YOU TO SAY. 10:40:44 NOW, WITH REGARD TO THE LOAN GUARANTIES THAT YOU JUST 10:40:51 MENTIONED, GIVEN AGAIN WHAT'S HAPPENED, DO YOU AND THE 10:40:55 PRESIDENT WANT THE CONGRESS TO SUPPORT THE FULL 36 BILLION THAT 10:41:00 YOU HAVE PUT IN THE PRESIDENT'S BUDGET? 10:41:02 YES. YOU'RE LEARNING. 10:41:05 YOU'RE NOT A NOBEL PRIZE WINNER FOR NOTHING. 10:41:09 THIS ONE IS GOING TO BE A LITTLE BIT TRICKIER. 10:41:14 YOU'RE A FORMER DIRECTOR OF A NATIONAL LABORATORY AND DID AN 10:41:17 EXCELLENT JOB. I'M A STRONG SUPPORTER OF THE 10:41:20 NATIONAL LABORATORIES. AT ONE TIME I HOPED TO HAVE ONE 10:41:24 IN TEXAS, THE SUPERER LABORATORY THAT WASN'T FUNDED UNDER 10:41:28 PRESIDENT CLINTON. HAVING SAID THAT, GIVEN THE 10:41:32 SITUATION OF OUR BUDGET, DO YOU THINK IT MIGHT BE TIME TO 10:41:38 REEVALUATE THE NUMBER OF NATIONAL LABORATORIES AND 10:41:42 PERHAPS BEGIN UP WITH A PLAN TO REORGANIZE AND CONSOLIDATE THEM? 10:41:48 YOU'RE RIGHT. THAT'S A TOUGHY. 10:41:52 I WOULD SAY -- I WOULD SAY BEFORE WE DO THAT, LS A LOT OF 10:41:57 OTHER THINGS WE CAN DO TO LOOK AT HOW WE GET REAL EFFICIENCIES 10:42:01 IN WHAT WE DO. EVEN THOUGH THE PRESIDENT AND I 10:42:05 FIRMLY BELIEVE THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WILL PLAY A 10:42:10 CRITICAL ROLE IN GUARANTEEING THE FUTURE PROS PARITY IN THE 10:42:15 UNITED STATES IN THIS RECENT DEVELOPMENT. 10:42:17 WE DO ALSO RECOGNIZE THAT WE HAVE TO LOOK TO GAIN 10:42:22 EFFICIENCIES WHEREVER WE CAN AND TO STREAMLINE WHAT WE DO, 10:42:27 KNOWING THAT ULTIMATELY THE MONEY WE GIVE TO UNIVERSITIES, 10:42:30 NATIONAL LABORATORIES AND HELP RESEARCH IN BUSINESSES, THAT'S 10:42:35 OUR REAL JOB AND THE OTHER STRUCTURES ARE THERE TO ENSURE 10:42:38 THAT WE DO THIS IN THE MOST INTELLIGENT WAY POSSIBLE. 10:42:45 WE'RE GOING TO BE WORKING VERY HARD TO LOOK AT HOW WE CAN 10:42:49 INCREASE THOSE EFFICIENCIES. I SUPPORT THE NATIONAL 10:42:54 LABORATORIES BUT I DO THINK WE OUGHT TO BEGIN TO REEVALUATE 10:42:58 THEM IN LIGHT OF THE BUDGET AND ALSO THE FACT THAT PERHAPS SOME 10:43:01 OF THEIR MISSIONS ARE NOT QUITE WHAT THEY WERE WHEN THEY WERE 10:43:04 ORIGINALLY ESTABLISHED. MY LAST QUESTION IS AGAIN 10:43:08 SOMETHING THAT'S OF A SENSITIVE NATURE. 10:43:11 WE HAVE HAD REPEATED SECURITY VIOLATIONS AT THE SAN DEA 10:43:22 NATIONAL LABORATORY AT LOS ALAMOS, THERE HAVE BEEN A NUMBER 10:43:26 OF SPECIAL TASK FORCES TRYING TO GET CONTROL OF THE SECURITY 10:43:33 SITUATION IN TERMS OF OUR NATIONAL SECRETS IN THOSE 10:43:36 INSTITUTIONS. CAN YOU TELL THE COMMITTEE WHAT 10:43:37 THE STATUS IS OF TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT THOSE TWO LABORATORIES 10:43:42 ARE SECURE IN TERMS OF THE SECRETS THAT WE HAVE OUT THERE? 10:43:46 I THINK THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TAKES THE SECURITY VERY 10:43:52 SERIOUSLY, NOT ONLY LOS ALMOS BUT OTHER PLACES. 10:44:04 WE TAKE THOSE VERY SERIOUSLY. I CAN GIVE YOU THE DETAILS. 10:44:08 I HAVE A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT VIEW THAN YOU ON THE NUMBER OF 10:44:13 SECURITY VIOLATIONS, BUT EVERY ONE WE TAKE SERIOUSLY. 10:44:16 WE WOULD BE GLAD TO BRIEF YOU AND YOUR STAFF. 10:44:18 I APPRECIATE THAT. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN FOR THE 10:44:21 COURTESY OF GIVING ME THE TIME TO ASK QUESTIONS. 10:44:23 AT THIS TIME, I RECOGNIZE THE GENTLE LADY FROM CALIFORNIA. 10:44:29 THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIMELY TESTIMONY. 10:44:32 I RECENTLY TOURED THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE FOR 10:44:35 ENERGY EFFICIENCY WHICH WAS NAMED A FRONTIER RESEARCH CENTER 10:44:40 BY YOUR DEPARTMENT. I WAS PLEASED YOU MENTIONED YOUR 10:44:42 SUPPORT FOR THIS PROGRAM IN YOUR TESTIMONY. 10:44:44 AS YOU KNOW, THIS CENTER IS RESEARCHING ENERGY SAVINGS IN 10:44:49 SOLID STATE LIGHTING. I'M SO IMPRESSED BY THE WORK OF 10:44:52 THE PROFESSORS AND THE STUDENTS, ESPECIALLY THEIR COMMITMENTS TO 10:44:55 THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES LIKE LEDs. 10:44:59 WOULD YOU TALK FOR A MINUTE OR TWO ABOUT HOW BUDGET REQUESTS 10:45:04 WILL -- YOUR BUDGET REQUEST WILL SUPPORT THE ADMINISTRATION'S 10:45:07 EFFORT TO GET PROJECTS FROM THE LABORATORY AND THE MARKETPLACE 10:45:10 WITH A DIRECT IMPACT ON THE ECONOMY? 10:45:13 CERTAINLY. I THINK THE BUDGET REQUEST IN 10:45:17 THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE THAT IS FUNDING THE GROUP YOU'RE 10:45:19 SPEAKING ABOUT IS PRECISELY THE KIND OF RESEARCH WE WILL NEED TO 10:45:24 ENSURE AMERICA STAYS AT THE FOREFRONT IN THESE DEVELOPING 10:45:29 TECHNOLOGIES. IT IS A VERY COMPETITIVE WORLD 10:45:30 OUT THERE. CURRENTLY THE UNITED STATES DOES 10:45:33 MAKE THE BEST LEDs BUT WE CAN EASILY LOSE THAT LEAD, KOREA, 10:45:40 CHINA, JAPAN, EUROPE WANTS TO TAKE THIS AWAY. 10:45:42 IN THE MEANTIME, WE'RE ACTUALLY TRYING TO RECAPTURE THE LEAD IN 10:45:46 THINGS WE HAVE LOST, ADVANCED BATTERY TECHNOLOGY AND WHAT WE 10:45:49 ARE SEEING COMING OUT OF THE UNIVERSITIES AND NATIONAL LABS 10:45:53 ARE THE NEXT GENERATION OF NEW BATTERIES WHERE I THINK WE CAN 10:45:58 RECAPTURE THAT LEAD. THESE ARE MULTI BILLION DOLLAR 10:46:02 MARKETS IN THE FUTURE. THIS GOES TO THE HEART OF WHAT 10:46:06 THE BUDGET REQUEST IS ABOUT, THAT IN THIS VERY COMPETITIVE 10:46:11 WORLD WHERE ALL OTHER COUNTRIES AND COMPANIES ARE TRYING TO SAY 10:46:14 WE WANT TO OWN THIS CHAIR, THIS IS WHAT'S GOING TO BE AT RISK. 10:46:19 THANK YOU. I ALSO WANT TO ASK YOU ABOUT THE 10:46:22 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM. DECREASED SUPPORT FOR THESE 10:46:26 PROGRAMS WILL LIMIT EFFICIENCY AID TO SMALL BUSINESSES AND 10:46:29 FAMILY AS WELL AS TO OUR LOCAL GOVERNMENTS. 10:46:31 AS YOU MENTIONED EARLIER, EFFICIENCIES WILL PRODUCE MAJOR 10:46:34 ENERGY AND COST SAVINGS. THAT'S BEEN CLEARLY DEMONSTRATED 10:46:37 OVER TIME. I'VE BEEN TOLD THE STATE ENERGY 10:46:40 PROGRAM HAS REDUCED KOFGS SAVINGS OF $300 MILLION 10:46:44 ANNUALLY. IT LEVERAGES $10 IN PRIVATE 10:46:48 MONEY OF EVERY DOLLAR OF GOVERNMENT MONEY SPENT. 10:46:51 WOULD YOU DESCRIBE HOW THE CUTS IN THE STATE ENERGY PROGRAM, 10:46:54 PARTICULARLY THOSED IN HR-1 WILL AFFECT LOCAL CLEAN ENERGY 10:47:01 INITIATIVES? WOULD YOU ANTICIPATE JOB LOSSES 10:47:03 AND HOW WOULD THESE CUTS AFFECT SMALL BUSINESSES TRYING TO 10:47:06 REDUCE THEIR ENERGY BILLS NOT TO MENTION HOMEOWNERS AND OTHERS? 10:47:10 WELL, THEY CERTAINLY WILL HAVE THE IMPACTS YOU TALKED 10:47:16 ABOUT AND THIS IS ONE OF THESE AREAS WHERE WE HAVE TO MAKE SOME 10:47:22 TOUGH CHOICES. WE HAD A VERY GOOD STATE ENERGY 10:47:27 PROGRAM IN THE RECOVERY ACT AND ALSO THE ECBG. 10:47:32 WE WILL HAVE TO WORK WITH CONGRESS GOING FORWARD IN 10:47:35 WHATEVER BUDGETS THEY DO GIVE US AND HOW TO APPORTION WHAT MONEYS 10:47:39 BETWEEN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AND THINGS LIKE THE STATE ENERGY 10:47:44 PROGRAM. FINALLY, I WANT TO ASK YOU 10:47:48 ABOUT THE INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO GENERATING ELECTRICITY FROM 10:47:52 MARINE RENEWABLES. I HAVE A PARTICULAR COMPANY IN 10:47:55 MIND. RIGHT NOW THE DEPARTMENT HAS 10:47:57 PLANNED FUNDING FOR NINE COMPANIES WITH ACTIVE PROJECTS. 10:48:00 INCLUDING A COMPANY BASED IN MY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT CALLED 10:48:06 ECOMERIT. CAN YOU PLEASE TALK TO US ABOUT 10:48:07 THE PROMISE OF MARINE RENEWABLES, MAYBE THE STEPS THE 10:48:10 DEPARTMENT IS TAKING TO AVOID OR MITIGATE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 10:48:13 IN COASTAL AREAS AND SECOND, ARE YOU CONCERNED THAT CUTS TO CLEAN 10:48:17 ENERGY PROGRAMS LIKE THIS ONE MIGHT SLOW DOWN THE DEVELOPMENT 10:48:24 OF RE -- DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF MARINE RENEWABLES? 10:48:29 AGAIN, THE CUTS WOULD DEFINITELY AFFECT THE RESEARCH 10:48:36 WE CAN FUND. BY MARINE RENEWABLES, I THINK 10:48:41 YOU'RE REFERRING TO KINETIC ENERGY EXTRACTION TECHNIQUES. 10:48:47 THERE ARE AT LEAST A DOZEN COMPANIES THAT I KNOW OF THAT 10:48:49 ARE LOOKING INTO THIS, BOTH HERE IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. 10:48:54 IT'S SOMETHING THAT IS A RESEARCH PROJECT SO WE DON'T 10:48:59 REALLY KNOW WHETHER IT'S GOING TO SEE DEPLOYMENT. 10:49:10 IT'S TREMENDOUS ENERGY IN OCEAN WAVES. 10:49:13 THAT'S WHY WE ARE LOOKING AT THIS. 10:49:15 THE OTHER PIECE IS THE STEPS YOUR DEPARTMENT IS TAKING TO 10:49:18 MITIGATE ENVIRONMENT IMPACTS ON COASTAL AREAS? 10:49:22 YES. ALL PART OF THE PACKAGE, BECAUSE 10:49:24 WE ALL KNOW THAT WHATEVER FORM OF ENERGY PRODUCTION WE USE, 10:49:30 THEY COULD EASILY HAVE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND YOU DO 10:49:33 THIS, YOU KNOW, AT THE VERY BEGINNING BECAUSE IN THE END, 10:49:37 WHAT YOU WANT TO DO IS DEVELOP A TECHNOLOGY THAT CAN ACTUALLY BE 10:49:42 DEPLOYED AND THERE WOULD NOT BE STRONG OBJECTIONS TO DEPLOYMENT. 10:49:46 IT IS ALWAYS PART OF THE PACKAGE. 10:49:48 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME, DR. CASSIDY OF 10:49:53 LOUISIANA IS RECOGNIZED FOR FIVE MINUTES. 10:50:00 NOW, I'M STRUCK THAT YOU MENTIONED THE SUBSIDIES, THE 10:50:06 HEIGHTENED OR CONTINUED SUBSIDIES FOR WIND AND OTHER 10:50:12 RENEWABLES. I'M LOOKING AT SOMETHING FROM 10:50:17 EIA, ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION. 10:50:19 IT SAYS AS OF 2007, THE SUBSIDY AND SUPPORT PER UNIT OF SOLAR IS 10:50:29 $24.34. FOR COAL, IT'S 44 CENTS AND 10:50:33 NATURAL GAS AND PETROLEUM LIQUIDS, IT IS 25 CENTS. 10:50:37 SO, GIVEN THERE'S ALMOST 100 TIMES INCREASE SUBSIDY FOR SOLAR 10:50:43 AND WIND VERSUS NATURAL GAS AND PETROLEUM, MAYBE 80 TIMES FOR 10:50:48 COAL, HOW MUCH SUBSIDY IS REQUIRED FOR US TO TAKE WIND AND 10:50:53 SOLAR UP TO 25% AND CAN WE AFFORD THAT SUBSIDY? 10:50:58 THERE ARE TWO WAYS OF CALCULATING SUBSIDIES. 10:51:01 ONE IS BY ABSOLUTE DOLLAR AMOUNT. 10:51:05 ANOTHER IS BY FRACTION OF ENERGY PRODUCED. 10:51:07 DOESN'T THAT SEEM A MORE REASONABLE WAY BECAUSE IF 10:51:11 SOMETHING THE 50% -- COAL IS 50% OF OUR ENERGY PRODUCTION, TO 10:51:15 TAKE THE ABSOLUTE NUMBER IS A LITTLE MISLEADING VERSUS THAT AS 10:51:20 PERCENTAGE OF THE ENERGY IT PRODUCES. 10:51:22 IT REALLY DEPENDS BECAUSE IF YOU LOOK AT THE SUBSIDY OF OIL 10:51:26 AND GAS BEGINNING IN THE BEGINNING OF THE 20th CENTURY -- 10:51:36 I DON'T MEAN TO BE RUDE, BUT JUST TO TAKE ELECTRICITY, 10:51:41 BECAUSE THERE IS THE MEGAWATT HOUR AND SUBSIDIES PER, SO IT'S 10:51:44 $25 ROUGHLY FOR SOLAR AND WIND. 25 CENTS FOR NATURAL GAS. 10:51:50 PER MEGAWATT HOUR. HOW LONG CAN WE SUBSIDIZE SOLAR 10:51:55 AND WIND AND CAN WE AFFORD IT IF WE'RE GOING TO INCREASE IT TO 10:52:00 25% OF OUR ELECTRICAL USE? WELL, I THINK THAT WIND AND 10:52:05 SOLAR SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY LONGER SUBSIDIES THAN OIL AND GAS, 10:52:10 WHICH IS ABOUT 80 OR 90 YEARS. MY CONCERN IS, OBVIOUSLY, OTHERS 10:52:14 HAVE ATTEMPTED TO DO THIS, SO THERE'S A INDUSTRY RENEWABLE 10:52:22 POWER NEWS, AN ADVOCACY GROUP FOR RENEWABLE POWER. 10:52:29 I'M STRUCK, I'M QUOTING, SPAIN WILL CUT RENEWABLE ENERGY 10:52:33 SUBSIDIES. THESE HAVE GROAN EXPONENTIALLY. 10:52:36 IT'S BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH AN ASTRONOMICAL RISE IN ENERGY 10:52:42 PRICES WHICH HAS EQUALLY RESULTED IN HEIGHTENING 10:52:45 INFLATION AND DECREASING LEVELS OF COME PETTIVENESS. 10:53:00 WE ARE DEVELOPING PLANS OF WHAT WE CAN DO IN ORDER TO BRING 10:53:05 THE COST OF RENEWABLES LIKE SOLAR AND WIND DOWN TO THE COST 10:53:08 OF FOSSIL FEEL AND WE'RE TALKING ABOUT A DECADE, MAYBE TWO, 10:53:13 MAXIMUM, SO THIS IS -- WE ARE ON AN ACCELERATED PLAN. 10:53:15 THE WORLD IS RACING AHEAD. THE DEVELOPMENT AND DROP IN 10:53:19 PRICE OF THESE RENEWABLES WILL BE VERY FAST. 10:53:22 MY CONCERN THOUGH IS THAT THERE ARE CERTAIN LAWS OF 10:53:29 PHYSICS, BUT THE BATTERY CAPABILITY TO STORE HUGE NUMBERS 10:53:34 OF ELECTRONS DOESN'T REALLY SEEM IT'S READY FOR COMMERCIAL USE IN 10:53:38 THE NEXT DECADE. NOW, THAT SAID, I'M FROM 10:53:44 LOUISIANA. HYDRO POWER ABILITY IS LIMITED. 10:53:46 CLEARLY THE REASON WIND WORKS IN DENMARK IS BECAUSE THEY HAVE 10:53:50 LOTS OF HYDRO POWER. IF THE BASE GOES DOWN FROM WIND, 10:53:54 THEY CAN RAMP UP WITH HYDRO POWER. 10:53:57 IN MY STATE, THE PEAKING WILL BE COAL OR NATURAL GAS. 10:54:01 YOU GET THE HIGHER COST OF R 10:54:06 RENEWABLES. WHAT DO WE DO ELSEWHERE? 10:54:08 FIRST, DENMARK HAS ACCESS TO OTHER GRIDS. 10:54:12 DENMARK THEMSELVES. I DON'T BELIEVE IT HAS 10:54:14 HYDROPOWER. SWEDEN IS WHAT I WAS 10:54:16 REFERRING TO. THE POINT IS THAT THEY HAVE 10:54:19 ACCESS TO OTHER SOURCES OF ENERGY OUTSIDE THEIR OWN 10:54:21 BORDERS. IN TERMS OF BATTERIES, WE'RE 10:54:31 PRETTY CERTAIN THAT, THE NEXT COUPLE OF YEARS, THE BATTERY 10:54:35 STORAGE TECHNOLOGY THAT BEGINS TO GO TO UTILITY SCALE WILL BE 10:54:39 DROPPING PERHAPS BY 50%. BUT WILL IT BE ADEQUATE TO 10:54:43 SAY POWER WASHINGTON, D.C. IF WE HAVE WINDMILLS TURNING AND THE 10:54:46 WIND STOPS TO BLOW OR THE NIGHT COMES OR THE CLOUDIEST DAY WILL 10:54:51 HAVE SUFFICIENT POWER TO POWER WASHINGTON, D.C.? 10:54:53 I THINK IT'S GOING TO BE TAKING SEVERAL DECADES TO 10:54:57 TRANSITION TO RENEWABLES, BUT TO GET TO 10, 20, 30% RENEWABLES, 10:55:01 YOU CAN GET TO 20%, POSSIBLY 30, WITHOUT ENERGY STORAGE, BUT 10:55:08 ENERGY STORAGE WILL BE AN INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT PART. 10:55:11 OBVIOUSLY, THE PEAKING PLANTS WILL STILL BE NECESSARY IN WHICH 10:55:15 CASE YOU STILL HAVE YOUR EMISSIONS. 10:55:17 I YIELD BACK. AT THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE 10:55:20 GENTLEMAN FROM WASHINGTON, MR. ENSLEY, FOR FIVE MINUTES. 10:55:24 THANK YOU. I WAS EXCITED ABOUT YOUR 10:55:26 COMMENTS ABOUT PERSPECTIVE GAINS IN SOLAR. 10:55:29 I JUST READ TA CLINER PER KINS, THE FOLKS THAT STARTED GOOGLE 10:55:36 JUST MADE A BIG INVESTMENT. 30% EFFICIENCY FOR SOLAR CELLS. 10:55:46 CAN YOU TELL ME WHY YOU THINK WE CAN GET THESE ADVANCEMENTS FOR 10:55:49 SOLAR AND WHAT THEY ARE? REALISTIC PROJECTIONS WITHIN 10:55:54 THE DECADE ARE WITHIN A 50% DROP AND 70% DROP IN COST. 10:55:59 NOT ONLY IS A MODULE, BUT INCLUDES INSULATION COSTS, 10:56:04 ELECTRONICS COSTS, THE FULL COST. 10:56:07 WE DON'T KNOW WHICH OF THE TECHNOLOGIES WILL WORK BECAUSE 10:56:11 SILICON CONTINUES TO MAKE DRAMATIC STRIDES AND WE'RE 10:56:16 ESPECIALLY OF THE MANUFACTURING OF SILICON 10:56:22 CELLS. THERE'S SOME WONDERFUL IDEAS OUT 10:56:24 THERE THAT ARE BEING PURSUED BY COMPANIES AND RESEARCHERS. 10:56:29 THERE'S ALSO A NUMBER OF FILM TECHNOLOGIES. 10:56:32 IF YOU LOOK AT THESE AREAS AND ALL THE COMPANIES ARE LOOKING AT 10:56:37 EACH OTHER, WE ALSO NEED TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY. 10:56:40 SILICON IS NOW IN THE LOW 20% E 10:56:44 EFFICIENCY. WE EXPECT IT TO MAKE CLIMBS IN 10:56:48 EFFICIENCY. THE THIN FILM TECHNOLOGIES ARE 10:56:52 ALSO BEGINNING TO MAKE SIGNIFICANT INCREASES. 10:56:54 SO, THERE IS A GREAT DEAL OF EXCITE 10:57:00 EXCITEMENT. WHEN I TALK TO THE 10:57:02 MANUFACTURERS, THEY'RE PRETTY CERTAIN THIS DROP WILL OCCUR IN 10:57:05 THIS DECADE, BUT WE THINK IT CAN BE BETTER AND THAT'S WHAT WE'RE 10:57:10 FOCUSED ON. THE REPUBLICAN BUDGET HAS 10:57:13 PROPOSED A RENEWABLE ENERGY PORTFOLIO AND 10:57:21 ABOUT HALF OF THAT CUT FOR NUCLEAR. 10:57:23 THAT JUST DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE TO ME. 10:57:26 IT WOULD SEEM WE HAVE A BALANCED PORTFOLIO. 10:57:29 WE HAVE GREAT STRIDES. WOULD YOU WANT TO COMMENT ON 10:57:31 THAT? I THINK WE WOULD LIKE TO SEE 10:57:33 RESEARCH IN BOTH. JUST AS WE'D LIKE TO SUPPORT THE 10:57:39 ENGINEERING FOR SMALL MODULAR REACTORS. 10:57:41 THE ENGINEERING FOR LOOKING AT HOW WE CAN IMPROVE BOTH THE 10:57:47 SAFETY AND PRODUCTIVITY OF FUTURE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. 10:57:50 WE THINK IN A BALANCED APPROACH, WE SHOULD BE LOOKING AT 10:57:56 RENEWABLES AS WELL. THANK YOU. 10:57:58 I WANT TO ASK ABOUT YUCCA MOUNTAIN. 10:58:05 WE'VE PAID ABOUT $300 MILLION INTO THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND. 10:58:10 WE'RE TOLD THAT THE OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIO ACTIVE WASTE IS 10:58:16 PROPOSED TO BE JUT DOWN THAT WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR MOVING FORWARD. 10:58:18 IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, WE HAVE HAD 53 MILLION GALLONS OF 10:58:23 RADIO ACTIVE WASTE STORED IN UNDERGROUND TANKS. 10:58:26 WE NEED A SOLUTION. RIGHT NOW, WE DON'T SEE A VIABLE 10:58:29 PROPOSAL BY THE ADMINISTRATION IN THIS REGARD AND WOULD LIKE TO 10:58:32 SEE ONE IN THE NEAR FUTURE. COULD YOU GIVE US WHAT OPTIONS 10:58:37 YOU INTEND TO PUT ON THE TABLE? FIRST, AS YOU WELL KNOW, THE 10:58:48 WASTE TREATMENT PLAN AT HAM FORD HAS GOTTEN A LOT OF ATTENTION 10:58:53 FROM ME AND MY SECRETARY. WE PUT IT ON THE TABLE, FIRST 10:58:58 BOTH THE CONTRACTOR AND ALL THE PEOPLE IN THE DOE INVOLVED AND 10:59:03 WE HAVE EIGHT TEAMS THERE. WE'RE
PRESIDENT TRUMP CONGRATULATES PEGGY WHITSON - CUTS
Monday, April 24, 2017 President Trump has a video conference with NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station DC SLUG: 1020 WH NASA CUTS FS33 73 AR: 16X9 NYRS: WASH-7 NASA: White House, this is Mission Control, Houston. Please call Station for a voice check. 10;00;33 THE PRESIDENT: Do you hear me? CMDR. WHITSON: Yes, sir. We have you loud and clear. 10;00;46 THE PRESIDENT: Well, that's what we like -- great American equipment that works. And this isn't easy. (Laughter.) I want to say it's very exciting to be here today -- very, very exciting -- and to speak to you live with three brave American astronauts. These are our finest. These are great, great Americans, great people. 10:01:13 Two join us from orbit aboard the International Space Station: Commander Peggy Whitson and Colonel Jack Fischer. And Peggy Whitson has been setting records, and we're going to talk about that very soon. I'm here in the Oval Office, along with my daughter Ivanka and astronaut Kate Rubins, who recently returned from space and from the Space Station. Together, we are being joined by students all across America, thousands and thousands of students who are learning -- they're learning about space, learning about a lot of other things -- and they're watching this conversation from the classroom. And, all over, we have astronauts and we have everybody, who are flying right now, 17,000 miles per hour. That's about as fast as I've ever heard. I wouldn't want to be flying 17,000 miles an hour. But that's what you do. Peggy, Jack, and Kate, I know that America's students are thrilled to hear from you. But first, I want to say that this is a very special day in the glorious history of American spaceflight. Today, Commander Whitson, you have broken the record for the most total time spent in space by an American astronaut -- 534 days and counting. That's an incredible record to break. And on behalf of our nation and, frankly, on behalf of the world, I'd like to congratulate you. That is really something. And I'd like to know, how does it feel to have broken such a big and important record? 10:02:59 CMDR. WHITSON: Well, it's actually a huge honor to break a record like this, but it's an honor for me basically to be representing all the folks at NASA who make this spaceflight possible and who make me setting this record feasible. And so it's a very exciting time to be at NASA. We are all very much looking forward, as directed by your new NASA bill - 10;03;25 We're excited about the missions to Mars in the 2030s. And so we actually, physically, have hardware on the ground that's being built for the SLS rocket that's going to take us there. And, of course, the hardware being built now is going to be for the test flights that will eventually get us there. But it's a very exciting time, and I'm so proud of the team. THE PRESIDENT: Great. And what are we learning from having you spending your time up there? I know so much research is done; I'm getting a glimpse of some of it right here in the Oval Office. What are we learning by being in space? CMDR. WHITSON: Well, I think probably the International Space Station is providing a key bridge from us living on Earth to going somewhere into deep space. So on those Mars missions, we need to better understand how microgravity is really affecting our body, and we need to understand it in great detail. So, many of the studies are looking at the human body. We're also looking at things that involve operations of a space vehicles on these long-duration missions and the technological advancements that will be required. For instance, on a multiyear Mars mission, we're going to need to be able to close the life support system, and that means we, right now, for instance, are taking solar power that we collect, and using it to break apart water into oxygen and hydrogen. The oxygen, we breathe, of course. We use the hydrogen, combine it back with the CO2 that we take out of the air, and make more water. But water is such a precious resource up here that we also are cleaning up our urine and making it drinkable. And it's really not as bad as it sounds. 10:05:22 THE PRESIDENT: Well, that's good. I'm glad to hear that. (Laughter.) Better you than me. I will say, Colonel Fischer, you just arrived, and how was your trip? Complicated? Easy? How did it go? COL. FISCHER: Oh, sir, it was awesome. It made even my beloved F-22 feel a little bit underpowered. I launched in a Russian vehicle with my Russian friend, Fyodor Yurchikhin, from Kazakhstan. Got the immediate perspective change as we got to orbit, and I saw that frail, thin blue line of life around the Earth. Six hours later, we're docked at the station. The next day, I install an experiment in the Japanese module that's going to be looking at new drugs and how we can make those drugs for muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's, multi-drug-resistant bacteria -- all sorts of things. 10;06;16 A couple hours later, I watched our crewmate, Thomas Pesquet, a Frenchman, drive a Canadian robotic arm to capture a spaceship from Virginia, carrying 3.5 tons of cargo and science that's going to keep us busy for the next few months, and dock that to the station. Sir, it's amazing. Oh, and then, you know, now I'm talking to the President of the United States while hanging from a wall. It's amazing. The International Space Station is, by far, the best example of international cooperation and what we can do when we work together in the history of humanity. And I am so proud to be a part of it. And it's just cool. (Laughter.) Like, yesterday, I had -- well, there you go 10:07:09 There's our resident space ninja doing the gravity demonstration. And yesterday morning, I had my coffee in floaty ball form, and, sir, it was delicious. So, it's awesome. THE PRESIDENT: Tell me, Mars -- what do you see a timing for actually sending humans to Mars? Is there a schedule? And when would you see that happening? CMDR. WHITSON: Well, I think as your bill directed, it will be approximately in the 2030s. As I mentioned, we actually are building hardware to test the new heavy launch vehicle, and this vehicle will take us further than we've ever been away from this planet. Unfortunately, spaceflight takes a lot of time and money, so getting there will require some international cooperation to get it to be a planet-wide approach in order to make it successful, just because it is a very expensive endeavor. But it so worthwhile doing. 10:08:17 THE PRESIDENT: Well, we want to try and do it during my first term or, at worst, during my second term. So we'll have to speed that up a little bit, okay? CMDR. WHITSON: (Laughter.) We'll do our best. THE PRESIDENT: Oh, you will. And I have great respect for you folks. It's amazing what you do. And I just want to introduce another great one. Kate Rubins is with us today, and she has been so impressive with research and so many other things having to do with NASA. And, Kate, I understand you're the first person to sequence DNA in space. Can you tell us about that? DR. RUBINS: Yeah. So that was actually just this last summer, and it's a real example of what we can do with technology and innovation. We've got a sequencer down to the size of your cellphone, and we were actually able to fly that onboard the space station and sequence DNA. It's not just the technology demonstration, but we can actually use that to do things like detect microbes on the space station, look at astronaut health. We can easily use that in Earth-based settings, too, to look for disease outbreaks and to do rural healthcare as well. THE PRESIDENT: That's fantastic. That is really great. I saw some of the work, and it's incredible. You know, I've been dealing with politicians so much, I'm so much more impressed with these people. You have no idea. Now, speaking of another impressive person -- Ivanka, you've been very much interested in this program. Tell us something about it. MS. TRUMP: Hi, Dr. Whitson. First of all, congratulations on your incredible milestone today. You may know that my father recently signed the Inspire Women Act to encourage female participation in STEM fields across all aerospace areas, and really with a focus on NASA. So encouraging women and girls to pursue STEM careers is a major priority for this administration. And today we are sitting with an amazing example of that -- Dr. Rubins, and you, Dr. Whitson. So I would love to hear from you, what was the impetus for you to get involved in the sciences? DR. RUBINS: Yeah, so when I around fifteen, I actually went to a conference, and that was very inspiring for me. It was sort of the beginning of recombinant DNA and understanding biology. And so just that exposure to scientists and the kinds of things that you can do with science and technology innovation. MS. TRUMP: Amazing. Dr. Whitson? 10;10;41 CMDR. WHITSON: For me, it was actually the Apollo program was my inspiration, and that was when it became a dream to become an astronaut. But I don't really think it became a goal until I graduated from high school, when the first female astronauts were selected. And seeing those role models, and with the encouragement of my parents and various mentors in college and graduate school, and when I started working at Rice, that's what made it possible, I think, to become an astronaut. And it took me a lot longer to become an astronaut than I ever really wanted it to take, but I do think I'm better at my job because of the journey. MS. TRUMP: You're an incredible inspiration to us all. So I would also like to ask you one more question. 10;11;26 I'm incredibly curious, as I'm sure all the students across the country are, to know what a day in the life in space is like. Could you share what a typical day looks like, what the challenges are, just any special moments? CMDR. WHITSON: Well, a typical day, we wake up and look at the messages from the ground, because we have a huge ground team that's working overnight to prepare changes or the details of the tests that we're going to be performing over the course of the day. So first thing I do is check out that, see what's changed. But on any given day, it can be so dramatically different. On one day, we might be focusing on science. On another day, we might be repairing the carbon dioxide removal system. On another day, soon Jack and I are going to do a spacewalk. We talked about, last Saturday, we did robotics operations. I love the diversity of the different activities that we do. Plus, you know, we have over 200 investigations ongoing onboard the space station, and I just think that's a phenomenal part of the day. Of course, there's also just the living and, onboard the space station, it's such a unique and novel environment. Nothing that we're used to on the ground. And it's so special to just be in zero gravity. So Jack is the new guy here, and I think he can probably give you a better perspective on what that's like. COL. FISCHER: Well, you know, everything here -- my dad always said that if you love what you do, you never work a day in your life. 10;13;01 And we work really hard up here, but it's not really work, it's just fun. It's like playing fort almost, only you're changing the world while you do it. And then on the off time, the other morning I was working out, and on our machine that we work out on, right below it is the Cupola window. And so when you're on the device where you do crunches, every time you come up, you see out the window. And it's awesome because you kind of go, crunch, "Oh, my gosh, that's beautiful! I got to do that again." Crunch, "Oh my gosh, that's beautiful." It's awesome. Everything we do here is fun, and it feels so great to know that we're making a difference on the ground and for the future of humanity as well. So it's an incredible, incredible job. THE PRESIDENT: You're making a great difference, I have to say. And this is a very exciting time for our country, and you see what's happening with our country in terms of jobs, in terms of business, and there's such excitement and such enthusiasm. 10;14;08 Many American entrepreneurs are racing into space. I have many friends that are so excited about space. They want to get involved in space from the standpoint of entrepreneurship and business. Tell us about the opportunities that could exist for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Is that something that you think a student -- because you have so many students, hundreds of thousands watching -- is that something that you think that students should be focusing, or should they be thinking about other subjects? What do you think are the opportunities for young students wanting to be involved in space? COL. FISCHER: Sir, absolutely. I think that this is probably the most exciting in space exploration, certainly in my lifetime. We are about to just have an explosion of activity. There is so much involvement on the space station with commercial industries and commercial partners. We have an entire program to manage the science. NASA has done a wonderful job of seeding a new industry with the Commercial Crew Program and the Commercial Cargo Program so that we can build the infrastructure we need for the future exploration. One thing I love about American entrepreneurs is, once you get them going, you better stand out of their way because they're going to start chucking. And we're about to that point. NASA is taking on that expensive, hard, complex task of going further and deeper into space with the wonderful new rocket, Space Launch System and Orion. And then, as soon as we break open that door, this incredible infrastructure that we've been building is going to be right there to pick up the baton and continue into the stars. I would say to all the students that are watching, the time to get excited is now. If you aren't studying science and math, you might want to think about that because our future in the stars starts now, and you can be a part of that if, like Dr. Whitson, you can find that passion and work really hard. And we're going to find a permanent foothold in the stars for humanity if you do that. THE PRESIDENT: Well, thank you. So well said. And I have to say, there's tremendous military application in space. We're rebuilding our military like never before. We're ordering equipment, and we're going to have the strongest military that we've ever had, the strongest military that the world has ever seen, and there's been no time where we need it more. 10;16;54 And I'm sure that every student watching wants to know, what is next for Americans in space. I'm very proud that I just signed a bill committing NASA to the aim of sending America astronauts to Mars. So we'll do that. I think we'll do it a lot sooner than we're even thinking. So which one of you is ready to go to Mars? Are you ready? And I think you're ready. I know you're ready, right? We just discussed that. She'd like to go to Mars very quickly. Who's ready to go to Mars up there? CMDR. WHITSON: We are absolutely ready to go to Mars. It's going to be a fantastic journey getting there, and very exciting times, and all of us would be happy to go. But I want all the young people out there to recognize that the real steps are going to be taken in a few years. And so by studying math, science, engineering, any kind of technology, you're going to have a part in that, and that will be very exciting. THE PRESIDENT: I just want to thank you very much. And, Dr. Whitson, I just -- congratulations. Amazing. 10;18;00 What an amazing thing that you've done. Everybody here -- I know you're family -- but everybody here is incredibly proud of the record you just broke. I hope that every young American watching today finds, in your example, a reason to love space and think about space because many great things are going to come out, tremendous discoveries in medicine and so many other fields. So thank you very much. I want to say God bless you, God bless America. We are very, very proud of you, and very proud of your bravery. Thank you very much.
White House Press Briefing by Tony Snow
White House Press Briefing by Tony Snow James S. Brady Briefing Room. 1:00 P.M. EDT MR. SNOW: This is good. Good to see you all. I'll try to keep this brief, because I do want to make it for the meeting with our Ambassador to Iraq in a few minutes. Obviously, the President is engaged in vigorous outreach to a number of leaders on the issues of concern. And he had a good meeting with Prime Minister Harper, as you got to see and we all got to sing "Happy Birthday," as well. So, questions. Wow. (Laughter.) This is going to be shorter than I thought. (Laughter.) Go ahead. Q The Mexican elections, the Prime Minister mentioned them in his press conference with President Bush. I wondered if you can give more details about it. MR. SNOW: He simply made the point that he supports the electoral process in Mexico, which is transparent, and therefore, he is willing to work with whomever emerges as the winner in the contest. Q Has he received the news that they are ready to declare a winner? MR. SNOW: Has it been officially declared? I thought it was to be -- Q Yes. MR. SNOW: And who was the winner? Q Calderón -- MR. SNOW: Well, both leaders had expressed a willingness, because you know the numbers have been bouncing around. So what you've told me, and I'm embarrassed to say, is news to me. I'm sure that there will be congratulations expressed on both sides quite soon. Right now, just to give you a sense of the President's schedule, he went straight from the press briefing with the Prime Minister -- they're in a working lunch. And as soon as that's over, he'll be meeting in the Oval Office with Zal Khalilzad. Q Why a news conference in Chicago tomorrow? What's that about? MR. SNOW: Keeping you happy. (Laughter.) Q He can do that here. MR. SNOW: No, it's -- you know, the President actually -- the President, you may recall, where was -- was it Laredo? Was it Laredo? I'm trying to remember which of the stops where -- Q Laredo. MR. SNOW: -- he did a press conference there. The President likes going into a place -- and I think you're going to see a little bit more of this -- likes to go in and spend a little bit of time there, talk to local leaders, also build some events around a central theme -- in this case, it's the economy and also the competitiveness initiative. And one of the other things is to do a press availability, and this will be a press availability, obviously, for local and national press. Q Tony, I just want to clarify that. Local reporters and national -- MR. SNOW: Yes. Q Have you gotten a readout on what's happened between Solana and Larajani? MR. SNOW: No. We'll try to provide whatever guidance -- probably later in the day, we'll have an NSC readout. It may also -- I don't know if that's going to fit neatly into the G8 briefing, but we'll try to figure out some way. Frankly, with the press of events, some of those things are a little slow in coming, and my apologies. Q Tony, there are some reports suggesting that North Korea may be within days of preparing to launch another long-range missile. What is the White House understanding? There are all kinds of reports flying around. MR. SNOW: Nobody really has -- I mean, look, even before the launches in that less than 24-hour period, nobody knew precisely what was going to happen. I mean, one of the problems in dealing with North Korea is you've got a society that doesn't communicate with the rest of the world, and, as the President pointed out in the press conference, simply decided to launch, after specific requests from all the other parties in the six-party talks, and after direct, diplomatic discussions with other parties. So we don't know what's going to happen. What we hope is that there are no further launches. It's -- again, let me reiterate a point I made earlier, which is, if the government of North Korea thinks that it's going to derive some sort of benefit from doing this, it's wrong. And there is -- all parties involved are agreed upon that point. Q Just one quick follow-up. When the President was saying earlier that stressing diplomacy will take some time -- MR. SNOW: Yes. Q -- was that a reference, in part, to Russia and China seeming to be reluctant? MR. SNOW: No, because, you know, what they're not reluctant -- they are not reluctant about the central theme, which is to figure out how to make the North Koreans stop. And I think -- I don't want to get too much behind the scenes on the diplomacy, but I think you'll find out in time that some of it's been mischaracterized, and I'm not going to go any further than that. But here's -- the most important thing is, everybody shares the goal not only of having a -- making sure that there is no nuclear proliferation, they want a non-nuclear Korean Peninsula. They want the North Koreans to abide by previous promises to set aside and shut down their nuclear weapon-building program, and furthermore, to cease with missile launches. That's the specific desire -- and to return to the six-party talks. They return to the six-party talks, they behave, and they do it in a way that's credible, then, all of a sudden, other options become available not only to the leader, but also to the rest of the country. And the President made a powerful and important point when he talked about the fact that you have North Koreans, by some estimates, 2 million or more, who have starved to death. And you've got a humanitarian crisis within that country, a deeply closed society, and those people deserve better. Q Tony, one week ago the President said in the East Room that a missile launch, a test firing would be unacceptable. MR. SNOW: It still is. Q China is now, at least publicly, saying that they're not for harsh sanctions against North Korea -- MR. SNOW: Well, again, Brett -- Q -- saying that they fear that the regime could crumble and that causes a refugee problem for them. MR. SNOW: Yes. Q Barring China's support, what are the tools that you could punish North Korea -- MR. SNOW: Brett, there are many tools. And already you've seen the Japanese, for instance, proceeding in their own way in saying, no port access and no travel available. But I'm not going to lay out for your the full options because -- neither am I go to start engaging in public negotiations. The important point that the President made and others made is that you act as a unit. And don't -- I would caution against drawing any firm conclusions until this process is over. Some people are making points publicly, but at the same point -- at the same time, there are discussions going on, vigorous discussions in the region. Chris Hill, for all I know is now in Beijing. He is certainly on his way. That's his first stop as he visits the leaders in the other capitals. And all options are still alive, and we're going to have to see which option the five parties in the six-party talks believe are going to be effective in getting the North Koreans to cease and desist and to return to the negotiating table. So rather than trying to get into the jousting about what the Chinese may be saying, or what a Russian official -- let's just wait and see what happens. I think that's the most important thing. They're going to do as a unit what they think is going to be most effective in achieving the desired result. Q If I could follow, if the first test firing was unacceptable, what's the potential second test firing? MR. SNOW: Well, look, we've had seven firings. They're all unacceptable, each and every one of them. Let's deal with that if and when it happens. I really -- it's one of these things. Remember -- poor Ivan, I was beating up on him last week for asking me hypothetical questions. Q -- three times, you said. (Laughter.) MR. SNOW: Well, I told you I was never going to answer your question. As it turned out, I never did. (Laughter.) But the fact is, let's see what happens. And if it comes to that eventuality, we'll give you a response. Q But following on Ed, intelligence is indicating that they have other Taepodong-2s that potentially they could put up on the pad -- MR. SNOW: That is correct. Well, I don't know -- you may have more intelligence than I. The reports that I've -- the public reports that I've seen say that there may be an attempt to get one launch ready. I don't know if that's true, or not. But again, the smart thing, if the North Koreans really do -- if they really think they're going to get any benefit out of it, they're just absolutely wrong. And I think that they're receiving that word not only from the United States, but from the Japanese and the Chinese. The Chinese have sent their top diplomat to Pyongyang, as I mentioned this morning. People are making the message as clear as possible to the regime. We're going to find out if the regime is going to listen. Q Tony -- MR. SNOW: Right now, keep it all on North Korea. If it's not on North Korea -- Q Tony, who is helping North Korea to develop this missile technology? And also, do you think the six-party talks are a failure? Because at least China is a failure because China has failed in the six-party talks because -- MR. SNOW: Okay, the idea the people engaged in diplomacy -- the failure comes on the part of the government of North Korea. And if you want to talk about a failed state, here's a state where its people are starving, where its infrastructure is decrepit, where you've got a leader who is completely isolated from the rest of the world, where, as Prime Minister Harper ably put it, wants to be a threat, and is -- that is a failure. That's what a failure is. What you're going to have are people trying to speak reason to a government and to say, you need to abide by your past promises. And if you do, good things are going to happen. That's how diplomacy works, and it is not a snap. When a diplomatic initiative is not met with the proper response, it is not the failure of the people who behaved reasonably, it's the failure of the people who behaved unreasonably. And I think it is clear to say that the government of North Korea behaved unreasonably. Q If I could follow, do you think the United Nations is doing enough to correct this -- from North Korea? What is the international community doing -- MR. SNOW: Again, they're talking. This is -- everybody -- it's like you guys want to do diplomacy with an egg timer. As the President said, it requires patience and persistence here. You've got a lot of people who have a lot of ideas about how best to proceed. And it is worth going ahead and trying to measure different alternatives and debate them out. That's what they're doing in the United Nations, and that's what our diplomats are doing in the region. And I can guarantee you, everybody has the same goal: They don't want to see further launches; they don't want to see a nuclear Korean Peninsula; and they're going to do everything they can to protect it. You've got to keep in mind that the people with the greatest vested interest in this are the people who live in the neighborhood. So they're not going to pursue policies that they don't think are going to be effective. And at this point, I know it's fun to try to sort of play the chess game about who's going to say what, but very smart, determined, dedicated and interested minds are trying to apply themselves to the business of trying to get this resolved peacefully. Q Will the President have anything new and pithy to say on Larry King tonight in the prepared statement of sorts? And will he be returning to the White House from Chicago, or going to Camp David? MR. SNOW: You mean is he going to say, thank you, Larry, and pull out a sheet and clear his throat and deliver a statement? Q Well, the President, although perhaps not as well-spoken as you, is capable of speaking -- MR. SNOW: Yes. No, he's not going to do a prepared statement. I mean, I think this is keyed off the President's birthday, and obviously, Larry will ask whatever he wants. But as somebody who had done interviews of this sort and been in the business, look, the last thing any interviewer wants is for somebody to come on and just recite stuff. And so you're going to have the President and the First Lady -- Q I didn't mean that -- sometimes a question is a means to come up with, if you will, a prepared answer. Even though it doesn't sound like one. I'm just asking -- MR. SNOW: Well, far be it for me -- (laughter.) I don't know. I don't have any clue. Q What's he going to do, though? MR. SNOW: Talk to the President. I think the President is going to this because he wants to do an interview with Larry King -- he and the First Lady are going to talk to Larry King. And so now what we're doing is providing a wonderful commercial for Mr. King's broadcast. We still have North Korea -- Connie, do you have a North Korea question? Q I do. Tony, what is the timetable by which the President would like the five nations to come to an agreement on sanctions? And is he concerned that as this debate goes on, the disagreements embolden the North Koreans? MR. SNOW: If the North Koreans want to be emboldened by deepening their failure, that's their business. But I'm not sure that it makes sense to describe what North Korea -- I mean, I don't know what you mean by embolden. You mean the fact that people are debating how to make them stop will make them bolder? I'm sure that's something that one takes into account. On the other hand, the North Koreans have to assess the other alternative, which is, if they continue down this road, what does it mean? The Japanese have already signaled some pretty clear intentions at least to take some preliminary steps. I don't know what the Chinese are telling them. The Chinese now have, as I said, dispatched the top diplomat to the region. It's important, again, to say that while there are unilateral steps the nations that have direct diplomatic ties with the North Koreans may take, the most important thing is what the group together is going to do. There is a certain sense of urgency in getting it done. There are no timetables on this, and the last thing that anybody wants to do -- Q -- weeks, not months? MR. SNOW: We're just talking as long as it takes. And the last thing anybody wants is to let the North Koreans think -- and one of the assumptions in your question is are we going to let them drive the bus? And the answer is, no. Q (inaudible) -- mentioned yesterday, any kind of sanctions against North Korea will be regarded as an act of war. Therefore, North Korea will take full-scale counter-measures against North Korea. What will be your comment on that? MR. SNOW: North Korea will take countermeasures against North Korea? Q Against the -- I mean, United States, or any of the five? MR. SNOW: I would characterize that as an act of rhetoric. Q Yes, Tony. Two questions. MR. SNOW: First, is that North Korea? Q Yes, the first is North Korea. MR. SNOW: Okay, we will divide the first and let the second die a crib death. Go ahead. (Laughter.) Q Before North Korea launched its missiles on July 4th, the President said the U.S. would attempt to shoot down any missiles headed towards U.S. territory, but it was civil -- but it was Cold War policy of launch on warning that kept the uneasy peace between the Soviet Union and U.S. for 40 years. And my question, has the U.S. abandoned its launch on warning policy? MR. SNOW: I'm not going to get into the vagaries of -- Q -- if I could finish. Is it not a signal of weakness to our enemies, many of them stateless terrorists, to suggest the U.S. will absorb a first strike before retaliating with their own nuclear weapons? MR. SNOW: That's one of the all time great preposterous questions. (Laughter.) Q Coming from the network. And I don't think it's preposterous. MR. SNOW: Well, memo to boss is, send the weak stuff back. No, look, I do think it's preposterous. And it's one of these things where this is something that has not come into play, and I'm not going to -- the United States reserves all options to defend itself. And I am going to go no further than that. Q Can I come back? MR. SNOW: I hope so. We'll see. Q Do current military obligations in any way limit or restrict potential U.S. responses to North Korea? MR. SNOW: Not that I'm aware of, but that's probably better posed to the Pentagon, which would have -- it's not a question that I can give you an informed answer to. Q Doesn't the White House operate under some parameters of what can be done, given -- MR. SNOW: I'm sure they do, but again, I'm not sitting around in the war-planning sessions should their be any such things, and I'm not aware of any. So everybody, relax, stand down. So I mean, I honestly don't know how to answer your question. I really do think that's one -- the President, as Commander-in-Chief, as you know, delegates considerable authority to his commanders. And, yes, there are rules and parameters. I just can't help you on it. I mean if you want a quick answer to it, give Eric Ruff a ring over at the Pentagon, and he may be able to give you something more precise. I just don't want to mislead you. Q Tony, can you expand on the President's statement today that Kim Jong-il is going to be less of a threat, the more he is isolated? Some experts say that with a leader as unstable as he is, if he's backed to a wall, he could do just about anything. MR. SNOW: Well, this gets into the tea leaf reading about is he sane or is he not, and I'm afraid I can't answer it. There is also this -- you've heard, Brett -- a lot of people think, well the theory -- and the Wall Street Journal has this as an editorial -- is that in the past, by behaving badly, he has received certain benefits and emoluments. The only thing I can say, again, is that if that's what he thinks, he's miscalculated in this case. But it is notoriously difficult to read his mind, and therefore, I really don't want to try to engage in scenario building based on that. Obviously, anybody -- let me put it this way -- I think the President made the point is that you plan for the worst and hope for the best. So when you're thinking through scenarios, you think through every possible scenario, how you coordinate and respond. But for me to start running through those, I don't think is appropriate right here. Q Somebody must be advising him from outside, or helping him to go to pick a fight with the international community in this time of -- MR. SNOW: I'm not sure that's the case. I mean, I'm really not sure, Goyal. And the other thing is -- one of the other dangers here is that North Korea -- again, North Korea, with these launches, is trying to provoke. It's trying to get people to panic. It's trying to get people to respond. It's trying to get people to say that the government is a threat, and by golly, what we need to do is to appease them. And that is simply not the way the international community has responded. One of the results of extended diplomacy on the part of this administration has been to bring together people who, in the past, were afraid -- or I shouldn't say afraid -- who were more reluctant to challenge -- what are you guys doing -- who are a bit reluctant to go ahead and push the North Koreans. And I think what you now see is concerted pressure from everybody in the neighborhood to do so. Q Can I ask a domestic question -- MR. SNOW: Well, first, I promised -- Kevin, you got one? Q Yeah, a North Korea question. I just want to make sure I'm clear. Essentially, it doesn't matter how many tests or missiles they send up, the American stance is going to be the same diplomatically in that we're going to keep trying to encourage them to go to the six-party talks -- MR. SNOW: No, I think. No, no. No, I don't want you to get the sense that it doesn't matter how many missiles they send off. Each one matters. The other thing is, it does take time to assess what's going on. The President talked a little bit, as I mentioned, in the past couple of days -- you take a look at the telemetry. What can you conclude based on what seems to have been a designed flight path. And when you have something that's up for 42 seconds, in the case of the Taepodong-2, it takes time to figure that out. You may recall the Taepodong-1 launch back in 1998, we didn't even know it was a three-stager for some time. It is a fairly complex business to try to do the research. And I guarantee you, the Russians are doing the same thing, and the Chinese are doing the same, and the Japanese, and the South Koreans. Everybody is trying right now to take a look at the data, and it takes longer to assemble than we might like, but it's going to take time. Each and every launch is unacceptable. And, again, you do not take them lightly. And I think what's become clear is that the North Koreans, at least so far, have been perfectly happy to defy all of their neighbors in doing this. And I think that it's probably going to add to the resolve for getting this done right and getting it done quickly. Q One other question, Tony? MR. SNOW: Yes. Q Hamas has threatened to murder that 19-year-old Israeli corporal that they captured. In the even that they do and Israel retaliates by hanging one or more Hamas leaders, the President will not condemn Israel, will he, since murdering of nine confederate POWs by General Custer in 1864 was stopped by Colonel Mosbey's hanging eight of Custer's command? There is a precedent for stopping the murder of prisoners of war in the United States. If Israel follows that same thing, they will not be condemned by the President, will they? MR. SNOW: I amend my characterization of your earlier question. (Laughter.) Q You are evading the question. You are evading the question, and you know it. MR. SNOW: Why didn't you just -- you decided upon specific means of retaliation, Lester. (Laughter.) Connie? Q On the New York ruling on same-sex marriage, does the President have a reaction to that? MR. SNOW: Not that I'm aware of. And I have not heard any conversation about it, so we'll get back to you later on it. I mean, the President's position on marriage has been consistent and clear. Q And this one, I don't know if anyone could answer this, but it seems outrageous -- I mean, I'm sorry Ken Lay died, sorry for his family, but I don't understand why the creditors can't somehow sue the estate, just because he died. There's nothing the White House can do to help those poor people out? MR. SNOW: As I said yesterday also, when it comes to legal matters, the White House, we give duly constituted legal authorities who do their work, and we will allow the court system to process in whatever way, to probate the estate as it sees fit. I am not going to just -- Q The slate is wiped clean because he died. MR. SNOW: Well, I can't help you with that. Q Would you be kind enough to amplify, if you know more travel plans, could you say that the President, after the Chicago trip is going to go out and see more of the country? MR. SNOW: Yes. Q How often will he try and do this? MR. SNOW: It really won't -- I mean, you know how it works. We tend to give week-ahead views, and I'm not going to go too far ahead on the schedule. But you will notice it. I mean, it's not going to be like every week there's going to be such an event. But you're going to see some times where the President goes out, spends a bit of time in a place, talks with the leaders, drills into the issues, listens to what they have to say, builds trips generally around one topic -- in this case, job growth and job development and economic development. And in this case also, since tomorrow is a so-called 'jobs day' -- that is, the economic data being released -- it provides a time that is appropriate for doing it. Q And if I may quickly follow up, when you talk about your desire to get questions from local press, does that mean format-wise, there will actually be questions that the President will deliberately say -- call on local press? MR. SNOW: Yes. I think we're going to mix it up. Q I want to ask a question that I asked yesterday. How is civil rights the cornerstone of this administration? MR. SNOW: The President has always talked about civil rights as a cornerstone in a number of ways. It is clear that in this nation, there have been people who have been left behind, that there was long history of discrimination in this nation that has been a stain, that American people have to work together to figure out not merely how to blot the stain, but how to heal the wounds. And the President has tried to reach out with faith-based initiatives. He's tried to do it by talking about not only No Child Left Behind, but also initiatives to allow people the choice to go to the best available schools. And I think the way you try to deal with civil rights is to try to create an atmosphere in which people can lay aside old prejudices and also try to remove that debris, because that is debris that stands between us and a better future. And you do that in a number of ways. You do that by building a stronger economy that can offer jobs to more. You do it by trying to make sure that everybody has an opportunity to be educated and trained in such a way as to take full advantage of it. You try to do that by doing family initiatives, because in many poor neighborhoods in this country there is one feature that stands out, and that is single-parent households where people toil heroically, but there is a difference -- and to try to rebuild families safe and whole. It's important, when you talk about crime, that somebody can walk the streets without having to worry about random acts of violence and shooting. In other words, civil rights is an extension of common sense, which is, in common sense, what you want to do is to build a society where young men and women have the opportunity to grow up in safe neighborhoods, attend good schools, be embraced by parents who love them and whose love they can count upon, and to do it in a way to know that they are not going to be victimized because of their race, because of their skin color, and because of their background. Civil rights is built around a whole series of programs, and they extend those same benefits to everybody. But for those who have never had them before, it is the hope that that is going to help transform their lives. If you talk about -- there are job training programs. There are reconstruction programs. There are business grant programs. There are attempts to do targeted grants. We're going to be seeing some of this, as well. And that's how you build civil rights. In many ways, the infrastructure that says bigotry is illegal has been constructed. But now comes the business of removing the barriers that still remain in the way, so the American Dream can be accessible to all. Q Did Hurricane Katrina divert the laying of that cornerstone of civil rights? MR. SNOW: No, I think what Hurricane Katrina did was to expose some ways -- to wake everybody up to the difficulty, not only of dealing with natural disasters, but their aftermath. Got to go, guys. Thank you very much. END 1:30 P.M. EDT
STATE DEPARTMENT BRIEFING
THE REGULAR STATE DEPARTMENT BRIEFING FS31X71 State Department Deputy Spokesman Mark Toner - Briefing TONER: Happy Thursday, everybody. Welcome to the State Department. Couple very quick items at the top, and then I'll take your questions. This falls in the "In Case You Missed It" category, but just wanted to call attention to the fact yesterday in Loas -- Laos, rather, President Obama announced a new State Department/Peace Corps initiative called English For All.TONER: English For All and its new website, which is englishforall.state.gov, will serve as a resource for foreign audiences interested in learning about the range of English programming offered by and supported by the U.S. government. It will also be a helpful resource to those Americans who may be looking to serve their country by teaching English abroad. And worth noting that U.S. government's English instruction programs provide opportunities to learn English to millions worldwide every year. Also, I just wanted to make note of the fact that tomorrow, on Friday, September 9th, the State Department will team up with foreign diplomats to clean beaches across the United States. This is part -- or in recognition, rather, of International Coastal Cleanup Day. This initiative will support the goals of our Ocean 2016 conference which is coming up next week. In collaboration with the Ocean Conservancy and its local partners, State Department personnel from the Office of Foreign Missions, together with the Foreign Consular Corps will clean beaches in Chicago, in Galveston, in Kahuku, in Key Biscayne, in New York, and in Santa Monica, as well as Seattle. That's it. Matt, over to you. QUESTION: Where? (CROSSTALK) TONER: All right. Sorry. (LAUGHTER) QUESTION: Where was that? TONER: Chicago, you know where that is. QUESTION: Yes. TONER: Illinois; Galveston, Texas... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Kahuku, Hawaii... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Yes, exactly. Yes, which is by the way the Great Lakes have more coastal -- more coastline than all of the of the -- either coast combined. I learned that. It's a fun fact. QUESTION: Absolutely fascinating. TONER: So I think I've answered all your questions. (LAUGHTER) (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: I think it's very worthy. (CROSSTALK) TONER: You got me. QUESTION: Very -- a very worthy endeavor. Just on your first one, what is the last letter in the word of the -- in the name of the country where this English... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Laos (ph). QUESTION: Yes. TONER: Did I mispronounce that. I apologize. QUESTION: You can say either... TONER: OK. QUESTION: ... you didn't need to correct yourself... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Oh, OK. I didn't know. I was wrong the other today, again, that I think you were supposed to drop the "S," but... QUESTION: It depends. TONER: OK. Again, I... QUESTION: All right. So, can we move to matters of perhaps more urgent substance? TONER: Sure. QUESTION: Syria. What is going on? Is -- apparently Foreign Minister Lavrov has arrived in Geneva. TONER: Well, I can't speak for the whereabouts of Foreign Minister Lavrov. All I can say is I don't have anything to update you on with regard to possible meetings. We continue to -- indeed, the secretary spoke earlier today with Foreign Minister Lavrov. And we're continuing to work through some of the remaining issues that we have before we can reach an agreement on a way forward with regard to Syria. And those questions, those issues continue to be discussed, and until we get to a point where we can feel that we can reach a resolution of those issues, we'll continue to work through them. QUESTION: Well, does that mean that those issues have to be resolved before there would be a meeting? TONER: No, but I would also -- and certainly not. And we've seen obviously indicative of the meeting he had last week in China that, you know, certainly, Secretary Kerry is willing to meet with Foreign Minister Lavrov to discuss remaining issues.TONER: However, I think it's our belief that, or our -- yes, our belief that the remaining issues are at a technical level that need to be addressed within our interagency and also by some of the working groups who have been working on these issues for some time now. So I guess to -- you know, to sum it up I mean we're just not at a point where we believe it's -- we can confirm a meeting and be that its worth his while to go have a meeting. QUESTION: Wait, you just referred to the interagency. So is some of the hold up here internal to the -- to the administration... (CROSSTALK) TONER: ...any agreement that we reach would have to be reached through the interagency I mean that's obvious in some sense. QUESTION: Right but in the past people have spoken about the reason that there wasn't -- the reason given by an official perhaps more than one official or there (inaudible) an agreement reached in China was that the Russians had walked back on some things that you all have thought had been previously agreed to. And now, maybe I'm just... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Look, I don't want to... QUESTION: ...your comment, it seems as though not only is there a problem with the Russians, there's also a problem in the interagency in the United States. TONER: I just think, Matt, it's you know, you know these are -- these are difficult processes. The Russians have conditions they want to see met and addressed, we have our own. And in reaching our own consensus with regard to a text or a way forward that we can agree on, we continue to have those conversations. We're just not there yet. I don't want to put the onus on anyone's either side at this point. I just want to -- I would just say that when we get there -- when we have a reason that we believe the meeting would be or rather when we've reached a point where we believe a meeting would be useful then we'll announce that. QUESTION: Mark, if this you know, almost going to happen kind of meeting, I mean this kind of feeling. Does that indicate that you guys are getting closer or farther apart? TONER: I just, I don't... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: Because the... (CROSSTALK) TONER: I mean it's a fair question I just -- you know, it indicates that these are complicated discussions and that -- and they're detailed discussions. And rather than rush to an agreement, we want to make sure that it meets and addresses all our concerns and all of our goals and objectives going into it. And so you know, it's painstaking to some degree. But it's part of the process, you know so I don't want to say we're going back, we're stepping away. I think that overall, we wouldn't still be in it if we didn't believe that it was still possible. QUESTION: I have a couple more. TONER: Yes, please. QUESTION: What are some of these technical issues that the Russians may have walked away from or walked back from? TONER: We've been -- we've been fairly circumspect about talking about those in detail partly to protect you know, the confidential discussions that we're having with Russia. Once we've reached an agreement you know, we'll talk about all the aspects of that agreement but until we get there we've been very broad and that's deliberate. QUESTION: And two points if I could have your comment on, one in the Syrian army, we took the neighborhood of Ramussa (ph) and Aleppo. And then today (inaudible) base (inaudible). And second, the Turks are saying that we took (ph) basically any participation by a country's forces liberate Kurdish forces to liberate (inaudible). Your comment on those issues. TONER: The second question again? I'm sorry, about... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: ...and the Turks want to have some sort of a better power over the participation of any Kurdish force in the upcoming effort to maneuver our tap-in to liberate Raqqah.TONER: Raqqah, OK. First -- the first part of your question I've already forgot -- I'm so sorry, it's been a long week. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: ... the Syrian Army re-took the neighborhood... TONER: Right. That's -- exactly. Look, I mean, you know, it's not for me to really talk about, you know, at a tactical level. We've seen those reports. I would just broadly state that, you know, we don't see any kind of military solution to the situation in Syria, and that also pertains to the situation in Aleppo. You know, it's -- it's why we're pushing so hard for a political resolution and, you know, we've seen tactical shifts from day-to-day. We've seen these latest reports. It only raises our concern that the civilians within Aleppo continue to suffer. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: The reason I ask this was because they... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: It was the opposition that basically threw a sort of a blitz attack a couple weeks ago -- four weeks ago, took the Syria, including... TONER: Exactly. QUESTION: A military academy and so on... TONER: And I think... QUESTION: At the time you did not express a great deal of concern that there was an attack by the opposition. TONER: Well, I just think there's a -- again, it's just -- it's a -- it's a complex battle space. We've said that many times and it's also a very intense battle space and there's a give-and-take and so I'm mostly not going to say that this is somehow some sea change tactically. I just don't know, for one. And two, it just -- you know, we've seen these shifts take place over a period of months now. Please, Barbara. QUESTION: You just -- because this (inaudible) part of the cease-fire talks in terms of how you would get aid into... TONER: Right. QUESTION: ... into Aleppo. Does this not affect the negotiations? It surely must have some ramifications there. TONER: Without getting into specifics, not necessarily, because, you know, if we were to reach an agreement, you know, it would obviously be -- we talk about this in broad terms, certainly a pause in the conflict or in the fighting before cessation could take place. And we've -- so, I mean, no in the sense that they're -- the fighting would cease, if that's what you're talking about. You're -- if your broader question or your question is whether this complicates that Syria or the regime, rather, would think that it can somehow take Aleppo. You know, that's really some -- an -- a question I can't answer. We've seen the regime continue to press the fight to take Aleppo. What we would say to that is there is no military solution to the conflict in Syria. And it's up to Russia to convince the regime that that's the case. QUESTION: Just a quick question on the interagency. TONER: Sure. QUESTION: Is that objections from the Pentagon with regards to joint operations... (CROSSTALK) TONER: I'm not going to characterize it -- all I'm trying to say is - I also don't want to say that there's -- sorry, I don't mean to talk over you, Barbara. I don't want to say that there's some kind of interagency battle. All I'm saying is as we look at the remaining issues, that's going to be a discussion that we have with the interagency and that just makes sense because it touches on the equities of the interagency. QUESTION: Mark, how much of a... TONER: Please. QUESTION: ... complicating factor is it -- comment today by the Turkish Foreign Minister that, for a deal, Turkey will not accept, under any conditions, any transition deal that leaves Assad in power? TONER: Well, again, I think we've tried -- in our own position is that we don't believe that Assad can be a legitimate leader in the long-term for Syria. I think ultimately that -- sorry. I think ultimately this is a question that Syrians need to answer and -- through the negotiation process that we want to see restarted in Geneva and ultimately how that transition takes place, you know, how long Assad steps -- stays in power before government can -- or transitional government can take power.TONER: Now, those are all questions that need to be answered. Our own belief is that he doesn't -- he lacks all legitimacy to be the leader of Syria. But ultimately, that's a question that the Syrians themselves are going to have to address. (CROSSTALK) TONER: Please? QUESTION: If the reports are true that Lavrov is in Geneva, is this in any case, you know, does the U.S. feel that this could be a propaganda issue by the Russians to kind of have one-up on what the U.S. (inaudible) that the U.S. Navy (ph) is not trying to get a deal on this? TONER: I just -- again, I won't speak to Foreign Minister Lavrov's travel, his schedule, his itinerary. All I can say -- speak for is our -- our own goal, and that is to try to settle the remaining issues that we have in reaching an agreement. And once we -- we feel like we're closer to a settlement and a meeting would be valuable, then we'll have that meeting. QUESTION: And other issues (inaudible) Kerry when he was in China spoke about, a couple of tough issues. Are these the same issues that -- that are preventing this deal right now? (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: Or is it something else? TONER: I think, broadly speaking, they're the same issues. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: Can I ask you about the Turkish Defense Minister? Fikri Islik said that... TONER: Oh, about Raqqah? QUESTION: Yes. They want -- they want to work with you to liberate Raqqah, but that they will not accept the popular defense community (ph), Kurdish community (inaudible). TONER: I haven't seen those comments. You know, we've been supportive of those Kurdish groups in northern Syria who have been really effective in taking the fight to Daesh. We're going to continue that support. But I don't -- I haven't seen his comments. QUESTION: But in principle, you do reject any kind of veto by the -- by the Turks on the... (CROSSTALK) TONER: We continue to have discussions, regular dialogue with Turkey. We are working closely with Turkey and indeed we're supporting its recent offensive around -- to secure its own border with Syria. We'll continue those discussions going forward. QUESTION: Iraq? TONER: Yes. QUESTION: The KRG prime minister led a delegation to Baghdad last week. And among the topics that he discussed with the Iraqi prime minister was the KRG's intent to hold a referendum on independence. And reportedly, the Iraqi prime minister didn't object. So if the Iraqi government accepts that the KRG will hold a referendum on independence, does the United States also concur in that view, that that is acceptable? TONER: I have not seen those remarks. I'm unaware of that meeting. You know, certainly, you know, these are discussions at the core that need to take place between Kurdish regional authorities and the government of Iraq. But our position hasn't changed. QUESTION: Is your position that if the Iraqi government accepts a Kurdish referendum on Kurdish independence that that's also acceptable to the United States, contingent on the approval of Baghdad? TONER: Again, I think these are -- what our emphasis is on is the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq. These are discussions that are ongoing, but we don't have any comment. Please? QUESTION: Afghanistan? TONER: Yes. QUESTION: Do you have any word on the fate of the American (inaudible) kidnapped near the American University in Kabul last month?TONER: Unfortunately, I don't have a lot of say. You're talking about the -- the U.S. citizen who was kidnapped in Kabul? Yes? XXX We're limited in what we can say because we don't have a Privacy Act waiver in this case. Obviously the safety and protection of U.S. citizens overseas is our top priority and we're going to continue to monitor this incident very closely but I can't really speak further to it. QUESTION: Has next of kin been notified? TONER: Again, speaking broadly, certainly, and I'm legally bound not to speak specifically to this case, but that would normally be standard operating procedures. We reach out to the family of missing Americans and work with them and provide any support we could and answer their questions, et cetera. QUESTION: And then have any U.S. diplomats participated in any decision making councils relating to a possible rescue attempt of the professor? TONER: So over there, I would not speak to any possible efforts that might be taken to secure his release. That's not something I would address. Please Michael, hey. QUESTION: One on Russia. TONER: Yes. QUESTION: According to foreign ministry, Russian foreign ministry, Foreign Ministry Lavrov and his phone call with Senator Kerry -- or Secretary Kerry the other day brought to Secretary Kerry's attention an open letter from Konstantin Yaroshenko's mother that she had sent to President Obama actually, but Lavrov said he brought this to Kerry's attention during their talks and expressed hope that it would be resolved in a positive manner. Do you know, has Secretary Kerry read the letter? TONER: One more time, the letter pertaining to? QUESTION: Yaroshenko's mother sent an e-mail to President Obama expressing concerns about her child. And then... TONER: Right, I'd have to look into it. I wasn't aware of the letter or that it was raised in the bilat, so I'll have to take the question. Please, in the back. QUESTION: My name is (inaudible) Washington-Pakistan? TONER: OK. Welcome. QUESTION: The relation of Pakistan and United States is at lowest level. What really are the challenges? TONER: Well, I wouldn't refute the premise of the question. I don't believe they're at their lowest level. I would say that our relationship with Pakistan is strong and in our mutual interest, and also in the interests of the region. It's not to say it's not sometimes a challenging relationship but we have a range of issues, including counter-terrorism that we work quite closely with Pakistan on and we believe again, our relationship is strong. QUESTION: So Secretary Kerry recently was in Southeast Asia. He went to Bangladesh and India but skipped Pakistan. It clearly indicates the interest of the United States in that region. Sir, what really was the reason for skipping Pakistan in that important visit? TONER: Look, I mean it doesn't clearly indicate anything about our relationship with Pakistan. The secretary has -- I think we would all agree in this room -- a very intense travel schedule. He's been to Pakistan recently, he speaks often to senior Pakistani leadership. Specifically he was in India for the strategic and commercial dialogue, and took the opportunity to also visit Bangladesh. I think the first time he's been there. But as we've said many times, there's not zero sum game here. We need to have a very strong and robust relationship with India, and we do, the world's largest democracy. And we also want to have a strong relationship with Pakistan, it's in the interests of the region to do so.QUESTION: The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee today rejected the proposal of putting sanctions on Pakistan for not taking actions against (inaudible). What kind of discussions are going on with Pakistan regarding these terror groups? TONER: Well, our discussions continue to focus on the fact that we're urging the government of Pakistan to take concerted action against safe havens and terrorist groups that threaten other countries in the region. And we've been very clear about that. And we have seen them attempt to address it. We want to see more action taken, but you know, it continues to be a topic of conversation with them. Please, sir. QUESTION: I want to get back to Russia. Well, kind of Russia. You will have seen, probably, that the Russians say that both the Israelis and the Palestinians have agreed in principle to have a meeting to try to get things started again in Moscow. What's your take on this? TONER: Our take -- not my take -- our take... QUESTION: Well your, meaning... TONER: That's right. That's exactly right. Thank you. Look, it's obviously up to the parties to decide if they want to do a meeting, and when and where that meeting takes place. So obviously, I'd refer you to them for comment. As we made clear in the quartet report, we continue to call on both sides to demonstrate their commitment to a two state solution, and to lay the groundwork for a successful negotiation. I think we're concerned that things might be moving in the opposite direction given, on the one hand, and we've expressed our concern about this, ongoing Israeli settlement activity, but equally, we've been troubled by the fact that -- or by the incitement to violence. I think most recently, the Fatah Facebook post that glorified the terrorist attacks on the Munich Olympics, where 11 innocent Israeli athletes were killed. So we are concerned and remain focused on encouraging all sides to take the necessary actions and steps that will allow for meaningful progress toward a two state solution. So we welcome talks. It's up for the both sides to decide if those take place. But it's also about laying the groundwork, so that any talks would be successful and be able to lead to negotiations. QUESTION: Yes, but basically since the Clinton administration -- Bill Clinton -- the U.S. has had a monopoly on hosting, mediating, you know, getting involved in the peace process. And you have successfully beaten back attempts by other countries, Russia included, and France, to have -- you know, to host their own meetings. So I'm just wondering if you don't have the same opposition to this, you're not concerned at all that you're -- that the West might be losing its primacy and... TONER: Not at all. And you know, the secretary remains fully engaged in this effort. He speaks to Prime Minister Netanyahu frequently. We speak to the Palestinian authority frequently. He speaks to leadership in the region, which is also vital to any eventual peace effort. But I think it's -- you know again, it's up to the parties to decide when and where they meet. I just would reiterate that we think there needs to be groundwork laid before effective and fruitful negotiations can take place.QUESTION: In other words, you think that this is not -- this is going to go nowhere? TONER: I'm not going to say that, I'm just saying... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: Well, it sounds like it because you say that... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: One, that you say that the groundwork needs to be laid before you can have a meeting that amounts to anything. At the same time, you say that things are moving in the opposite direction, which this all suggests to me, maybe I'm reading too much into it, but I don't think I am, that you don't think that this Moscow meeting is necessarily a good idea. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: It's not right. TONER: I'll leave it where I just left it. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: ...a Quartet member? Or -- and when you say "we," you're referring to the United States. TONER: Right. QUESTION: In your previous answer. So Russia is a Quartet member, but its (inaudible) and its hosting -- (inaudible) but not in its role as a Quarter member. TONER: I don't believe so. If that's wrong, I'll correct it. QUESTION: And would you be observers at this meeting? TONER: Not sure what our level of participation would be, so I -- I'll hesitate. And again, its not set in stone yet, I understand. But obviously we'll be following it closely. QUESTION: And does taking this decision to host the conference that wasn't premised in the Quartet Report in any way call into question Russia's role within the Quartet, if it's kind of having an independent initiative on the same (inaudible)? (CROSSTALK) TONER: I wouldn't say that. And I don't want to cast too much aspersion on this effort, not at all. I just -- all I was saying in my response to Matt was, you know, we need to make sure that any talks, face-to-face talks have the right climate in which to succeed in. QUESTION: So what -- what are the -- what is the groundwork that needs to be done, like what? TONER: Well, again, I mean, you know -- I mean I gave two examples of actions that are having the opposite effect. So we want to see deescalation by both sides in the process. And there's any number of things that they can -- steps they can take that would lead to that. I'm not going to give them a step-by-step road map to that. That's up for them to -- to decide to do and undertake. But, you know, it's our belief that, and this speaks broadly to any peace negotiations, but certainly in this case if you're not -- if you don't have the right climate for them to be successful, then its not worth having it. QUESTION: I have a couple more questions. TONER: Please. (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: First of all, do you have any comment on the reports suggesting that president of the Palestinian Authority may have been a KGB agent? TONER: None whatsoever. QUESTION: I mean, you know, in all fairness, he was the head of the Palestinian Soviet Friendship for a long, long time. TONER: I think those are questions you can ask him or the Palestinian Authority. QUESTION: All right. Let me ask you a couple of other things. The Palestinian Supreme Court in Ramallah (inaudible) a municipal election. Is that something that you encourage or frown upon? What is your position on this? TONER: Our position, and you're right, I mean they froze preparatory work for the municipal elections. I think they have two or three election-related issues to decide on. Look, we're monitoring it. We're following it closely. Its not for us to litigate this matter on behalf of the courts. You know, in general, we support democratic process and we've been active in supporting the development of Palestinian democratic institutions. But, you know, this is a matter for them to resolve. QUESTION: And finally, (inaudible) issued a dismal report on the situation in Palestinian development, saying that growth has been, you know, stalled because of, you know, settlement activities and closures and all these (inaudible) Israeli practices in the West Bank. Do you have any -- have you seen the report, first of all? (CROSSTALK) TONER: I have not read the report. I'm aware of it. QUESTION: OK. You're aware of it.TONER: But I mean, look, we highlighted our same concerns in the quartet report. And those concerns specifically relate to constraints on Palestinian economic development and growth. And generally speaking, we remain committed to seeing strong economic development in the West Bank and Gaza. QUESTION: And these English schools will also cover places like Gaza and the West Bank... (CROSSTALK) TONER: Oh, that I started off with -- I would assume so, yes. QUESTION: Mark, you said that, about the Russian initiative, you said you didn't -- excuse me -- you said you didn't want to cask too much aspersion on it. Does that mean that you only want to -- you want to only cast some aspersion on it? (LAUGHTER) I'm going to try to figure out your level of unhappiness. (LAUGHTER) TONER: No, I'm not (inaudible) aspersion -- yes. No, I'm not trying to -- I -- I -- look, I don't want to -- all I'm simply saying is that we want to see any negotiations, any talks going forward begin on the right footing, in the right climate. That's all I'm saying. QUESTION: Well, then... (CROSSTALK) TONER: We've seen... (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: So these talks are (inaudible). TONER: Again, I'll stop (inaudible). (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: And then, just -- the Israelis have started building this underground barrier to prevent (inaudible) from Gaza. Do you have anything to say about that? TONER: I don't. This is to stop (inaudible) tunnels, right? I mean, look, I mean, you know, we've said before that obviously Israel has a right to take steps to protect its citizens. And we respect that right. And as long as these tunnels exist and are used to carry out attacks on innocent Israelis, you know, we support efforts to address those concerns. QUESTION: (inaudible) but, I mean, on the same issue, Mark, the Israelis over the last just few days, they killed an (inaudible) Palestinian who did not (inaudible). In fact, they said they killed him by mistake. They shot today someone who was coming back from school, you know, in a refugee camp outside Ramallah. They shot someone in Gaza who was also walking, a teenager and so on. So, Israel is taking some, you know, almost on a daily basis, unprovoked attack on -- committing an unprovoked attack against the Palestinians and (inaudible). (CROSSTALK) QUESTION: ... that you began by, you know, pointing to the (inaudible)... (CROSSTALK) TONER: But I also spoke about ongoing settlement activity. I think with respect to these incidents that you mentioned, I don't know the particulars. You know, we've always said that while we understand and respect the right of Israeli security forces to take action to protect Israeli citizens, we would always call on them to exercise restraint as they carry out their duties. That said, I think it also speaks to something I referred to as well, which is that we don't want to see escalating tensions. And right now, I think we've got an atmosphere of tension. And that obviously exacerbates the situation. Please, sir? QUESTION: Yes, on North Korea. TONER: Yes? (CROSSTALK) TONER: Sure, go ahead. And then I'll get to you. QUESTION: Have you seen -- sorry -- have you seen any change in -- I mean, there have been a couple of major issues that have prevented Netanyahu and Abbas from meeting. And one of them is this issue of, you know, no preconditions, and the stopping of settlement building. Have you seen any change in -- I mean, you're talking about I think slightly other issues in terms of laying the groundwork. But have you seen any change in their -- in their positions that would make it seem like this meeting would actually happen?TONER: Certainly, with regard to settlement activity, it's been frankly the -- to the contrary. In terms of no preconditions, I think, at least I've seen from the Israeli government their continued commitment to that. So, I would refer you to them to speak to whether there's any change in that. Please. No, North Korea. QUESTION: Yes, several Japanese lawmakers arrived in North Korea today under the premise of conducting sports exchanges. Given sort of the tensions in the region and with North Korea, do you think this is an appropriate... TONER: They arrived where? I apologize. QUESTION: In North Korea. TONER: Japanese? QUESTION: Japanese lawmakers. TONER: OK, and this is -- these are sports exchanges? QUESTION: So they arrived with the intent of conducting sports exchanges but they might be meeting with higher level officials. TONER: I'm not aware of these meetings. Certainly it's up to the Japanese government to decide its level of engagement with North Korea. Our only concern is that this is a pretty opaque regime that has showed no effort to address in any way, shape or form, the international community's ongoing concerns about its nuclear program. And while we don't discount the effect of people to people exchanges, which is sounds like this falls into that category, it certainly doesn't address the broader concerns we continue to have about North Korea. And we continue to work closely with Japan, with other allies and partners in the region to address those concerns. Yes, Tajinder (ph)? QUESTION: At a press conference in Athens, Greece, the E.U. has announced that there will an E.U.-Arab summit on November 3 and 4. They've already said 35 participants confirmed. Will there be a U.S. presence and at what level? TONER: Nothing to announce in terms of U.S. presence and I'd have to refer you to the Greeks. I just don't have any details or any reaction to it so thus far, I'll have to look into that. QUESTION: Have you received the invitation to... TONER: I'm not aware that we have. QUESTION: And another, India? TONER: Sure, of course. QUESTION: Have you got any update on the trilateral summit that was announced soon? India, Afghanistan, during Secretary Kerry's visit? TONER: It's tentatively scheduled, I think for September 21st on the margins of the U.N. General Assembly, but I don't have any further details. Yes sir? Go ahead, Matt. And then I'll get to you. QUESTION: Yes, he can go first. TONER: Oh, he ceded the floor to you, sir. QUESTION: Thank you very much. Somehow (ph) I was talking about the foreign relations committee meeting today, chaired by the Senator Bob Corker. So the committee observed that Pakistan is expanding its nuclear program just to deal with the Indian aggression and there's a threat of nuclear war between two countries and U.S. government should place all of mediation to (inaudible) tensions between the two countries. So what really is stopping United States to act as a mediator? TONER: Well, again I -- I mean I don't know what kind of formal, if he's talking about some kind of formal mediation role. I mean we act as... QUESTION: Some of the senator were observed in that meeting today. U.S. senator said U.S. should play the role of mediator between Pakistan and India. TONER: I mean we strongly encourage in all of our dealings with either India or Pakistan, stronger relations between the two countries. It's clearly in the security interests of the region that they work to deescalate tensions and that they have dialogue and that's something we constantly encourage for just that -- or out of just that concern, which is that we don't want to see tensions escalate, spiral out of control and lead to some kind of incident.TONER: Again, it's important for the two countries, the two governments to maintain strong, cordial and productive relations. Yes, sir. (CROSSTALK) TONER: Yes. I'm sorry. Do I have to consent? QUESTION: The IAEA's latest report on Iran is out today. TONER: Its confidential report, you mean? QUESTION: Well, it's not so confidential. I just read it, so it's not really confidential. TONER: Yes, but... QUESTION: And I'd prefer that you have read it, or if you haven't read it, that people in this building have read it and know what it says. And it basically says that in general, they're sticking to the terms of the agreement. But it also points out a potential problem, and that is that the Iranians have begun manufacturing rotors to be used in centrifuges, which they are allowed to do, but within limits. And I'm just wondering, if this -- the report points this out as an area of potential concern, is this a concern for the United States? TONER: So, the report does remain confidential until the IAEA releases it. (CROSSTALK) TONER: Let me continue. Which I think will be during the board of governors meeting, September 19th to 23rd. So I don't want to get into the details. As you note, though, it accurately portrays the status of Iran's nuclear program, we believe, and including the fact that, as you note, Iran continues to meet its commitments under the JCPOA. As for the specific concern that you raise, I'll try to speak to it in greater detail. At this point, we're still looking at the report, assessing it. As you said, it's not -- it's not prohibited, so I can't say to this point, without having looked at the report, whether we're concerned about it, and to what degree we're concerned about it. So I will ask for your patience on that. Is that it? Yes, please. QUESTION: Today in Cairo, the secretary general of the Arab League, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, accused Iran of meddling in Arab affairs and destabilizing the region. I wonder if you saw the comment, and I wonder if you would comment on that. Do you think that Iran does play that kind of meddling role that destabilizes the region? TONER: I mean, I haven't seen the specific comments he made. I know there's been a bit of a war of words between Saudi Arabia and Iran this past week regarding, well, stemming from concerns over the Hajj, and we've spoken to that. I think broadly speaking, and we've been very clear about this, in the wake of the JCPOA, the nuclear agreement, while that agreement addressed a very serious, but specific concern about Iran's behavior, one that would have caused without doubt greater tension in the region, and posed a real risk to the region, we haven't seen any kind of sea-change in Iran's broader behavior in the region. We would hope that it would play a more constructive role, but to this point we haven't seen any indication that it is pursuing that path. That's it? Thanks, guys.
CAMPAIGN 2012 / NEWT GINGRICH CAMP HILL PA 032412
IN INTERPLAY AS: NNSDEC10 CAMPAIGN 2012 NEWT GINGRICH CAMP HILL PA 032412 14;23;53 (Gingrich introduced) 14;24;25 thank you all very much for that warm welcome and charley thank you for that introduction. I should introduce, this is my sister Susan, who lives right here in the Harrisburg area and she is one thing that I want to point out is that she is not only a solid conservative who has been at this conference from many years but she is also an NRA member and is deeply in support of the right to bear arms and with her is my brother Randy, who is not an NRA member but is a hunter and is in support of the right to bear arms and bears them quite frequently as a hunter. (crowd laughs) I am just thrilled to have them here, they both live near here in the Harrisburg area because I was born here. I grew up in Hummlestown, Middletown, Royalton, and places like that. In fact, there is still a plaque in Hummelstown because we lived in an apartment just above a gas station on the square. Some of you have probably been down there. The station is still there, now it is just a convenient store but it is still there. ***14;25;26 I am very proud to be here as Charley said, I am a conservative, I did have ectha sketches for my children but I thought that they were actually children's toys and not presidential campaign design systems.*** I think that one of the reasons that Ronald Regan first decided to run and called for bold colors rather than pale pastels, was precisely the fact the he thought that we should be a party that stood for things that were real and that was prepared to fight for those things not just a zig zag or as governor Romney's communications director said, "shake the slate clean". Leaving one to wonder what Romney might say in his acceptance speech or even what he would say as a candidate or what he would say as president. There are multiple opportunities for having a clean slate with an etcha sketch. I think that great parties in fact aren't build on sand, I think that they are built on believing in things that are sound an fundamental and we have historically been the party of freedom . We were founded in the cause of freedom in the 1850's. Abraham Lincoln lead the push for freedom in this country and we have consistently come back to that. Ronald Reagan's presidency centered on providing freedom for the soviet empire and it was a core centerpiece for everything that Ronald Reagan believed in. Here at home economically, freedom in terms of our civil liberties, freedom from limited government and also freedom from abroad of soviet oppression. So I think there is a tradition there. 14;26;58 I am delighted that one of the folks that I worked with for many years in congress and all through the Regan years is Bob Walker is here. Who ably represented the Lancaster area and who also is my national chairman of my campaign and I would note by the way that he was a Pennsylvania elected official that was prepared to stand up for the right to work and was prepared to explain right to work on a regular basis. I am very delighted that Senator Toomey has done the same thing. He has proven that you can be a Pennsylvania politician who stands for freedom and answers questions of union members in a way that they accept rather than assuming that you have to give in to pressure from the union leadership. I think there are big differences here in the campaign and they will become clear as we campaign here in Pennsylvania. 14;27;54 When I was speaker, we lead an effort that lead four consecutive balanced budgets in a row. The only time in your lifetime that we had four consecutive balanced budgets and we paid off 405 billion dollars in federal debt during that period. By contrast, My good friend Senator Santorum was a member of the leadership that ran up a trillion 700billion dollar deficit including the bridge to nowhere and in the process set the stage in 2006 for the worst republican defeat since Watergate. So I think if you talk about how to defeat Obama this fall, somebody who designed the contract with America and helped get the first republican majority in 40 years, had the largest one party increase in 1994, 9 million additional republican voters for the party that year, over 1990 and who lead the first re-election for a house majority leader since 1928 may have a better understanding how to win this fall and I think that winning this fall is really important. 14;28;51 The objective fact is that this is the most important election of our lifetime. A re-elected Barack Obama will be a nightmare in terms of American values and American interests. ***Just think that if he can get re-elected in this economy, with these gas prices, with these deficits, with the policies that he outlines, he will take that as a vindication to go even further to the left and to do everything that he can to impose a Chicago-style machine on this country.*** That is why this really is a critical election and that is why we really have to look at the question of who can, if you thought about September and October and you had a billion dollar campaign by the president, you have the elite media doing everything they can to reelect him. Who can we elect and nominate to stand on the podium and win the debates against Obama and decisively prove that he should not be reelected and frankly that is why I have decided to run. I believe that it is important to have a principled candidate, it is important to have an articulate candidate, and I think that it is important to have a candidate that can go toe-to-toe. Now for the last three weeks we have been giving people a demonstration on how to do that. We began campaigning on $2.50 a gallon gasoline and the first reaction of president Obama was to attack the idea and then the pollsters started to tell him that this was a really bad idea. That in fact people would actually like to have $2.50 a gallon gasoline and so if you actually look at the last three week. It is a perfect set piece, this is what I learned for Ronald Regan and Margaret Thatcher, it is a perfect set piece for this fight. 14;30;37 I mean how do you offset a billion dollars. You find a truth so obvious that the ads don't work. If we are going to fight over the price of gasoline and it stays where it is or goes higher. You can't run enough ads to convince people that it is cheap and that is a huge problem. So one of the keys to successful conservativism is to pick fights that are the right principle but are also the right solution because people want to know that their lives will be better and so let's take the example of energy, which is a great opportunity for conservatives to demolish the left intellectually. The left has a whole series of ideas that are profoundly wrong. As Ronald Regan once said, it is not what they don't know that's what's dangerous, it's what they do know that isn't true. You have to recognize that president Obama belongs to the "Sierra club flat earth society". Any new information that makes coal and gas and oil acceptable is bad and therefore cannot be heard. 14;31;58 so the president a few weeks ago, and I was very clear, we need an energy policy that makes us independent of the middle east so that no American president bows to a Saudi king. Now if we go for that kind of American energy policy the byproduct for that will be that gasoline is cheaper because we will produce such huge volumes. People have forgotten that in WWII 83% of the oil produced in the world annually was produced here in the US. 83% we defeated Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan on a sea of oil from the United States. Our allies had oil, the Japanese and Germans ran out of oil. Very simple. Then we adopted policies in the 60's and 70's that provided that was supposed to be cheap Saudi Arabian oil, because it was very cheap to pump oil from Saudi Arabia and then we started calculating how many troops we had to send to the region and how many ships we had to send to the region and all of a sudden that oil started to get more expensive and cost American lives. It is controlled by dictatorships that are not our friends. This idea of walking arm and arm with the Saudi's is nonsense. The Saudi's fund the most extreme form of Islam, Wahhabism. The chief cleric of Saudi Arabia this last week said that every church in the Arabian Peninsula should be torn down. We have to understand who these folks are and because we want the oil, we tip toe around them. They are the primary funders of and participants in 9/11. It wasn't an Afghan operation it was a Saudi operation, but we don't want to say that too clearly because they will get mad at us. 14;34;03 So I've said no we have ought to move in the direction of an American energy supply and this is what makes it magic. Once again despite every effort of the socialist regime, American ingenuity and American creativity has broken loose. We have developed new technologies for drilling and the first in the natural gas field which is what you have seen in Western Pennsylvania, where there are over 60,000 new jobs because we have learned how to get natural gas out of the shale and in Ohio it looks like we can get oil out of shale and in the eagle ford shale in Texas. ***14;34;50 We are going to get a huge volume of oil and as much as there is in North Dakota and all of a sudden there is this new technology that Obama cannot recognize it is against the rules for a legitimate left wing person to recognize this breakthrough, because if the breakthrough is real, then it means you can afford to have gasoline and when you can afford to buy gasoline you don't have to go out and buy a volt. 14;35;14 now the government currently subsidizes the Volt, $7500 tax credit and they have sold a total in 2 years about 1,100 and I said at the time it was going to be a very hard sell for sociological reasons because you can't put a gun rack in a Volt.*** To be fair there is actually a YouTube video of a guy in Atlanta who owns a volt who put a gun rack in the trunk and my friend of mine form Camilla Georgia then said to me, "well then where does the deer go. But here is my point, I'm not against the Volt and I'm not against the Prius, I am for the right for you taking the money that you earned to buy the kind of vehicle that you want without the president of the United States dictating what is appropriate. So this new technology exists this is a fact and in North Dakota the effect has been extraordinary. We have gone from 150 million barrels of reserve to last week it was estimated 24 billion barrels of reserve. That is a 100 fold 160 fold 16,000% increase and the people that have done it say that when we get another generation of technology and we can go deeper they say that there will be 500 billion barrels in North Dakota. Now North Dakota is one state, the Moteray formation in California is suspected to have 80 billion barrels minimum and remember you have all of Alaska. 14;37;13 So we need a president that will open up offshore and we need a president that will open up federal lands and the response from Obama was promptly hysterical. It was the demagoguery of the left and he has made several speeches now where he has said they want to drill on the national mall. Now I just want to say here and I don't want to turn off any hard core conservatives, but I am prepared to give you my word that in a Gingrich administration that we will not drill on the mall. I mean the level of demagoguery that Obama indulges in is absurd. He has to believe that the American people have the level of education of a five year old. 14;38;06 We don't, that is why in this election we are going to beat him by a huge margin. So the president goes to Florida because we have talked about it enough began to get nervous so two weeks to go and he has this very pretentious Obama style speech in which he says drilling is not the answer. Then he gives us his answer. Alright how many knew it was algae? Ok now I did my newsletter this week. I do an electronic newsletter every week and my newsletter this week was on algae. Well I mean you know if a president of the United States gives you a solution, you owe it to him to dig into him. So literally we contacted the association for algae research and there is such a group and they believe that in 10 years they will probably be able to produce commercially usable petroleum products from algae and they believe that they can produce them for somewhere between a 140 and 800 dollars a barrel. 14;39;35 now notice two things here they don't think it is going to be available for another ten years. So you can see that the Obama administration's idea is walk for ten years then we will be ready. But notice also what they are doing. Once again like they did with solar power they are for a solution that is so expensive that it is not economically rational. This is Solindra in green and by the way they don't not have a green energy policy, they have a greenback energy policy. They want to know who they are going to giving greenbacks to and that is what you have in Nevada where you have the president, which I thought was the dumbest possible scheduling by the white house. They send the president to a solar power facility that has five fulltime employees for a 50 million dollar in tax subsidies. That means that they are putting up ten million dollars per job. Now frankly most of you would be happy to take the money and not have them build the facility. 14;40;45 because think about this the president goes out and visits this totally irrational thing to prove that he is really into the technology of the future. The technology of the present it drilling and what is fascinating is if you read on page 3 or 4 he says drilling is not the answer and two pages later he says now natural gas, we have had terrific breakthroughs and we have gone from a 7 year on 2000 to a 120 year supply today. We've gone from preparing to import liquid natural gas in the middle east to preparing to export liquid natural gas to china and I have not been able to get a single reporter in the white house staff to go up to him and say Mr. President, just as a matter of record how do you think they find the natural gas? I mean I want to all to think about this because this is at the core of the indictment of president Obama. This is a man whose ideology blocks him from reality. So he cannot literally say well gee if drilling works in natural gas then how can I say two pages earlier that drilling doesn't work. 14;42;09 when he read the speech in the white house he didn't ask his staff, isn't there sort of a logical inconsistency here. Now the news media in the effort to defend Obama has said that additional oil won't make any difference. Which is just first of all just irrational. It repeals supply and demand as a model, but it is deeper there is an historical parallel that the president has cited, natural gas. We have had an 11% increase in the production of natural gas since 2008 and the price has dropped from $7.90 a unit to $2.50 a unit. If you had the same decline in the price of gasoline, you would pay $1.13. That is a literal parallel to natural gas. Now it is not quite the same you have to refine it and so on, so maybe it would only drop to $1.50, but I didn't even try to go there. 14;43;07 by the way $1.13 was the price when I left the speakership. I didn't even go back to the day Obama was sworn in, which was $1.89 and so the idea of getting to $2.50 which is the number we picked was impossible is just utterly irrational. But I want you to notice that if we are prepared to have an American energy policy, if we are prepared to encourage the development of more oil and gas, the opportunities are enormous. First of all you are going to see a natural gas highway in the near future, you are going to see trucking companies switch over, because in equivalency natural gas is a dollar a gallon cheaper than diesel fuel. So you're going to see lots of people making this transition. That's going to further reduce the pressure on gasoline. Second, if you look at what is happening in North Dakota, where the federal government can't block it. It is astonishing and by the way every time you see Obama say we are drilling more today remember the places he controls we are drilling less. The private property where he can't stop, we are drilling more. 14;44;16 From him to take credit for the places that he can't stop, is just the height of hypocrisy. Everywhere the federal government controls it is down. I was at port Fourchan yesterday morning, which is the largest oil port in the United States, it is in southern Louisiana and they will tell you there how many thousands of jobs Obama has cost them because again the dishonesty is stunning. We are not going to have a moratorium anymore, we are now going to issue permits, but by the way we are not issuing any. So they are now taking about the permitarium, which has replaced the moratorium, which has replaced the moratorium with paper. 14;45;16 one man told me that they have increased the size of the form that you fill out, from 50 pages to 3500 pages. I mean the whole things is designed by liberal bureaucrats in Washington to block the development of more energy. One person in port Fourchan told me there estimate was it the government got out of the way they would create 400,000 jobs in developing energy. Again we have case study in Minnesota where the current unemployment rating is 3.5% and that overstates it. There are 16,000 jobs in the oil field they can't fill because they can't find people with the right skills and 3.5% of the people don't have the right skills. That is why we modify unemployment compensation by adding a training requirement so if you sign up for unemployment compensation you have to get trained. 14;46;00 Now there are profound reasons to develop an American energy policy. I'm sticking on this today because I want you to understand that you can take an idea like this and drive it home in every single level. First of all there is an everyday cost of living benefit. If we can drive the price of gasoline to $2.50 a gallon everyone will be able to afford more and everybody will have a slightly better family budget, small businesses would be much better off, independent truckers would be much better off, the cost of food will be lower because the cost of energy to get the food to the grocery store would go down. Every single way less expensive gasoline will benefit the American people, unless you are a sierra club fanatic. Second if we kept 500 billion dollars at home instead of sending it to Venezuela and Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq and kept it here. That would create millions of new jobs. North Dakota is proof of that concept. 14;47;01 Third, if you are producing the oil here you are producing royalties to the American government and the state government. If you produce the oil in Saudi Arabia, the royalties are going to the Saudi government. So it is a way to increase revenue without raising taxes and in fact one of the people in South Dakota says if we were to unlock federal lands and unlock offshore that the total amount paid in royalties over the next generation to the government would be between 16 and 18 trillion dollars. Now why does that matter because if you go back to when bob and I came into power in 1994, if we would impose discipline in Washington, get back to the balanced budget. Take the royalty money from gas and put it in a fund to pay off the national debt, then in the life time of the youngest people in this conference, the US would be debt free and we would have paid off the national debt. 14;48;18 so notice there is a double victory. You end up not bowing to a Saudi king and you end up paying off the Chinese bond holders, while creating American jobs and lowering the price of gasoline. That is why I would like to run a major part of the campaign this fall on the question of energy. The president finally got panic stricken a week ago and decided that they had to produce more oil, so what did they do, they turned to the Saudi's. They didn't turn to Louisiana, they didn't turn to North Dakota, to Pennsylvania, or Texas, or North Dakota, or Alaska. It makes you wonder what kind of country Obama thinks he is president of. It's also important for National security reasons to have a American energy policy. We need to have a national debate about the people who are trying to kill us and you can't have that national debate if you are so frightened that they are going to cut off your supply of oil. 14;49;28 So we need to as a matter of national security to be able to have an honest debate and it is a couple of layers. The Iranians are practicing the straights of Hormus. In the short run the answer for that is the American navy and US air force. In the long run the answer for that is American energy independence so we can say to the Chinese, the Indians, the Europeans, and the Japanese, you have a problem and you had better figure out how you are going to keep open the straights of Hormus because we produce enough oil that we don't care. 14;50;24 Let me stay along the same line, as president of the United States and Commander and Chief, I will never apologize to people that are killing young Americans. What the president should have said is that it is unfortunate that Muslim political prisoners where defacing the Koran in order to use it as a communications tool and we certainly hope that the Muslim clerics in Afghanistan are going to condemn the Muslim political prisoners, who have defaced the Koran, because those where the people responsible for the problem. Not the Americans. ***14;51;25 Now this administration in response has adopted a slogan in the defense department that sounds something like we will hold sacred object that others hold sacred. To which my reaction is terrific we are going to put crosses back up.*** 14;51;45 I mean think about it, during his administration he apologizes to Islamic fanatics while he is attacking the Catholic Church and he doesn't see any contradiction in those two behaviors. I was at Louisiana college, which is a Baptist college, which is a very right to life college and has said that they will close rather implement Obamacare. Now why does the president not have the same respect for the religious beliefs of the American people that he has for Afghans. I just think that this is a fundamental debating point this fall, I am told by this administration that we are not worthy of its respect, but everyone else is worthy of apology and appeasement and weakness. I think that it is a terrible policy. 14;52;44 let me say one more thing about job creation and balancing the budget. Someone asked me what would the last three years been like under a Gingrich administration, instead of an Obama administration. First thing I said, having worked with the Regan administration, to cut taxes, cut regulation, honor people who created jobs, and create 16 million jobs in the Regan years and by the way the price of gas went down as the economy got more prosperous and it didn't go up because we produced more and more oil and then having worked with Bill Clinton to balance the federal budget. Have the first tax cut in 16 years, have the largest capital gains tax cut in history, reformed welfare so 2 out of 3 people went back to school and the result was that we created 11 million new jobs in four years and the unemployment rate dropped to 4.2%. 14;53;36 So if I would have walked in January of 2009 and I had a 280 billion dollar proposal in front of me. I would have said it may not have been a big enough tax cut, but it is the right direction and I would have passed a giant tax cut to return the money to the American people and American businesses, because I actually think that you spending the money, you investing the money, you creating the jobs, works where triple down bureaucracy is a failure. The fact that this president found it surprising that shovel ready jobs weren't shovel ready tells me how out of touch with reality he was and how little he understood about American government. Now I will close with this thought. 14;54;26 I believe we can balance the budget. We did it last time in 3 years. I believe we can do it much faster than anyone in Washington believes, but the key from the conservative perspective is very simple, We need to shrink Obama's spending, not raise the American peoples taxes and the key is to reduce spending to the level of revenue coming in, not try to raise revenue to catch up with Obama's credit card. Now I just gave you these example because I want to ask for your help. It is very simple, if you're on facebook, go on face book and put in Newt = $2.50 a gallon gasoline and if people ask you, it is an interesting slogan but how would he do and in that case tell them to go to Newt.org there is a 30 minutes speech where I walk through step by step an American energy policy that would get us independent from the middle east and reduce the cost of gasoline tremendously and if any of you interested in donating, you can start at Newt.org and we have 176,000 donors and the smallest donation that we have to check off is one gallon of newt gas which is $2.50. I believe with your help Pennsylvania has a chance, we have candidates I was born here, Rick was a Senator here. I think it will be a very spirited primary debate, but I believe that having somebody who knows how to design a winning national campaign and having somebody who can debate Barack Obama head to head and win and have someone who believes in conservativism far beyond the depth of an etcha sketch and has proven his willingness to fight for conservitivism will give us the best chance for our children's future and I ask for your help come the primary. Thank you all very much.14:56:24
BOEHNER AND GOP ON RISING GAS PRICES
Hosue Speaker John Boehner and other House GOP members on rising gas prices. SLUGGED: 1115 BOEHNER PRESSER RS51 80 AR: 16X9 DISC# 154 11:20:51 SPEAKER BOEHNER: Good morning, everyone. REPORTERS: Good morning. SPEAKER BOEHNER: Rising gas prices are a major burden for American families and small businesses. As gas prices go up, the cost of everyday life goes up. It costs more to drive to work, costs more to buy groceries or just to get the kids to school. And at a time when our economy is already in a position where it's not creating enough jobs, rising gas prices hurt the very people that we need to lead us out of our economic crisis, and that's small businesses. Just as with jobs, the American people recognize that Washington has been a big part of the problem when it comes to the price of energy. The Obama administration has consistently blocked American energy production that would lower costs and create jobs in our country. They've canceled new leases for exploration, jeopardized our nuclear energy industry, and imposed a de facto moratorium on future drilling in our country. They've even pushed a cap-and-trade national energy tax that the president himself admitted that would cost -- cause the price of energy to skyrocket. Well, the average price for a gallon of gas is on its way to $4 quickly. You know, if White House has its way, the EPA is about to impose a backdoor national energy tax, which means that gas prices would only go higher. 11:22:33 Republicans have a plan to lower gas prices and to create new jobs, and in the coming weeks and months, we'll be taking action on that plan. We're calling it the American Energy Initiative. And the American Energy Initiative is rooted in our Pledge to America. In the pledge, we said we would help end some of the uncertainty facing small businesses so they can begin hiring again. And we said we will fight to increase access to domestic energy sources and oppose attempts to impose a national cap-and-trade energy tax, and that's exactly what we're going to do. Under the American Energy Initiative, we'll work to stop government policies that are driving the price of gasoline, expand American energy production to lower costs and to create jobs, and promote our all-of-the-above strategy to increase all forms of American energy. We'll also work with governors and state officials to identify ways we can help them increase energy production and to create jobs in their states. Now, these are common-sense policies that the American people support. And the American Energy Initiative will be a sustained, ongoing effort by House Republicans in the weeks and months ahead. Our committees are fully engaged. Americans don't want some knee-jerk reaction. What they want are real solutions that increase the amount of domestic energy that we produce. And through this initiative, we will work to lower gas prices, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and to create new jobs. We made a pledge to America and we intend to keep it. REP. UPTON: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm Fred Upton from Michigan. 11:24:21 We have seen in the last two years, since President Obama was elected, gas prices have gone up double. And the first gas price bill that we have now passed out of subcommittee -- I just left the Energy and Power Subcommittee -- we passed by voice, H.R. 910, and it blocks the EPA from driving fuel prices even higher. We are not going to let this administration regulate what they've been unable to legislate. And this bill, H.R. 910, is the first step. We intend to mark that bill up in full committee next week. We want to apply the Hippocratic Oath: first, do no harm. The idea that this administration or some want to focus on SPRO -- Strategic Petroleum Reserve -- which has the volume of only 770 million barrels, is really not the right answer. Our focus should be on the 50 billion barrels of oil that have been put off-limits. As part of the speaker's efforts, what he just said now, we want to streamline the permitting process. I'm going to give you a couple of examples. Shell, off the coast of Alaska has spent $3.5 billion over the last couple of years, trying to drill some test wells into an area off the shore of Alaska where they think that there could be as many as 25 billion barrels of oil, and yet their efforts have been stopped up to date so far. 11:25:44 The Keystone Pipeline, you know, which will provide access to Canada, to the oil sands there coming down into the Midwest, being able to tap the 4 million barrels a day of oil that are being produced out of oil stands in Canada, need to come here to the lower 48. And I look forward to working in our committee, with Doc Hastings's committee, to see what we can do to streamline the permitting process to, in fact, increase the supply so that we can put downward pressure on those prices that are impacting every business, farm and household across the country. REP. HASTINGS: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am Doc Hastings, and I am the chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee. And the focus of our committee is to utilize the tremendous resources we have on federal lands. Federal lands were designed to be multiple-use lands, and that includes commercial activity. We have tremendous known resources under our jurisdiction on federal lands, on the outer continental shelf, and certainly in Alaska. In fact, the known reserves that we have is -- are in excess of 160 billion barrels. Unfortunately, this administration, since they have taken charge, have obviously gone in 180 degrees away from utilizing these resources. For example, right after President Obama was elected and Secretary Salazar was appointed as the Interior secretary, they cancelled active leases in the Intermountain West and exploratory leases in the Intermountain West. And as a result of what happened with the BP spill, there is now, in fact, a de facto moratorium on Gulf drilling. And meanwhile, gasoline prices go higher and higher. So we are going to focus -- in fact, we have four hearings this month alone, and we'll have a field hearing in the Gulf of Mexico -- to make sure that we can, in the long run, have these resources for our use. And I really believe this to be, as we -- as we move forward on this debate regarding utilizing our resources, becomes a national security issue. 11:27:51 We have seen today and in the last month or so the sharp spike in the price of gasoline because of the unrest. Here we are sitting on all these resources. It seems to me it's in the best interest of our country to utilize these resources, not only for jobs, the economy, but also for national security issues. So I'm looking forward to working with others and Fred and make sure that we can make our country less dependent on foreign sources for the things that make our economy run and create jobs here. Thank you. 11:28:46 REP. JEB HENSARLING (R-TX): Principally due to the policies of President Obama and the two previous Democratic congresses, the American people have witnessed the longest recession and the most tepid economic recovery in the postwar era. This Congress, this House, is about creating jobs. It's why, under the leadership of Speaker Boehner, we've had H.R. 1, to put America on a fiscally sustainable path, because historic levels of debt lead to historic levels of taxation, which, in turn, lead to historic levels of unemployment. It's also why we took steps to get rid of the dreaded 1099 form that would crush small-business job creation. This is a House that is dedicated to empowering small businesses to create more W-4s, not force them to fill out more 1099s. Businesses face a great environment of uncertainty. Compounding that uncertainty is energy prices. We know that we have had an administration and two previous Democratic congresses that have been anti-carbon-based energy, which means they are anti-energy, which has the impact of being anti-business and anti-family. 11:30:02 Small businesses -- all job creators in America do not need greater uncertainty to keep their capital on the sidelines. Struggling American families do not deserve higher prices at the pump. And so Republican members of the House embrace the beginning of this American Energy Initiative. American businesses and American families need affordable American energy. SPEAKER BOEHNER: Questions. Q: Yeah. Mr. Speaker, when -- you mentioned that this going to be focused in the weeks and months ahead. When can we expect to see energy legislation on the floor of the House? And secondly, both Chairman Hastings and Chairman Upton have said in the past that it's their preference not to do a single, sweeping, comprehensive energy bill, but rather pieces. So yeah, so can you comment on the timeline and the structure? SPEAKER BOEHNER: Well, I'll let the chairmen comment on the timeline. 11:31:22 But you know, the days of big, comprehensive bills, I think, should be over, and I would rather deal with this in what I'll call bite-sized chunks. Why wouldn't we have a bill to encourage vehicles to use natural gas and do it by itself? Why wouldn't we have a bill that would encourage more oil and gas exploration, where the royalties would go to support more green energy development? Why wouldn't we do that by itself? Why wouldn't we do a nuclear energy bill, as an example, by itself? I think it's a more logical and thoughtful way to deal with these issues. And when it comes to the timing, I'll turn it over to the chairmen. REP. UPTON: Well, we've begun hearings, lots of discussions. As you know, we sent lots of letters seeking information. I agree with what Speaker Boehner just said. I know that for the first time in a long time, we're intending to have all the NRC nuclear regulatory commissioners to come and testify before our committee. We want to find out why it takes so long to go from start to finish on a new nuclear reactor. Why does it take us 10 to 12 years and it takes the French and the Japanese four to five years? We want to see what we can do to change that. And by lowering the number of years, we can lower the cost. 11:32:29 We want to talk about nuclear recycling. We're going to look at the specific legislation on that. We're going to look at a number of things to streamline the process, and again, use bite-sized chunks. We're looking for bipartisanship on a lot of these different issues. And I look forward to working with the leadership to get these bills out of our committee and to the House floor so we can begin to do something about increasing the supplies so we can look long-term at decreasing the cost. Q: Speaker Boehner? Q: Speaker Boehner? Speaker Boehner? Speaker Boehner? REP. HASTINGS: I just want to say that we are going to focus on what we think is the most immediate solution to try -- to this issue, and that is the de facto moratorium on the Gulf of Mexico. We're going to have hearings in the full committee this month and we're going to have a field hearing on that, and there are several things we can do. For example, there were active leases prior to the moratorium. There's no reason why those leases now should not be executed and we should commence utilizing those resources. That's just one example if we're going to be as aggressive, because, after all, we get roughly one-third of our crude from the Gulf of Mexico. It's an active area that we need to utilize and not take off-limits. So that's where we're going focus our area. Q: Speaker Boehner? Q: Speaker Boehner? Q: Speaker Boehner, H.R. 1 was just mentioned and it's being spoken of in very glowing terms. Quick question here, you rescinded about 123 mandatory appropriations so far through the H.R. 1, yet do you see that seriously defunding health care? Because, just frankly, there's about ($)105 billion left in future appropriations in that bill, and it seems like leadership doesn't want to even bother rescinding that particular appropriation. 11:34:07 SPEAKER BOEHNER: Listen, we made it pretty clear when we put "Obamacare" on the floor and the House passed the repeal of that bill. We're going for regular order, and I would expect that the committees of proper jurisdiction will bring forward bills to eliminate some of the mandatory spending that is involved in that bill. Q: Leader Boehner? Q: Speaker Boehner? Q: For Chairman Upton, the White House has been -- hasn't exactly been forthcoming with your investigation into the negotiations, the health care negotiations with trade associations. And I was wondering if you've given any thought to inviting Billy Tauzin and the chair and the CEOs of those trade associations up to the Hill to maybe get more information? REP. UPTON: We received a letter back earlier this week from the White House and we are preparing a response back, and we'd be glad to share that letter with you. It's something that is not off the table in terms of what we may do. We're looking for more information for the Oversight Subcommittee. Q: Speaker Boehner. Q: Speaker Boehner, Senator McCain said recently that having these two-week CRs continuing is harmful to our national security. What would you need from Senate Democrats and the White House to budge from that $61 billion number in cuts? And what do you need for -- (inaudible) -- Mr. McCarthy said yesterday, another two- to three-week temporary CR? How does that need to look for you in order to get your conference behind it? 11:35:35 SPEAKER BOEHNER: It's time for Democrats here in Washington to get serious about these budget negotiations. Listen, we're trying to clean up last year's mess. The Democrats did no budget. They did no appropriation bills. And as a result, they dumped this in our lap. And we're trying to clean it up. We -- the House passed a bill that would cut $100 billion from the president's request for this year. The Senate had a couple of votes yesterday, neither of which received the necessary votes, but they've got to get serious. The American people understand that cutting spending will lead to a better environment for businesses to create jobs. And that's - 11:36:47 Q: Could you move from that $61 billion number, though? SPEAKER BOEHNER: To where? Where is the Senate Democrat plan? I'm not going to sit up here and negotiate with myself. And that's what you're asking me to do. Q: Speaker Boehner, what do you -- what do you make of the Democrats' proposal they're talking about to widen the -- widen the conversation here to include revenue raisers, to look at cuts in mandatory spending programs? SPEAKER BOEHNER: They don't seem to be able to understand that the American people want us to cut spending, because they know that cutting spending will, in, fact create a better environment for job creation. To try to muddle the current issue with entitlement programs, tax increases, that's what the next budget process is for. And we'll have plenty of opportunities to talk about that. Q: Speaker Bohener. Q: Mr. Speaker -- and this might -- (inaudible) -- chairmen on the energy issue here. Is it fair to blame the Obama administration for the price of gas here when not three years ago your party was taking around bumper stickers that called it the Pelosi premium in 2008, when the price of gas went up? Do you not bear some of the responsibility in this short time since these prices have spiked if that was the blame on the speaker -- SPEAKE BOEHNER: I think -- I think we did everything that we could to increase the amount of American energy that we've produced. And if you watch what this administration has done for the last two years, in their regulatory process, they've stopped drilling in the Gulf. They've slowed the number of leases that are coming out of the government. They're imposing these EPA regs on American businesses that are going to sharply increase the cost of energy in America. One only has to look at the cap-and-trade bill, the 2,000-page monstrosity that came through here about a year and a half ago, and to look at what kind of cost that would impose on American industry. If we want to create jobs in America, we have to have American people investing in our economy. All of these policies will tend to discourage investment and to move it overseas. And the net result of that will be the question the American people are still asking: Where are the jobs? Q: Speaker Boehner. Speaker Boehner. REP. UPTON: Let me just respond to that briefly as well. As Doc said, a third of our oil comes from the Gulf, and this administration has said no to everything that's been there since the BP. So what is the result? The result is that today we are getting 250,000 barrels less of oil from the Gulf than were predicted just four or five months ago. That's the result. And because of that, that has helped raise these prices to in essence double what they were two years ago. We can't afford that. We've got to safely reopen the Gulf, and we can. Alaska has dropped by about 10 percent every year in terms of production. And if you look now even at the Department of Energy numbers for the Gulf from where we were to where we want to be in '12, almost a half a million barrels less in '12 than we were producing in '09. That's not acceptable. Q: Speaker Boehner -- REP. HASTINGS: Let me -- let me respond to that, too, because the situation in 2008, if you recall, there was a presidential moratorium on drilling and there was a congressional moratorium on drilling. The price of gasoline went up to $4 a gallon. The American people ask, what is going on? 11:40:02 And what is going on, of course, was the activity of our conference in August, when we weren't in session, bringing this to the attention of the American people. Both those moratoria went away. And once those moratoria went away, that sent a signal to the markets that the United States was serious about utilizing the resources that we have in our country, and the -- and the prices went down. This administration has gone 180 degrees from that. And that is the reason why it's sending a signal to the markets that the -- and prices are going up again. When we import more than 50 percent of our crude oil, we are becoming dependent on foreign sources. And so when we send a signal we're going to even make that less, obviously, the prices are going to go up. We need to send a signal that we are serious about becoming less energy dependent, and the way to do that is utilize the resources that we know we have in this country. And that's where we're going to focus our energy, on those public lands that have those resources. Q: Speaker Boehner? Speaker Boehner, I wanted to follow up on the negotiations on spending cuts, because Senator Schumer just spoke to reporters on the Senate side and he said that Democrats have already moved several times towards the Republican position, and are prepared to move even more. But he said they can't do that unless you come to them with some kind of compromise, publicly or privately, and move off of the 61 billion (dollars) that you've already passed. SPEAKER BOEHNER: Yes, I guess the Senate has moved several times. Remember, for months it was no cuts: you know, we've got to -- we've got to continue spending at last year's levels. We said that was unacceptable, and the House acted. Then the Senate decided, well, we'll give you some cuts. We'll give you $4.7 billion worth of real cuts for this fiscal year -- while we cut some $61 billion. I think it's time for them to get serious, and they're not serious. And it's time to get serious about cutting spending. And we're not -- I hope the talks -- they are going to continue, but we're not going to get very far if they don't get serious about doing what the American people expect of us. Q: So are you saying you're not willing to move off your position until you think they are more serious? SPEAKER BOEHNER: I don't think I'm going to negotiate with you -- (chuckles) -- over what those spending levels are going to be. This is not going to be easy. Our goal, as I've said many times, is to cut spending and keep the government open, because cutting spending will lead to a better environment for job creation. Thanks. END. ----------------------------------------------------------------
ELIZABETH WARREN NORTHFOLK VA TOWN HALL FOX POOL P2
LU 3 ELIZABETH WARREN NORTHFOLK VA TOWN HALL FOX POOL 101819 2020 P2 TVU 18 ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI101819 2020 Sen. Elizabeth Warren called the upcoming Supreme Court case challenging the constitutionality of the CFPB an attack on consumers across the country and a sign that the agency "still has got a lot of enemies" tonight in a gaggle with reporters after her rally in Norfolk, Virginia. "When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine," Warren said. 200014 She was asked on a gaggle if she saw the case "as the administration going after" her. "I see it as the administration going after consumers all across this country," Warren said. 200014 "Those big banks have been forced to return more than 12 billion dollars directly to people they cheated. I know that that still makes the Republicans really unhappy, because it shows that we can make government work for the people. And I know it makes the big banks unhappy because, sheesh, they've already had to cough up 12 billion dollars and give up a lot of their cheating schemes. So, I know the agency has got a lot of enemies. They're gonna keep coming after it. When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine," Warren said. 200014 She also repeated her line from the debate that "President Barack Obama fought for that agency" even when other Democrats didn't. 200042 Warren was also asked about the evolution of her thinking on her recent decision not to do closed-door fundraisers, even into the general election when she would potentially face President Donald Trump and his war chest. "This is what I now understand about how it works, and I just decided I'm not running for President by sucking up to the wealthy and the well-connected. I'm gonna do it this way and it works," Warren said. 195826 And -- a question on Medicare for All that Warren dodged, yet again. "Critics say that you are not telling the truth about what Medicare for all will cost, that taxing the top 1% won't pay for it. What do you say?" a reporter asked. "I say that I have made my principles on this clear, and that is wealthy people and big corporations are going to see their costs go up and that hard working middle class families are going to see their costs go down," Warren said tonight. 195544 Also want to flag a fairly intimate moment at the end of the Q+A portion of the rally, which the campaign said was about 4,000 people in the Chartway Arena. The president of Old Dominion University's College Democrats club, who screamed "OH MY GOD are you serious" when her ticket got pulled to ask a question, asked Warren what the single most impactful moment of her life was that made her the woman she is today. "You mean other than marrying Bruce?" Warren said at first, before launching into a more detailed, more emotional version of what we've heard her say time and time again in her stump speech. The moment was "about when I was 19 and I got married to the guy who'd been my first boyfriend, first guy who ever dated me, first guy who'd ever dumped me," she said.192533 She talked about deciding to settle down but then realizing the opportunities that finishing her education could bring, about how nervous she was to screw up when she went back to school but how happy it made her -- then she got a bit emotional talking about how "extraordinary" it has been running for president. Here's the full log of that moment: And when he dropped back into my life and proposed, I said yes in a nanosecond. That was gonna be my path. And I thought, I've given everything else up and when the little glimmer was out there, that little bit that I had---far on the horizon, it looked like at the time---the chance for me to finish my education so I could do the work I wanted to be able to do. 192614 It was...It was like something opened up in me. And it was the idea that somebody, somewhere had helped build that thing that gave me a chance, that let me fall off the track and get back on, and, when I did, I held on for dear life. I still remember how much I sweated about the books, about the classes, about the commute. You know what that's like. But, so afraid that I'd screw this up and I wouldn't be able to finish it. 192700 And by the time I graduated and I got my first job working with the little ones, for me, it became a kind of pattern that things opened up in my life and then I got a chance to reach and help somebody else out. And sometimes, it was a little tiny kids. Later, it was big kids. This is what ultimately pulled me in to politics---not in a million years did I ever think I would run for public office. 192734 I was just going to be the dork. You know---it's true! The teacher, the researcher, man I would feed the information over. I go try to talk to people. I tell them, "here's what's broken. Here's what you could do about it." I spent, god, eight years saying, "there's a crash coming. There's a crash coming." And nobody wanted to hear it, but what I started to figure out when I made the decision to run for public office is you could actually build structures that open up more possibilities for everybody else. 192813 It's great to do it hand over hand, but it's also great to do it big time. I have to tell you all---running for president is just an extraordinary experience for me [someone shouts, "WE LOVE YOU ELIZABETH WARREN"] [cheers] All right, all right. In that case, I'm not going to get but---I will. I am just going to say it is extraordinary. It's extraordinary because this is the moment. This is our moment. TVU 18 ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI 101819 2020 GAGGLE 195455 Q: Why didn't we hear about Medicaid for all tonight? WARREN>> We didn't get a question about it. Q: Beto O'Rourke recently said that churches who oppose same sex marriage should lose their tax excempt status. What do you feel about that position? 195510 WARREN>> Look, I stand with the LGBTQ+ community until everyone in this country is treated equally and fairly. We have a long tradition in our country of permitting churches to make their own decisions about how they worship. I respect that tradition and I would not change it. Q: Critics say that you are not telling the truth about what Medicare for all will cost, that taxing the top 1% won't pay for it. What do you say? 195544 WARREN>> I say that I have made my principles on this clear, and that is wealthy people and big corporations are going to see their costs go up and that hard working middle class families are going to see their costs go down. Q: Tell us your strategy of why you wanted to come to virginia? 195606 WARREN>> I want to be out and get a chance to talk face to face with as many people across this country as I can. And that's what town halls are all about. This is my 141st town hall and i've taken thousands of unfiltered questions, and now we're well over 70,000 selfies. And it gives people in every part of this country, and Puerto Rico, a chance to tell me a little bit about their lives, a chance to tell me why they will spend hours waiting in line, listening to speech, listening to the questions, waiting for the selfies. 195646 To say, this is what matters to me about voernment. You know, it takes a lot of optimism to be here, a lot of belief that if we get out there and fight, side by side, we can make real change in this country. We can make this the country of our best values. Q: Can you explain your thinking on fundraising [MIC DISRUPTION] that you didn't apply to your senate runs? 195709 WARREN>> So, I was up for reelection in 2018. I raised about 20 million dollars in grassroots donations, and I also gave away or directly raised about 11 million dollars for other Democrats running around the country. When I made the decision to run for President, a part of that was how I would run, and I just decided I'm not gonna spend my time sucking up to wealthy donors and corporate executives. 195748 I want to spend my time doing town halls in, so far, 27 states and Pureto Rico, all around the country. This is what has both kept me grounded and has helped rebuild American democracy. We're building a movement out here, a movement of people who believe that, you know, rich people may own more shoes than everyone else, they may own more cars than everyone else, they may even own more houses than everyone else, but they don't get to own a bigger share of our democracy. Q: Do you think you've had an evolution of thinking, then? 195826 WARREN>> So, this is what I now understand about how it works, and I just decided I'm not running for President by sucking up to the wealthy and the well-connected. I'm gonna do it this way and it works. Q: How do you plan to activate and connect with HBCU students? 195848 WARREN>> So, I visited HBCUs and I will keep doing that. I also will reach out with plans that directly affect both the HBCUs, including my plan to put 50 billion dollars into HBCUs to help level the playing field, and that will reach out to HBCU current students and graduates. That's partly with student loan debt forgiveness, but it's also with things like closing the black-white entrepreneurship gap. 195926 By making a real investment in people of color who are developing their own businesses. So, I got a lot of pieces in a lot of plans. I just hope I can get people to come and hear live or to go to the website, ElizabethWarren.com, and look up some of these plans. Together, we have a chance to change this country. Q: Supreme Court case challenging the constitutionality of the CFUB. Do you see this as the administration going after you, specifically? 200014 WARREN>> I see it as the administration going after consumers all across this country. Look, when I first had the idea for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, it was pretty straightforward. I thought that banks should not be able to boost their profits but cheating people and that we needed a cop on the beat to make sure that that didn't happen, and the big banks fought us, the Republicans fought us---shoot---a big chunk of the Democrats fought us. 200042 They told us not even to try to get the agency through, but I ignored them. I stayed in there. I fought for that agency. President Obama fought for that agency. It was signed into law and it has made a big difference. Those big banks have been forced to return more than 12 billions dollars directly to people they cheated. I know that that still makes the Republicans really unhappy, because it shows that we can make government work for the people. 200112 And I know it makes the big banks unhappy because, sheesh, they've already had to cough up 12 billion dollars and give up a lot of their cheating schemes. So, I know the agency has got a lot of enemies. They're gonna keep coming after it. When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine. Q: What's your stance on Japan? 200135 WARREN>> Japan is an important ally to the United States. I was there a little over a year ago and met with many officials in the Japanese government, toured our base, and heard a lot about both the challenges the Japanese economy faces and how committed the Japanese people and the Japanese government are to their alliance with the United States. Japan is a strategic partner that is absolutely critical not only in the region, but around the world. #### TOWN HALL 183121 WARREN>> Hello! Virginia is for lovers. I love this. So let me start by saying a very big thank you to---I love you too---to Senator Locke, fabulous. Thank you! Just wonderful. And we have many special guests. I also want to say it very special thank you to who has who has given me a lot of good advice and is always there, has served our country so honorably, Admiral Smith wherever you are, Admiral Smith. Thank you. Thank you for getting us started. Thank you. 183204 We also have another very special guest in the house. The man who helps the United States House of Representatives, who was on one of the most critical committees, who leads that Committee on health and labor, Congressman Bobby Scott is here. Please stand up. 183235 Congressman Scott are hatching all kinds of plans around labor and education. Am I right? We're gonna do this. And as long as we're doing all this family stuff, I also brought along my husband Bruce, where are you sweetie? He's the man with the very debonair black cast on his arm. He defended Bailey from another dog. And Bruce ended up with the broken bone over it. But he's on the mend. He's on the mend and outwith us. 183317 So I am just so glad to be here with you all today. Thank you. 18 days, Virginia's gonna get this done. In 2017, you inspired our nation. And what you did in 2017, the rest of the nation doubled down on in 2018. Now, in 2019, we're turning to you again. Do it again and inspire us for 2020. So I thought what we'd do tonight is I'll tell you a little bit about myself. We'll take some questions. And then if anybody wants to, I'll stay as long as you want, and we'll do selfies. 183419 Yes. The core part of democracy. Okay. There we go. So, I was born and raised in Oklahoma. We got a few Okies here, okay. There aren't so many of us, I understand -- Oh, I got one over here. Good. Good. I was the baby in the family. 183439 I have three much older brothers. I was what use to be called a late-in-life-baby. My mother always just called me, "the surprise." Now, all three of my older brothers went off to joined the military. My oldest brother, Don Reed, was career military. He spent about five and a half years off and on in combat in Vietnam. We were really lucky to get him back home. Very, very lucky. 183520 My brother, John, was stationed overseas for a little over a year. Now my brother David, the youngest of the three, David trained as a combat medic and, to this day, we have a rule in our family. Never choke around David. He is convinced that he could perform an emergency tracheotomy. Ready to go, always has his sharpened pocket knife with him. It makes for some very exciting Thanksgivings. 183556 Anybody goes [clears throat] and David's ready, the rest of us are like "whoa back, brother." I love my three brothers. They are, To this day, referred to as "the boys," to distinguish them from the surprise. They've all retired. they all live back in Oklahoma, close together. When we were growing up, our daddy had a lot of different jobs. He sold fencing. 183625 he sold carpets. He sold housewares. He sold paint and when I was in middle school, the boys were all gone by that point. And it was just my momma and my daddy and me, and my daddy had a massive heart attack. And for a long time, we thought he was gonna die. The neighbors came in, folks from church brought covered dishes, everybody spoke in quiet tones. 183701 Daddy made it through. And we were deeply grateful. But he couldn't work, not for a long, long time. And, that meant no money coming in. I can still remember the day we lost our family station wagon. I remember learning words like mortgage and foreclosure. I remember how every night, my mother would tuck me in, and she'd kiss me on the forehead, and she'd pat me. And I knew what was coming next. She'd walk outside and close my door and lean back against it and start to cry. 183749 She won't cry in front of me. And one day, I walked into my folks' bedroom. And laid out on the bed was the dress. Now, some of you in this audience will know the dress. It's the one that only comes out for weddings, funerals, and graduations. And it's laid out on the bed. And I see it, and I look at the end of the bed, and there's my mama in slip and her stocking feet, and she's pacing, and she's saying, We will not lose this house. We will not lose this house. We will not lose this house. 183838 She was 50 years old. She had never worked outside the home. And she was terrified. And finally, she sees me standing there in the doorway. I'm just a kid. And she looks at me and she looks at that dress, and she looks at me, never says a word, wipes her face, pulls that dress on, puts on her high heels, and walked to the Sears and gets a full time minimum wage job answering phones. That minimum wage job saved our house and more importantly, it saved our family. 183930 I always think as the lesson my mama taught me, that no matter how scared you are, no matter how hard it looks, when it comes down to you, you reach down deep, you find what you have to find, you pull it up, and you take care of the people you love. That's what she taught me. It was years later, years later that I came to understand, that wasn't just what my mama taught me. It's what millions of Americans do every day. No matter how hard it looks, no matter how scared they are, they reach down deep, they find what they have to find, they pull it up, and they take care of themselves and the people they love. That's what we do. 184037 But it was only years after that, that I came to understand that same story is also a story about government. It's also a story about government cause understand this. Back when I was a girl, a full time minimum wage job in America, would support a family of three. It would pay a mortgage and it would cover the utilities and it would put food on the table. Today, a full time minimum wage job in America will not keep a mama and a baby out of poverty. That is wrong and that is why I'm in this fight. 184131 And understand this, that difference is no accident. It's about who government works for. When I was a girl, go back and look, the question asked about minimum wage is "what does it take a family of three to survive? What does it take a family of three to get a foothold in America 's middle class? What does it take a family of three to have something secure that they can build on?." 184205 Today, the question asked in Washington is: where should the minimum wage be set to maximize the profits of giant multinational corporations? Well, I don't want a government that works for giant multinational corporations. I want one that works for our families. Yup. 184237 So, like I said, the three boys, they went off to the military. That was their path. That was their ticket to America's middle class. Me, I had a different plan. I have known what I wanted to be since second grade. You may laugh, back there. You didn't until, what? Like, fourth grade, fifth grade, I can tell me. No, me, I have known what I wanted to be since second grade, and I've never wavered from it. 184308 I wanted to be a public school teacher. Can we hear it for America's public school teachers? Yes! Whoa. Yes, this is what I wanted. Oh, I wanted to teach public school. I gotta tell ya, and I invested early. I used to line up my dollies and teach school. I had a reputation for being tough, but fair. It's all I wanted. 184339. By the time I graduated from high school, my family didn't have the money for an application to college, much less sent me after four years of university. So, here's the deal. Like a lot of Americans, I have a story that's not exactly a straight line. It's got a lot of twists and turns. So here's how mine goes. I graduated from high school and I got a scholarship to college! Yay! 184409 And then, at 19, fell in love, got married, and dropped out of school, and got a minimum wage job. Not to that guy. To somebody who is currently referred to as husband number one. Never a good sign when you have to number your husbands. It's true. But, back in the story. So, here I am. Look, I chose it, it's gonna be a good life. It was my decision. Nobody made me do this. But I thought I'd given up the dream, that that was it. I'd stepped off, and I would never get to be a teacher. 184458 And then I found it. We're living down in Houston at the time, and I found what was then a commuter college. It was about 45 minutes away. And it cost $50 a semester. And for a price I could pay for on a part time waitressing job, I finished my four year diploma, I became special needs teacher, I've lived my dream job. 184539 So, listen, we've got public school teachers in here? Yes? Yes? We got any special needs teachers in here? A few? Yeah? Good. Okay, you're gonna have to back me up on this. This is not a job for teachers. It's a calling. I loved the work. I loved those babies. [18:44:22] Husband number one, never a good sign when you have to number your husband's. [18:44:31] Sorry, but. But back to the story. [18:44:39] So here I am. Look, I chose it. It's going to be a good life. It was my decision. Nobody made me do this. [18:44:49] But I thought I'd given up the dream. That that was it. I'd stepped off and I would never get to be a teacher. And then I found it. [18:44:59] We're live in downtown Houston at the time, and I found what was then a commuter college was about 45 minutes away. And it cost fifty dollars a semester. And for a price I could pay for on a part time waitressing job, I finished my four year diploma. [18:45:26] I became a special needs teacher. I've lived my dream job. [18:45:39] So it was he got public school teachers in here. Yes. Yes. We got a special needs teachers and here a few, yeah, but okay. [18:45:49] You're gonna have to back me up on this. This is not a job for teachers. It's a calling. I love the work. I love those babies. I had to six year olds mostly. [18:46:04] And to this day I can remember faces, names. I couldn't remember successes. I remember places. We didn't get it done. I loved it. And I probably would still be doing that work today. But my story has another twist in it. And here's the twist. By the end of the first year, I was visibly pregnant. [18:46:28] And the principal did what principals did in those days. He wished me luck and hired someone else for the job. [18:46:41] So there I am. I'm at home. I can't get a job. I got a baby. What do I gotta do? I gotta do something right. [18:46:51] I got to do something so I decide. [18:47:03] So baby on hip by this time we're living in New Jersey. [18:47:08] I head off to a yeah, I had off. Got everybody here. I head off to a public law school back then cost four hundred and fifty dollars this semester. Woo! And graduate visibly pregnant. You will discover a pattern to these stories. Took the bar and practiced law for 45 minutes. [18:47:37] And then went back to my first love teaching, I traded little folks for much taller folks, but always in teach. [18:47:49] Oh, and also traded out husbands. And that's how I ended up with Bruce. [18:47:57] A lot of change in that period of my life. [18:48:00] But that's how I've spent most all my life is teaching in law school. [18:48:05] So, you know, I don't know, maybe this is what happens to everybody who kind of grows up on the ragged edge of the middle class. But I'll tell you when I talk money. [18:48:15] If it was about money, I mastered it and I taught it. [18:48:19] So I taught contract law and commercial law. I taught secure transactions. Feel free to cheer at any point. [18:48:27] I taught security. I taught the Uniform Commercial Code. All were good points. [18:48:34] Law and economics. Corporate finance. Partnership finance. [18:48:38] I taught it all, but there was always one central question that I worked on. And that is, why is America's middle class being hollowed out? [18:48:52] Why is it that for families that work every bit as hard as my mom and dad did two generations ago, find the path today so much rockier and so much steeper and for people of color, even rockier and even steeper. And the answer is just like the answer around minimum wage. The answer is about who government works for. Think of it this way. We have a government that works fabulously, wonderfully, terrifically for giant drug companies. [18:49:45] Just not for people trying to get a prescription filled. Am I right? Works great for people who want to invest in private prisons and private detention centers, just not for the people whose lives are torn apart by those institutions. [18:50:14] A government that works terrifically for giant oil companies that want to drill everywhere, just not for the rest of us who see climate change bearing down upon us. [18:50:36] Here's the thing, when you see a government that works great for the wealthy and the well-connected and isn't working for much of anyone else. [18:50:50] That is corruption, pure and simple. And we need to call it out for what it is. [18:51:06] Corruption and think of it this way. [18:51:09] What ever issue brought you here today? Climate, health care. The cost of prescription drugs, gun violence. [18:51:22] Whatever it is, we'll do a small immigration. You bet. [18:51:26] What ever is the issue that brought you here today? If there is a decision to be made in Washington, it has been touched by money. It has been influenced by money. [18:51:40] It has been nudged by money. It's had an exception created by money. [18:51:47] In fact, let me tell you a quick story around this. So back in the early 1990s, we're beginning to get it about what's happening on climate. Don't have quite all the words are calling global warming at that point. But they're getting it. The science is there and people are starting to say, wow, this could be this is a real catastrophe that could be headed our way. Here's the amazing part. [18:52:13] Democrats and Republicans basically are working together. [18:52:19] Think about it. They're talking about. So what do we need to do? Do we need to give more power to the EPA? Do we need some new laws? Because all of us have to care about the future of this country and the future of this earth. And then long come the Koch brothers. I see you've heard of the Koch brothers. Nice, nice. Along come the Koch brothers. Oh, and let's be clear. And the giant oil companies and the big polluters, and in effect, they go together and say, wow. If Congress gets really serious about this climate thing. That's gonna cut into our bottom line. That's gonna cost us money. So they've got a decision to make. They've got an investment decision to make. Think about it that way. So they have to decide now. They could have decided. They could decide. Let's see. We see this happening. What we're gonna do is we're going to stop doing carbon based fuels. We're just going to pull ourselves out of that and we're going to go into green. No, they don't do that. [18:53:27] They could decide we're going to really double down on investment, our already investment in how to clean carbon out of the air, how to clean it out of the water. They don't do that. [18:53:39] You know what they invest in. [18:53:41] Politicians, they invest in politicians. They invest in Washington. And now it's campaign contributions. But it is so much more. It's about lobbyists. It's about PR firms. It's about oh, it's about bought and paid for experts. [18:54:03] You ever think about those bought and paid for experts, these guys, the climate deniers, right. Who come in and say, I'm a doctor of somebody somewhere and climate, blah, blah, blah. The dinosaurs loved it. Good days for South, whatever it is. [18:54:19] They don't support those guys and put money into the think tanks for them because they're fooled. They do it because those guys, those those climate deniers, they build an umbrella over the politicians. So the politicians can stand under it and continue to take Coke brother money, big oil money, big polluter money and say, oh, I don't know. [18:54:44] I'm not a scientist. Well, let me tell you. You want to understand the climate crisis that we face right now. [18:54:55] It is 25 years of corruption in Washington that brought us here. [18:55:10] So here's the thing. [18:55:13] The corruption is felt everywhere. If we are going to make change in this country, it can't be one statute over here. A couple little regulations over there. Maybe one more piece over here. What we've got to have in this country is big structural change. [18:55:34] Little applause. [18:55:39] And let me tell you where a big structural change starts. It starts by attacking corruption head on. [18:55:48] You read. [18:55:55] And I got a plan for that. [18:56:03] In fact, here's the good news. I have the biggest anti-corruption plan since Watergate. Here's the bad news. We need the biggest anti-corruption plan since Watergate. [18:56:22] OK, so this thing is big because money is felt in lots of places around Washington. So let me just give you a little sample out of this plan. Here's part of it. And lobbying as we know it. [18:56:46] Here's another block. The revolving door between Wall Street and Washington. Here's one you might not have thought about. But it matters. Make the United States Supreme Court follow basic rules of ethics on conflicts of interest. [18:57:19] Yeah, I can do these all night long. But let me tell you. I could. But let me do just one more. Just one more. [18:57:26] And that is anyone who wants to run for federal office underline anyone has to put their tax returns online. [18:57:52] OK. So that's part one attack the corruption head on, no. Think of it because if you disrupt it, if you disrupt the influence of money, if you knock it back, if you get off your back foot and onto your front foot, so much more is now possible. [18:58:09] OK. So let's talk about what we can do. And that is part one attack the corruption part, too. We need some basic structural change in this economy. Yep. And let me tell you how this starts. We got a huge problem with these giant corporations that have swallowed up little businesses. Medium sized businesses shoot. [18:58:32] They've swallowed up what used to be big businesses. And the problem is they are so big, they run over their own employees, they run over their customers. [18:58:44] They run over the communities where they are shoot. [18:58:47] They call the tune in Washington. That's how much power they have. So what do we do about that? Well, part 1. I say it's time to break them up. Let's enforce the antitrust laws. [18:59:07] Big tech. [18:59:08] Yes, Mark Zuckerberg. I'm looking at you. [18:59:18] And big egg. I mean, we can just keep doing this. But the point is we got to start by having the courage to enforce our antitrust laws. [18:59:28] We've got to give little businesses a chance. That's a key part of it. But here's the other part. I think of this in structural terms, and that means we got to have some balance in the system. We can't have all the power in the corporations. [18:59:45] We need more power in the hands of workers, make it easier to join a union and give unions more power when they negotiate. [18:59:58] Yep, unions built America's middle class. Unions will rebuild America's middle class. [19:00:12] So that's how we make structural change. Let me give you one more idea. For making structural change, it's time for a wealth tax. And Mark Zuckerberg, I'm still looking at you. [19:00:31] All right. [19:00:32] So here's the idea behind the wealth tax. Just so everybody gets this, your first 50 million dollars is free and clear. [19:00:42] I see people saying, oh, gosh, I get your and you're good. [19:00:47] You're good, OK? Yeah. [19:00:48] People say, OK, I can do business with this woman. She's just reasonable. OK, first, 50 million free and clear, but you're 50 million and first dollar. You've got to pitch in two cents. And two cents on every dollar after that. And just so everybody understands about a wealth tax. Anybody in here on a home or grew up in a family that owned a home. Yeah. Can pay on a wealth tax. They just call it a property tax. All I'm doing different is for the guys who are really rich is to say your property tax is not just your real estate, it's also your stock portfolio. The diamonds, the Rembrandt and the yachts. [19:01:42] And here's the thing. I want us to do this. I want I want to think about this. I'm not pushing a wealth tax because I'm cranky. Or punitive or mean? Oh, poor billionaires. It's none of them. You know, people who've built great fortunes and understand that 50 million threshold on assets, that is the top one tenth of one percent. It's about 70000 families in this country. That's all we're talking about. One tenth of one percent. You built a great fortune in America. [19:02:20] And, you know, they say, well, I got out there, you know, I worked hard. I stayed up late at night, unlike anybody else, you know? But but, OK, you had a great idea. You caught the moment. Good for you. Good for you. [19:02:35] But if you built a great fortune here in America, I guarantee you built it, at least in part using workers. All of us help pay to educate. [19:02:54] You built it, at least in part getting your goods to market on roads and bridges. All of us help pay the build. You built it, at least in part protected by police and firefighters. All of us help pay the salaries for. [19:03:20] Here's the thing, we're happy to do it. [19:03:24] We're Americans, we believe in making these investments. All we're saying is fair, is fair. When you make it big, I mean really big. [19:03:37] I mean, top one tenth of one percent bid pitch in two cents. [19:03:42] So everybody else in this country gets a chance to make it. [19:03:58] Oh, and here comes the fun part. What can we do? For two cents? OK, ready? First thing we can do is universal child care for every baby in this country, age zero to five, all of them. [19:04:20] Universal pre-K for every 3 year old and 4 year old in America. [19:04:29] And enough of the exploitation of largely black and brown women raise the wages of every child care worker and preschool teacher in America. [19:04:49] To a sense, we can do all of that and I'm not through yet. All of that and we can provide tuition free technical school to your college and for your college for anyone who wants to get an education. [19:05:19] We can expand our Pell Grants so that low income students have a real chance to get an education. And we can help level the playing field by putting 50 billion dollars directly into historically black colleges and universities. We couldn't do all of two cents. We can do all of that, plus we can cancel student loan debt for 95 percent. [19:06:12] Two cents. [19:06:14] That's what we can do for two cents and just for a kitchen. [19:06:21] Let's start with two. [19:06:23] Let's start with two. But two cents and we can make an investment in an entire generation. All right. [19:06:32] So that's part two. Structural change. Just a couple of structural pieces in this economy. Part three. We need to protect our democracy. [19:06:52] I want to see a constitutional amendment that guarantees the right of every American citizen to vote and to get that vote counted. And here's one we can do through federal law. Let's outlaw political gerrymandering once and for all. Let's roll back every racist voter suppression law and. And just one more overturn Citizens United tomorrow. [19:07:59] So there it is. So I just want three things. Attack the corruption head on. Make a couple of structural changes in our economy and protect our democracy. Three things. [19:08:16] And here's the thing. Those three things to me are all related to the same question. Who gets opportunity in this country? Who gets a chance to build a future, who has an opportunity? You know, you born into wealth and privilege. You have plenty of opportunities, but not so much for everyone else. Those three and we make this a country of opportunity for everyone. So understand this for me, this is the heart of it. Opportunity for every single one of our children to get a first rate education. [19:08:59] There is. Opportunity. [19:09:07] Opportunity to get a good job, opportunity to start your own business, opportunity, opportunity. Remember, I'm a special needs teacher. Opportunity may mean opportunity to live independently. [19:09:24] Opportunity. Opportunity to love who you love and build the family you want to build. [19:09:42] Opportunity it is the best of what America can be. My daddy. He ended up as a janitor. But his baby daughter. She got the opportunity. [19:09:58] The opportunity to be a public school teacher, the opportunity to be a college professor. The opportunity to be a United States senator. And the opportunity to be a candidate for president of the United States. [19:10:56] Let's do some Q and A are. We've got some who we are, people with our microphones. --- Q&A 191125 Q: Despite the stock market doing really well, we know that a lot of Americans are struggling. What would the Warren administration do to change the way we talk about the health of our economy in a way that's more holistic and does not cause us to lose sight of those suffering? 191145 WARREN>> Okay, it's a great question, Chris. You know, there used to be a time where there were two or three key economic indicators---how the stock market is doing, how GDP is going, how unemployment is going. Two of 'em up, one of 'em down. And that meant, generally, America was doing pretty well. Not everybody, but we're all kind of moving in the same direction and then, about four decades ago---oh, I don't know like when Ronald Reagan got elected---I'm just sayin'... 191220 You watch and it starts to---they start to divide. So, GDP keeps going up, stock market keeps going on, right? Unemployment sometimes goes down, sometimes goes up, but [for] hard-working middle class families, wages just flatten out. And, I don;t know about the rest of you, anybody's housing costs go up? [crowd shouts "yes"] Yeah. Anybody's health insurance costs go up? [crowd shouts "yes"] Oh yeah. 191250 Cost of childcare? Uh, yeah. Cost of sending somebody or going to college? Right? So the costs go up, incomes are flat, and hardworking people are just squeezed in the middle. And, so, you're exactly right. When we talk about our economy, right now, what we're often doing is just talking about how's it working for the richest? How's it working for the---and listen, it's working great for them. 191319 The top 1/10th of 1%, they're doing fabulously. The top 1% is doing pretty darn good. Right? The problem is the 90%. It's not just the poorest, it's all of em. It's everybody on the way down. So, here's how I think about this. I like to reframe this as a values question. Show me your budget, and I'll tell you your values. Show me how the federal government's budget works. 191349 Tell me where you think money should be. Do we need to leave two cents with the top 1/10th of 1% or two cents that we invest in every kid in this country, in building a future for them? And, by the way, I'll throw in a couple of quick ones because you gave me an opening to do this. And that is, because I have some other plans I just want to give a quick mention to. I've got a plan to build about 3.2 million new housing units across this country [applause] 191426 It gives opportunity for housing to middle class families, to working class families, to the working-poor, to the poor-poor, to the homeless, to seniors that want to age in place, to people with disabilities so that they'll have housing opportunities---yeah! Best independent estimate is it'll bring down rents across this country by about 10%. It's not huge, but it's the right direction to start doing it. We make that investment, and it's a place for me to say something else. 191455 Housing is a perfect example---we make a big investment in everybody because we should. Housing is America's middle class, #1 way to build wealth. For each family and generation after generation, that is why the federal government, for decades, subsidized the purchase of housing for white people, and for black people, said, "not you. We will actively discriminate against African Americans who are trying to get mortgages and subsidize whites." 191531 So, my housing plan is a big housing plan for everyone, and then has a special section to say "people who live in formerly red-lined areas or who were targeted during the last housing crash that targeted people of color, are gonna get home-buyer's assistance to get back into the housing market." So, there's an example. But that's the basic idea. We're gonna keep doing this. Thank you, Chris. Q: I was born in Bolivia and moved to the US in 2014, I have seen in the last 5 years how my community has started to become afraid. As President, how will you help the hispanic community to get back their trust in the country that we've worked so hard to be a part of? 191653 WARREN>> So, let me start by saying---I'm very glad you're here. Not just tonight, but I'm glad you've been here now for 5 years and glad you're a part of our country [applause] Let's talk a little bit about immigration and then let's talk a little bit about respect. Okay? So, first, about immigration---I got a plan for that. 191720 And I just want to lay out the outlines because I want everyone to hear this, and it starts with a basic statement of our values. Immigration does not make America weaker. It makes America stronger. It makes our economy stronger and it makes the fabric of our nation stronger. So my immigration plan has basically three parts to it. 191751 Part one, we need to expand legal immigration across this country. Families have been held apart. It's not right. Trump has been shrinking legal immigration. We need to expand it. And that's also true for people who are here on temporary protected status, people who are here seeking asylum, refugees. It's every part of this. 191816 Part two, we need a pathway to citizenship for the people who are here. Yes, the dreamers. But it doesn't stop there. It's about our dreamers. It's about grandmas. It's about little kids. It's about people who came to work agriculture. It's about people who overstayed student visas. These are our friends. These are our neighbors. 191851 These are people who contribute to our economy and the vibrancy of our country. We need a path to citizenship that is fair and achievable, and we need it now. So that's part two. Part 3: we need to stop this Trump-made crisis at our southern border. [applause] 191927 This crisis turned into a crisis, first, when the Trump administration withdrew help from the countries of Central America. When people see nothing around them but destruction, when they see an economy that doesn't work, when they have a government that is not functioning, that is when people fear for their lives and have to run. We need first to restore our help to Central America, help stabilize those governments, help stabilize that economy---those economies. 192008 So that's part of it, but it's not all of it. We need to live our values. When it first came out that the Trump administration was separating children from their families, I went down to the border. I went down to McAllen, Texas, before they started locking people from Congress out. I went down and I--- just briefly, because I want everyone to keep this image in your mind about what was happening and still is. 192042 Picture an Amazon warehouse. Only it's dirty, it smells bad and it's full of cages of people. And that's what it was like. Cages of women on my left, maybe ten feet wide, 40 feet deep. A toilet in the back corner---so crowded with people, they couldn't all lie down at the same time. Cages of men. And then walk into the main area and there they were, the freestanding cages of little girls. 192114 Another cage of little girls over there. Nothing. They had nothing, they had aluminum foil blankets and that was it. No toys, nothing. There was a guard tower in the center, a little wooden guard tower. So one person could watch all those little girls. Back in one corner was a cage of nursing mothers. And I stopped and talked with the mothers. One mother told me she had given a drink of water to a policeman in her home country in Central America. And she said, the next day the word came back that the gangs believe she's working with the police. 192153 And she knew what that meant. She and her baby would be killed. She wrapped up her baby and ran for the border. When people come to our borders, frightened for their lives, frightened for the lives of their children---we are a country that welcomes them and tries to help them. That is who we are. [applause] One last small part on this. I could go on for a long time on this, but one last small part on this that I just want to add. 192227 We need to get rid of for-profit detention centers and for-profit prisons. No one should make a profit from locking people up. So, last thing I want to say about this is do understand that what's going on right now with Trump administration, with Donald Trump himself. This is not accidental. This is strategic. Donald Trump believes that if he can turn people against people in our country---white against black and brown, straight against gay and trans, particularly against trans. 192312 Christian against Muslim, and everybody against immigrants, particularly black and brown immigrants. He believes that if he can get that going and stir it up, that kind of hatefulness in America, that nobody will notice that he and his corrupt buddies are stealing this country blind. We're not going to fall for this. We're going to build a better America. Thank you. Thank you. We're gonna do this. You bet. 192352 Q: I'm a senior at Old Dominion University. WARR>> So wait a minute. What are you majoring in? Q: geography and international studies? WARR>> Wow. Cool. Q: I'm the vice president of the ODU Democrats... Both of my professors, the one that's recording me and one right over there. Oh, I'm so happy to see everyone WARR>> Is she gonna get extra credit for this? Oh, good. You're getting extra credit. I just negotiated. I know how to negotiate. Right? 192433 Q: So I called my mom, I had no idea what I wanted to ask. WARR>> So, this is your help line. You called mom and said, Oh, what would you ask? Q: My mom is the world to me. And I had to call her. So what we came up with was, what is the single most impactful event of your life that has made you the woman you are today? 192457 WARR>> You mean other than marrying Bruce? [she waves to Bruce, some people "boo"] You know, that is a---it's a hard question. But I actually think it's it's the story I told you. I mean, you know, if I spent more time, maybe I guess---But I think it's the story I told you. About when I was 19 and I got married to the guy who'd been my first boyfriend. 192533 First guy who ever dated me, first guy who'd ever dumped me. It's true. And when he dropped back into my life and proposed, I said yes in a nanosecond. That was gonna be my path. And I thought, I've given everything else up and when the little glimmer was out there, that little bit that I had---far on the horizon, it looked like at the time---the chance for me to finish my education so I could do the work I wanted to be able to do. 192614 It was...It was like something opened up in me. And it was the idea that somebody, somewhere had helped build that thing that gave me a chance, that let me fall off the track and get back on, and, when I did, I held on for dear life. I still remember how much I sweated about the books, about the classes, about the commute. You know what that's like. But, so afraid that I'd screw this up and I wouldn't be able to finish it. 192700 And by the time I graduated and I got my first job working with the little ones, for me, it became a kind of pattern that things opened up in my life and then I got a chance to reach and help somebody else out. And sometimes, it was a little tiny kids. Later, it was big kids. This is what ultimately pulled me in to politics---not in a million years did I ever think I would run for public office. 192734 I was just going to be the dork. You know---it's true! The teacher, the researcher, man I would feed the information over. I go try to talk to people. I tell them, "here's what's broken. Here's what you could do about it." I spent, god, eight years saying, "there's a crash coming. There's a crash coming." And nobody wanted to hear it, but what I started to figure out when I made the decision to run for public office is you could actually build structures that open up more possibilities for everybody else. 192813 It's great to do it hand over hand, but it's also great to do it big time. I have to tell you all---running for president is just an extraordinary experience for me [someone shouts, "WE LOVE YOU ELIZABETH WARREN"] [cheers] All right, all right. In that case, I'm not going to get but---I will. I am just going to say it is extraordinary. It's extraordinary because this is the moment. This is our moment. 192846 You know, when I first started running, people said to me, I go back to Washington. And experts, also known as senators, would say to me, "hey, I saw you were out on the trails. What you're doing isn't going to work. It's too hard. People do not want to hear plans. That sounds boring. It's complicated. That's not how you run for President. What you need to do? Talk in generalities and smile more." 192920 That's true. That's what people told me---"it's too hard. What you're asking of people is too hard." And the first time I heard that, you know what I thought? I thought, what do you think they said to the abolitionists? Right. Said, it's too hard, right? We're not going to make that kind of change. Oh, that's way too hard. What do you think they said just a little over 100 years ago to the suffragettes? What'd they say? "Too hard, give up now." 192950 What did they say to the early union organizers? "Too hard. Give up now." What did they say to the foot soldiers in the civil rights movement? "Too hard. Give up now." What were they saying a decade ago to the LGBTQ+ activists who wanted equal marriage? "Too hard. Give up now." 193024 But here's the thing. They didn't give up. They got organized. They built a grassroots movement. They persisted. [cheers] And they changed the course of American history. This is our moment in American history---our moment to dream big, to fight hard, and to win. Thank you! #####
ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI P2
TVU 18 ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI 101819 2020 P2 TVU 18 ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI101819 2020 Sen. Elizabeth Warren called the upcoming Supreme Court case challenging the constitutionality of the CFPB an attack on consumers across the country and a sign that the agency "still has got a lot of enemies" tonight in a gaggle with reporters after her rally in Norfolk, Virginia. "When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine," Warren said. 200014 She was asked on a gaggle if she saw the case "as the administration going after" her. "I see it as the administration going after consumers all across this country," Warren said. 200014 "Those big banks have been forced to return more than 12 billion dollars directly to people they cheated. I know that that still makes the Republicans really unhappy, because it shows that we can make government work for the people. And I know it makes the big banks unhappy because, sheesh, they've already had to cough up 12 billion dollars and give up a lot of their cheating schemes. So, I know the agency has got a lot of enemies. They're gonna keep coming after it. When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine," Warren said. 200014 She also repeated her line from the debate that "President Barack Obama fought for that agency" even when other Democrats didn't. 200042 Warren was also asked about the evolution of her thinking on her recent decision not to do closed-door fundraisers, even into the general election when she would potentially face President Donald Trump and his war chest. "This is what I now understand about how it works, and I just decided I'm not running for President by sucking up to the wealthy and the well-connected. I'm gonna do it this way and it works," Warren said. 195826 And -- a question on Medicare for All that Warren dodged, yet again. "Critics say that you are not telling the truth about what Medicare for all will cost, that taxing the top 1% won't pay for it. What do you say?" a reporter asked. "I say that I have made my principles on this clear, and that is wealthy people and big corporations are going to see their costs go up and that hard working middle class families are going to see their costs go down," Warren said tonight. 195544 Also want to flag a fairly intimate moment at the end of the Q+A portion of the rally, which the campaign said was about 4,000 people in the Chartway Arena. The president of Old Dominion University's College Democrats club, who screamed "OH MY GOD are you serious" when her ticket got pulled to ask a question, asked Warren what the single most impactful moment of her life was that made her the woman she is today. "You mean other than marrying Bruce?" Warren said at first, before launching into a more detailed, more emotional version of what we've heard her say time and time again in her stump speech. The moment was "about when I was 19 and I got married to the guy who'd been my first boyfriend, first guy who ever dated me, first guy who'd ever dumped me," she said.192533 She talked about deciding to settle down but then realizing the opportunities that finishing her education could bring, about how nervous she was to screw up when she went back to school but how happy it made her -- then she got a bit emotional talking about how "extraordinary" it has been running for president. Here's the full log of that moment: And when he dropped back into my life and proposed, I said yes in a nanosecond. That was gonna be my path. And I thought, I've given everything else up and when the little glimmer was out there, that little bit that I had---far on the horizon, it looked like at the time---the chance for me to finish my education so I could do the work I wanted to be able to do. 192614 It was...It was like something opened up in me. And it was the idea that somebody, somewhere had helped build that thing that gave me a chance, that let me fall off the track and get back on, and, when I did, I held on for dear life. I still remember how much I sweated about the books, about the classes, about the commute. You know what that's like. But, so afraid that I'd screw this up and I wouldn't be able to finish it. 192700 And by the time I graduated and I got my first job working with the little ones, for me, it became a kind of pattern that things opened up in my life and then I got a chance to reach and help somebody else out. And sometimes, it was a little tiny kids. Later, it was big kids. This is what ultimately pulled me in to politics---not in a million years did I ever think I would run for public office. 192734 I was just going to be the dork. You know---it's true! The teacher, the researcher, man I would feed the information over. I go try to talk to people. I tell them, "here's what's broken. Here's what you could do about it." I spent, god, eight years saying, "there's a crash coming. There's a crash coming." And nobody wanted to hear it, but what I started to figure out when I made the decision to run for public office is you could actually build structures that open up more possibilities for everybody else. 192813 It's great to do it hand over hand, but it's also great to do it big time. I have to tell you all---running for president is just an extraordinary experience for me [someone shouts, "WE LOVE YOU ELIZABETH WARREN"] [cheers] All right, all right. In that case, I'm not going to get but---I will. I am just going to say it is extraordinary. It's extraordinary because this is the moment. This is our moment. TVU 18 ELIZABETH WARREN NORFOLK VA TOWN HALL ABC UNI 101819 2020 GAGGLE 195455 Q: Why didn't we hear about Medicaid for all tonight? WARREN>> We didn't get a question about it. Q: Beto O'Rourke recently said that churches who oppose same sex marriage should lose their tax excempt status. What do you feel about that position? 195510 WARREN>> Look, I stand with the LGBTQ+ community until everyone in this country is treated equally and fairly. We have a long tradition in our country of permitting churches to make their own decisions about how they worship. I respect that tradition and I would not change it. Q: Critics say that you are not telling the truth about what Medicare for all will cost, that taxing the top 1% won't pay for it. What do you say? 195544 WARREN>> I say that I have made my principles on this clear, and that is wealthy people and big corporations are going to see their costs go up and that hard working middle class families are going to see their costs go down. Q: Tell us your strategy of why you wanted to come to virginia? 195606 WARREN>> I want to be out and get a chance to talk face to face with as many people across this country as I can. And that's what town halls are all about. This is my 141st town hall and i've taken thousands of unfiltered questions, and now we're well over 70,000 selfies. And it gives people in every part of this country, and Puerto Rico, a chance to tell me a little bit about their lives, a chance to tell me why they will spend hours waiting in line, listening to speech, listening to the questions, waiting for the selfies. 195646 To say, this is what matters to me about voernment. You know, it takes a lot of optimism to be here, a lot of belief that if we get out there and fight, side by side, we can make real change in this country. We can make this the country of our best values. Q: Can you explain your thinking on fundraising [MIC DISRUPTION] that you didn't apply to your senate runs? 195709 WARREN>> So, I was up for reelection in 2018. I raised about 20 million dollars in grassroots donations, and I also gave away or directly raised about 11 million dollars for other Democrats running around the country. When I made the decision to run for President, a part of that was how I would run, and I just decided I'm not gonna spend my time sucking up to wealthy donors and corporate executives. 195748 I want to spend my time doing town halls in, so far, 27 states and Pureto Rico, all around the country. This is what has both kept me grounded and has helped rebuild American democracy. We're building a movement out here, a movement of people who believe that, you know, rich people may own more shoes than everyone else, they may own more cars than everyone else, they may even own more houses than everyone else, but they don't get to own a bigger share of our democracy. Q: Do you think you've had an evolution of thinking, then? 195826 WARREN>> So, this is what I now understand about how it works, and I just decided I'm not running for President by sucking up to the wealthy and the well-connected. I'm gonna do it this way and it works. Q: How do you plan to activate and connect with HBCU students? 195848 WARREN>> So, I visited HBCUs and I will keep doing that. I also will reach out with plans that directly affect both the HBCUs, including my plan to put 50 billion dollars into HBCUs to help level the playing field, and that will reach out to HBCU current students and graduates. That's partly with student loan debt forgiveness, but it's also with things like closing the black-white entrepreneurship gap. 195926 By making a real investment in people of color who are developing their own businesses. So, I got a lot of pieces in a lot of plans. I just hope I can get people to come and hear live or to go to the website, ElizabethWarren.com, and look up some of these plans. Together, we have a chance to change this country. Q: Supreme Court case challenging the constitutionality of the CFUB. Do you see this as the administration going after you, specifically? 200014 WARREN>> I see it as the administration going after consumers all across this country. Look, when I first had the idea for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, it was pretty straightforward. I thought that banks should not be able to boost their profits but cheating people and that we needed a cop on the beat to make sure that that didn't happen, and the big banks fought us, the Republicans fought us---shoot---a big chunk of the Democrats fought us. 200042 They told us not even to try to get the agency through, but I ignored them. I stayed in there. I fought for that agency. President Obama fought for that agency. It was signed into law and it has made a big difference. Those big banks have been forced to return more than 12 billions dollars directly to people they cheated. I know that that still makes the Republicans really unhappy, because it shows that we can make government work for the people. 200112 And I know it makes the big banks unhappy because, sheesh, they've already had to cough up 12 billion dollars and give up a lot of their cheating schemes. So, I know the agency has got a lot of enemies. They're gonna keep coming after it. When I'm President, that agency's gonna be just fine. Q: What's your stance on Japan? 200135 WARREN>> Japan is an important ally to the United States. I was there a little over a year ago and met with many officials in the Japanese government, toured our base, and heard a lot about both the challenges the Japanese economy faces and how committed the Japanese people and the Japanese government are to their alliance with the United States. Japan is a strategic partner that is absolutely critical not only in the region, but around the world. #### TOWN HALL 183121 WARREN>> Hello! Virginia is for lovers. I love this. So let me start by saying a very big thank you to---I love you too---to Senator Locke, fabulous. Thank you! Just wonderful. And we have many special guests. I also want to say it very special thank you to who has who has given me a lot of good advice and is always there, has served our country so honorably, Admiral Smith wherever you are, Admiral Smith. Thank you. Thank you for getting us started. Thank you. 183204 We also have another very special guest in the house. The man who helps the United States House of Representatives, who was on one of the most critical committees, who leads that Committee on health and labor, Congressman Bobby Scott is here. Please stand up. 183235 Congressman Scott are hatching all kinds of plans around labor and education. Am I right? We're gonna do this. And as long as we're doing all this family stuff, I also brought along my husband Bruce, where are you sweetie? He's the man with the very debonair black cast on his arm. He defended Bailey from another dog. And Bruce ended up with the broken bone over it. But he's on the mend. He's on the mend and outwith us. 183317 So I am just so glad to be here with you all today. Thank you. 18 days, Virginia's gonna get this done. In 2017, you inspired our nation. And what you did in 2017, the rest of the nation doubled down on in 2018. Now, in 2019, we're turning to you again. Do it again and inspire us for 2020. So I thought what we'd do tonight is I'll tell you a little bit about myself. We'll take some questions. And then if anybody wants to, I'll stay as long as you want, and we'll do selfies. 183419 Yes. The core part of democracy. Okay. There we go. So, I was born and raised in Oklahoma. We got a few Okies here, okay. There aren't so many of us, I understand -- Oh, I got one over here. Good. Good. I was the baby in the family. 183439 I have three much older brothers. I was what use to be called a late-in-life-baby. My mother always just called me, "the surprise." Now, all three of my older brothers went off to joined the military. My oldest brother, Don Reed, was career military. He spent about five and a half years off and on in combat in Vietnam. We were really lucky to get him back home. Very, very lucky. 183520 My brother, John, was stationed overseas for a little over a year. Now my brother David, the youngest of the three, David trained as a combat medic and, to this day, we have a rule in our family. Never choke around David. He is convinced that he could perform an emergency tracheotomy. Ready to go, always has his sharpened pocket knife with him. It makes for some very exciting Thanksgivings. 183556 Anybody goes [clears throat] and David's ready, the rest of us are like "whoa back, brother." I love my three brothers. They are, To this day, referred to as "the boys," to distinguish them from the surprise. They've all retired. they all live back in Oklahoma, close together. When we were growing up, our daddy had a lot of different jobs. He sold fencing. 183625 he sold carpets. He sold housewares. He sold paint and when I was in middle school, the boys were all gone by that point. And it was just my momma and my daddy and me, and my daddy had a massive heart attack. And for a long time, we thought he was gonna die. The neighbors came in, folks from church brought covered dishes, everybody spoke in quiet tones. 183701 Daddy made it through. And we were deeply grateful. But he couldn't work, not for a long, long time. And, that meant no money coming in. I can still remember the day we lost our family station wagon. I remember learning words like mortgage and foreclosure. I remember how every night, my mother would tuck me in, and she'd kiss me on the forehead, and she'd pat me. And I knew what was coming next. She'd walk outside and close my door and lean back against it and start to cry. 183749 She won't cry in front of me. And one day, I walked into my folks' bedroom. And laid out on the bed was the dress. Now, some of you in this audience will know the dress. It's the one that only comes out for weddings, funerals, and graduations. And it's laid out on the bed. And I see it, and I look at the end of the bed, and there's my mama in slip and her stocking feet, and she's pacing, and she's saying, We will not lose this house. We will not lose this house. We will not lose this house. 183838 She was 50 years old. She had never worked outside the home. And she was terrified. And finally, she sees me standing there in the doorway. I'm just a kid. And she looks at me and she looks at that dress, and she looks at me, never says a word, wipes her face, pulls that dress on, puts on her high heels, and walked to the Sears and gets a full time minimum wage job answering phones. That minimum wage job saved our house and more importantly, it saved our family. 183930 I always think as the lesson my mama taught me, that no matter how scared you are, no matter how hard it looks, when it comes down to you, you reach down deep, you find what you have to find, you pull it up, and you take care of the people you love. That's what she taught me. It was years later, years later that I came to understand, that wasn't just what my mama taught me. It's what millions of Americans do every day. No matter how hard it looks, no matter how scared they are, they reach down deep, they find what they have to find, they pull it up, and they take care of themselves and the people they love. That's what we do. 184037 But it was only years after that, that I came to understand that same story is also a story about government. It's also a story about government cause understand this. Back when I was a girl, a full time minimum wage job in America, would support a family of three. It would pay a mortgage and it would cover the utilities and it would put food on the table. Today, a full time minimum wage job in America will not keep a mama and a baby out of poverty. That is wrong and that is why I'm in this fight. 184131 And understand this, that difference is no accident. It's about who government works for. When I was a girl, go back and look, the question asked about minimum wage is "what does it take a family of three to survive? What does it take a family of three to get a foothold in America 's middle class? What does it take a family of three to have something secure that they can build on?." 184205 Today, the question asked in Washington is: where should the minimum wage be set to maximize the profits of giant multinational corporations? Well, I don't want a government that works for giant multinational corporations. I want one that works for our families. Yup. 184237 So, like I said, the three boys, they went off to the military. That was their path. That was their ticket to America's middle class. Me, I had a different plan. I have known what I wanted to be since second grade. You may laugh, back there. You didn't until, what? Like, fourth grade, fifth grade, I can tell me. No, me, I have known what I wanted to be since second grade, and I've never wavered from it. 184308 I wanted to be a public school teacher. Can we hear it for America's public school teachers? Yes! Whoa. Yes, this is what I wanted. Oh, I wanted to teach public school. I gotta tell ya, and I invested early. I used to line up my dollies and teach school. I had a reputation for being tough, but fair. It's all I wanted. 184339. By the time I graduated from high school, my family didn't have the money for an application to college, much less sent me after four years of university. So, here's the deal. Like a lot of Americans, I have a story that's not exactly a straight line. It's got a lot of twists and turns. So here's how mine goes. I graduated from high school and I got a scholarship to college! Yay! 184409 And then, at 19, fell in love, got married, and dropped out of school, and got a minimum wage job. Not to that guy. To somebody who is currently referred to as husband number one. Never a good sign when you have to number your husbands. It's true. But, back in the story. So, here I am. Look, I chose it, it's gonna be a good life. It was my decision. Nobody made me do this. But I thought I'd given up the dream, that that was it. I'd stepped off, and I would never get to be a teacher. 184458 And then I found it. We're living down in Houston at the time, and I found what was then a commuter college. It was about 45 minutes away. And it cost $50 a semester. And for a price I could pay for on a part time waitressing job, I finished my four year diploma, I became special needs teacher, I've lived my dream job. 184539 So, listen, we've got public school teachers in here? Yes? Yes? We got any special needs teachers in here? A few? Yeah? Good. Okay, you're gonna have to back me up on this. This is not a job for teachers. It's a calling. I loved the work. I loved those babies. [18:44:22] Husband number one, never a good sign when you have to number your husband's. [18:44:31] Sorry, but. But back to the story. [18:44:39] So here I am. Look, I chose it. It's going to be a good life. It was my decision. Nobody made me do this. [18:44:49] But I thought I'd given up the dream. That that was it. I'd stepped off and I would never get to be a teacher. And then I found it. [18:44:59] We're live in downtown Houston at the time, and I found what was then a commuter college was about 45 minutes away. And it cost fifty dollars a semester. And for a price I could pay for on a part time waitressing job, I finished my four year diploma. [18:45:26] I became a special needs teacher. I've lived my dream job. [18:45:39] So it was he got public school teachers in here. Yes. Yes. We got a special needs teachers and here a few, yeah, but okay. [18:45:49] You're gonna have to back me up on this. This is not a job for teachers. It's a calling. I love the work. I love those babies. I had to six year olds mostly. [18:46:04] And to this day I can remember faces, names. I couldn't remember successes. I remember places. We didn't get it done. I loved it. And I probably would still be doing that work today. But my story has another twist in it. And here's the twist. By the end of the first year, I was visibly pregnant. [18:46:28] And the principal did what principals did in those days. He wished me luck and hired someone else for the job. [18:46:41] So there I am. I'm at home. I can't get a job. I got a baby. What do I gotta do? I gotta do something right. [18:46:51] I got to do something so I decide. [18:47:03] So baby on hip by this time we're living in New Jersey. [18:47:08] I head off to a yeah, I had off. Got everybody here. I head off to a public law school back then cost four hundred and fifty dollars this semester. Woo! And graduate visibly pregnant. You will discover a pattern to these stories. Took the bar and practiced law for 45 minutes. [18:47:37] And then went back to my first love teaching, I traded little folks for much taller folks, but always in teach. [18:47:49] Oh, and also traded out husbands. And that's how I ended up with Bruce. [18:47:57] A lot of change in that period of my life. [18:48:00] But that's how I've spent most all my life is teaching in law school. [18:48:05] So, you know, I don't know, maybe this is what happens to everybody who kind of grows up on the ragged edge of the middle class. But I'll tell you when I talk money. [18:48:15] If it was about money, I mastered it and I taught it. [18:48:19] So I taught contract law and commercial law. I taught secure transactions. Feel free to cheer at any point. [18:48:27] I taught security. I taught the Uniform Commercial Code. All were good points. [18:48:34] Law and economics. Corporate finance. Partnership finance. [18:48:38] I taught it all, but there was always one central question that I worked on. And that is, why is America's middle class being hollowed out? [18:48:52] Why is it that for families that work every bit as hard as my mom and dad did two generations ago, find the path today so much rockier and so much steeper and for people of color, even rockier and even steeper. And the answer is just like the answer around minimum wage. The answer is about who government works for. Think of it this way. We have a government that works fabulously, wonderfully, terrifically for giant drug companies. [18:49:45] Just not for people trying to get a prescription filled. Am I right? Works great for people who want to invest in private prisons and private detention centers, just not for the people whose lives are torn apart by those institutions. [18:50:14] A government that works terrifically for giant oil companies that want to drill everywhere, just not for the rest of us who see climate change bearing down upon us. [18:50:36] Here's the thing, when you see a government that works great for the wealthy and the well-connected and isn't working for much of anyone else. [18:50:50] That is corruption, pure and simple. And we need to call it out for what it is. [18:51:06] Corruption and think of it this way. [18:51:09] What ever issue brought you here today? Climate, health care. The cost of prescription drugs, gun violence. [18:51:22] Whatever it is, we'll do a small immigration. You bet. [18:51:26] What ever is the issue that brought you here today? If there is a decision to be made in Washington, it has been touched by money. It has been influenced by money. [18:51:40] It has been nudged by money. It's had an exception created by money. [18:51:47] In fact, let me tell you a quick story around this. So back in the early 1990s, we're beginning to get it about what's happening on climate. Don't have quite all the words are calling global warming at that point. But they're getting it. The science is there and people are starting to say, wow, this could be this is a real catastrophe that could be headed our way. Here's the amazing part. [18:52:13] Democrats and Republicans basically are working together. [18:52:19] Think about it. They're talking about. So what do we need to do? Do we need to give more power to the EPA? Do we need some new laws? Because all of us have to care about the future of this country and the future of this earth. And then long come the Koch brothers. I see you've heard of the Koch brothers. Nice, nice. Along come the Koch brothers. Oh, and let's be clear. And the giant oil companies and the big polluters, and in effect, they go together and say, wow. If Congress gets really serious about this climate thing. That's gonna cut into our bottom line. That's gonna cost us money. So they've got a decision to make. They've got an investment decision to make. Think about it that way. So they have to decide now. They could have decided. They could decide. Let's see. We see this happening. What we're gonna do is we're going to stop doing carbon based fuels. We're just going to pull ourselves out of that and we're going to go into green. No, they don't do that. [18:53:27] They could decide we're going to really double down on investment, our already investment in how to clean carbon out of the air, how to clean it out of the water. They don't do that. [18:53:39] You know what they invest in. [18:53:41] Politicians, they invest in politicians. They invest in Washington. And now it's campaign contributions. But it is so much more. It's about lobbyists. It's about PR firms. It's about oh, it's about bought and paid for experts. [18:54:03] You ever think about those bought and paid for experts, these guys, the climate deniers, right. Who come in and say, I'm a doctor of somebody somewhere and climate, blah, blah, blah. The dinosaurs loved it. Good days for South, whatever it is. [18:54:19] They don't support those guys and put money into the think tanks for them because they're fooled. They do it because those guys, those those climate deniers, they build an umbrella over the politicians. So the politicians can stand under it and continue to take Coke brother money, big oil money, big polluter money and say, oh, I don't know. [18:54:44] I'm not a scientist. Well, let me tell you. You want to understand the climate crisis that we face right now. [18:54:55] It is 25 years of corruption in Washington that brought us here. [18:55:10] So here's the thing. [18:55:13] The corruption is felt everywhere. If we are going to make change in this country, it can't be one statute over here. A couple little regulations over there. Maybe one more piece over here. What we've got to have in this country is big structural change. [18:55:34] Little applause. [18:55:39] And let me tell you where a big structural change starts. It starts by attacking corruption head on. [18:55:48] You read. [18:55:55] And I got a plan for that. [18:56:03] In fact, here's the good news. I have the biggest anti-corruption plan since Watergate. Here's the bad news. We need the biggest anti-corruption plan since Watergate. [18:56:22] OK, so this thing is big because money is felt in lots of places around Washington. So let me just give you a little sample out of this plan. Here's part of it. And lobbying as we know it. [18:56:46] Here's another block. The revolving door between Wall Street and Washington. Here's one you might not have thought about. But it matters. Make the United States Supreme Court follow basic rules of ethics on conflicts of interest. [18:57:19] Yeah, I can do these all night long. But let me tell you. I could. But let me do just one more. Just one more. [18:57:26] And that is anyone who wants to run for federal office underline anyone has to put their tax returns online. [18:57:52] OK. So that's part one attack the corruption head on, no. Think of it because if you disrupt it, if you disrupt the influence of money, if you knock it back, if you get off your back foot and onto your front foot, so much more is now possible. [18:58:09] OK. So let's talk about what we can do. And that is part one attack the corruption part, too. We need some basic structural change in this economy. Yep. And let me tell you how this starts. We got a huge problem with these giant corporations that have swallowed up little businesses. Medium sized businesses shoot. [18:58:32] They've swallowed up what used to be big businesses. And the problem is they are so big, they run over their own employees, they run over their customers. [18:58:44] They run over the communities where they are shoot. [18:58:47] They call the tune in Washington. That's how much power they have. So what do we do about that? Well, part 1. I say it's time to break them up. Let's enforce the antitrust laws. [18:59:07] Big tech. [18:59:08] Yes, Mark Zuckerberg. I'm looking at you. [18:59:18] And big egg. I mean, we can just keep doing this. But the point is we got to start by having the courage to enforce our antitrust laws. [18:59:28] We've got to give little businesses a chance. That's a key part of it. But here's the other part. I think of this in structural terms, and that means we got to have some balance in the system. We can't have all the power in the corporations. [18:59:45] We need more power in the hands of workers, make it easier to join a union and give unions more power when they negotiate. [18:59:58] Yep, unions built America's middle class. Unions will rebuild America's middle class. [19:00:12] So that's how we make structural change. Let me give you one more idea. For making structural change, it's time for a wealth tax. And Mark Zuckerberg, I'm still looking at you. [19:00:31] All right. [19:00:32] So here's the idea behind the wealth tax. Just so everybody gets this, your first 50 million dollars is free and clear. [19:00:42] I see people saying, oh, gosh, I get your and you're good. [19:00:47] You're good, OK? Yeah. [19:00:48] People say, OK, I can do business with this woman. She's just reasonable. OK, first, 50 million free and clear, but you're 50 million and first dollar. You've got to pitch in two cents. And two cents on every dollar after that. And just so everybody understands about a wealth tax. Anybody in here on a home or grew up in a family that owned a home. Yeah. Can pay on a wealth tax. They just call it a property tax. All I'm doing different is for the guys who are really rich is to say your property tax is not just your real estate, it's also your stock portfolio. The diamonds, the Rembrandt and the yachts. [19:01:42] And here's the thing. I want us to do this. I want I want to think about this. I'm not pushing a wealth tax because I'm cranky. Or punitive or mean? Oh, poor billionaires. It's none of them. You know, people who've built great fortunes and understand that 50 million threshold on assets, that is the top one tenth of one percent. It's about 70000 families in this country. That's all we're talking about. One tenth of one percent. You built a great fortune in America. [19:02:20] And, you know, they say, well, I got out there, you know, I worked hard. I stayed up late at night, unlike anybody else, you know? But but, OK, you had a great idea. You caught the moment. Good for you. Good for you. [19:02:35] But if you built a great fortune here in America, I guarantee you built it, at least in part using workers. All of us help pay to educate. [19:02:54] You built it, at least in part getting your goods to market on roads and bridges. All of us help pay the build. You built it, at least in part protected by police and firefighters. All of us help pay the salaries for. [19:03:20] Here's the thing, we're happy to do it. [19:03:24] We're Americans, we believe in making these investments. All we're saying is fair, is fair. When you make it big, I mean really big. [19:03:37] I mean, top one tenth of one percent bid pitch in two cents. [19:03:42] So everybody else in this country gets a chance to make it. [19:03:58] Oh, and here comes the fun part. What can we do? For two cents? OK, ready? First thing we can do is universal child care for every baby in this country, age zero to five, all of them. [19:04:20] Universal pre-K for every 3 year old and 4 year old in America. [19:04:29] And enough of the exploitation of largely black and brown women raise the wages of every child care worker and preschool teacher in America. [19:04:49] To a sense, we can do all of that and I'm not through yet. All of that and we can provide tuition free technical school to your college and for your college for anyone who wants to get an education. [19:05:19] We can expand our Pell Grants so that low income students have a real chance to get an education. And we can help level the playing field by putting 50 billion dollars directly into historically black colleges and universities. We couldn't do all of two cents. We can do all of that, plus we can cancel student loan debt for 95 percent. [19:06:12] Two cents. [19:06:14] That's what we can do for two cents and just for a kitchen. [19:06:21] Let's start with two. [19:06:23] Let's start with two. But two cents and we can make an investment in an entire generation. All right. [19:06:32] So that's part two. Structural change. Just a couple of structural pieces in this economy. Part three. We need to protect our democracy. [19:06:52] I want to see a constitutional amendment that guarantees the right of every American citizen to vote and to get that vote counted. And here's one we can do through federal law. Let's outlaw political gerrymandering once and for all. Let's roll back every racist voter suppression law and. And just one more overturn Citizens United tomorrow. [19:07:59] So there it is. So I just want three things. Attack the corruption head on. Make a couple of structural changes in our economy and protect our democracy. Three things. [19:08:16] And here's the thing. Those three things to me are all related to the same question. Who gets opportunity in this country? Who gets a chance to build a future, who has an opportunity? You know, you born into wealth and privilege. You have plenty of opportunities, but not so much for everyone else. Those three and we make this a country of opportunity for everyone. So understand this for me, this is the heart of it. Opportunity for every single one of our children to get a first rate education. [19:08:59] There is. Opportunity. [19:09:07] Opportunity to get a good job, opportunity to start your own business, opportunity, opportunity. Remember, I'm a special needs teacher. Opportunity may mean opportunity to live independently. [19:09:24] Opportunity. Opportunity to love who you love and build the family you want to build. [19:09:42] Opportunity it is the best of what America can be. My daddy. He ended up as a janitor. But his baby daughter. She got the opportunity. [19:09:58] The opportunity to be a public school teacher, the opportunity to be a college professor. The opportunity to be a United States senator. And the opportunity to be a candidate for president of the United States. [19:10:56] Let's do some Q and A are. We've got some who we are, people with our microphones. --- Q&A 191125 Q: Despite the stock market doing really well, we know that a lot of Americans are struggling. What would the Warren administration do to change the way we talk about the health of our economy in a way that's more holistic and does not cause us to lose sight of those suffering? 191145 WARREN>> Okay, it's a great question, Chris. You know, there used to be a time where there were two or three key economic indicators---how the stock market is doing, how GDP is going, how unemployment is going. Two of 'em up, one of 'em down. And that meant, generally, America was doing pretty well. Not everybody, but we're all kind of moving in the same direction and then, about four decades ago---oh, I don't know like when Ronald Reagan got elected---I'm just sayin'... 191220 You watch and it starts to---they start to divide. So, GDP keeps going up, stock market keeps going on, right? Unemployment sometimes goes down, sometimes goes up, but [for] hard-working middle class families, wages just flatten out. And, I don;t know about the rest of you, anybody's housing costs go up? [crowd shouts "yes"] Yeah. Anybody's health insurance costs go up? [crowd shouts "yes"] Oh yeah. 191250 Cost of childcare? Uh, yeah. Cost of sending somebody or going to college? Right? So the costs go up, incomes are flat, and hardworking people are just squeezed in the middle. And, so, you're exactly right. When we talk about our economy, right now, what we're often doing is just talking about how's it working for the richest? How's it working for the---and listen, it's working great for them. 191319 The top 1/10th of 1%, they're doing fabulously. The top 1% is doing pretty darn good. Right? The problem is the 90%. It's not just the poorest, it's all of em. It's everybody on the way down. So, here's how I think about this. I like to reframe this as a values question. Show me your budget, and I'll tell you your values. Show me how the federal government's budget works. 191349 Tell me where you think money should be. Do we need to leave two cents with the top 1/10th of 1% or two cents that we invest in every kid in this country, in building a future for them? And, by the way, I'll throw in a couple of quick ones because you gave me an opening to do this. And that is, because I have some other plans I just want to give a quick mention to. I've got a plan to build about 3.2 million new housing units across this country [applause] 191426 It gives opportunity for housing to middle class families, to working class families, to the working-poor, to the poor-poor, to the homeless, to seniors that want to age in place, to people with disabilities so that they'll have housing opportunities---yeah! Best independent estimate is it'll bring down rents across this country by about 10%. It's not huge, but it's the right direction to start doing it. We make that investment, and it's a place for me to say something else. 191455 Housing is a perfect example---we make a big investment in everybody because we should. Housing is America's middle class, #1 way to build wealth. For each family and generation after generation, that is why the federal government, for decades, subsidized the purchase of housing for white people, and for black people, said, "not you. We will actively discriminate against African Americans who are trying to get mortgages and subsidize whites." 191531 So, my housing plan is a big housing plan for everyone, and then has a special section to say "people who live in formerly red-lined areas or who were targeted during the last housing crash that targeted people of color, are gonna get home-buyer's assistance to get back into the housing market." So, there's an example. But that's the basic idea. We're gonna keep doing this. Thank you, Chris. Q: I was born in Bolivia and moved to the US in 2014, I have seen in the last 5 years how my community has started to become afraid. As President, how will you help the hispanic community to get back their trust in the country that we've worked so hard to be a part of? 191653 WARREN>> So, let me start by saying---I'm very glad you're here. Not just tonight, but I'm glad you've been here now for 5 years and glad you're a part of our country [applause] Let's talk a little bit about immigration and then let's talk a little bit about respect. Okay? So, first, about immigration---I got a plan for that. 191720 And I just want to lay out the outlines because I want everyone to hear this, and it starts with a basic statement of our values. Immigration does not make America weaker. It makes America stronger. It makes our economy stronger and it makes the fabric of our nation stronger. So my immigration plan has basically three parts to it. 191751 Part one, we need to expand legal immigration across this country. Families have been held apart. It's not right. Trump has been shrinking legal immigration. We need to expand it. And that's also true for people who are here on temporary protected status, people who are here seeking asylum, refugees. It's every part of this. 191816 Part two, we need a pathway to citizenship for the people who are here. Yes, the dreamers. But it doesn't stop there. It's about our dreamers. It's about grandmas. It's about little kids. It's about people who came to work agriculture. It's about people who overstayed student visas. These are our friends. These are our neighbors. 191851 These are people who contribute to our economy and the vibrancy of our country. We need a path to citizenship that is fair and achievable, and we need it now. So that's part two. Part 3: we need to stop this Trump-made crisis at our southern border. [applause] 191927 This crisis turned into a crisis, first, when the Trump administration withdrew help from the countries of Central America. When people see nothing around them but destruction, when they see an economy that doesn't work, when they have a government that is not functioning, that is when people fear for their lives and have to run. We need first to restore our help to Central America, help stabilize those governments, help stabilize that economy---those economies. 192008 So that's part of it, but it's not all of it. We need to live our values. When it first came out that the Trump administration was separating children from their families, I went down to the border. I went down to McAllen, Texas, before they started locking people from Congress out. I went down and I--- just briefly, because I want everyone to keep this image in your mind about what was happening and still is. 192042 Picture an Amazon warehouse. Only it's dirty, it smells bad and it's full of cages of people. And that's what it was like. Cages of women on my left, maybe ten feet wide, 40 feet deep. A toilet in the back corner---so crowded with people, they couldn't all lie down at the same time. Cages of men. And then walk into the main area and there they were, the freestanding cages of little girls. 192114 Another cage of little girls over there. Nothing. They had nothing, they had aluminum foil blankets and that was it. No toys, nothing. There was a guard tower in the center, a little wooden guard tower. So one person could watch all those little girls. Back in one corner was a cage of nursing mothers. And I stopped and talked with the mothers. One mother told me she had given a drink of water to a policeman in her home country in Central America. And she said, the next day the word came back that the gangs believe she's working with the police. 192153 And she knew what that meant. She and her baby would be killed. She wrapped up her baby and ran for the border. When people come to our borders, frightened for their lives, frightened for the lives of their children---we are a country that welcomes them and tries to help them. That is who we are. [applause] One last small part on this. I could go on for a long time on this, but one last small part on this that I just want to add. 192227 We need to get rid of for-profit detention centers and for-profit prisons. No one should make a profit from locking people up. So, last thing I want to say about this is do understand that what's going on right now with Trump administration, with Donald Trump himself. This is not accidental. This is strategic. Donald Trump believes that if he can turn people against people in our country---white against black and brown, straight against gay and trans, particularly against trans. 192312 Christian against Muslim, and everybody against immigrants, particularly black and brown immigrants. He believes that if he can get that going and stir it up, that kind of hatefulness in America, that nobody will notice that he and his corrupt buddies are stealing this country blind. We're not going to fall for this. We're going to build a better America. Thank you. Thank you. We're gonna do this. You bet. 192352 Q: I'm a senior at Old Dominion University. WARR>> So wait a minute. What are you majoring in? Q: geography and international studies? WARR>> Wow. Cool. Q: I'm the vice president of the ODU Democrats... Both of my professors, the one that's recording me and one right over there. Oh, I'm so happy to see everyone WARR>> Is she gonna get extra credit for this? Oh, good. You're getting extra credit. I just negotiated. I know how to negotiate. Right? 192433 Q: So I called my mom, I had no idea what I wanted to ask. WARR>> So, this is your help line. You called mom and said, Oh, what would you ask? Q: My mom is the world to me. And I had to call her. So what we came up with was, what is the single most impactful event of your life that has made you the woman you are today? 192457 WARR>> You mean other than marrying Bruce? [she waves to Bruce, some people "boo"] You know, that is a---it's a hard question. But I actually think it's it's the story I told you. I mean, you know, if I spent more time, maybe I guess---But I think it's the story I told you. About when I was 19 and I got married to the guy who'd been my first boyfriend. 192533 First guy who ever dated me, first guy who'd ever dumped me. It's true. And when he dropped back into my life and proposed, I said yes in a nanosecond. That was gonna be my path. And I thought, I've given everything else up and when the little glimmer was out there, that little bit that I had---far on the horizon, it looked like at the time---the chance for me to finish my education so I could do the work I wanted to be able to do. 192614 It was...It was like something opened up in me. And it was the idea that somebody, somewhere had helped build that thing that gave me a chance, that let me fall off the track and get back on, and, when I did, I held on for dear life. I still remember how much I sweated about the books, about the classes, about the commute. You know what that's like. But, so afraid that I'd screw this up and I wouldn't be able to finish it. 192700 And by the time I graduated and I got my first job working with the little ones, for me, it became a kind of pattern that things opened up in my life and then I got a chance to reach and help somebody else out. And sometimes, it was a little tiny kids. Later, it was big kids. This is what ultimately pulled me in to politics---not in a million years did I ever think I would run for public office. 192734 I was just going to be the dork. You know---it's true! The teacher, the researcher, man I would feed the information over. I go try to talk to people. I tell them, "here's what's broken. Here's what you could do about it." I spent, god, eight years saying, "there's a crash coming. There's a crash coming." And nobody wanted to hear it, but what I started to figure out when I made the decision to run for public office is you could actually build structures that open up more possibilities for everybody else. 192813 It's great to do it hand over hand, but it's also great to do it big time. I have to tell you all---running for president is just an extraordinary experience for me [someone shouts, "WE LOVE YOU ELIZABETH WARREN"] [cheers] All right, all right. In that case, I'm not going to get but---I will. I am just going to say it is extraordinary. It's extraordinary because this is the moment. This is our moment. 192846 You know, when I first started running, people said to me, I go back to Washington. And experts, also known as senators, would say to me, "hey, I saw you were out on the trails. What you're doing isn't going to work. It's too hard. People do not want to hear plans. That sounds boring. It's complicated. That's not how you run for President. What you need to do? Talk in generalities and smile more." 192920 That's true. That's what people told me---"it's too hard. What you're asking of people is too hard." And the first time I heard that, you know what I thought? I thought, what do you think they said to the abolitionists? Right. Said, it's too hard, right? We're not going to make that kind of change. Oh, that's way too hard. What do you think they said just a little over 100 years ago to the suffragettes? What'd they say? "Too hard, give up now." 192950 What did they say to the early union organizers? "Too hard. Give up now." What did they say to the foot soldiers in the civil rights movement? "Too hard. Give up now." What were they saying a decade ago to the LGBTQ+ activists who wanted equal marriage? "Too hard. Give up now." 193024 But here's the thing. They didn't give up. They got organized. They built a grassroots movement. They persisted. [cheers] And they changed the course of American history. This is our moment in American history---our moment to dream big, to fight hard, and to win. Thank you! #####
APTN 1430 PRIME NEWS - MIDDLE EAST / EUROPE
AP-APTN-1430: Pakistan India Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:Pakistan India- REPLAY Reax to Indian arrest warrants for 22 Pakistani suspects in Mumbai attacks LENGTH: 02:50 FIRST RUN: 1330 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Urdu/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610659 DATELINE: Islamabad/Lahore - 24 June 2009 / FILE LENGTH: 02:50 SHOTLIST: Islamabad, Pakistan - June 24, 2009 1. Wide exterior of Pakistani Foreign Ministry 2. Wide of Pakistani Foreign Ministry Spokesman Abdul Basit walking into room 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdul Basit, Pakistan Foreign Ministry Spokesman: "I understand these people were not present there in the crime scene in any case. And secondly it is a hypothetical question in the sense that first we do not have an extradition treaty with India and secondly, India has not asked us to extradite these people, so it is all media hype which has been created, but there is nothing." 3. Close of Basit's hands 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdul Basit, Pakistan Foreign Ministry Spokesman: "We are cooperating from day one, and we arrested a few individuals and they are still behind bars in detention and we wish that India had provided us all the relevant material in one go, rather than in instalments." 5. Wide of Basit seated FILE - Lahore, Pakistan - date not known ++MUTE++ 6. Mid tracking shot of Hafiz Saeed walking with security and supporters Islamabad, Pakistan - June 24, 2009 7. Wide of street scene 8. Wide of newspaper kiosk 9. Mid of Urdu and English newspapers at kiosk 10. Close up of newspaper headline reads (English) "Indian court issues warrants for Hafiz Saeed, 21 others" 11. Close up of man reading newspaper 12. Mid of people at kiosk 13. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Shamis ul Islam, Vox pop: "After reading this news, it would have angered the whole of Pakistan. It would have reminded people of (former President) Musharraf, who used to hand over Pakistanis any day on the instructions of the Americans. Now India is also doing the same. Whenever there's loss of millions and killings (in Pakistan), it's because India is involved in it." 14. Various of street scenes 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Asad Ali, Vox Pop: "I don't think so, that the government of Pakistan has to deliver those 22 people to India. What the Indians are doing, they have made the terrorism in Bombay and they are blaming the same thing on Pakistan. Have they any proof? Not yet." 16. Mid of street scene 17. Wide of downtown traffic STORYLINE: Pakistan's Foreign Ministry spokesman says there has been no formal request from India to hand over 22 Pakistani suspects in connection with last year's Mumbai attacks. Abdul Basit noted on Wednesday that there was no extradition treaty between Pakistan and India, and dismissed talk of extradition requests as "media hype". On Wednesday, a prosecutor in Mumbai said an Indian court had issued arrest warrants for 22 Pakistani nationals accused of masterminding last year's deadly Mumbai attacks. One of those named was the founder of a militant group recently freed by a Pakistani court. Public prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam said the warrants require Islamabad to extradite the suspects, though Pakistan has vowed that it will not transfer any Mumbai suspects to India, saying instead it will try them in its own courts. Among those sought for arrest were Hafiz Mohammed Saeed, and Zaki-ur-Rahman Lakhvi and Zarar Shah. Saeed is the head of the Jamat-ud-Dawa charity which the United Nations (UN) says is a front group for Lashkar-e-Taiba, the militant organisation blamed in the Mumbai attacks. Pakistan arrested all three in December after Indian diplomats provided a dossier of evidence in a rare sharing of intelligence between the nuclear-armed rivals, who have fought three wars since independence. However, a court in the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore earlier this month freed Saeed, a hard-line Islamic cleric, saying there was no evidence against him. Indian officials condemned the move. Authorities took Saeed into custody in the wake of the Mumbai attacks last year, but Pakistan has a poor track record of prosecuting alleged militant leaders, and India and Pakistan argued for weeks after the attack over the proper amount of evidence needed to convict the suspected masterminds. India has demanded Pakistan vigorously pursue those they think behind the November siege of its commercial capital that killed 164 people and left nine of 10 gunmen dead. Pakistan has acknowledged the Mumbai attacks were partly plotted on its soil. Saeed helped establish Lashkar-e-Taiba two decades ago to fight Indian rule in the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir. After the group was banned, Saeed set up an Islamic charity called Jamaat-ud-Dawa. The 22 warrants were issued in Mumbai on Tuesday as part of the ongoing trial of the only surviving suspected gunman in the attacks in November that left some 166 dead in a three-day siege. The latest spat between Pakistan and India has been receiving media coverage in Pakistan's newspapers and at least two men criticised India. "Whenever there's loss of millions and killings, it's because India is involved in it," on man, Shamis ul Islam, said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-24-09 1030EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1430: Germany Economy Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:Germany Economy- REPLAY German cabinet approves 2010 budget which foresees record debt LENGTH: 01:30 FIRST RUN: 1230 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: German/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610657 DATELINE: Berlin, 24 June 2009 LENGTH: 01:30 SHOTLIST: 1. Mid of Peer Steinbrueck (red tie, glasses) and others walking into news conference 2. Wide of news conference 3. Mid of news conference 4. SOUNDBITE: (German) Peer Steinbrueck, German Finance Minister: "The recession is hitting Germany harder then we had expected. The reason is that a country like Germany is much more dependent on the global economic trend then any other country playing with us in the Champions League. Why? Because Germany generates 45 percent of the gross national product through exports." 5. Cutaway of media 6. Cutaway of photographer 7. SOUNDBITE: (German) Peer Steinbrueck, German Finance Minister: "If we had a normal economic situation I would have presented you now with a figure for net raising of credit of six (b) billion euros, with great confidence that in 2011, we would have had a balanced budget for the first time since 1969. The figure I'm presenting today is a net borrowing not of six (b) billion but of 86 (b) billion euros." 8. Cutaway of journalists 9. Wide of news conference STORYLINE: Germany's cabinet has approved a budget for 2010 that foresees taking on record debt in an effort to safeguard the nation against the global financial crisis, the nation's finance minister said on Wednesday. The new budget anticipates 86.1 (b) billion euros (120.35 (b) billion US dollars) in fresh debt, more than double the 40 (b) billion euros (56.23 (b) billion US dollars) for the current year and the largest credit to be taken out by the German government since World War II. Finance Minister Peer Steinbrueck defended the high debt as unprecedented but necessary in the face of an economy the government predicts will shrink by six percent in the coming year. He said the recession was hitting Germany "harder than expected" and cited the reason as the country's strong dependence on its export market. In a normal economic situation, Steinbrueck said, he would have announced fresh debt of only 6 (b) billion euros. Steinbrueck said he expects to spend 327.7 (b) billion euros (460.64 (b) billion US dollars), an increase of roughly 24 percent over the current budget. The long-term financial plan foresees a gradual decrease in spending that would drop to 313.5 (b) billion (440.68 (b) billion US dollars) by 2013. The budget plans now go to both houses of parliament for approval. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-24-09 1031EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1430: Kenya Piracy Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:Kenya Piracy- REPLAY Report from on board the USS Arleigh Burke, on patrol off Kenya LENGTH: 01:26 FIRST RUN: 1230 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610655 DATELINE: At Sea, 24 June 2009 LENGTH: 01:26 SHOTLIST: 1. Wide of Gunners Mate 1st Class Benjamen O'Connor explaining weapons drill to members of Kenyan Navy 2. O'Connor explaining M16 assault rifle 3. Wide of the right side of the ship, USS Arleigh Burke, cruising 4. Various of the Kenyans firing the M16 assault rifles 5. Wide of targets on wooden board 6. Close of target with bullet holes 7. US sailors loading M16 clips 8. Close up of clip being loaded 9. Various of US personnel firing M16 assault rifles 10. Targets 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Gunners Mate 1st Class Benjamen O'Connor, US Navy: "We create a small range on the flight deck here so we can continue with our marksmanship by training while at sea." 12. Wide of ships superstructure and bridge with US Flag and Red Flag flying, indicating live ammunition is being used 13. Close up of satellite dishes and red flag STORYLINE: The flight deck of the USS Arleigh Burke, an American guided missile destroyer, was turned into a live firing range for Kenyan navy personnel on Wednesday. The destroyer is on a seven month long US led training mission for the African Partnership Station (APS) in response to requests by African nations for military-to-military or civilian-military maritime training. Kenyan Navy personnel were given assault rifle training on the destroyer, which is en route to the Seychelles after visiting Kenya's main port Mombasa. APS is an international initiative in Africa aimed at improving maritime safety and security which involves the US Navy, the US Coast Guard and interagency members, plus European allies. Somalia, which neighbours Kenya, has long been a lawless, war-torn country, and the waters off its coast are now the world's worst piracy hotspot. There have been dozens of ship hijackings by Somali pirates disrupting shipping in the busy Gulf of Aden. NATO now has five warships on anti-piracy patrol and similar operations are being carried out by the European Union and nations including the United States, China, Russia and India. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-24-09 1032EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1430: ++Afghan Girl 2 Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:++Afghan Girl 2- NEW Little girl who suffered white phosphorus burns leaves hospital for home LENGTH: 03:10 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Various/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610652 DATELINE: Bagram, 24 June 2009 LENGTH: 03:10 SHOTLIST 1. Various of hospital staff treating little girl Razia's wounds 2. One of Razias wounds being cleaned by nurse 3. Pan of Nurse, Captain Christine Collins and Razia's father looking to little girl sitting on the bed 4. Razia talking to the staff 5. Nurse, Captain Christine Collins wipes tears from her eyes UPSOUND (English) "She is just like my fourth daughter" 6. Nurse Collins bending over to hug Razia and say goodbye, Razia caressing her face UPSOUND (English) "I'm gonna miss you." 7. Razia in hospital ward 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Christine Collins, nurse: "(It's) a dream come true, I think, for everybody, for her to be able to go home and I can still remember the first time that I saw her, and no one thought she was going to make it, she was intubated and on life support, from the time that we saw her with her face charred and burned to her being extubated for the first time, for her reaching for her father for the first time..." 9. Nurse Collins and Abdul Azis (Razia's father) fitting a wig to Razia 10. Nurse Collins adjusts the wig 11. Close up of Razia with new wig 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Christine Collins, nurse: "The things we did together, all the first that I enjoyed with my own daughters, the first time seeing her walk again, the first time seeing her eat again, the first time for her to laugh and for her to throw a ball, for her to wave for the first time. All these different firsts that I experienced with her that is something that will be with me for the rest of my life for sure." 13. Various of Razia saying goodbye to the hospital staff 14. SOUNDBITE (Pashto) Abdul Azis, Razia's father "I didn't even think that my daughter could make it alive but now what I see I feel very happy that she can walk she can speak with me, her mother and the rest of her family." 15. Various of Razia and her family leaving Bagram hospital 16. Outside the hospital Razia says goodbye to US soldiers 17. Razia walks past camera and heads for home STORYLINE After nearly four months and 15 surgeries, a little Afghan girl who was severely burned by white phosphorous ran around emergency rooms meeting and greeting doctors and nurses as she left a US military hospital on Wednesday for an arduous journey back to the village, where an uncertain future awaits her. Captain Christine Collins fixed a wig over the scarred and disfigured scalp of 8-year old Razia, who suffered horrific burns when shells slammed into her village house. It was a tough day for Collins, a military nurse from Miami, Arizona and a mother of three girls back in the U.S., to see Razia leave. "This is kind of dream come true for everybody, for her to be able to go home," Collins said, while chocking on her tears."She is like my fourth daughter," she said. "You're just not even sure whether this child is going to make it or not," said Collins. "And then seeing her actually walk for the first time, taking her outside for the first time ... it's one of those life-changing things that you'll never, ever forget." When she came into the hospital the American military doctors watched in horror as the oxygen mask on the young Afghan girl's face started to melt. The 8-year-old's skin was smoking from white phosphorus, a lethal chemical. Her hair was burned away. Her face, head, neck and arms were scorched yellow, pink and black. When the doctors tried to scrape away the dead tissue, flames leapt out. Today, after 15 surgeries, she can smile again. She has learned to say "ice cream" in English and play catch with nurses. But her skin will remain scarred, her hair will never grow back and the mystery behind who fired the lethal chemical that caused her injuries remains unsolved. Razia had just finished breakfast when US, French and Afghan forces appeared near her village March 14 in the Tagab Valley of Kapisa, north of Kabul. Abdul Aziz, a father of nine, told his children to get inside their mud-brick home. But two shells ripped through the house. Fire, smoke and dust filled the room. Flames engulfed Razia. Aziz dumped a bucket of water on her but the chemicals burned on. Two of Razia's sisters lay dead. Five other family members, including the mother, were seriously wounded. Aziz took Razia to the Afghan soldiers near his home, but they could do nothing. A private Afghan vehicle took Aziz and his daughter to the nearby French base. Razia slipped in and out of consciousness as her father poured water on her face to keep her awake. A US medevac helicopter stopped at the French base to pick up Razia and took her to Bagram's SSG Heath N. Craig Joint Theater Hospital 20 minutes later, only a couple of hours after the battle. White phosphorus burns until it's gone. It can burn right down to the bone. US and NATO troops use white phosphorus to illuminate targets, create smoke screens and destroy old bunkers, but say they don't use it as a weapon. While white phosphorus is not banned under international law, human rights groups denounce its use in populated areas. US officials allege that militants have used white phosphorus in mortars or rockets at least 12 times in the last several years. Razia's father Aziz is convinced international forces fired the round that destroyed his home. French troops in green armoured personnel carriers, U.S. troops in tan Humvees and Afghan soldiers gathered nearby before the attack, Aziz said. The Taliban in his region have only AK-47s, heavy machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades, he said. A US military spokeswoman with NATO's security force said military officials can't be certain whether it was their own round or an enemy round that hit Razia's house. Two US officials told The Associated Press that the battle was primarily a French operation. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to release the nationality of the force involved. In Paris, military spokesman Christophe Prazuck said French troops don't have white phosphorus bombs but do have rounds to create smoke screens or illuminate targets. He could not immediately say whether such devices were used in the March 14 battle. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-24-09 1110EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1430: ++Pakistan Attack Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:++Pakistan Attack- NEW Intv with analyst on Taliban movements in wake of drone attack that killed scores LENGTH: 01:11 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610663 DATELINE: Islamabad - 24 June 2009/File LENGTH: 01:11 ++PLEASE NOTE: SHOTS 1-3 ARE ARCHIVE PICTURES AND DO NOT SHOW WEDNESDAY'S SUSPECTED US MISSILE STRIKE THAT KILLED 80++ SHOTLIST: FILE: South Waziristan, 13 November 2004 1. Wide of South Waziristan area showing mountainous terrain ++AERIAL SHOT++ 2. Mid of Pakistani soldiers patrolling 3. Wide of South Waziristan area, smoke rising in distance, pan left Islamabad, 24 April 2009 4. Mid of Muhammad Amir Rana 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Muhammad Amir Rana, Pak Institute for Peace Studies: "Tackling with the drone attacks and the military operations, they have their own strategies, as most of their leadership hasn't stayed in one place for a day, and they keep moving in different areas." 3. Close of Rana 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Muhammad Amir Rana, Pak Institute for Peace Studies: "Their tactic, strategic, looks like they want to hit initially the small pockets of the militants or the Taliban, and then they will finish the small pockets and by then they will think to launch a massive operation." 5. Mid of sign reads (English) "Media workshop, Peace for all, Pak Institute for Peace Studies" STORYLINE: The head of Pakistan's Taliban, Baitullah Mehsud, narrowly escaped a suspected US missile strike that killed 80 people in South Waziristan tribal area bordering Afghanistan on Wednesday, according to intelligence officials. The intelligence officials also said several senior Taliban militants were killed in the strike. However, a senior Taliban aide contradicted the reports, saying that Mehsud was nowhere near the missile strike, and that all but five of the dead were civilians. Pakistan forces have launched campaigns in South Waziristan before. Video filmed in November 2004 shows the rugged terrain where Taliban groups can easily hide. The 2004 video also shows Pakistani troops in the area at the time. An analyst at the Pak Institute for Peace Studies said Mehsud's survival was likely down to a Taliban strategy ensuring that most of the local leadership in South Waziristan only stays a short time in one place before moving on. "They keep moving in different areas," said Muhammad Amir Rana. Two intelligence officials said on Wednesday that although Mehsud had visited a village where the funeral which was targeted took place, he left before the drone-fired missiles killed 80 people and wounded dozens more. The two officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to talk to media, said it was unclear how long before the attack Mehsud left. Intelligence officials had said on Tuesday that militants lost contact with Mehsud for a while. Media reports suggested he had a very close call. Mehsud, accused of plotting suicide bombings and the assassination of his chief rival on Tuesday, is the target of a looming offensive by Pakistan's military in South Waziristan. Earlier this month, the Pakistani government gave the green light to the military to launch an operation against Baitullah Mehsud's Taliban militants, but so far no ground offensive has started. In the absence of any "surge" of ground troops, missile strikes have continued in South Waziristan. Rana said it was likely the military wanted to target smaller, local pockets of Taliban fighters before launching any major military operation. On Tuesday, a suspected missile strike killed several people at a purported Taliban training centre, then another barrage rained down on a funeral procession for some of those killed in the first attack. Dozens of airstrikes have been carried out in the tribal regions over the last year, drawing criticism from Pakistan's leaders who say they jeopardise the military operation by firing up an already raging anti-Americanism. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-06-24-09 1118EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM ------------------- AP-APTN-1430: +France OECD Economy 2 Wednesday, 24 June 2009 STORY:+France OECD Economy 2- WRAP OECD presser on European economic outlook ADDS ministers' photo op LENGTH: 03:23 FIRST RUN: 1430 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 610662 DATELINE: Paris - 24 June 2009 LENGTH: 03:23 SHOTLIST: (FIRST RUN 1230 GMT NEWS UPDATE - 24 JUNE 2009) 1. Exterior of Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) building 2. Close-up of flags 3. Close-up of OECD sign reading (English) "The crisis and beyond: for a cleaner, stronger, fairer economy." 4. Wide of people in foyer 5. Wide of news conference, pan right 6. Mid of Angel Gurria, OECD Secretary General: 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Angel Gurria, OECD Secretary General: "We anticipate still for the year of 2009 a deep contraction in output, in general the OECD area at large is going to shrink by upwards of four percent." 8. Mid of media 9. Close up of man in audience 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Angel Gurria, OECD Secretary General: "World trade is set to fall by as much as 16 percent due to a host of economic influences. This is a very, very important indicator of the size, and the depth and the breadth of the problem we are facing today." 11. Wide of news conference 12. Mid of audience 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jorgen Elmeskov, OECD acting economics department head: "Financial conditions have improved, and we assume that they will stay broadly unchanged through the rest of this year before gradually normalising in the course of 2010. That assumption could be too cautious." 14. Mid of Angel Gurria listening 16. Wide of Elmeskov speaking on big screen 17. Mid of Elmeskov's shadow ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1430 GMT ME EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 24 JUNE 2009) 18. French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde walking into meeting room and being photographed 19. Mid of Japanese Finance Minister Kaoru Yosano, zoom in 20. Close up of Lagarde talking to Belgian Finance Minister Didier Reynders 21. Mid of members of US and Russian delegations 22. Mid of Lagarde shaking hands with Han Seung-soo, Korean Prime Minister and chairman of the OECD summit 23. Wide of officials in conference room 24. Mid of Chinese delegation 25. Mid of officials sitting at conference table, pan left 26. Mid of Belgian delegation, pan left to delegations from Canada and Brazil 27. Wide of meeting room STORYLINE: Finance ministers from the 30 member states of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) met at the organisation's headquarters in Paris on Wednesday. The ministers were also joined by their counterparts from some non-member states including Brazil, Chile, India, Estonia, Israel, Indonesia, South Africa, China and Russia. Earlier on Wednesday the OECD said the recession is close to bottoming out but that recovery will be weak unless governments take further action to remove uncertainty over banks' balance sheets. In its half-yearly economic outlook, the OECD said it expects its member countries' economies to shrink by 4.1 percent this year, and said the only thing heading off an even worse decline was the economic rescue measures taken by governments. That represented a slightly improved outlook compared to the OECD's last forecast, in March, of a 4.3 percent decline this year. It was the first time in two years that the OECD had revised its forecast upwards, Secretary General Angel Gurria said at a news conference at OECD headquarters in Paris. However, he said world trade was still set to fall by up to 16 percent as a result of the economic crisis, which was an "indicator of the size, and the depth and the breadth of the problem we are facing today." OECD acting economics department head Jorgen Elmeskov gave a cautiously upbeat assessment about the future direction of the world's economy. He said financial conditions had improved and that the OECD assumed "they will stay broadly unchanged through the rest of this year before gradually normalising in the course of 2010." But Gurria warned the recovery was likely to be weak and fragile for some time. The OECD now expects the 16 nation euro-zone economy to shrink by 4.8 percent this year. It forecast the US economy would shrink by 2.8 percent this year compared to 1.1 percent growth in 2008, while Japanese output is likely to contract by 6.8 percent. The OECD forecast a return to growth in all three regions next year, with overall growth across its membership expected to average 0.7 percent in 2010, according to the report. That also represented an improved outlook compared to the OECD's last forecast of a 0.1 percent contraction in the OECD area economy next year. The OECD urged countries to both start devising strategies to roll back their stimulus measures after the worst of the economic crisis has passed, while also continuing with measures to ensure a faster and more robust recovery. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN (Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) AP-NY-06-24-09 1133EDT ------------------- END -- OF -- ITEM -------------------
SENATE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE HEARING ON JAPAN 1430
14:44:41 GO OUT TO THE VICTIMS AND 14:44:43 THEIR FAMILIES. TODAY WE'RE HEARING THAT THIS 14:44:48 EVENT NOW, IN TERMS OF RADIATION LEAKED, IS EQUAL TO THAT OF 14:44:53 CHERNOBYL SO THE NEWS ISN'T GOOD COMING OUT OF JAPAN. 14:44:56 THE TRAGEDY SERVES AS AN IMPORTANT WAKE-UP CALL FOR US. 14:45:01 WE CAN'T IGNORE IT. I THINK ONE THING WE'D ALL AGREE 14:45:05 TO IS WE MUST PLAN FOR THE UNEXPECTED. 14:45:08 WHEN WE KNOW OF THREATS, WE MUST ACT QUICKLY TO ADDRESS THEM. 14:45:11 SO WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE TRAGIC SITUATION IN JAPAN? 14:45:15 THE U.S. HAS 104 COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS OPERATING 14:45:22 AT 65 SITES IN 31 STATES. 23 REACTORS ARE BOILING WATER 14:45:27 REACTORS WITH MARK ONE CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS WITH LIKE 14:45:30 THE ONES AT THE DAIICHI PLANT. IT IS TRUE THAT THE NRC HAS 14:45:34 INSTITUTED AN IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FOR THIS TYPE OF 14:45:37 REACTOR. HOWEVER, THE LESSONS FROM THE 14:45:41 TRAGEDY IN JAPAN DEMONSTRATE THE IMPORTANCE OF REASSESSING THE 14:45:45 SAFETY OF THE REACTORS. THE KPROMGSED REACTORS IN JAPAN 14:45:49 WERE SET ON THE SET OF ASSUMPTIONS REGARDING THE 14:45:54 MAGNITUDE OF NATURAL DISASTERS SUCH AS EARTHQUAKES AND 14:45:57 TSUNAMIS. WE KNOW SOME U.S. HAVE A COUPLE 14:46:06 OF THOSE THE SITUATION IN JAPAN HAS SHOWN US WE MUST LOOK AT THE 14:46:12 RISK ASSUMPTIONS THAT WERE MADE BH THE REACTORS WERE DESIGNED. 14:46:15 WE KNOW IN JAPAN THEY DESIGNED IT FOR A LOWER MAGNITUDE QUAKE. 14:46:20 AS A RESULT OF THE CATASTROPHIC SITUATION IN JAPAN, SENATOR TOM 14:46:23 CARPER, WHO IS GOING TO CHAIR THIS HEARING AS SOON AS I 14:46:26 COMPLETE MY REMARKS, TOM CARPER AND I HAVE CALLED IN THE NRC TO 14:46:32 CONDUCT A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF ALL NUCLEAR FACILITIES IN THE 14:46:36 UNITED STATES TO ASSESS THEIR CAPACITY TO RESPOND TO NATURAL 14:46:40 OR MANMADE DISASTERS. SENATOR FEINSTEIN AND I ALSO 14:46:45 REQUESTED THAT IMMEDIATE AND SPECIAL ATTENTION BE GIVEN TO 14:46:47 THOSE U.S. REACTORS SUBJECT TO SIGNIFICANT SEISMIC ACTIVITY OR 14:46:52 LOCATED NEAR A COASTLINE. THE NRC HAS IDENTIFIED TWO 14:47:00 PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA AS BEING LOCATED IN HIGH SEISMICITY 14:47:08 ZONES. THE COMMISSION FOUND NINE OTHER 14:47:09 PLANTSES IN ILLINOIS, NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA, 14:47:11 GEORGIA, VIRGINIA AND TENNESSEE, THAT THEY'RE IN MODERATE SIZE 14:47:17 RICKITY ZONES. BOTH IN CALIFORNIA ARE LOCATED 14:47:20 IN HIGH-DENSITY AREAS, 424,000 PEOPLE LIVE WITHIN 50 MILES OF 14:47:26 DIABLO, 7.4 MILLION LIVE WITHIN 50 MILES OF SAN ANOFRE. 14:47:40 OTHER NUCLEAR FACILITIES IN THE UNITED STATES ARE ALSO LOCATED 14:47:43 IN HIGHLY POP LATE LAITED AREAS. IF YOU LOOK AT THE ONE IN NEW 14:47:46 YORK, IT'S ABOUT 17 MILLION PEOPLE LIVE WITHIN THAT 50-MILE 14:47:51 RADIUS. ALTHOUGH EVACUATION PLANS ARE 14:47:53 GENERALLY A STATE AND LOCAL CONCERN, THERE HAVE BEEN CALLS 14:47:57 FOR MORE INVOLVEMENT FROM FEMA TO ASSESS THOSE PLANS. 14:48:00 TODAY WE'LL HEAR TESTIMONY FROM A NUMBER OF OUR COLLEAGUES AS 14:48:05 WELL AS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NRC, GREG GASCO, WHO'S BEEN SO 14:48:11 HELPFUL TO US AS WE MOVE FORWARD, AND ALSO WE'LL HEAR 14:48:13 FROMMED ADMINISTRATOR OF THE EPA LISA JACKSON. 14:48:17 I'M VERY INTERESTING TO HEAR HOW THE EPA IS MONITORING THE 14:48:21 RADIATION IN THE U.S. WE HAVE, LISA AND I, TALKED OVER 14:48:27 THE WEEKS JUST MAKING SURE WE HAVE ACCURATE, UP-TO-DATE 14:48:30 INFORMATION ON THE RADIOACTIVITY. 14:48:32 WE KNOW THAT LOW LEVELS OF RADIATION HAVE BEEN DETECTED IN 14:48:35 THE U.S. FROM THE COMPROMISED REACTORS IN JAPAN. 14:48:39 WE CAN ONLY IMAGINE WHAT THE POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON HEALTH AND 14:48:43 ENVIRONMENT WOULD BE IF, GOD F 14:48:47 FORBID, WE EVER EXPERIENCED THE SAME TYPE OF ACCIDENTS THAT 14:48:49 OCCURRED IN JAPAN. A SMALL BUT ELEVATED OF 14:48:54 RADIATION HAVE BEEN DETECTED IN MILK AND OTHER FOOD. 14:48:58 WEAR WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT THAT. 14:49:02 EXPERTS SAY THAT WE'RE OKAY RIGHT NOW. 14:49:05 I WANT TO PROBE THAT, MAKE SURE OF THAT. 14:49:07 AND WHETHER IT'S THE NRC'S REVIEW PROCESS OF OUR REACTORS 14:49:11 OR EPA'S MONITORING OF OUR DRINKING WATER, COMPLETE 14:49:16 TRANSPARENCY AND PROMPT DISCLOSURE ARE VITAL IN 14:49:18 MAINTAINING THE GOVERNMENT'S CREDIBILITY, OUR CREDIBILITY, 14:49:21 FRANKLY, AS THIS OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE. 14:49:24 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MUST HEED THE WAKE-UP CALL FROM THE 14:49:27 CATASTROPHE IN JAPAN. AS CHAIRMAN OF THIS COMMITTEE, 14:49:30 WORKING WITH EVERYBODY ON BOTH SIDES OF THE AISLE, PARTICULARLY 14:49:33 MY SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIR, I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE VIGOROUS 14:49:37 OVERSIGHT TO ENSURE THAT WE LEARN THE TRAGIC LESSONS FROM 14:49:40 FUKUSHIMA REACTORS AND TAKE REASONABLE STEPS TO MAKE OUR 14:49:46 NATION'S NUCLEAR FACILITIES AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE. 14:49:48 I KNOW CHAIR MAN YAUSCO AND ADMINISTRATOR JACKSON SHARE MY 14:49:55 CONCERNS. OUR COMMON GOAL IS TO SHOW WE'RE 14:49:58 PREPARED AND OBVIOUSLY TAKING A HARD LOOK AT WHAT'S GOING ON IN 14:50:02 OUR COUNTRY AT A TIME WHEN WE NEED EVERY BIT OF ENERGY WE CAN 14:50:05 GET. THERE'S NO QUESTION ABOUT THAT. 14:50:07 BUT AS LOOKING AT WHAT'S GOING ON OVER THERE, IT'S 14:50:12 THE UNTHINKABLE AND WE HAVE TO AVOID IT. 14:50:15 SO WITH THAT, I'M GOING TO TURN THE GAVEL OVER TO SENATOR 14:50:21 CARPER. THANK YOU, MADAM CHAIRMAN. 14:50:23 FIRST OF ALL, SENATOR JOE IN ANSWER -- NANCE WAS GOING TO BE 14:50:35 HERE TODAY AND COULDN'T BE. HE ASKED ME IF I WOULD PUT IN A 14:50:39 STATEMENT WHICH I ENTER INTO THE RECORD RIGHT NOW, MS. CHAIRMAN. 14:50:43 CHAIRMAN YASCO, I APPRECIATE YOUR EFFORTS TO ENSURE THE 14:50:48 NATION THAT WE ARE -- THAT THE NUCLEAR PLANTS HERE IN THE 14:50:52 UNITED STATES ARE SAFE, AND I APPRECIATE VERY MUCH, ADMIN 14:50:59 -- ADMINISTRATOR JACKSON, YOUR 14:51:02 REASSURANCE THAT THE MATERIALS THAT HAVE DRIFTED HERE FROM 14:51:05 JAPAN WILL NOT IMPACT PUBLIC HEALTH. 14:51:06 I'M SURE WE ALL AGREE THAT WE NEED TO STUDY THE ACCIDENT IN 14:51:12 FUKUSHIMA AND LEARN FROM IT. AS CHAIRMAN YASCO FREQUENTLY 14:51:18 REMINDS US, WE CAN'T BE COMPLACENT WITH REGARD TO 14:51:21 NUCLEAR SAFETY, AND AT THE SAME TIME WE CAN'T ALLOW US TO BE 14:51:25 PARALYZED BY FEAR. HARNESSING ANY ENERGY SOURCE 14:51:28 CARRIES SOME LEVEL OF RISK, AND WE NEED TO BE SURE WE CAN SAFELY 14:51:32 MANAGE THAT RISK. ENSURING THE SAFETY OF NUCLEAR 14:51:36 ENERGY IS A VERY SERIOUS JOB. IN 2004, CONGRESS CHARGED FIVE 14:51:41 INDIVIDUALS WITH THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT PUBLIC 14:51:44 HEALTH AND SAFETY. THE PUBLIC IS BEST SERVED BY A 14:51:47 COMMISSION THAT F 14:51:53 FUNCTIONS COLLECTIVELY WITH THEIR EXPERTISE. 14:51:56 I'M AFRAID THE COUNTRY MAY BE GETTING LESS THAN IT DESERVES. 14:51:59 I WAS SURPRISED TO LEARN FROM MY STAFF THAT CHAIRMAN YASCO HAS 14:52:07 INVOKED EMERGENCY AUTHORITY IN TRANSITIONING HIMSELF IN THE 14:52:12 WAKE OF THE TRAGEDY IN JAPAN, ESPECIALLY A BY PHONE AND IN 14:52:19 FRONT OF THIS COMMITTEE. LEET GET OUR DATES STRAIGHT. 14:52:22 FIRST OF ALL, IT TOOK PLACE ON THE 11th. 14:52:26 OUR PHONE CALL TOOK PLACE ON THE 14th, THE HEARING TOOK PLACE ON 14:52:29 THE 16th AND NEVER WAS THIS MENTIONED THAT THIS WAS GOING TO 14:52:32 BE INVOKED. THE LAW CONFERS EMERGENCY 14:52:35 AUTHORITY ON THE CHAIRMAN IN THE WAKE OF AN EMERGENCY AT A 14:52:38 PARTICULAR FACILITY OR MATERIALS REGULATED BY THE NRC. 14:52:43 AT PRESENT, I AM NOT AWARE OF AN EMERGENCY CONDITION THAT EXISTS 14:52:47 IN THE UNITED STATES FACILITY. CHAIRMAN YASCO, I WANT TO WORK 14:52:52 WITH YOU AS THE NRC TRIES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT HAPPENED IN 14:52:56 JAPAN, WHAT THE UNITED STATES CAN LEARN FROM IT, BUT OUR 14:53:00 COLLABORATION INDEED, COLLABORATION WITH ALL OF US IN 14:53:03 CONGRESS, WITH ONLY PROCEED FRUITFULLY IF WE HAVE OPENNESS 14:53:06 AND FAIRNESS AND A TRANSPARENCY. THAT APPLIES TO YOUR OFFICE. 14:53:10 AS WE MOVE FORWARD, I HOPE YOU'LL PROVIDE US WITH FULL AND 14:53:13 COMPLETE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR ACTIVITIES AND THAT YOU WILL 14:53:15 WORK WITH YOUR FELLOW COMMISSIONERS IN THE SAME 14:53:19 SPIRIT. AND IN THAT VEIN, I LOOK FORWARD 14:53:21 TO YOUR TESTIMONY AND TO YOURS, ADMINISTRATOR JACKSON, AND TO 14:53:26 WORKING WITH BOTH OF YOU ON GAINING FULL UNDERSTANDING OF 14:53:29 THE IMPACT OF THE FUKUSHIMA ACTION. 14:53:32 AND BEFORE I YIELD TO MY COLLEAGUE, I THINK IT'S 14:53:34 SIGNIFICANT THAT I GET MY REQUEST IN HERE. 14:53:36 I'M ANXIOUS TO SEE PROGRESS ON THE NOMINATIONS OF COMMISSIONERS 14:53:44 WHICH I HOPE THE PRESIDENT OBAMA SENDS US SOON. 14:53:47 GIVEN THE SCOPE OF ISSUES BEFORE THE COMMISSION, IT'S IMPORTANT 14:53:50 WE HAVE OUR COMMISSION FULL WITH ALL THE MEMBERS APPOINTED AND 14:53:53 CONFIRMED. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 14:54:03 FIRST OF ALL, MADAM CHAIR, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR HOLDING 14:54:08 THIS HEARING AND FOR GIVING THE OPPORTUNITY TO CO-CHAIR WITH 14:54:11 YOU. OUR THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS GO OUT 14:54:13 TO ALL THE CITIZENS OF JAPAN, ESPECIALLY THOSE FAMILIES OF THE 14:54:17 THOUSANDS OF DISASTER VICTIMS AND THOSE THAT ARE GOING THROUGH 14:54:21 A VERY, VERY DIFFICULT TIME. AS THIS TRAGEDY UNFOLDS, I 14:54:26 ENCOURAGE THE REGULATORY COMMISSION AND OTHER U.S. 14:54:29 AGENCIES TO CONTINUE TO COORDINATE WITH THE JAPANESE 14:54:32 GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE ANY ASSISTANCE THEY NEED TO RECOVER. 14:54:36 THE INCIDENT THAT STRUCK JAPAN REMINDS US WE ARE ALL VULNERABLE 14:54:41 TO DISASTERS, WHETHER IT'S AN ACT OF NATURE OR A TERRORIST 14:54:44 ATTACK. WHILE WE CANNOT PREDICT WHEN AND 14:54:46 WHERE THE NEXT MAJOR DISASTER WILL OCCUR, WE KNOW THAT IT WILL 14:54:49 OCCUR, AND WE ALSO KNOW THAT ADEQUATE PROTECTION, ADEQUATE 14:54:53 PREPARATION AND RESPONSE PLANNING ARE VITAL TO MINIMIZE 14:54:56 BOTH THE INJURY AND DEATH WHEN IT DOES HAPPEN. 14:55:01 TODAY'S HEARING IS ONE OF MANY I HOPE THIS COMMITTEE WILL HAVE TO 14:55:04 ENSURE THAT OUR NATION HAS PREPARED FOR THE WORST IN ORDER 14:55:07 TO PREVENT ANY LIES LOST FROM NUCLEAR POWER IN THIS COUNTRY. 14:55:12 IN THE UNITED STATES WE HAVE, AS YOU KNOW, 104 NUCLEAR POWER 14:55:16 PLANTS IN 31 STATES WHICH GENERATES ABOUT A FIFTH OF OUR 14:55:20 STATE'S TOTAL NUCLEAR CONSUMPTION. 14:55:23 NUCLEAR POWER HAS RELIED ON D 14:55:33 DIRTY FOSSIL FUELS FOR GLOBAL WARMING. 14:55:34 OVER THE YEARS, WE HAVE RELATIVE SAFETY IN THE ADMINISTRATION AND 14:55:39 WE'VE WORKED HARD TO REINFORCE THOSE EFFORTS. 14:55:43 AS A RESULT WE HAVE SEEN OR NOT SEEN ANY DIRECT RESULT OF 14:55:48 NUCLEAR PAR EXPOSURE IN THIS COUNTRY IN OVER 50 YEARS. 14:55:51 AS PART OF THIS CULTURE OF T SAFETY, NRC REQUIRES NUCLEAR 14:55:57 FACILITIES TO BE DESIGNED TO WITHSTAND DISASTERS AND 14:56:00 TERRORIST ATTACKS. AFTER SEPTEMBER 11, THE NRC TOOK 14:56:03 A CLOSER LOOK AT THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY, PUT IN PLACE 14:56:06 ADDITIONAL SAFETY AND NUCLEAR REQUIREMENTS. 14:56:08 DESPITE ALL THE PROTECTIONS THAT ARE IN PLACE, THE CRISIS IN 14:56:18 JAPAN AND A CLEAR REMINDER THAT WE CANNOT BECOME COMPLACENT WHEN 14:56:22 IT COMES TO SAFETY. MY COLLEAGUE IN JAPAN SAYS, MAKE 14:56:31 IT SAFER, MAKE IT BETTER. THAT'S WHY I ASK THE NRC FOR A 14:56:34 CONFERENCE OF REVIEW OF OUR NUCLEAR FLEET. 14:56:37 WE WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT EVERY PRECAUTION IS BEING TAKEN TO 14:56:40 SAFEGUARD THE AMERICAN PEOPLE FROM A SIMILAR NUCLEAR ACCIDENT. 14:56:44 THE NRC IS JUST GETTING STARTED ON THIS REVIEW, AND I ANXIOUSLY 14:56:49 AWAIT THEIR RESULTS. TODAY I LOOK FORWARD TO HEARING 14:56:52 FROM OUR WITNESSES AN UPDATE ON FUKUSHIMA DIACHI, A NUCLEAR 14:56:57 PLANT AND AN UPDATE TO OUR RESPONSE ON THAT CRISIS. 14:57:01 I ALSO LOOK FORWARD TO HEARING WHAT WE CAN LEARN OF THE ONGOING 14:57:04 CRISIS TO PREVENT SIMILAR THINGS FROM OCCURRING RIGHT HERE. 14:57:08 I'M PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN HEARING ABOUT THE STATE OF 14:57:10 EMERGENCY PLANNING PROCESS FROM THE DELAWARE SAFETY AND HOMELAND 14:57:15 SECURITY. AS CHAIRMAN OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE 14:57:17 ON NUCLEAR SAFETY, I TAKE SERIOUSLY MY RESPONSIBILITY, OUR 14:57:22 RESPONSIBILITY, TO MAKE CERTAIN WE ARE TAKING THE APPROPRIATE 14:57:24 MEASURES TO MAKE THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY AS SAFE AS THEY CAN 14:57:27 POSSIBLY BE. AS I SAID BEFORE, WHILE I'M A 14:57:31 PROPONENT OF CLEAN ENERGY, MY TOP PRIORITY OF NUCLEAR POWER 14:57:36 INDUSTRY REMAINS PUBLIC SAFETY. AND WITH THAT HAVING BEEN SAID, 14:57:39 I LOOK OVER TO MY RIGHT AND I SEE SENATOR LAMAR ALEXANDER OF 14:57:45 TENNESSEE. WE AWAIT YOUR COMMENT. 14:57:47 THANKS, MR. CHAIRMAN. I WANT TO THANK YOU AND SENATOR 14:57:50 BOXER FOR -- SENATOR, I DID NOT NOTICE 14:57:55 SENATOR BROSLER SLIPPED IN. ARE YOU SURE? 14:57:57 THANK YOU. GO AHEAD, SIR. 14:58:02 THANKS, SENATOR BRASSO. I THANK SENATOR CARPENTER FOR 14:58:10 HAVING THIS HEARING. I THINK NUCLEAR REACTORS IS 14:58:17 SOMETHING WE OUGHT TO HAVE MORE OVERSIGHT, AND THAT IS BECAUSE 14:58:19 IT'S COMPLEX SCIENCE, IT'S COMPLEX ENGINEERING AND IT'S 14:58:24 VITALLY IMPORTANT TO THE FUTURE OF OUR COUNTRY. 14:58:26 I REMEMBER BACK WHEN I WAS GOVERNOR OF TENNESSEE IN THE 14:58:29 1980s, WE HAD A QUESTION THAT WAS PRESENTED TO ME WHEN TBA WAS 14:58:33 BUILDING ONE OF ITS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. 14:58:35 AND THE ISSUE WAS WHETHER TO DISTRIBUTE IODIDE TABLETS TO 14:58:41 PEOPLE WHO WERE IN THE AREA OF THE NEW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT. 14:58:46 SOMEONE SAID, DON'T DO THAT, BECAUSE YOU'LL SCARE PEOPLE TO 14:58:50 DEATH. THE OTHER ARGUMENT WAS, WELL, IF 14:58:53 PEOPLE UNDERSTAND WHAT THEY'RE FOR AND THEY'RE ONLY TO BE USED 14:58:56 IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY, THEN IT'S BETTER TO GO AHEAD AND 14:58:59 TALK ABOUT THE PROCESS WE'RE USING AND LET PEOPLE KNOW WHAT
CAMPAIGN 2012 / GINGRICH DUBUQUE IA
FTG REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE NEWT GINGRICH SPEAKING AT EVENT IN DUBUQUE, IOWA 13:56:35 Campaign on the idea that we would change the economy with a strategy of four things: Lower taxes, less regulation, more American energy, and being favorable to people who create jobs. In the Reagan years it was extraordinarily successful. The economy turned around, we created 1.3 million jobs in the month of August 83 alone. If you took the Reagan recovery and laid it out over the current population, it'd be 25 milliion new jobs. Then people forgot it. There's a fight, not just between the left and the right. There is a fight inside the Republican party, between those who are passionate about raising traxes. In 1982, Reagan was talked into a tax increase. I opposed it, Kemp and I led the fight against it, Reagan said it was a mistake. It was the biggest single mistake of his administration. In 1990 Pres. Bush wanted to raise taxes, I opposed it. We had a huge fight. A majority of Republicans voted no. And this fight still goes on today, so it's not just Democrats Republicans. There's an establishment wing in America that believes that you have to have bigger government, to have bigger governmnmet you have to have more taxes, and they do not understand the econpomiuc impact of their policies. And there is a conservative wing, which beginning with Kemp, and. in the 1970s said, 'Wait a second. What we really want is a bigger America, so I became Speaker in 1994, and we went back to the Regaan-Kemp supply side model. We cut taxes, we cut regulations, we reformed welfare, the first entitlement reform of your lifetime. Two out of three people went to work or went to school. The number of children in poverty droipped to the lowest number in American history because their parents were working. It was tremendously successful. We passed the first tax cut in sixteen years and the largest capital gains tax cut in history, and guess what happened. Une,ployment dropped to 4.2%. Because we took off unemploymnmet, off medicade, off public housing, off welfare, we then turn over here and they got jobs and paid taxes. A decline in federal spending, the rise in revenue, not by higher taxes, but by more workers. We balanced the federal budget for four straight years, paid off 405 billion dollars in debt." 13:59:08 "Now, I find myself, and I think it's fascinating, because I'v been around long enough. This is my third try at this. Twice it's worked. We know. I mean, these are historic facts. Nobody doubts the facts. And by the way, I'll concede, Bill Clinton signed the bills, he gets to claim half the credit. It was a bi-partisan effort. I mean, when you've got a livberal Democrat in the White House, you're not gonna get a tax cut through unless he signs it, unless your majorities are so big you can override his veto., and that was impractical. So, I would be candid with all of you. I was effective. I actually got the deal done. So, it wasn't 112% pure, but it worked., and we got a liberal Democrat to sign welfare reform, we got a liberal Democraty to sign tax cuts. We got a libveral Democrat to sign four consecutive balanced budgets. Now, I think that's pretty effective conservatism." 14:00:03 "So, where are we today? We have a president who is to the left of Jimmy Cartrer. Barack Obama is legitimately, and I think this is important thing to understand about him. He is legitimately a radical in the tradition of rules for radicals, in the whole concept of Saul Alinksy, which, in fact, Obama taught in Southside Chicago, and people say he was a community organizer. He wasn't organizing b boys and girls clubs. He was training people to be part of ACORN and other radical groups, and his policies reflect that. And what are the result? He's anti-American energy. We have the highest price of gas today in history, and we're very vulnerable. People should be watching what the Iranians are doing in the Straits of Varmus, practicing closing the straits. The fact we do not have an active, aggressive American energy policy is a serious national security problem. The President's anti-job creator. Remember I said earlier there are four parts. The fourth part is you should like people who create jobs. It seems hard for the White House to understand, but class warfare does not encourage people to create jobs. It encourages people to put jobs outside the country. SO, you have an administration which raises taxes instead of lowering them, which increases regulations instead of lowering them, which is against American energy, and which attacks job creators. That's where we are today." 14:01:35 "Now, because of my background. If you go to newt.org you'll see an entire program. Lower taxes, less regulation, more American energy, favor the people that create jobs. Sound familiar? Third time in my lifetime. And it's almost like you cannot get the national establishment to learn these rules. And one the major differences I have with Gov. Romney, who's a fine person. I've said publicly he's a good manager, he's a competent person, he did very well with the winter Olympics, but there's a huge difference in the philosophy of a supply side conservative in the Kemp-Reagan tradition, and the philosophy of a Massachusetts moderate. I would dramatically cut taxes, and I don't try, by the way, to get into the arguments of the national establishment. If we have zero capital gains tax cut, and we bring hundreds of thousands of dollars into the US, fact is people who0 have capital will be the big winners, but so will every American who gets a job. Let me show you have the left, in the way they analyze things. If you look at a chart.. My budget proposals have been analyzed by a liberal group, and they came back and said to their great shock, there's not a very big tax break for the lowest 20%, and they're right, because the lowest 20% doesn't pay any taxes. On the other hand, they refused to count the number of jobs that would be created. So let's take August of 1983. It's hard, when you look at the pathetic Obama economy, it's hard to imagine a month where you created 1.3 million jobs in one month. But if you think about it, nobody on the left counts the value of the jobs. SO somebody says how much would the income of unemployed Americans go up if they got an average income job times 1.3 million? All of a sudden you have billions of dollars going into the hands of working Americans who are currently unemployed. Now, you're not gonna get in Washington that kind of analysis, because they don't think about jobs, they don't think about markets, they don't understand how it works. We have 12.5% corp. tax rate. We picked it at a very straight level. It's the corporate tax rate of Ireland, and Microsoft files all of its royalties in Ireland for a practical reason. 12.5% is a lot lower than 35. SO, if we had a 12.5% corp. tax rate, and we're working to make it apply both to sub-chapter s and to c corps, guess what happens. You suddenly liberate about 7.5 billion dollars in locked up profits overseas to come back home. You suddenly make American companies competitive worldwide. And by the way, Gov. Romney's 25% rate is still above the Canadian rate. The Canadian rate is 16%. My rate would actually put us better than Canada. You then look at 100% expensing. What does that mean? It means if you're a farmer or a factory or a business, you write off 100% of your investment annually in all new equipment. Why does that matter? We want American workers to be the most productive, most creative workers in the world. I wanna rebuild our manufacturing base. You cannot be the arsenal of democracy if you don't have an arsenal. You can't stay out of China unless you have a massive increase in manufacturing, and you apply science and technology, which is why one of my proposals is to actually combine unemployment compensation with a training requirement, so we're not ever again gonna give people 99 weeks to do nothing. If you need the help, we'll g I've you the help, if you'll sign up with a business to get trained during the time we're helping you so you'll rebuild the human capital of the US, so you'll have a better trained workforce more prepared for modern jobs. So, you talk new equipment that can be written of every year, and you take new training and you suddenly have the best equipped, best trained workforce in the world, we go back to being the leading economic country in the world, and leading manufacturing country in the world." 15:05:46 "We also eliminate the death tax for a very practical reason. It's an immoral tax. The death tax says if you do everything right your entire lifetime, you save, you invest, you work, you end up in a situation where politicians can take away your money when you die. No society should require you to visit the undertaker and the IRS in the same week. It is fundamentally, profoundly wrong. And if you allow businesses to focus on job creation, because by definition the people you're talking about are the people who are good at creating jobs. I don't want them to be devoting the last twenty years of their life to avoiding taxes. I want them to continue to grow jobs. Finally, for individuals, we create a 15% flat tax as an option. You keep the current tax code with all its complexities and all its deductions, or you can have a very simple, one-page form. This is what Hong Kong does, and it's very successful. People are better off with one page, fill out one page. People are better off with all the deductions and all the paperwork, keep the deductions. So, that's the core model." 14:06:48 "Deregulation is very straightforward. Repeal Obama care, repeal Dodd-Frank, which is killing small banks and killing small business and crippling the housing industry. Remember, price of housing in the last month, it was announced this morning, went down again. We have a continuing deflation the value of housing, and that means we have a deflation in the wealth of the middle class, and that means that we have people who are in trouble because their mortgage is bigger than their house. Turning that around is a key part of the economy and a key part of where we're going, and repealing Dodd-Frank helps turn that around. I would also repeal Sarbanes-Oxley, which is a regulatory system which is very expensive to implement and produces virtually no information that's useful." 14:07:31 "Finally, I would replace the EPA with a brand new ESA. It is amazing how many jobs the EPA is killing, and it is amazing how badly they're crippling small towns with totally impractical rules and regulations that are absorbing all the available tax base of small towns, just top meet the requirements of Washington bureaucracy. Our number one requirement for our ESA would be that you would have to have common sense. We would not hire you to work there unless you had some real acquaintance with thee real world. Those of you that are aware of the dust proposals that Sen. Grassley fought give you an example of what I'm talking about. When you start having guys in Washington write rules as to whether or not you create dust while plowing for corn, and who are afraid your dust is going to go to the field next door, you understand that they are just totally out of touch with reality. We also propose to replace the FDA with a 21st century model which you want the FDA to be in the laboratory, understanding science, and accelerating it getting to the patient. The fact is, the largest part of the world market is health, and if we could be the best producer of new medicine, new technology, new solutions in health, we will create hundreds of thousands of high-paying jobs, and we will do it in a way that creates billions of dollars in foreign exchange. If you go to the University of Iowa, as I did recently, and talk to their advanced scientists, who are at the edge of a revolution in urn ability to help people live longer and more independently and more healthily, and if we do it right with a 21st century FDA it will create an enormous number of jobs." 14:09:06 "On energy I have a very simple postposition. I'm for American energy whether its oil or gas, whether it's coal, whether it's nuclear, whether it's wind or solar, whether it's ethanol. I think the idea of the next billion dollars going to Iran or going to Iowa, it shouldn't be that hard to figure out. I'd rather have it go to Iowa. Or the next billion dollars going to Saudi Arabia or going to South Dakota. So, I favor an across the board energy approach designed to make us independent from the middle east so we do not ever have to worry about Iranians closing the (inaudible) or the Saudis not being our friends. I can promise you, you will never see me bow to a Saudi King or lock arm-and-arm with a Saudi King. I think that we need a policy that lets us stand direct and say to them that we are rather indifferent to them. And we are not going to tolerate them funding terrorist. I think we cannot do that effectively if we are relying on them. 14:10:05 "I give you this broad outline because I think that it is very important to understand how dangerous the world is right now. We are the engine which for most of the 20th century has driven the world economy. When we get weak and we get confused, the entire world economy gets confused. The European situations very real and very dangerous and we need to reaccelerate the American economy to create jobs and economic growth or we run a very bad risk of another downward spiral with the collapse of Greece and Spain and Portugal. This is a very dangerous time for the world economy. We also recognize that we have been very foolish on national energy. Clist and I had lunch with secretary of state George Shultz at the Reagan Library on President Reagan's 100th anniversary and secretary of state's Shultz said "how many times do you have to get hit over the head by a 2x4 before you realize that we need an American energy policy before there is a true crisis which drives the entire industrial world into a depression. And the dangers of the middle east are very real. And so I think both as a matter of national economics and national security we need a profoundly American energy policy and that is part of what this campaign is about. *14:11:22 I would love to have your help. I would just like to say two last things in closing then I would like to take questions if that's alright? The first is I'm not going to ask anyone to be for me. Because if you vote for me you will vote, then go home and say "I sure hope Newt gets it done". I don't believe it's possible for any one person, even the president to get this country back on the right track. I think it takes a lot of us. And that is why I will ask you to be with me. I would ask you to stand side by side enlisting me for the next 8 years because we need to remind the congress every day, we need to remind the governor, the state legislature, the city council, the county commissions, the school board, we all have to move in the same direction. Furthermore, the fact is if we undertake the scale of change, we need to get America on the right track. We're going to make mistakes, it's not going to be perfect and we need you to network together through social media to be able to say that "that's not quite working" or "the world has changed" or "here's a better idea". Finally, if we implement the 10th amendment we shrink the bureaucracy in Washington and return power back home we have to grow citizens because you have to fill the vacuum with the power that we have taken from the western bureaucrats. So I will ask you to be with me, I would love to have your help on the third I think this election this coming year is the most important election of our lifetime, I think 8 years of Obama will wreck the country and I think that we have to win this election which means we have to win the argument. AS lady Thatcher used to say when she was prime minister "first you win the argument, then you win the vote" which is why if you do make me your nominee I will challenge the president to 7, 3 hour Lincoln Douglas style debates with a time keeper but no moderator. I will concede in advance that he can use a teleprompter if he wants (crowd laughs). Now after all, if you have to defend Obama care wouldn't you want to have a teleprompter? (Crowd laughs) I believe he will agree to the debates, and I can assure you that if I am your nominee in my acceptance speech in Tampa in Tampa, if he has not accepted I will announce as of that night that the Whitehouse will become my scheduler. Wherever the president goes I will be there 4 hours later to respond to his speech until he accepts the debates. And I don't think that in the time and age of talk radio and 24 hour television news it won't take many weeks of that until he decides that the debates would be less painful. But I do think that this is a time that we need a serious discussion and that is why I started off with what is in sense a history lesson. Supply side economics has worked twice, it has worked in the early 80s when Kemp and Reagan and other with my help as a very Junior member implemented, it worked in the 90s when we implemented it. It will work again in 2013, it will work with startling speed it will move the country the minute people start to believe that Obama is going to lose. You will see the economy start to boom and on election night it is clear that the team committed to cutting taxes, cutting regulations, and creating American energy and rebuilding respect for people who create jobs is winning. I think you will be surprised by the next morning how much new investment, how many new opportunities, how much new energy there is in the American system. I'm very optimistic, we have done it before, we can get it done it again ,and I look forward to having your help to get it done. *P 14:15:05 And I would be glad now to take questions. And the first question is apparently right here. Hold on he's going to bring you a microphone. (off camera male voice) "Mr. Speaker I want to thank you for coming to visit our club today it's a pleasure to have you here and Mrs. Gingrich as well. Mr. Speaker you made a few references to governor Romney in your talk today and I have to say I imagine you got a Christmas card from the post master general because all of the negative things that got in the male with your name on it. So you've been hit with this stimulate via post office in the past year. But anyway with that aside all of these pieces of male sale all of these great terrible things about Newt Gingrich. But you have stayed above the prey and not made negative comments which is great. At the same time elections are about contrasts and I'm not asking you to go negative but I'm wondering if you could draw some stark contrasts between you yourself and governor Romney. 14:16:15 "Well let me say first of all, and I repeat this suggestion all over Iowa. The governor has been very cheerful about his path spending millions and millions in negative ads and he's been very cheerful about his staff being negative. I'd like to have one 90 minute debate with the governor myself somewhere in Iowa sometime before the caucus. He can bring all of his negative attacks and let's just face to face. All of you who have watched my debates know I worked very hard in the debates to get the news media to stop trying to get us to fight each other. I am a Reaganite, I believe that Reagan's 11th commandment. The only person these negative ads are helping is Barack Obama. Now, I don't mind people taking on my record. And I don't mind defending and explaining my record. But when you have been around as long as I have you have a record. But I also think that I also think, I don't want to be invidious about Governor Romney I think that he's a very competent manager and a very smart man. But to have somebody who is a Massachusetts moderate who said he does not want to go back to the Reagan Bush years, who voted as a democrat for Paul Sigas in '92, who campaigned to the left of Teddy Kennedy, who as recently as running for governor said "I'm really sort of a moderate pragmatic guy". To have him run a commercial that questions my conservatism? I mean I've been a conservative my entire life. I went to a conservative gold water organizing media in Columbia, South Carolina in 1964. I worked with Ronald Reagan starting in 1974, as I said earlier I worked with Kemp and others to developed supply side economics. I have a 90% American Conservative union lifetime rating. I got a 98.6 life to right rating. There's a point where you look at some of these ads and wonder. Lincoln once said "If a man will not agree that 2+2=4, you will never win the argument because facts make no difference". So I watch most of these negative ads and I think they never read Lincoln. So I try not to answer them , what my commercials are that I'm about to put up are all positive. They all go straight at how do you create jobs and how do you get the right things done. But I do reserve the right if I am asked to explain the differences. We have done a series of telephone Town hall Meetings and we will do a series more. We ask people to go to the telephone Town Hall Meetings you can ask questions based on any brochure, any rob call, any TV ad you've seen and I would be glad to answer them. 14:18:35 (off camera male voice) "Mr. Speaker, thank you very much for coming we appreciate it very much. Could you say maybe a quick synopsis on your kind of policy.(loud tone wipes sound).the republican establishment for years said that if we do a lot of trade with China, as long as we stay active in their internal affairs and their policies they will become friends and our world citizens. They will in fact become good partners and things will get better rather than worse. Yet their human rights issues continue, unabated and I want to say they are worse than ever. So what would be your china policy trying to improve human conditions in a country that really does not allow a whole lot of freedom." 14:19:21 "Well I think it's a good question about china. I think a couple of things about the Chinese. First of all, the primary challenge with us is to remain the dominant military power in the world, it's us not china. If we adopt the right technology on science and technology, the right reforms of education, if we adopt the right tax and regulatory policy for manufacturing they won't catch up to us in the next 100 years. We have to make a substantial investment in making a better navy, better air force, better activity in space, in cyber warfare, and be able to defend ourselves against an electromagnetic pulse attack. But if we make those investments in rational calm methodical way they will remain decisively for the next hundred years less powerful then we are and I would just tell you on behalf of our two grandchildren; Maggie who is 12 and Robert who is 10. I do not want them living in a world where the Chinese dictatorship is the dominant country. I think it is very dangerous to let the us decay to the point where the Chinese would be confused about a confrontation. So I am very much in favor of us doing what is needed both domestically which is key. You cannot sustain national security if you don't have a strong economy. And we have very fortunate since 1840, we have been consistently bigger than everyone else to have huge advantages any time we have ended up in conflict. 14:20:46 "Secondly, distinguish the Chinese people and the Chinese dictatorship. We should make every effort to make friends with the Chinese people we have 4,000 Chinese students at the university of Iowa. I mean the fact is we have a real interest in Chinese people understanding freedom, the rule of law, understanding that our rights come from our creator. The Chinese dictatorship is exactly that. It is a Chinese dictatorship. Well we as a country should have a job of jaundice attitude toward dictators. We don't have to go out and be hostile but we also don't have to back off. I once had a great time debating Jean Jiang (hard to understand) when he was the head of china and I was the speaker of the house and we had a great meeting. He by the way had done his undergraduate work on "Gone With the Wind" and was a student of American studies when he was young. So we were able to chat. 14:21:38 "We had just done the 3,000 anniversary of the founding of the city of Jerusalem. And we had a ceremony in the US capital. And so I decided since the Chinese like this game of saying "well since we represent this very ancient civilization" and I said "yeah, well so do we". So I started part of the conversation by saying to him "You know we both represent very ancient civilizations, but you know our government is much older than yours." (Crowd Laughs) And he just broke up, he knew exactly what I was doing to him. In a very pleasant but firm way we go nose-to-nose with them. I would like to find the toughest most aggressive trial lawyer in the country and make them our US trade representative and I would like to have them as a major job negotiate with Be Jing every Monday because the Chinese are good at negotiating and we are not. We just need to learn to be as good as they are. I would also say we should be prepared to retaliate when they do things like this recent surcharge on American trucks. Within 24 hours we should hit something that is very high profit to them and say "Okay, you want to play games? That's not going to hit it in the US". And there are lots of ways to do it within the gap. The French took all Japanese imports through one city and only had 1/3 as many agents there as they needed and the line of trucks was like, 30 miles long waiting to be inspected when the Japanese said "Oh, you really want to negotiate" and the French said "You got it" and you have to sometimes have that attitude. But we should not be suckers and we should not be soft, and we should have to be nice to the Chinese dictatorship so they don't have their feelings hurt." (Applause) 14:23:21 "Mr. Speaker, welcome. A lots being said today about the role and function of public education. Being a member of the public school board the biggest expenditure the state has in educating young people. What are your thoughts on the role function and purpose of the department education particularly in regards to some of the unfunded and underfunded mandates that come from the.(trails off to quiet) 14:23:46 "I think that we should dramatically shrink the department of education, eliminate virtually all regulations, return all the power to the states, and frankly I would meddle a little bit in Des Moines and suggest that the Des Moines state department of education should go through a similar shrinking and return state power to the school boards. I think we made a huge mistake centralizing school boards. I also think we ought to recognize the current model of curriculums is entirely wrong. It bureaucratizes learning and it tells kids to slow down to the rate that the state department of education sets, which is really crippling for gifted children and is a profoundly wrong model. But I would like that to be done at a local level. I'd also reprioritize the student loan program. Now my brother used to work at the state department of Pennsylvania collecting student loan money, particularly from doctors who borrowed a lot of money. He will tell you stories about when the federal government tried to administer a program like that it grantees a level of fraud and a level of failure to collect that will be staggering in another 10 years, and the sooner we get it back from the private sector where people have a real incentive to figure out what to do the more money we'll save the tax payer and the better it will be for students. (Applause) 14:25:13 (male voice off camera) "Hi Mr. Speaker my name is Jim. I talked to you a few weeks ago about strong American now on the telephone. (Inaudible) Strong American Now there's flyers out on the table, Mitt Romney's the only candidate and Obama that hasn't signed on to program to cut federal waste by 500 dollars a year. I want you to elaborate a little bit on what you are going to do about strong America Now. One other thing I would like to say is Mitt Romney on Bill Orally the other night says he doesn't believe, Mitt says he doesn't believe that Obama is a socialist which means he's catering to the middle, he believes he's in over his head that Obama I believe is won a caliphate (??) for One world Order. Just like Ron Paul doesn't believe the extreme Muslims aren't going to do anything to America. But I believe its rigid, it's another caliphate, they will destroy us if we do not believe in their religion. Thank You." 14:26:10 "You sort of covered about 3 zones there. Let me work my way back. Now let me say I do disagree deeply with Ron Paul about the danger of a Iranian nuclear weapon, and I disagree with him deeply the survival of Israel I think that it is very important both morally and practically that Israel survive and that the United States recognize that a threat to destroy Israel is in fact a very long term threat to the US and that an Iranian nuclear weapon is a very dangerous thing. So on foreign policy I am just profoundly different from Ron Paul's view. " 14:26:49 "I'm surprised actually that Governor Romney hasn't signed strong America Now because as a manager it should be pretty obvious to him. For those of you who don't know Strong America Now takes the concepts of modern management in a system called Lien Sick Sigma and applies to it to the federal government. The estimate is if you took what you see at any modernized, I've seen, for example if you go to PELA windows or vampire you see the models of Lien Sick Sigma, and they'll tell you it's a dramatic improvement of efficiency and creativity and reduction of waste and the estimates that it will save $500billion a year for the federal government and I think that's an underestimate candidate. But it is a very profound change, it means the end of the 130 year old civil service model, it means the end of the eternal regulatory model that makes it so hard to change things because the essence of quality is continuous improvement. Every day you do things a little bit better. Celeste and I recently visited a plant in Charleston, South Carolina where Bowing is making the 787 Dream liner and they had one particular workstation that takes 16 days to get anything done. It builds this huge airline. And there goal is to get it down to 6 days using the same work force. And I looked and them and thought "okay, going from 16 to 6. Imagine applying that to the department of labor, or the department of housing and urban development, or you name it" and you suddenly realize how much waste would drop out of the federal government if you simply applied the modern systems to it. 14:28:32 "I'm a big believer Mike George has been a big heroic as a citizen. He has took his own money which he has made as a management consultant and he helped create strong America Now and I am a big fan of that model. " 14:28:49 "We're giving you a pretty good workout today" (man passes by camera - crowd laughs) 14:28:59 "Mr. Speaker thank you very much for coming here today. Your opponents have painted you as a man of cap and trade, and heavily restrictive environmental policy that could cripple our economy. I would like to hear your thoughts in rebuttal to those commercials. " 14:29:13 " I want to use this as an example and I hope you don't mind me sharing with you my perplexity. Let me say upfront, the dumbest thing I have done in the past 4 years is sit on a couch with Nancy Pelosi, and I can't defend it (crowd laughs). I mean it was just dumb! Okay? I'm not going to defend it, if someone wants to run an ad that says Newt Gingrich shows a total lack of judgment and this is one of them, I will laugh with the rest of them okay. I don't mind an opponent who takes a clean shot and says "I got yak" they then go from there and frankly they plain lie. I don't know any other word for it. I testified at energy and commerce against cap and trade immediately after Al Gore. You can go to Newtgingrich.org and you can see a video of the testimony. I helped defeat cap and trade in the senate through American solutions working very aggressively to attack it. And what they do is they take something that was real, that's in 1991 as a republican whip I helped pass a very narrow version which applied to sulfuric acid and large electric regenerating plants in the purpose of eliminating acid rain destroying the lakes of New Hampshire and New England. It was a very controlled, very small program that worked. And everyone agrees it was less expensive as a way to get rid of acid rain then a government bureaucracy would have been. 14:30:47 "So they take that, they skip past the fact that I apposed new model for cap and trade which is the EPA used carbon which is used to run the national economy. They take away the fact that the delegation that I sent to Keota as the speaker of the house opposed the Keota agreement. And so they come up with this grotesque thing that says since he, this is why Lincoln said "if you can't get them to agree that 2+2=4, you have no hope of winning the argument" because they said "since he sat on the couch he must be for cap and trade even though he testified against cap and trade and helped defeat it. And I just think that that's everything that is sick about our political system. I don't mind shots taken at me for things that I have done that weren't smart but for somebody to then go out and grotesquely distort my experience I don't know how to quite answer. And it has taken great discipline to not run ads that counter them. I just think every Iowan has a chance to go out on the third and have the chance to teach people that negative campaigns don't work by voting against everyone who has run a negative campaign. And that's my hope, that the people of Iowa will be sickened by the pile of negativity. (Applause) 14:32:15 "I know that you have immigration policy and that's close to my heart, when I married my wife she's foreign born from the Philippines. After we were married we took 8 months and a congressman to put the paperwork through for her to come to the states and us to live as a married couple. When we wanted to bring her mother over it took a year and the intervention of a congressmen to get the paperwork pushed through. When we decided to adopt my son who I have with me here today, it took two years and the intervention of a congressman to get the paperwork through. What are you going to do with the overall integration bureaucracy that will in my opinion resolve all of the illegal immigration that we have gone through." 14:33:10 "This is a very powerful and a very human question, and if you look at my proposal for immigration reform which starts with controlling the border by January 1, 2013 that has English as the official language of government, and then has a requirement to learn more thoroughly American history before becoming a citizen including suggesting our own American born children learning American history more thoroughly before voting (applause). 14:33:42 "But the next thing I go to is fixing the current legal visa system and that is where the struggling America Now guys need help. We should be applying modern systems. I think to visit the US as a tourist from Brazil today is a 174 day wait. I mean if you're in Disney world and your saying how many people might come to the US if it wasn't humiliating, expensive, and frustrating how many more tourist dollars would we have they think its billions of dollars. If you look families and we used to have pretty solid rules it said, yes you can get somebody to come visit you if you will grantee that they will not become a burden on the country. So you would need to be willing to say "I will under write for them, I will sign for them" I mean there are ways that you can do this that are practical and make sense. We want business people to come here easily because we want them to come here to do business. SO I think it is important to have a fundamental overall of the state department and homeland security of bureaucracy part of which is just pure paperwork and part of it is attitude. I had the same experience before I became a congressman. I had a Palestinian Christian couple actually the husband was American born and taught with me and the wife was Palestinian Christian and she wanted to get her mother over in time to celebrate Christmas. They were prepared to post a bond, they were prepared to be responsible. And trying to deal with the state department and the embassy, it was my first introduction I wasn't even sworn in yet. It was my first introduction so I am totally with you on that and I think people need to separate "how do we make it easier to come here legally while making it virtually impossible to come here illegally?" Because they are different problems but they have a mutual impact. 14:35:25 "If you make it easy to come in and out legally you are going to have a lot fewer people trying to sneak in and out of the country. 14:35:37 (male voice off camera) "When you are president, will you do the work necessary to make sure the united nations convention economic social and cultural rights is fully and completely implemented in the United States since were only one of two nations in the world that has not defined or implemented through our congress. You hear a lot about human rights in this country but were one of the few nations that does not abide by the rule of law as said by the UN Charter and indicated by the universal declaration of human rights. SO what I ask you is when you are president will your first job be to fully and completely implement the United Nations (inaudible) social means. 14:36:29 "I'd have to capture that with my instinct and say probably not. And you just said all of these countries have signed up to conventional human rights. Well look at Saudi Arabia where you can't have a church, you can't have a synagogue, women have extraordinarily limited roles. Look at Iran (voice: just answer the question sir) where a girl is hung for walking in the park hand in hand with an older man. That's human rights? Where people who are homosexual can be killed, that's human rights? I mean I think there's a lot of countries that say a lot of things that have no meaning are you to suggest that we have less a rule of law than Venezuela? Or Cuba? I mean look at the countries that cheerfully sign these things, they're dishonest and corrupt and they thing were stupid. So I'm very careful about united nations agreements because they are often created by people who don't understand our civilization don't understand our social values and want to cause us harm.(Applause) 14:37:44 "I'm told I am allowed to take one more question." 14:37:49 "It was written by Eleanor Roosevelt I think she knows what she was talking about. 14:38:02 We should all thank Gary for the heroic job he has done. 14.38.12 "Mr. Gingrich I have one question it strikes me as a key element of the foundation of a strong economy is a strong education system. Could you speak to what your plan is due to the spiraling costs to the college and university and educations today. 14:38:34 " Yes that's an excellent question and I think it's amazing that the people have not paid more attention to it. I'm going to meddle here for a minute because I used to teach in the state colleges and briefly in a private college and I taught in a private high school. I urge everybody state legislature in the country and every board of regions to go to Missouri and visit the college of the oars. The college of the Ozarks is the 5th ranking college in the nation coming after Columbia University. You cannot apply to it unless you need student aid, and they do not have any. When you go to the college of the Ozarks you work 15 hours a week during the school year and two 40 hours a weeks that pays for your tuition and books. And you work 40 hours a week during the summer and that pays your room and board. 92% of the students graduate owing 0. 8% graduate averaging $5,000 because they bought a car their senior year. I went out and visited because I was fascinated. The students all do real work. And among the real work they do is when they redid the library they brought in a contractor and all the labor was students. They produced two commercial products. They produced fruit cake for Christmas and they produce stained glass products that people can buy. But most of their clerical work is students. By 2014 there will be one person for every teacher of higher education. The federal government has loaned enough money, and the states have put up enough money so that it has grown to 59 a month. You have professors that are tenured at 3 different universities simultaneously drawing contracts of substantial amounts from all 3. U have a college at North Carolina which has lobster night in the student cafeteria because they want to attract students. And by having the student loan program kids figure "well this isn't going to cost me anything" and so they borrow the money. And then one morning they graduate and under Obama they graduate to unemployment. So now they have no job and a big loan. We need to fundamentally reverse it. I urge every state in the country to open up one work study college preferably in the poorest part of the state so you can look every child in the eye and say "if you work you can get through college". 14:41:19 And second so they have a benchmark of cost. To then go back and look at the rest of the schools and universities and go back and ask why they are so expensive. There is no reason for higher education to be as expensive as it is today. I think we should be prepared to fundamentally review it and look carefully why it's so expensive. We need to look at work study being preferable to borrowing money as a way for students to get through school. And I will say one last thing to further dive into this topic, my news letter which comes out tomorrow through (inaudible) productions builds on a theme I got involved in on work. TO one of the things is the children in the poorest neighborhoods need is the experience of work. Unlike liberals who say you don't want to go out and get a hamburger flipping job I think that any job is important. My younger daughter reminded me that she actually was the janitor in the first Baptist church in Atlanta when she was 13. She actually did clean out the bathrooms she found it an educational experience and one for which she got paid. She found that getting paid was an educational experience which changed her idea about the value of money. So I have said for example that we ought to look at schools in New York City where the janitors are paid more than the teachers. And we got to ask the question "What if you took half the janitors replaced them with students" so in a very poor neighborhood students would work part time in a school. Which I suggest to you would keep a lot of them from dropping out. They would actually learn the habit of showing up, learn the habit of work, (inaudible). But if you look at the total cost of hireling a janitor in New York City you could probably put 12 students to work for 1 janitor. Now some of they may be in the cafeteria, some may be in the bathroom, some may be in the front office, some may be in the school library, some may be doing the lighter work for example mopping the floors. But I think there is an inherent dignity to work that we need to get back to honoring and recognizing. 14:43:24 I had someone in Davenport say to me the other day some of these things really involve doing things that are not pleasant. And I said in Iowa you go talk to farm families many of them will say the things they have the kids doing are "not pleasant" they seem to all grow up through the experience and they seem to be ok. I just think that a country that establishes work ethic as part of the American model as students work their way through college would work better off than the current system we have today. Thank you I do want you to be with me. Thank you
HOUSE ENERGY SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING WITH SECRETARY CHU 1100
House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing with Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy and Gregory Jaczo, Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission 11:00 11:00:00 BLACKWATER HAS PASSED UNDER THE BRIDGE. 11:00:02 THAT'S THE CHARGE OF THAT COMMITTEE. 11:00:04 I BELIEVE THEY'RE COMING OUT WITH RESULTS THIS JUNE. 11:00:07 I SUSPECT YOU KNOW OUR POSITION. 11:00:09 BUT NOT ONLY WATER OVER THE BRIDGE, BUT SOME RADIO ACTIVE 11:00:12 WATER MAY BE BURNING RIGHT NOW AND WE HAVE POOLS AROUND THIS 11:00:16 COUNTRY IN SCORES OF PLACES THAT PRESENT RISK, NOT JUST FINANCIAL 11:00:21 RISKS, SO WE'RE GOING TO CONTINUE TO PRESS THE 11:00:24 ADMINISTRATION ON THIS ISSUE. THANK YOU, MR. SECRETARY. 11:00:26 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE 11:00:28 GENTLEMAN FROM WEST VIRGINIA FOR FIVE MINUTES. 11:00:30 MR. McKINLEY. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 11:00:40 THERE WERE SEVERAL QUESTIONS I HAVE WITH ONE WAS THERE HAD BEEN 11:00:45 A DIALOGUE FROM PEOPLE THAT HAVE COME BEFORE YOU IN THIS HEARING 11:00:49 HAVE CALLED ABOUT COAL SUBSIDIES. 11:00:52 COULD YOU PROVIDE US THAT? I DON'T EXPECT YOU TO GIVE THEM 11:00:56 NOW, BUT COULD YOU SHARE WITH US THOSE COMPANIES BEING SUBSIDIZED 11:01:01 AND HOW THAT IS? BECAUSE PEOPLE SEEM TO BE 11:01:03 LOOSELY APPLYING THEIR COAL SUBSIDIES AND I'VE HAD 11:01:08 OPPORTUNITIES TO TALK TO A FEW COAL COMPANIES AND THEY'RE NOT 11:01:11 GETTING ANY SUBSIDIES. THERE'S ANOTHER ISSUE, THE SOAP 11:01:16 PROGRAM. THE SMALL OPERATORS ASSISTANCE 11:01:19 PROGRAM. THERE SEEMS TO BE SOME FUNDING 11:01:23 DIFFICULTIES WITH THAT AND I WOULD APPRECIATE IF YOU WOULD 11:01:25 LOOK INTO THAT. YOUR DEPARTMENT IS NOT FREEING 11:01:28 UP MONEY FOR THE STATE TO REIMBURSE SOME OF THE SMALL 11:01:31 OPERATORS THAT ARE PRODUCING COAL. 11:01:32 SO IF YOU COULD GET BACK TO ME ON THAT, I'D APPRECIATE IT. 11:01:36 ALSO, AS IT RELATES TO A FUN G ING RATIOS. 11:01:44 IT WAS ALLEGED EARLIER THAT SINCE YOU'VE BEEN FUNDED 11:01:48 SOMEWHERE IN THE EARLY '70s, YOU'VE PROBABLY RECEIVED MAYBE 11:01:53 $800 BILLION IN COSTS, REVENUE TO OPERATE. 11:02:04 ON A COST BENEFIT RATIO, IF YOU COULD SHARE WITH US SOMETIME, 11:02:06 WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS WE'VE RECEIVED OUT OF THAT $800 11:02:12 BILLION. I DON'T WANT TO GET INTO THAT 11:02:14 RIGHT NOW. I'M SURE IT COULD GO ON FOR SOME 11:02:16 TIME. I'VE GOT TO ASSUME, I'M HOPING 11:02:19 IT'S MORE THAN A 1-1 RATIO. MORE IMPORTANTLY, WHERE I WANT 11:02:29 TO SPEND MORE TIME, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABS IN 11:02:32 PENNSYLVANIA, TEXAS, ALASKA, OREGON, WEST VIRGINIA. 11:02:38 WHEN I MET WITH THEM, THEY INDICATED THAT THEY ARE THE ONLY 11:02:41 LABORATORY FOR THE DOE. OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE D.O.E. 11:02:51 AND THEY'RE INDICATING THAT YOU'RE PROPOSING THE BUDGET 11:02:56 BEING PROPOSED IS GOING TO BE REDUCED THEIR EXPENDITURE BY 11:03:00 ALMOST $800 MILLION. BY THEIR OWN DATA THEY HAVE. 11:03:06 THAT'S VERY THREATENING BECAUSE I SEE A PARADOX WITH THIS. 11:03:11 I HEARD THE ADMINISTRATION TALKING ABOUT WE WANT TO DO MORE 11:03:15 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN ENERGY, BUT YET THE VERY ENERGY 11:03:20 SOURCE, THE LABORATORY YOU ALL FUND IS BEING REDUCED BY $800 11:03:26 MILLION. THERE MUST BE A MISUNDERSTANDING 11:03:29 THERE SOME PLACE, EITHER THE ADMINISTRATION MAKING THAT 11:03:32 REPRESENTATION OR THE DATA THAT THEY HAVE PROVIDED IN A CHART. 11:03:35 SO IF YOU COULD PROVIDE US SOMETHING BACK ON THAT. 11:03:39 THEY'RE DOING SOME WONDERFUL THINGS THERE AT THE NATO AND 11:03:41 THEY'RE TRYING TO BUILD RESEARCH COOPERATIVES WITH THE 11:03:48 UNIVERSITIES IN THE AREA. AND FOR US TO CUT THEIR SPENDING 11:03:52 IS JUST UNCONSCIONABLE. SO, FOR EXAMPLE, ONE IS WITH THE 11:04:00 MARCELLUS SHALE WE HAVE IN PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK, WEST 11:04:02 VIRGINIA AND LIKE, THEY'RE TRYING TO FIND WAYS THROUGH NATO 11:04:06 OF GETTING MORE THAN 15% OF THE GAS OUT. 11:04:10 RIGHT NOW, THAT'S ALL THEY'RE GETTING OUT OF MARCELLUS FOR ALL 11:04:14 THAT EXPENDITURE AND THEY WANT TO SPEND THE MONEY, AND YET, THE 11:04:19 PROPOSED BUDGET IS CUTTING THE AMOUNT OF MONEY THAT WE HAVE FOR 11:04:23 RESEARCH. CAN YOU SHARE WHAT THAT 11:04:25 UNDERLYING CURRENT -- WHY ARE WE CUTTING MONEY IN ENERGY RESEARCH 11:04:31 AT YOUR OWN FACILFACILITIES? I'LL GET BACK TO YOU ON THAT. 11:04:36 I CERTAINLY KNOW THE LABS, WE HAVE NOW AN EXCELLENT LABORATORY 11:04:41 DIRECTOR THAT I'M VERY POSITIVE ABOUT. 11:04:47 I KNOW WHAT THEY'RE DOING WITH THE UNIVERSITY. 11:04:49 I'M VERY POSITIVE ABOUT. I'LL GET BACK TO YOU ON THE 11:04:53 DETAILS ABOUT BECAUSE THERE MAY BE A MISUNDERSTANDING ON 11:04:57 CERTAINLY THE RESEARCH THAT NATO DOES IN UNIVERSITIES, WE ARE 11:05:03 VERY POSITIVE ON THAT. THANK YOU VERY MUCH. 11:05:12 THANK YOU. THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE 11:05:16 GENTLEMAN -- GENTLE LADY FROM CALIFORNIA. 11:05:19 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN AND SECRETARY FOR BEING HERE WITH US 11:05:25 TODAY. I APPLAUD YOUR LEADERSHIP ON 11:05:27 SUPPORTING INVESTMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY. 11:05:29 THESE INVESTMENTS ARE CRITICAL FOR THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF MY 11:05:37 HOME DISTRICT IN SACRAMENTO. THE DEVELOPING NUCLEAR SITUATION 11:05:38 IN JAPAN HAS CAPTURED THE ATTENTION OF THE WORLD AND 11:05:41 CERTAINLY THIS COMMITTEE AND MY THOUGHTS AN PRAYERS WITH 11:05:44 CERTAINLY WITH THE PEOPLE OF JAPAN. 11:05:54 WHEN CHAIRMAN WHITFIELD ASKED YOU ABOUT THE CRISIS IN JAPAN, 11:05:58 HE MENTIONED NUCLEAR ACCIDENTS AND EXPLAIN THAT HAD THE 11:06:01 SITUATION IN JAPAN IS WORSE ALREADY LIKELY THAN THAT OF 11:06:05 THREE MILE ISLAND. MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT THE BIG 11:06:10 DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THREE MILE ISLAND AND CHERNOBYL IS THAT IN 11:06:14 THREE MILE ISLAND, THE REACTOR'S CONTAINMENT SYSTEM WAS ABLE TO 11:06:18 RETAIN THE RADIO ACTIVE MATERIAL, SO MOST OF IT DIDN'T 11:06:23 SPREAD INTO THE ENVIRONMENT. IN CHERNOBYL, THERE WAS NO 11:06:26 CONTAIN M, SO THE RELEASE OF THE MATERIAL DEVASTATED THE SOVIET 11:06:30 UNION AND OTHER COUNTRIES. MR. SECRETARY, WHAT HAPPENS IF 11:06:34 THERE IS A MELTDOWN IN ONE OR MORE OF THE JAPANESE REACTORS 11:06:38 AND THE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FAILS? 11:06:42 WELL, WE THINK THERE IS A PARTIAL MELTDOWN, BUT THAT AND 11:06:46 AS YOU CORRECTLY NOTED, THAT DOESN'T NECESSARILY MEAN THE 11:06:51 CONTAINMENT VESSEL WILL FAIL. THREE MILE ISLAND HAD A PARTIAL 11:06:56 MELTDOWN AND IT DID NOT FAIL. WE ARE TRYING TO MONITOR VERY 11:07:01 CLOSELY. WE HEAR CONFLICTING REPORTS 11:07:04 ABOUT EXACTLY WHAT IS HAPPENING. THERE SEVERAL REACTORS NOW AT 11:07:08 RISK. I WOULD NOT WANT TO SPECULATE ON 11:07:11 EXACTLY WHAT WILL HAPPEN AND SO, LET'S JUST SAY THAT WE MONITOR 11:07:14 IT VERY CLOSELY. AND WE'LL TAKE IT AS IT COMES. 11:07:23 WE DON'T WANT TO GO THERE AT ALL. 11:07:25 WE DON'T WANT THIS TO BECOME CHERNOBYL. 11:07:28 BUT I WOULD THINK THAT IN THE LIGHT OF THESE EVENTS, THE 11:07:31 COMMITTEE SHOULD INVESTIGATE THE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS OF OUR 11:07:36 OWN REACTORS. BECAUSE WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO 11:07:39 MAKE SURE THAT OUR OWN REACTORS ARE SAFE. 11:07:43 MR. CHAIRMAN, MY HOME DISTRICT OF SACRAMENTO, WE HAVE A 11:07:50 DECOMMISSIONED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WHICH MANAGES THE USED 11:07:53 NUCLEAR FUEL AND THERE ARE ABOUT TEN SITES AROUND THE COUNTRY 11:07:56 INCLUDING SACRAMENTO WHERE USED NUCLEAR FUEL IS BEING STORED BUT 11:08:03 WHERE THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT HAS BEEN DISMANTLED. 11:08:06 I'M INTERESTED IN KNOWING WHAT IS BEING DONE AT D.O.E. TO 11:08:12 REMOVE THE USED FUEL TO BE PLACED BACK INTO PRODUCTIVE USE. 11:08:17 HOW DOES YOUR REQUESTED BUDGET ADDRESS THESE ISSUES? 11:08:20 I WOULD HAVE TO GET BACK TO YOU ON THE DETAILS OF THE SITES 11:08:23 YOU'RE SPEAKING ABOUT, BUT THERE ARE VARIOUS STAGES. 11:08:25 AFTER YOU TAKE THE FUEL RODS OUT OF THE REACTOR, IMMEDIATELY, YOU 11:08:30 PUT THEM IN A POOL OF WATER FOR A PERIOD OF TIME AND WHERE 11:08:35 THEY'RE ACTUALLY STILL DISSIPATING A CONSIDERABLE 11:08:38 AMOUNT OF HEAT. BUT THEN AFTER THAT, THE NEXT 11:08:41 STAGE IS THAT YOU CAN PUT THEM IN DRY CAST STORAGE, WHICH IS 11:08:47 MUCH SAFER AND IT'S CHAIRMAN JACZKO WILL BE FOLLOWS ME, BUT 11:08:52 THE NRC HAS RECENTLY RULED THAT STORAGE ON SITE OF DRY CAST 11:09:00 STORAGE WOULD BE A SAFE INTERIM ON THE SCALE OF 50 OR 60 YEARS 11:09:08 AND THAT GIVES US TIME TO DEVELOP A STRATEGY ON SPENT 11:09:13 FUEL. MAYBE NOT 50 OR 60 YEARS, BUT 11:09:17 MAYBE 40. WE HOPE TO DEVELOP A PLAN FOR 11:09:22 SOONER THAN THAT. MR. SECRETARY, WE'RE 11:09:26 FORTUNATE WE HAVE ACCESS TO CLEAN HYDRO POWER AS PART OF OUR 11:09:31 RENEWABLE ENERGY PORTFOLIO. I BELIEVE TO ACHIEVE THE PRESENT 11:09:35 GOAL OF ESTABLISHING CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE HYDRO POWER NEEDS 11:09:39 TO BE PART OF THE DISCUSSION. I'D LIKE TO KNOW WHAT D.O.E. IS 11:09:43 DOING TO ADVANCE THE ADOPTION OF NEW SYSTEMS TO GENERATE CLEAN 11:09:47 ENERGY IN THE COUNTY TR. SEVERAL THINGS WE CAN DO. 11:09:50 WE DON'T ANTICIPATE BUILDING NEW LARGE DAMS, BUT WE CAN REPLACE 11:09:56 THE OLD TURBINES WITH MORE EFFICIENT TURBINES THAT ARE 11:10:00 FRIENDLIER TO FISH AND MORE EFFICIENT. 11:10:05 WE SHOULD LOOK AT WHAT ARE CALLED RUN OF THE RIVER HYDRO 11:10:08 DAMS. SO AGAIN, IT HAS FAR LESS 11:10:11 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS THAN A CONVENTIONAL DAM AND WE SHOULD 11:10:15 ALSO LOOK AT STORAGE OF WATER, SITE WHERE IS WE STORE WATER FOR 11:10:19 FLIGHT CONTROL, BUT THEN RELEASE THE WATER TO PUT TURBINES IN 11:10:23 THOSE SITES AGAIN WOULD HAVE VIRTUALLY NO ENVIRONMENTAL 11:10:27 IMPACT, BUT YOU CAN CAPTURE THE ELECTRICITY. 11:10:30 THESE ARE THINGS WE ARE LOOKING AT. 11:10:34 MY NAME HAS RUN OUT. THANK YOU. 11:10:35 AT THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN FROM COLORADO FOR FIVE 11:10:40 MINUTES. MR. GARDENER. 11:10:43 THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENDANCE TODAY. 11:10:46 A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS FOR YOU. FOLLOWING UP SOMEWHAT ON OTHER 11:10:54 M MEMBERS' QUESTION, BUT SOME 11:10:55 QUESTIONS CONCERNS YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND WHAT'S HAPPENING IN 11:10:58 JAPAN. RIGHT NOW, WHAT IS YOUR LEVEL OF 11:11:02 COMMUNICATION WITH ADMINISTRATION IN JAPAN 11:11:07 REGARDING THE EVENTS? I SPOKE TO THE MINISTER 11:11:11 YESTERDAY MORNING. AND OFFERED HIM SOME OF OUR 11:11:14 SERVICES, OUR EQUIPMENT, THINGS LIKE THAT, WHICH HE ACCEPTED AND 11:11:20 EXPRESSED GRATITUDE FOR THAT. WE ARE CERTAINLY MORE THAN I 11:11:24 DON'T KNOW WHETHER HOURLY CERTAIN CONSTANT CONTACT WITH 11:11:29 PEOPLE IN JAPAN OF OUR PEOPLE. THERE ARE COMMUNICATIONS WITH 11:11:36 AMBASSADOR RUS, SEVERAL DAILY AND SO WE'RE MOSTLY GOING 11:11:43 THROUGH CHALLENGES. THERE ARE MANY, MANY AND THEN 11:11:49 OTHER INFORMAL CHALLENGES. WE'RE CONTINUING TO OFFER STANCE 11:11:53 TO JAPAN IN ANY WAY WE CAN AS WELL AS INFORMING OURSELVES OF 11:11:57 THE SITUATION. AT THIS POINT, YOU ARE 11:11:59 SATISFIED WITH THE RESPONSE TO THE SITUATION? 11:12:02 WELL, I CAN'T REALLY SAY. I THINK WE HEAR CONFLICTING 11:12:06 REPORTS, BUT I'LL GO BACK THE SAY THAT JAPAN IS A VERY 11:12:09 ADVANCED COUNTRY. THEY TAKE THESE THINGS VERY 11:12:15 SERIOUSLY AND SO I DON'T WANT TO SAY ANYTHING MORE THAN WE WILL 11:12:23 STAND BY THEM AND HELP AS BEST WE CAN. 11:12:24 THANK YOU. MR. SECRETARY, DO YOU BELIEVE, 11:12:25 I'VE SEEN WHAT APPEAR TO BE CONFLICTING STATEMENTS REGARDING 11:12:33 THE PETROLEUM RESERVE. DO YOU OR NOT SUPPORT ACCESS OF 11:12:37 THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE? IF BY ACCESS, YOU MEAN THAT 11:12:41 REGARDING THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE AS ONE OF 11:12:44 SEVERAL OPTIONS THAT WE CAN HOLD IN OUR ARSENAL. 11:12:52 IT IS DESIGNED FOR SEVERE DISRUPTIONS IN SUPPLY. 11:12:57 THE PRESIDENT HAS MADE CLEAR THAT HAS AN OPTION HE CAN 11:13:01 CONSIDER AND THERE ARE OTHER THINGS THAT ARE HAPPENING RIGHT 11:13:03 NOW, I THINK THE OTHER OIL PRODUCING COMPANIES IN THE WORLD 11:13:06 ARE STEPPING UP THEIR PRODUCTION. 11:13:08 WHAT ABOUT PRODUCTION HERE? HAVE YOU TALKED TO SECRETARY 11:13:12 SALAZAR OR PERHAPS THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ABOUT 11:13:14 STEPPING UP PRODUCTION WITHIN OUR OWN RESOURCES? 11:13:18 I THINK THAT'S RIGHT. SECRETARY SALAZAR AS I 11:13:21 UNDERSTAND IT, IS NOW TWO DEEP WATER LEASES HAVE BE RECENTLY 11:13:30 ISSUED. THERE HAVE BEEN A NUMBER OF 11:13:32 SHALLOW WATER LEASES THAT HAVE BEEN ISSUED. 11:13:34 THERE IS AN INCREASE IN PRODUCTION IN THE CONTINENTAL 11:13:38 UNITED STATES BECAUSE OF THE SHALE GAS ACTUALLY HAS SHALE OIL 11:13:41 IN IT AS WELL. PEOPLE ARE BEGINNING TO WE SEE 11:13:45 AN INCREASE IN RECOVERY OF THAT AND THAT'S GOING TO BE A 11:13:49 SIGNIFICANT ASSET GOING FORWARD. ARE YOU ENCOURAGING DOMESTIC 11:13:53 PRODUCTION TO HELP LOWER THE PRICE OF GASOLINE? 11:13:58 I THINK DOMESTIC PRODUCTION SHOULD BE PART OF A COHERENT 11:14:01 PLAN GOING FORWARD AND WHAT WE NEED TO DO WITH OUR 11:14:04 TRANSPORTATION FUEL. WHAT IS THE PRESIDENT'S PLAN 11:14:07 TO LOWER GAS PRICES BY THIS SUMMER? 11:14:11 WELL, IT'S -- FIRST, IT'S -- WE -- DOMESTIC PRODUCTION ITSELF 11:14:17 DOESN'T TURN ON INSTANTLY EVEN IF YOU HAVE A KNOWN RESERVE 11:14:22 PRODUCING MORE PRODUCTION FROM THAT KNOWN RESERVE WILL ACTUALLY 11:14:25 TAKE MONTHS TO YEARS DEVELOPING NEW RESERVES WOULD TAKE LONGER. 11:14:29 BUT THE FACT THAT'S COMING ONLINE SHOULD BE REFLECTED IN 11:14:32 PRICE? THAT IS TRUE. 11:14:34 SO, THE IMMEDIATE THING IS THAT IF YOU KNOW THAT THERE ARE 11:14:38 RESERVES COMING ONLINE, JUST AS OIL PRODUCING EXPORTING 11:14:43 COUNTRIES, YOU KNOW THEY'RE INCREASING PRODUCTION, SO THAT 11:14:45 SHOULD HAVE A CALMING INFLUENCE ON PRICE. 11:14:48 BUT IN THE LONG RUN, I THINK WE SHOULD ALSO SAY THAT IF YOU LOOK 11:14:51 AT THE DEMAND BY LONG RUN I MEAN TEN PLUS YEARS -- 11:14:55 SO THE ADMINISTRATION'S PLAN TO LOWER GAS PRICES BY THE 11:14:58 SUMMER IS 10 TO 12 YEARS? NO, WE ARE WORKING TOWARDS 11:15:03 DOING WHAT WE CAN IN THE SHORT-TERM, BUT I'M ALSO SAYING 11:15:06 THAT THIS PROBLEM CAN EMERGE EASILY AGAIN BECAUSE OF THE LAWS 11:15:10 OF SUPPLY AND DEMAND. WHAT IS THE ADMINISTRATION'S 11:15:14 PLAN THOUGH BY THE SUMMER TO LOWER TO PRICE OF GAS? 11:15:17 WELL, IT'S -- WE'RE GOING TO BE SEEING IF PRODUCTION CAN BE 11:15:23 INCREASED. WE'RE INCONVERSATIONS WITH OTHER 11:15:25 COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD ON HOW WE CAN INCREASE PRODUCTION 11:15:32 AND STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE OPTION IS ON THE TABLE. 11:15:34 BUT YOU ARE TALKING TO THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE TO 11:15:42 CREASE PRODUCTION HERE? I TALK TO THE SECRETARY 11:15:45 SEVERAL TIMES A WEEK, BUT I THINK THE LICENSING AND THINGS 11:15:50 OF THAT NATURE IN SECRETARY SALAZAR AND IT'S IN GOOD HANDS. 11:15:55 I HAVE ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS I'D LIKE TO SUBMIT. 11:15:59 THANK YOU. AT THIS TIME, THE CHAIR 11:16:02 RECOGNIZES THE GENTLEMEN FROM MICHIGAN FOR FIVE MINUTES. 11:16:05 CURTIS, I THANK YOU FOR HOLDING THE HEARING AND FOR YOUR 11:16:09 COURTESY IN RECOGNIZING ME. MR. SECRETARY, WELCOME TO THE 11:16:11 COMMITTEE. THE PRESIDENT IN HIS STATE OF 11:16:16 THE UNION SAYS IF THE UNITED STATES IS TO COMPETE, WE INTEND 11:16:20 TO OUTINNOVATE, OUTEDUCATE AND OUTBUILD THE REST OF THE WORLD. 11:16:24 A BIG PART OF THAT FROM MY PERSPECTIVE IS SECTION 136 11:16:30 PROGRAM OR THE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES 11:16:34 MANUFACTURING PROGRAM. I'VE HEARD FROM NUMEROUS 11:16:38 ENTITIES THAT HAVE APPLIED FOR FUNDING UNDER SECTION 136 AND 11:16:45 FIND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THAT, NONE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO TELL ME 11:16:48 IT HAS BEEN AN ENTIRELY POSITIVE EXPERIENCE ALTHOUGH I BELIEVE 11:16:51 YOU AND THE DEPARTMENT HAVE TRIED TO BE AS HELPFUL AS YOU 11:16:56 CAN. IT IS COMPLICATED AND A NEW LAW, 11:17:00 WHICH IS SOMEWHAT MADE DIFFICULT BY THE FACT THAT YOU HAVE TO 11:17:05 FUNCTION UNDER VERY, VERY LIMITED TIME FRAMES. 11:17:08 IN FACT, I HEAR A COMPLAINT THAT THE GOAL POSTS ARE CONSTANTLY 11:17:14 MOVING. THIS IS PERHAPS THE MOST SERIOUS 11:17:18 AND IT IS PERHAPS THE ONE THAT I HEAR MOST. 11:17:23 COMPANIES FEEL THAT ANYBODY THAT ENTERS INTO NEGOTIATIONS WITH 11:17:29 THE BEST OF INTENTIONS BUT HAVE NO ASSURANCES THEY'LL EVER GET 11:17:33 TO THE END OF THE ROAD. FOR THE RECORD, PLEASE, WOULD 11:17:39 YOU PROVIDE A DETAILED SUMMARY OF HOW 136 WORKS? 11:17:45 I NOTE THAT YOUR BUDGET REQUESTS FOR THIS YEAR IS 40% LESS THAN 11:17:49 REQUESTED IN 2011 AND THAT THE 2011 REQUESTS IS 50% LESS THAN 11:17:56 THE 2010 ENACTED LEVELS. I UNDERSTAND OUR BUDGET 11:18:00 SITUATION IS SERIOUS. BUT THIS SEEMS TO BE 11:18:03 INCONSISTENT WITH THE PRESIDENT'S OUTINNOVATE, 11:18:07 OUTEDUCATE AND OUTBUILD MESSAGE. HAS THE NEED FOR FUNDING TO 11:18:12 REEQUIP, EXPAND AND BUILD MORE FACILITIES TO CREATE THE 11:18:17 VEHICLES OF THE FUTURE GONE DOWN SINCE 2010? 11:18:19 YES OR NO? NO, WE CERTAINLY NEED TO 11:18:24 EXPAND AND BUILD FACILITIES. WERE YOU COMPARING THE RECOVERY 11:18:30 BUDGET OR OUR BASE BUDGET? WELL, MY CONCERN HERE IS THE 11:18:36 SECTION 136 PROCESS AND HOW IT'S WORKING. 11:18:39 AND WHAT I'M TRYING TO FIND OUT IS HAS THE NEED FOR THAT SECTION 11:18:44 TO BE USED FOR FUNDING TO REEQUIP, EXPAND AND BUILD MORE 11:18:49 FACILITIES TO CREATE THE VEHICLES OF THE FUTURE GONE DOWN 11:18:52 SINCE 2010? SO AS TO JUSTIFY THE REDUCTION 11:18:57 IN THE LEVEL OF FUNDING REQUESTED BY THE ADMINISTRATION. 11:18:59 YES OR NO? I THINK YOUR -- IT'S GONE 11:19:03 DOWN IN YOU'RE INCLUDING RECOVERY ACT FUNDING. 11:19:06 SAY AGAIN. IF YOU'RE REFERRING TO THE 11:19:10 ATVM LOANS AND INCLUDING THE RECOVERY ACT FUNDING FOR 2010, 11:19:15 THAT'S IF YOU DO -- IF YOU INCLUDE THAT, OUR FUNDING 11:19:18 REQUEST HAS GONE DOWN. WELL, I THINK IT WOULD BE 11:19:21 HELPFUL TO BOTH OF US IF YOU WERE TO SUBMIT THE ANSWERS TO 11:19:25 THE RECORD, BUT I AM -- WHAT I AM CONCERNED IS THAT WE UP THERE 11:19:31 FIND THAT THERE'S STILL A SUBSTANTIAL DEED AND YET WE ARE 11:19:36 FINDING THAT THE REQUESTS FOR FUNDING ARE GOING DOWN. 11:19:40 AND WHAT I'M SLIS ITTING IS YOUR COMMENTS ON THIS MATTER. 11:19:49 LAST QUESTION, MR. SECRETARY, COULD YOU FOR THE RECORD, SUBMIT 11:19:50 A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF APPLICANTS FOR ASSISTANCE UNDER 11:19:58 SECTION 136 AND GIVE US EACH WITH REGARD TO EACH AN 11:20:03 INDICATION OF WHERE THEY ARE IN THE PROCESS? 11:20:08 I THINK THE APPLICANT, I DON'T THINK WE'RE REALLY WOULD 11:20:13 BE FILING SOME CONFIDENTIALITY IN THE APPLICANTS OF WHO HAS 11:20:22 A APPLIED, SO THAT WOULD BE 11:20:23 DIFFICULT. WELL, MR. SECRETARY, I AM NOT 11:20:26 TRYING TO LAY ANY TRAPS FOR YOU AND I RECOGNIZE THIS IS 11:20:30 DIFFICULT, WHICH IS WHY I ASK THAT YOU SUBMIT THIS FOR THE 11:20:32 RECORD. AND MY STAFF WILL BE HAPPY TO 11:20:36 WORK WITH YOUR STAFF TO SEE TO IT THAT WE ARE ABLE TO WORK 11:20:40 TOGETHER TO GET THE PROPER ANSWERS. 11:20:44 WE CAN SUPPLY INFORMATION IN THE AGGREGATE AND ENEM ANITY OF 11:20:50 THAT NATION. AND I HOPE YOU UNDERSTAND, 11:20:54 MR. SECRETARY, THESE ARE FRIENDLY QUESTIONS. 11:20:58 THANK YOU FOR YOUR COURTESY. THANK YOU. 11:21:01 I RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN FROM PENNSYLVANIA, MR. PITTS. 11:21:05 THANK YOU FOR YOUR TESTIMONY TODAY. 11:21:06 IN LIGHT OF YOUR OPENING STATEMENT, I BELIEVE IF I CAN 11:21:12 PARAPHRASE IT, YOU SAID NUCLEAR POWER SHOULD CONTINUE TO BE A 11:21:16 KEY PART OF OUR NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY. 11:21:18 IS THAT CORRECT? THAT'S CORRECT. 11:21:24 WE WOULD LIKE TO BE PART OF OUR ENERGY IN THIS CENTURY, YES. 11:21:26 IN LIGHT OF THIS, THE ADMINISTRATION HAS ELIMINATED 11:21:30 THE OFFICE OF WASTE MANAGEMENT. AN OFFICE WITHIN D.O.E. 11:21:36 EXPRESLEY CREATED BY STATUTE. ALSO SHUT DOWN THE YUCCA 11:21:41 MOUNTAIN PROGRAM. THERE ARE CURRENTLY CONCERNS 11:21:44 ABOUT THE STATUS OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL RODS THAT HAVE BEEN 11:21:47 IN WET STORAGE AT THE JAPANESE NUCLEAR PLANT AFFECTED BY THE 11:21:53 RECENT EARTHQUAKE. IN LIGHT OF THE EVENTS IN JAPAN, 11:21:57 DOES THE DECISION TO ELIMINATE THE OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIO 11:22:02 ACTIVE WASTE AND SHUT DOWN OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROGRAM DESERVE 11:22:08 RECONSIDERATION FROM THE PRESIDENT? 11:22:13 AGAIN, WE SHOULDN'T -- WITH WHAT IS HAPPENING IN JAPAN THE 11:22:23 NEED FOR A LONG TIME REPOSITORY. THAT'S A VERY SHORT-TERM THING 11:22:29 AND THEN YOU CONVERT AFTERWARD AFTER SEVERAL YEARS TO DRY CAST 11:22:33 STORAGE AND THEN FINALLY, YOU LOOK FOR DISPOSITION, BUT 11:22:39 TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING AND THERE IS AGAIN, I DON'T WANT TO 11:22:44 PREEMPT WHAT THE BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION WILL SAY, BUT THERE 11:22:50 COULD BE OTHER OPPORTUNITIES TO PERHAPS CAPTURE MORE OF THE 11:22:54 ENERGY CONTENT OF THAT HUGE SHIELD. 11:22:58 SO HOW DOES THE ADMINISTRATION FULFILL ITS 11:23:02 OBLIGATIONS UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT TO MANAGE AND 11:23:08 DISPOSE OF THE NATION'S SPENT FUEL INVENTORIES. 11:23:11 PARDON? HOW DO YOU MANAGE AND 11:23:18 PERMANENTLY DISPOSE OF THE NATION'S SPENT FUEL INVENTORIES 11:23:20 TODAY? WELL, WE -- THE DEPARTMENT OF 11:23:25 ENERGY IS RESPONSIBLE FOR DEALING THE W THE SPENT FUEL AND 11:23:30 WE'RE ASKING THE BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION TO GIVE US ADVICE ON, 11:23:34 WHICH THEY WILL DO IN JUNE, ON HOW TO PROCEED FORWARD SO THAT 11:23:39 WE CAN TAKE THIS SPENT FUEL AS I SAID, I DON'T WANT TO PREEMPT 11:23:44 WHAT THEY'RE SAYING, SO I DON'T REALLY KNOW WHAT -- ONCE IT'S 11:23:51 CYCLED ONCE. IN LIGHT OF THE EVENTS IN 11:23:54 JAPAN, CAN YOU MAKE ANY CONCLUSIONS AT THIS POINT ABOUT 11:23:57 THE SAFETY OF NUCLEAR POWER IN THE UNITED STATES AS A RESULT OF 11:24:04 WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT THE INCIDENT? 11:24:08 NO, AS I SAID BEFORE, WHAT WE WANT TO DO IS LOOK AT WHAT 11:24:11 HAPPENED IN JAPAN AND SAY IF THERE ARE THESE MULTIPLE EVENTS 11:24:16 AS WHAT'S HAPPENED IN JAPAN, A TERRIBLE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI, 11:24:22 OR THAT WE WOULD BE MORE VULNERABLE TO A CASCADE OF 11:24:25 MULTIPLE EVENTS AN HOW THEY MIGHT COMPROMISE SAFETY, SO WE 11:24:29 FIRST INTEND TO LOOK FULLY AT WHETHER WE HAVE CONSIDERABLE 11:24:33 POSSIBILITIES AND GET WHATEVER LESSONS WE CAN LEARN FROM. 11:24:36 WHAT IS D.O.E. DOING IN TERMS OF MONITORING ANY POTENTIAL 11:24:40 RADIATION EMITTED FROM THE JAPANESE FACILITY? 11:24:44 WILL YOU COLLECT EXPOSURE AND HELP AFFECT DATA? 11:24:50 WHAT WE HAVE DONE IS WE'VE AIR LIFTED AIRBORNE EQUIPMENT 11:24:55 THAT CAN HELP MONITOR, MADE THAT AVAILABLE TO THE JAPANESE. 11:24:59 WE ALSO HAVE GROUND EQUIPMENT SO IT CAN PICK UP EXPOSURE LEVELS 11:25:03 AND THE TYPE OF RADIATION OF PEOPLE ON THE GROUND. 11:25:10 WE'VE ALSO -- IN THE PROCESS, SO IT'S IN JAPAN NOW AND WE'RE 11:25:13 LOOKING TO DEPLOY THAT IN VARIOUS AREAS SO WE CAN HAVE A 11:25:18 FIRSTHAND UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT THE EXPOSURE LEVELS ARE AND HOW 11:25:23 THEY MIGHT CHANGE. IN YOUR TESTIMONY, YOU SAY WE 11:25:26 ARE CUTTING BACK IN MULTIPLE AREAS, INCLUDING ELIMINAING 11:25:31 UNNECESSARY FOSSIL FUEL SUBSIDIES AND REDUING FUNDING 11:25:39 FOR THE HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM. 11:25:41 WILL THIS INCREASE OR DECREASE GAS PRICES IN YOUR OPINION? 11:25:49 I THINK THE FOSSIL FUEL PROGRAM -- BECAUSE OF THE 11:25:51 RECOVERY ACT, THERE WAS A TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF INVESTMENTS 11:25:57 IN CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES, CARBON CAPTURE TECHNOLOGIES. 11:26:02 AND SO BECAUSE OF THAT, WE FELT THAT GIVEN THAT ESSENTIALLY $4 11:26:07 BILLION OF INVESTMENTS, THAT WE CAN GIVEN THE ISSUES ABOUT 11:26:13 FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY, WE THOUGHT THAT VERY LARGE 11:26:18 INVESTMENT CAN CARRY US FORWARD FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, SO THAT'S 11:26:22 WHERE MOST OF THE INVESTMENTS IN OUR FOSSIL ENERGY WERE GOING 11:26:28 INTO. INTO CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES. 11:26:30 WE WILL STILL CONTINUE TO MAKE THOSE INVESTMENTS BECAUSE WE 11:26:33 BELIEVE THAT IS A PROPER GOVERNMENT ROLE TO DEVELOP CLEAN 11:26:36 COAL TECHNOLOGIES. BUT THAT IS DIFFERENT THAN 11:26:39 TRANSPORTATION FUEL. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 11:26:45 THIS TIME, CHAIR RECOGNIZES GENTLEMAN FROM MASSACHUSETTS. 11:26:49 DR. CHU, YOU WEAR MANY HATS AS THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY. 11:26:54 ONE OF THEM IS BANKER IN CHIEF TO THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY. 11:26:58 A SOCIALIST SYSTEM THAT ALLOWS FOR THE U.S. GOVERNMENT TO 11:27:04 PROVIDE TAXPAYER-BACKED LOAN GUARANTEES FOR NUCLEAR POWER 11:27:08 PLANT CONSTRUCTION IN OUR COUNTRY. 11:27:11 I WANT TO KNOW FROM A PURELY FINANCIAL RISK PERSPECTIVE, DO 11:27:15 YOU THINK THAT THE EVENTS IN JAPAN WILL PROBABLY MAKE IT LESS 11:27:19 LIKELY FOR WALL STREET INVESTORS OR UTILITY EXECUTIVES TO WANT TO 11:27:24 ASSUME THE FINANCIAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH ORDERING A NEW 11:27:26 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT? I CAN'T REALLY PREDICT WHAT 11:27:31 WALL STREET WILL DO, BUT CERTAINLY, THE EVENTS IN JAPAN 11:27:36 WILL -- ARE GOING TO CAUSE EVERYBODY TO LOOK BACK AND LOOK 11:27:39 BACK TO THEIR EXISTING PLANTS AND THEIR FUTURE PLANS. 11:27:46 AND I THINK THAT'S A GOOD THING IN THE SENSE THAT YOU TAKE THIS 11:27:51 OPPORTUNITY TO LOOK BACK AND SEE WHAT YOU'RE DOING AND ARE YOU 11:27:55 DOING EVERYTHING POSSIBLE TO MAXIMIZE THE SAFETY. 11:27:57 SO ALONG THOSE LINES, ARE YOU GOING TO REASSESS AS THE BANKER 11:28:03 IN CHIEF, THE RISK PREMIUM THAT YOU CHARGE NUCLEAR UTILITIES FOR 11:28:06 THE LOAN GUARANTEES YOUR GIVING THEM IN LIGHT OF THE EVENTS IN 11:28:12 JAPAN? THAT IS, THE RISK PREMIUM IS 11:28:18 ULTIMATELY A CREDIT SUBSIDY ISSUE. 11:28:21 ARE YOU GOING TO RE-EXAMINE IT IN LIGHT OF WHAT HAPPENED IN 11:28:25 JAPAN? I THINK ALL FACTORS GET 11:28:27 FOLDED INTO A LOAN. SO, YOU ARE? 11:28:31 PART OF THE GOVERNMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE 11:28:33 DETERMINATION OF THAT CREDIT. SHOULD O.B.M. RE-EXAMINE THE 11:28:40 RISK PREMIUM? I THINK THEY WILL INCLUDE 11:28:43 ANYTHING LIKE WHAT HAS HAPPENED IN JAPAN. 11:28:45 SO THEY SHOULD GO BACK AGAIN. I THANK YOU. 11:28:47 THE DEPARTMENT HAS AWARDED AN $8.3 BILLION LOAN GUARANTEE TO 11:28:52 THE SOUTHERN COMPANY CONDITIONAL UPON THE CERTIICATION OF THE 11:28:59 NEW DESIGN REACTOR BY THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION. 11:29:02 THREE DAYS BEFORE THE JAPANESE EARTHQUAKE, I SENT A LETTER TO 11:29:05 THE NRC BECAUSE I LEARNED THAT ONE OF ITS MOST SENIOR 11:29:11 SCIENTISTS HAS SAID THAT THE DINE OF THAT PLANT MAY BE TOO 11:29:15 BRITTLE TO WITH STAND A STRONG EARTHQUAKE AND THAT IT WILL 11:29:18 QUOTE, SHATTER LIKE A GLASS CUP, UNDER STRONG IMPACT. 11:29:23 HE SAID THAT WESTING HOUSE MODELLED THE RESILIENCY USING AN 11:29:28 UNREALISTIC EARTHQUAKE SIMULATION. 11:29:30 DON'T YOU THINK IT'S TOO RISKY TO ISSUE CONDITIONAL LOAN 11:29:34 GUARANTEES FOR REACTORS LIKE THE AP1000 THAT HAVE NOT BEEN FULLY 11:29:40 APPROVED BY THE NRC IN FINAL FORM AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE AND 11:29:49 COMMENT, PARTICULARLY WHEN ONE OF THE NRC'S TOP TECHNICAL 11:29:55 PEOPLE HAS RAISED SIGNIFICANT CONCERNS? 11:29:56 THE NRC HAS TO GRANT APPROVAL AND LICENSE AND THAT IS STILL 11:30:00 PENDING BEFORE THE NRC. SO THE SOUTHERN COMPANY AND ITS 11:30:05 COLLABORATORS DO NOT GET FEDERAL MONEY UNTIL THE CONSTRUCTION 11:30:14 IS -- DON'T YOU THINK WE SHOULD 11:30:15 HOLD OFF ON NEW REACTOR DESIGNS OR NEW LOAN GUARANTEES UNTIL WE 11:30:21 ARE SURE THESE NEW REACTORS ARE SAFE AND WE HAVE LEARNED THE 11:30:25 LESSONS OF FUKUSHIMA? I THINK WE WILL NO MATTER 11:30:27 WHAT HAPPENS GOING FORWARD, TRY TO TAKE THE LESSONS OF FUKUSHIMA 11:30:31 AND APPLY THEM TO OUR EXISTING FLEET AND ANY FUTURE REACTORS WE 11:30:38 WILL BE BUILDING. NOW, IN THE CASE OF THE 11:30:42 CONDITIONAL LOAN GUARANTEE YOU GAVE THE SOUTHERN COMPANY FOR 11:30:45 THE TWO NEW REACTORS AT VOGEL, THE $8.3 BILLION TAXPAYER LOAN 11:30:51 GUARANTEE WILL THEN ALLOW THE SOUTHERN COMPANY TO GET AN $8.3 11:30:55 BILLION LOAN DIRECTLY FROM THE FEDERAL FINANCING BANK AT THE 11:31:00 DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY. SO, THE TAXPAYERS ARE FULLY ON 11:31:06 THE HOOK FOR 8.3 BILLION OUT OF THE $14 BILLION PROJECT. 11:31:08 IF THERE IS A DEFAULT ON THIS VOGEL PLANT AND THE FIRST TWO 11:31:11 UNITS THAT THEY HAVE ALREADY BUILT IN PAST YEARS THERE WERE 11:31:16 11 TIMES OVERBUDGET, SO IF THERE'S A DEFAULT ON THE VOGEL 11:31:20 LOAN, WHAT WOULD HAPPEN? OUR LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM OF 11:31:24 THE PEOPLE WHO WORK IN THAT PROGRAM WORK VERY, VERY HARD SO 11:31:28 THAT THEY MAKE SURE THAT IF THERE IS A DEFAULT THAT THE 11:31:33 GOVERNMENT TAXPAYERS ARE PROTECTED. 11:31:35 THAT THERE ARE ASSETS IN SOUTHERN COMPANY AND OTHERS -- 11:31:38 BUT IF YOU CAN'T GET PAID OFF, WHAT HAPPENS THEN? 11:31:42 IT'S A VERY COMPLEX AGREEMENT AND THERE ARE -- 11:31:46 WOULD WE OWN THE SOUTHERN COMPANY LIKE WE INVOLUNTARILY 11:31:50 WOUND UP OWNING GENERAL MOTORS? IF THEY CAN'T PAY? 11:31:54 THAT, I WOULD HAVE TO GET BACK TO YOU IN THE DETAILS ON 11:31:58 WHAT THE EXACT RECOVERY IS. I THINK THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER 11:32:01 REALLY HAS TO BE PROTECTED HERE GOING FORWARD. 11:32:04 GENTLEMAN'S TIME IS EXPIRED. SHOULD NOT BE LICENSING AP 1000. 11:32:10 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. THANK YOU SECRETARY CHU, FOR 11:32:15 BEING HERE TODAY. YOU CAN SEE THE END IN SIGHT OF 11:32:18 THE QUESTIONING. I KNOW YOU'LL APPRECIATE YOUR 11:32:21 TIME BEING HERE. AND I WANTED TO TALK TO YOU 11:32:24 ABOUT SOMETHING THAT PRESIDENT OBAMA SAID IN A PRESS CONFERENCE 11:32:27 RECENTLY. THAT WE SHOULD INCREASE ENERGY 11:32:32 PRODUCTION IN THIS COUNTRY AND MENTIONED OIL SPECIFICALLY. 11:32:35 IT APPEARS HIS TWO PLUS YEARS IN OFFICE, I WOULD ARGUE THE 11:32:39 PRESIDENT HAS REALLY NOT DONE MUCH IN THAT WAY, NOT MUCH 11:32:42 TOWARDS INCREASING OUR PRODUCTION OF OIL. 11:32:45 WHEN THE PRESIDENT CAME INTO OFFICE, GAS AT THE PUMP WAS 11:32:48 UNDER $2 A GALLON. WE'RE APPROACHING $4 A GALLON IN 11:32:55 MANY REGIONS AND OF COURSE, WE'VE HAD THE DEEPWATER HORIZON 11:32:58 EXPLOSION ON APRIL 20th, APPROACHING THAT ONE-YEAR 11:33:01 ANNIVERSARY. THEN A MORITORIUM WAS PLACED ON 11:33:03 THE DEEP WATER OFFSHORE DRILLING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FOLLOWING 11:33:11 THAT. THERE HAVE BEEN LIMITING OF 11:33:12 LEASES ON THE EAST COAST AND WE CONTINUE TO IGNORE OUR RESOURCES 11:33:17 IN ANWR. I WOULD ASK IF YOU'VE HAD 11:33:21 CONVERSATIONS WITH THE PRESIDENT ABOUT EXPANDING DOMESTIC OIL AND 11:33:24 IF SO, WHAT INPUT OR DIRECTION HAVE YOU RECEIVE FRD THE 11:33:30 PRESIDENT? THE PRESIDENT HAS ALREADY 11:33:34 SPOKEN ON THIS MATTER. HE MENTIONED IN A PRESS 11:33:37 CONFERENCE THAT IN 2010, THE PRODUCTION OF OIL WAS AS HIGH AS 11:33:42 IT'S BEEN SINCE 2003. PRIOR TO MACONDO ACCIDENT, WHAT 11:33:48 HAPPENED WAS MORE LAND WAS MADE OPEN TO HAVE ACCESS DRILLING. 11:33:55 THE OIL COMPANIES ARE SEEING A LOT OF LEASES SO FAR NOT FULLY 11:34:01 UTILIZED AND THE PRESIDENT HAS SAID THAT THEY WOULD ASK THAT IF 11:34:08 THOSE COMPANIES ARE JUST SITTING ON THOSE LEASES, THAT WE CAN 11:34:14 EXPLORE MECHANISMS TO EXPLORE THOSE. 11:34:17 SO THE PRESIDENT IS AS PART OF A STRATEGY GOING FORWARD, THAT'S 11:34:24 ONE OF THE THINGS TO DEAL WITH THAT WE ARE NOW FACING. 11:34:28 WHEN THE PRESIDENT SAYS OR THE WHITE HOUSE SAYS THAT PRUX 11:34:32 IS AS HIGH AS IT'S BEEN SINCE 2003, IS THAT HIGH ENOUGH AND 11:34:38 WHAT'S GOING ON AROUND THE WORLD? 11:34:40 FIRST WITH THE CONCERNS IN EGYPT, THEN LIBYA AND NOW, 11:34:42 WHAT'S HAPPENED IN JAPAN. ARE YOU CONVINCED THAT WE'RE 11:34:49 PURSUING THE RECOVERY OF OUR OWN NATURAL RESOURCES AS IT COMES TO 11:34:52 OIL IN THIS COUNTRY AND THE REGIONS THAT WE CAN GO INTO 11:34:59 OFFSHORE. DO YOU BELIEVE WE'RE DOING A 11:35:00 SUFFICIENT AMOUNT AT THIS LEVEL? I THINK WE'RE GOING TO HAVE 11:35:03 TO DO MANY THINGS. INCREASING OIL PRODUCTION IS 11:35:06 ONLY PART OF THE SOLUTION. AS THE PRESIDENT SAID. 11:35:10 WE NOW HAVE 2% OF THE KNOWN OIL RESERVES IN THE WORLD. 11:35:14 AND YET WE CONSUME 25% OF THE OIL. 11:35:17 AND SO, WE CAN INCREASE PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES, 11:35:21 BUT IT CLEARLY CAN'T BE A FULL SOLUTION. 11:35:23 THAT'S WHY WE'RE FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE FURTHER ENERGY 11:35:28 EFFICIENCY IN AUTOMOBILES AND ADVANCD BIOFUELS. 11:35:37 HAVE YOU HAD CONVERSATIONS ABOUT THE SLOWNESS AND PERMITS 11:35:42 BEING APPROVED OR THE GULF OR MEXICO? 11:35:45 NO, I HAVEN'T. DO YOU INTEND TO HAVE ANY 11:35:48 ABOUT THE SLOWNESS OF THE PERMIT PROCESS? 11:35:51 I BELIEVE THIS HAS GOTTEN STARTED AGAIN AND THE SHALLOW 11:35:55 WATER PERMITS WERE CONTINUING AND NOW, WE HAVE TWO DEEP WATER 11:36:00 PERMITS AND I ANTICIPATE THAT WILL BE ACCELERATING. 11:36:06 BAND WHAT IS YOUR POSITION ON DRILLING IN ANWR? 11:36:09 RIGHT NOW, THERE ARE MANY OPEN SITES FOR DRILLING SO WE 11:36:13 NEED NOT TAP THERE. THE PRESIDENT'S ALSO EXPLORING 11:36:16 OTHER SITES IN ALASKA, BOTH ON AN OFFSHORE. 11:36:19 AT THE PRESENT TIME, THERE ARE MANY SITES OPEN FOR DRILLING 11:36:26 THAT ARE NOT BEING USED AND SO I THINK WE FIRST LOOK TO THOSE 11:36:30 SITES AND TRY TO GET THE OIL COMPANIES INTERESTED. 11:36:33 WOULD YOU LOOK TO THOSE SITES BEING USED FIRST BEFORE YOU TAP 11:36:40 INTO THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE? 11:36:44 IT WAS SOMETHING MEANT TO HAVE CONTINUED OIL SUPPLIES IN 11:36:48 CASE OF SIGNIFICANT DISRUPTION AND THAT'S A STRATEGIC RESERVE. 11:36:53 OIL IS VERY ESSENTIAL FOR OUR COUNTRY AND SO THAT'S THE 11:36:58 ORIGINAL INTENT. WHAT YOU'RE SPEAKING OF ARE 11:37:03 THINGS THAT HAVE IT TAKES EVEN IN A KNOWN RESERVE, IT TAKE AS 11:37:08 YEAR OR TWO TO BRING UP PRODUCTION AND THEN FOR UNKNOWN 11:37:12 RESERVES, FIVE PLUS YEARS. EXACTLY, WOULDN'T IT BE 11:37:20 NECESSARY, WILL YIELD BACK BY TIME WITH THAT. 11:37:21 THANK YOU. THIS TIME, THE GENTLELADY 11:37:23 FROM COLORADO. THANK YOU FOR COMING TODAY. 11:37:28 MR. UPTON SAID WE'RE GOING TO HAVE MORE HEARINGS ABOUT WHAT 11:37:31 HAPPENED WITH THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN JAPAN, BUT I JUST 11:37:36 WANTED TO ASK YOU A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ON MY 11:37:42 MIND SINCE THE TERRIBLE EVENTS OF LAST WEEK. 11:37:48 THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI PLANT, THREE OF THE SIX REACTORS WERE 11:37:51 OPERATING AT THE TIME OF THE EARTHQUAKE TO MY UNDERSTANDING. 11:37:53 IS THAT CORRECT? THIS IS MY UNDERSTANDING, 11:37:56 ALSO. OKAY, AND SO WHEN THE 11:37:59 EARTHQUAKE STRUCK, THE CONTROL RODS ESSENTIALLY SHUT DOWN THOSE 11:38:04 REACTORS AS IT WAS DESIGNED TO DO IF THERE WAS AN EARTHQUAKE. 11:38:07 IS THAT ALSO RIGHT? THAT'S MY UNDERSTANDING. 11:38:10 AND THEN AFTER THE REACTORS WERE SHUT DOWN, THEN POWER WAS 11:38:16 LOST IN THE PLANT AND THEN THE COOLING PUMPS WERE SHUT OFF. 11:38:19 IS THAT CORRECT? THAT'S CORRECT. 11:38:21 THE POWER WAS LOST. SO THEN THE BACK UP DIESEL 11:38:25 GENERATORS CAME ON. AS THAT WAS ALSO DESIGNED TO DO. 11:38:30 AND THEN THOSE GENERATORS QUIT FUNCTIONING BECAUSE THEY WENT 11:38:33 UNDER THE FLOOD WATERS FROM THE TSUNAMI. 11:38:36 IS THAT RIGHT TO YOUR BEST OF YOUR KNOWLEDGE? 11:38:39 THE GENERATORS CAME ON THEN LATER, I'VE BEEN INFORMED THAT 11:38:44 SOME OF THEM SHUT OFF. IT HAD MORE -- THIS IS WHERE I 11:38:50 COULDN'T GIVE ASSURANCES BECAUSE YOU HEAR CONFLICTING REPORTS, 11:38:55 BUT THE STORY I HEARD WAS THAT COOLING FOR THE GENERATORS WAS 11:38:58 AT RISK AND THEY TRIPPED OFF FOR THAT REASON. 11:39:00 RIGHT. OKAY, SO THEN NOW WHAT THEY'RE 11:39:04 TRYING TO DO IS PUMP THE SEA WATER IN TO KEEP THESE RODS FROM 11:39:08 MELTING DOWN, RIGHT? THAT'S CORRECT. 11:39:15 SO, THIS IS THE CONCERN I'VE GOT. 11:39:17 I IMAGINE YOU SHARE THIS CONCERN. 11:39:20 IS THAT THERE WERE NUMEROUS FAIL SAFE SYSTEMS HERE WITH THIS 11:39:29 PLANT. IT'S 40 YEARS OLD -- NUMEROUS 11:39:35 FAIL SAFE METHODS, CORRECT? YES. 11:39:36 BUT THEN, BECAUSE OF THE TSUNAMI, THE PLANT WAS BUILT TO 11:39:42 WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES, BUT BECAUSE OF IS TSUNAMI, NOW WE'VE 11:39:45 GOT THIS CRISIS ABOUT WHAT TO DO. 11:39:47 THE THING I'M CONCERNED ABOUT IS THAT YOU CAN'T ALWAYS PLAN FOR 11:39:52 EVERY EXIGENCY IN THESE SITUATIONS. 11:39:55 WE SAW THIS ON THIS COMMITTEE. YOU SAW IT LAST YEAR WITH THE 11:40:00 DEEPWATER HORIZON DISASTER BECAUSE THERE WERE NUMEROUS FAIL 11:40:03 SAFE MECHANISMS ON THAT RIG AND THEN EACH ONE OF THEM FAILED AND 11:40:08 THEN WE SAW HUGE AMOUNTS OF OIL SPEWING OUT INTO THE GULF. 11:40:12 SO, HERE'S MY QUESTION FOR YOU. I KNOW D.O.E. IS PUTTING 11:40:17 RESOURCES IN TOWARDS ADVANCED REACTOR TECHNOLOGY AND THERE ARE 11:40:21 A LOT OF CONCERNS FROM THIS COMMITTEE AND FROM A LOT OF MY 11:40:25 COLLEAGUES WHO LIVE IN SOME CALIFORNIA AND SOME OF THE OTHER 11:40:29 EARTHQUAKE ZONES, BUT HERE'S MY QUESTION IS HOW CAN YOU EVER 11:40:33 HAVE ENOUGH, WITH SOMETHING SO POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE AS THESE 11:40:42 NUCLEAR RODS, HOW CAN WE EVER ANTICIPATE THE WORST? 11:40:44 SO THAT WE CAN BE PREPARED FOR IT? 11:40:46 THAT'S A TOUGH QUESTION, I KNOW, BUT MAYBE YOU HAVE SOME INITIAL 11:40:49 THOUGHTS ON IT. WELL, WHAT -- WHAT THE 11:40:53 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IS VERY INTERESTED IN DOING IS 11:40:56 DEVELOPING TOOLS TO GET A BETTER HANDLE ON THESE MULTIPLE E 11:41:03 CASCADES EVENTS. AN EARTHQUAKE PLUS TSUNAMI, A 11:41:07 TORNADO PLUS THIS OR THAT. THINGS LIKE THAT. 11:41:09 ONE OF THE THINGS WE'RE KEEN ON DOING BECAUSE WE HAVE DEVELOPED 11:41:14 HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTERS AND SIMULATION TECHNIQUES THAT THIS 11:41:17 IS ONE OF THE TOOLS THAT WE THINK CAN BE USED TO MAKE ANY 11:41:21 SYSTEM WE HAVE TO MAKE REACTORS SAFER. 11:41:24 THERE ARE IF YOU CONSIDER ALL THE THINGS WE DO NOW, WE FLY IN 11:41:31 AIR PLAINS. WE DO ALL SORTS OF THINGS AND 11:41:32 THERE IS EVER INCREASING ABILITY TO MAKE EACH OF THESE SYSTEMS 11:41:37 SAFER AS WE GO FORWARD. SURE. 11:41:39 YOU KNOW, ONE THING THAT STRIKES ME AND I WAS JUST IN SWRA PAN A 11:41:45 COUPLE OF JAPAN A COUPLE OF WEEKS AGO. 11:41:50 ONE THING THAT STRIKES JOU ABOUT JAPAN, THIS IS NOT CHERNOBYL. 11:41:52 THIS IS NOT SOME THIRD WORLD COUNTRY WITH RINKY DINK 11:41:58 TECHNOLOGY. THIS IS THE STATE-OF-THE-ART 11:41:59 TECHNOLOGY AND YET, IT FAILED. I REALLY THINK ONE OF THE 11:42:02 QUESTIONS WE'RE GOING TO WANT TO EXPLORE AS WE MOVE FURTHER IS DO 11:42:06 WE REALLY HAVE THE KINDS OF MODELING THAT WE NEED TO DEVELOP 11:42:12 NUCLEAR ENERGY SAFELY IN THIS COUNTRY AND I'M SURE YOU'RE 11:42:14 LOOKING AT THAT, TOO. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 11:42:17 AT THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMAN FROM CALIFORNIA. 11:42:20 YES, MR. CHAIRMAN. I THINK SECRETARY WILL AGREE 11:42:24 THAT THE STATEMENT THAT JAPAN WAS STATE-OF-THE-ART IS 11:42:30 INAPPROPRIATE. IT IS A STATE THAT WAS DESIGNED 11:42:33 40 YEARS AGO. WE HAVE DESIGNS EVEN IN THE FUEL 11:42:42 COMPOSITION THAT REALLY ADDRESS ISSUES. 11:42:43 AS SOMEBODY WHO LIVES DOWNWIND OF SANTA -- OUR SURGE WALL IS 11:42:48 THREE TIMES WHAT THEY HAVE IN JAPAN. 11:42:50 THE CONSTRUCTION AT DIABLO IS 30 TIMES HIGHER AND THE FAULT LINE 11:42:56 IS INLAND, NOT OFFSHORE. I THINK THERE ARE DIFFERENCES 11:43:01 S SCIENTIFICALLY. 11:43:03 I AM ONE GUY SITTING ON THIS SIDE OF THE AISLE THAT IS VERY 11:43:05 EXCITED TO SEE YOU AS SECRETARY. WE TALKED ABOUT THIS LAST YEAR 11:43:10 IN THE SCIENCE COMMITTEE. WHEN I WAS AT -- JUST REALIZED 11:43:13 THE CONNECTION. BACK WHEN I WAS A YOUNG, 11:43:16 26-YEAR-OLD CITY COUNCIL MAN, THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WAS 11:43:22 CREATED. BACK IN THE '70s WHEN IT WAS 11:43:26 CREATE, OUR DEPENDSY WAS WHAT AGAIN? 11:43:28 I HEARD 35. I WAS GUESSING 25. 11:43:31 I THINK YOU'RE RIGHT. MORE LIKE 25. 11:43:34 AND WHEN YOU TOOK OVER IN '08, THE IMPORTED ENERGY WAS WHAT 11:43:39 PERCENTAGE? PROBABLY 60, 59. 11:43:43 THAT'S HOW MUCH SUCCESS OUR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HAS HAD IN 11:43:46 THE PAST, THAT'S WHY I'M OPTIMISTIC YOU'RE THE RIGHT GUY 11:43:51 AT THE RIGHT TIME WITH THE RIGHT PRESIDENT TO FINALLY GET THIS 11:43:55 COUNTRY TO HAVE AN ENERGY POLICY. 11:43:57 THAT'S ONE OF THE THINGS I'M REALLY ENCOURAGED ABOUT. 11:44:00 MY BIGGEST CONCERN AND I'LL SAY THIS AS TONGUE AND CHEEK, HOW 11:44:04 MUCH OBSTRUCTIONISTS SEEM TO BE THERE WHEN YOU COME UP WITH AN 11:44:10 INNOVATIVE APPROACH. AS ONE OF THE THREE CALIFORNIA 11:44:12 SURFERS IN CONGRESS, YOU MESS WITH OUR WAVES TO GENERATE 11:44:16 ELECTRICITY, YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE A REAL PROBLEM WITH US, 11:44:20 OKAY? EVERY TIME SOMEBODY SAYS THERE'S 11:44:22 SOMETHING NOBODY WILL COMPLAIN ABOUT, BELIEVE ME, YOU START 11:44:26 TALKING ABOUT WAVE ACTIONS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, HAWAII, 11:44:30 WE'RE GOING TO HAVE SOME CONCERNS. 11:44:32 BUT THAT ASIDE, ONE OF THE THINGS I WANT TO TALK ABOUT IS 11:44:37 YOU'RE BEING ASKED TO DO THINGS IN ISOLATION. 11:44:40 MY ATTITUDE ABOUT OIL RESERVES, THE AREAS BEING DRILLED, RIGHT 11:44:43 NOW, WE ARE BUYING OIL OVERSEAS, SENDING OUR RESOURCES OVER SEAS. 11:44:50 WHAT HAPPENS TO THE FEDERAL PROFITS WE GET FROM OPENING UP 11:44:54 LANDS LIKE ANWR OR ALASKA? WE MAKE SOME PROFITS OFF THOSE 11:44:58 OIL EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT DON'T WE? 11:45:00 WE DO. AND WHERE DOES THAT RESOURCE 11:45:02 GO NOW? AS FAR AS I KNOW TO THE 11:45:05 TREASURY. DON'T YOU THINK WE MAY WANT 11:45:08 TO AT LEAST DISCUSS THE POSSIBILITY OF OPENING UP LANDS 11:45:12 AND COMMITTING TO NEXT GENERATION GREEN FUEL SO WE HAVE 11:45:16 A BUILT IN RESOURCE LIKE THE TRANSPORTATION COMPONENTS, HAVE 11:45:19 A BUILT-IN SOURCE FOR YOU TO USE TO BE ABLE TO PAY FOR THAT 11:45:23 BRIDGE TO A GREENER FUTURE? I WOULD LOVE THE DEPARTMENT 11:45:44 OF ENERGY TO HAVE A BUILT-IN SOURCE TO DO THE RESEARCH. 11:45:50 LET'S TALK ABOUT OBSTRUCTIONS. 11:45:52 ISN'T IT TRUE THAT THE TECHNOLOGY WE USE FOR EFFICIENT 11:45:54 ELECTRIC MOTORS AND THE EFFICIENT GENERATION OF WIND 11:45:55 POWER DEPENDS ON PERMANENT MAGNET TECHNOLOGY BECAUSE IT'S 11:45:56 MORE EFFICIENT? THE PERMANENT IS MORE 11:45:58 EFFICIENT AND WE'RE ALSO LOOKING AT OTHER, BECAUSE THESE -- 11:46:03 THIS IS WHERE WE COME DOWN. THE RARE EARTH. 11:46:05 AT THE SAME TIME WE'RE TALKING ABOUT LICHTRYIFICATION, NOBODY 11:46:10 IS TALKING ABOUT OPENING UP PUBLIC LANDS TO ALLOW THE MINING 11:46:17 OF RARE EARTH, 70 POUNDS IN EVERY PRIUS. 11:46:20 30 YEARS IN THIS ENERGY DEPARTMENT, THE DEPARTMENT OF 11:46:25 INTERIOR HAS CREATED AN ENVIRONMENT -- IT'S NOW IN 11:46:30 CHINA. DON'T YOU AGREE IF WE WANT TO 11:46:33 CREATE EFFICIENT ELECTRICAL GENERATION AND USE, WE'VE GOT TO 11:46:38 BE BRAVE ENOUGH TO ASK OUR COLLEAGUES TO START LOOKING AT 11:46:41 OPENING UP PUBLIC LANDS WITHIN OUR COUNTRY SO THESE ESSENTIAL 11:46:45 RARE EARTH CAN BE DEVELOPED IF YOU'RE GOING TO GO TO ELECTRIFY 11:46:51 KAGS. I AGREE HAVE CHINA CONTROL 11:46:54 RARE EARTH OF THE WORLD IS NOT A GOOD SITUATION AND WE ARE 11:46:58 LOOKING I BELIEVE MOLLY CORP. CORPORATION -- I THINK 11:47:03 CALIFORNIA. MY POINT, DOCTOR, IS THAT YOU 11:47:10 UNDERSTAND THE BARRIERS. MORE GOVERNMENT OBSTRUCTIONISM. 11:47:15 WE WRITE CHECKS QUICK. WE TALK ABOUT NEEDING A 11:47:21 MANHATTAN PRODUCT FOR ENERGY D 11:47:23 DEPENDENCE. IT WOULD NOT BE LEGAL TO PERFORM 11:47:24 UNDER FEDERAL AND STATE REGULATIONS AND WE'VE GOT TO BE 11:47:28 WILLING NOT TO JUST TELL OTHER PEOPLE HOW TO CHANGE. 11:47:31 THOSE IN GOVERNMENT HAVE TO CHANGE THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS, 11:47:35 TOO. WOULDN'T YOU AGREE? 11:47:36 I THINK WE ARE GOING TO BE LOOKING AT MANY, MANY THINGS, 11:47:39 BUT CERTAINLY MEET THE REQUIREMENTS OF SOMETHING WE 11:47:42 ALSO HAVE TO TAKE SERIOUSLY AND I'D BE GLAD TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT 11:47:45 THAT IN PRIVATE. THIS TIME, RECOGNIZE THE 11:47:47 GENTLEMAN FROM PENNSYLVANIA. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 11:47:52 MR. SECRETARY, WELCOME, IT'S A PLR TO HAVE YOU HERE TODAY. 11:47:57 SECRETARY CHU, IN PITTSBURGH, WE ARE FORTUNATE TO HAVE THE 11:48:05 TECHNOLOGY LAB THAT DOES A WILL THE LOT OF RESEARCH. 11:48:07 I WAS HOPING TO ASK YOU ABOUT THE CUTS IN T UPCOMING BUDGET 11:48:12 PROPOSAL. I SEE YOU'VE TERMINATED ALL THE 11:48:15 NATURAL GAS AND OIL PROGRAMS OUT OF THE NATL. 11:48:20 DON'T YOU VIEW THESE PROGRAMS AS BEING PARTICULARLY RELEVANT 11:48:24 TODAY SINCE IT FUNDS PRODUCTS RELATED TO DRILLING, AS WELL AS 11:48:31 DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES THAT WILL ALLOW 11:48:35 INCREASED RECOVERY OF OUR OIL AND GAS RESOURCE SNS. 11:48:42 I THINK THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PLAYED A VERY IMPORTANT 11:48:44 ROLE IN THE DWMT OF NATURAL GAS RECOVERY TO 1992. 11:48:49 IT WAS THE AGENCY THAT LED TO THE TRACKING OF NATURAL GAS. 11:48:54 BUT THE PRIVATE SECTOR HAS PICKED IT UP AND IS DOING QUITE 11:48:57 WELL. THERE'S BEEN A TRANSFER OF FUNDS 11:49:00 FROM FEDERAL FE, FOSSIL ENERGY, TO THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE. 11:49:04 FOR DOING RESEARCH IN METHANE HYDRATE. 11:49:09 BECAUSE COMMERCIALLY ENTITIES ARE NOT THAT INTERESTED IN SO 11:49:14 FAR, BUT THE BULK OF OUR FUNDING IN FE AS YOU KNOW, IS FOR CARBON 11:49:23 C CAPTURE. 11:49:24 I UNDERSTAND THE LARGER COMPANIES HAVE THE ABILITY TO 11:49:26 PICK UP SOME OF THAT SLACK, BUT THIS PROGRAM, AT LEAST IN MY 11:49:31 VIEW, IS NOT SUBSIDIZING THE BIGGER COMPANIES AND IN THE 11:49:35 UNITED STATES, WE HAVE 5,000 SMALL INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS. 11:49:39 THEY DO 60% OF THE DOMESTIC OIL AND 80% OF THE NATURAL GAS COME 11:49:47 FRS THESE SMALL COMPANIES AND THEY DON'T HAVE THE RESOURCES TO 11:49:49 INVEST IN THE RND AND THIS IS WHERE DOD HAS FULFILLED A 11:49:55 CRITICAL NEED THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS WITH COMPANIES LIKE 11:49:59 THESE AND UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS AND TECHNOLOGY. 11:50:01 I WANT TO ASK ALSO TO FOLLOW UP, YOU JUST MENTIONED THIS. 11:50:04 THE ADMINISTRATIONS PROPOSED THAT THE HYDRATE RESEARCH 11:50:08 PROGRAM IN THE GAS HYDRATE RESOURCE PROGRAM AND 11:50:14 FOSSIL ENERGIES BEING TERMINATED AND TRANSFERRED TO THE 11:50:17 DEPARTMENT OFFICE OF SCIENCE. THE PROGRAM HAS BEEN 11:50:20 WELL-MANAGED, MADE SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS AND IT CONCERNS ME THAT 11:50:22 YOU ARE GOING TO KILL A PROGRAM THAT'S ON THE VERGE OF MAKING 11:50:26 PRODUCTION FROM GAS HYDRATE TO PRACTICAL REALITY AFTER DECADES 11:50:31 OF RESEARCH AND MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SPENT BY DOE AND OTHER 11:50:36 AGENCIES TO BRING THIS TO THIS POINT, THAT YOU ARE GOING TO 11:50:39 START UP A NEW PROGRAM IN THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE THAT I THINK 11:50:41 WOULD HAVE LITTLE BEARING ON ANYTHING. 11:50:43 WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE LANGUAGE JUST IN THE MOST RECENT SENATE 11:50:47 ENERGY AND WATER SENATE REPORT, WE CONTAIN LANGUAGE ABOUT THIS 11:50:52 THAT THE COMMITTEE RECOMMENDED INCLUDED 22 MILLION AND OF THIS 11:50:57 AMOUNT, 15 MILLION IS PROVIDED BY METHANE HYDRATE ACTIVITIES. 11:51:01 THE COMMITTEE RESTORED THIS HYDRATE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TO 11:51:04 THE ACCOUNT AN THEY DON'T SUPPORT FUNDING THIS WITHIN THE 11:51:07 OFFICE OF SCIENCE. THEIR INTENTION WAS THIS WAS TO 11:51:13 BE FUNDED OUT OF FOSSIL ENERGY. I AM CURIOUS WHY YOU ARE 11:51:15 DECIDING TO DEFUND THIS PROGRAM AND THANS FER IT TO THE OFFICE 11:51:18 OF SCIENCE. I KNOW THE PROGRAM VERY WELL 11:51:24 AND WE WILL CERTAINLY ABIDE BY, AND I DO THINK HIGHLY OF IT. 11:51:27 WE HOPE THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE WILL LOOK TO THE PEOPLE DOING 11:51:30 THAT RESEARCH. WE WILL ABIDE BY CONGRESS'S 11:51:36 WISHES. AS CO-CHAIR OF THE HYDROGEN 11:51:39 AND FUEL CELL CAUCUS, I AM CONCERNED ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT'S 11:51:42 ELIMINATING BASICALLY ZEROING OUT FUNDING FOR THE FUEL CELL 11:51:45 ENERGY PROGRAM WITHIN THE OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY. 11:51:48 I UNDERSTAND THAT ONE OF THE PROJECTS MANAGED BY D.O.E. WON 11:51:57 AN AWARD IN 2010. I AM CURIOUS WHY WOULD YOU 11:52:01 ELIMINATE THIS VERY SUCCESSFUL FOSSIL ENERGY PROGRAM THAT'S 11:52:04 DEVELOPING FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY REQUIRED FOR LARGE SCALE POWER 11:52:08 GENERATION APPLICATIONS TO PRODUCE AFFORDABLE, EFFICIENT 11:52:12 AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY ELECTRICITY FROM COAL? 11:52:16 WE HAVE SEVERAL FUEL CELL PROGRAMS WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT 11:52:18 OF ENERGY AND WE WERE CONSOLIDATING THEM. 11:52:25 WE ARE CONTINUING TO FUND FUEL SELL DEVELOPMENT AS STATIONARY 11:52:29 FUEL CELLS. SO IT WAS MOVED OUT OF FOSSIL 11:52:32 ENERGY. MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT YOU 11:52:34 ARE CONTINUING TO FUND TRANSPORTATION FUEL CELLS BUT 11:52:37 THAT YOU HAVE ZEROED OUT THE STATIONARY FUEL CELLS. 11:52:41 ARE YOU SAYING THAT IS NO THE ACCURATE? 11:52:43 IT IS MY UNDERSTANDING WE ARE MOSTLY CONCENTRATING ON 11:52:48 STATIONARY FUEL CELLS. WE DO HAVE SOME. 11:52:52 THANK YOU. I SEE MY TIME HAS EXPIRED. 11:52:56 THANK YOU, MR. SECRETARY. AT THIS TIME, THE CHAIR 11:52:59 RECOGNIZES THE GENTLEMEN FROM VIRGINIA, MR. GRIFFITH. 11:53:01 THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. CONTINUING TALKING ABOUT COAL A 11:53:06 LITTLE BIT, I'M CONCERNED THAT NEW REGULATIONS WILL SLOW GROWTH 11:53:09 AND SEND JOBS TO CHINA. BOTH YOU AN THE PRESIDENT ARE 11:53:13 SUPPORTERS OF CHINA'S ENERGY POLICY. 11:53:15 WE HEAR TIME AND TIME AGAIN FROM THE ADMINISTRATION THAT CHINA 11:53:18 HAS STRONG COMMITMENT TO WIND AND SOLAR ENERGY AND WE NEED TO 11:53:21 CATCH UP OR WE WILL LOSE THE FUTURE. 11:53:23 YOU WOULD AGREE AND ARE AWARE THAT CHINA GETS 70% OF ITS TOTAL 11:53:27 ENERGY AND 80% OF ITS ELECTRICITY FROM COAL, WOULDN'T 11:53:30 YOU AGREE WITH THAT? I HAVE HEARD NUMBERS LIKE 11:53:33 THAT, YES, YES. ISN'T IT TRUE THAT CHINA USES 11:53:37 3.5 TIMES AS MUCH COAL AS THE UNITED STATES AND THAT NUMBER IS 11:53:43 GROWING? I THINK SO. 11:53:44 AGAIN, I'M NOT SURE OF THE EXACT NUMBERS. 11:53:47 OKAY. YOU ARE AWARE THAT UNDER THE 11:53:50 KYOTO PROTOCOL, CHINA HAS NO OBLIGATIONS TO REDUCE HE 11:53:54 EMISSIONS AND IS NOT IMPOSING ANYTHING ANYWHERE XLOES TO THE 11:53:59 EPA'S GREENHOUSE GAS REGULATION ON ITS COAL USE, ISN'T THAT 11:54:02 CORRECT? THAT IS CORRECT. 11:54:03 YOU ARE ALSO AWARE THAT THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT HAS 11:54:07 REPEATEDLY STATED THEY WOULD NEVER PUT A PRICE ON CARBON, 11:54:10 ISN'T THAT ALSO TRUE? I DON'T KNOW. 11:54:15 CHINA HAS COMMITTED VERY EMPHATICALLY TO TRANSITION TO 11:54:20 15% RENEWABLE ENERGY BY 2020. THEY MAY GET TO 20%. 11:54:25 OKAY. WHILE YOU ARE AWARE THAT WIND 11:54:27 AND SOLAR IN CHINA ARE GROWING IN PERCENTAGE TERMS, THEY WILL 11:54:32 NEVER OR AT LEAST NOT ANY TIME IN THE NEAR FUTURE BE EQUAL TO 11:54:40 THEIR RELATIONSHIP OR THEIR RELIANCE ON COAL, ISN'T THAT 11:54:43 TRUE? WELL, IT IS THEIR INTENTION 11:54:48 TO GREATLY DIVERSIFY THEIR ENERGY SUPPLIES. 11:54:52 IN THE SHORT-TERM, THEY ARE HEAVILY DEPENDANT ON COAL BUT 11:54:56 THEY WANT TO DEVELOP WIND AND SOLAR, HYDRO, NUCLEAR. 11:55:00 THE FACTORIES THAT MAKE THE WIND TURBINES AND SOLAR PANELS 11:55:05 FOR EXPORT TO EUROPE AND THE U.S., ISN'T IT TRUE THEY ARE 11:55:09 POWERED BY COAL ENERGY SOURCES? I WOULD PRESUME GIVEN THAT 11:55:12 COAL IS STILL THE DOMINANT FORM OF ENERGY. 11:55:15 DON'T YOU THINK THAT'S A PART OF THEIR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE, 11:55:18 THAT THEY ARE USING A CHEAP SOURCE OF FUEL THAT WE SEEM TO 11:55:25 NOT WANT TO USE IN THIS COULDN'T INTEREST I? 11:55:27 WELL, IT'S MORE COMPLICATED THAN THAT. 11:55:33 I THINK IF YOU DON'T MIND, I WILL TELL YOU A LITTLE STORY. 11:55:36 I TOURED A CHINESE SOLAR COMPANY AND THEY WERE -- THEY WOULD GET 11:55:42 THEIR SILICON FROM COMPANIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND THEN ADD 11:55:46 THE HIGH-VALUE PART OF IT TO MAKE THE MODULES IN CHINA. 11:55:51 I APPRECIATE THAT. MY CONCERN IS, I ONLY GET A SRN 11:55:54 NUMBER OF MINUTES TO ASK YOU QUESTION. 11:55:57 MY CONCERN IS THAT IT APPEARS TO MANY THAT THE FUTURE OF COAL IN 11:56:01 THE UNITED STATES IS MERELY TO MINE IT TO CHINA AND SEND IT FOR 11:56:06 THEM TO USE AND OUR JOBS ARE GOING TO GO OVER THERE. 11:56:09 THEY ARE GOING TO SEND THEIR POLLUTION BACK TO US, BECAUSE 11:56:12 THINK ARE NOT GOING TO HAVE SOME OF THE MORE REASONABLE 11:56:14 REGULATIONS THAT WE HAVE BUT THAT WE ARE NOT USING OUR OWN 11:56:18 COAL FOR OUR MANUFACTURING PURPOSES. 11:56:20 SO AS A PART OF THAT, I'M WONDERING IF YOU HAVE TALKED TO 11:56:22 ANY OF THE FOLKS AT THE EPA ABOUT THEIR SLOWNESS TO PERMIT 11:56:28 NEW COAL MINING OR IS THIS PART OF AAN ADMINISTRATION PLAN TO 11:56:33 SLOW DOWN THE PRODUCTION OF COAL AND FORCE US TO, I THINK, LOSE 11:56:36 JOBS AND NOT USE COAL, BECAUSE THERE ISN'T A SUPPLY AVAILABLE 11:56:40 DOMESTICALLY. I HAVE NOT TALKED TO THE EPA 11:56:44 REGARDING THIS. JUST TO FINISH THAT STORY, CHINA 11:56:47 TAKES ITS SILICON FROM THE UNITED STATES BECAUSE THEY SAY 11:56:51 THAT ENERGY IS SO CHEAP IN THE UNITED STATES AND THAT'S WHY WE 11:56:54 DO IT. IN REGARD TO COAL, YOU WOULD 11:56:57 AGREE THAT IT IS A FAIRLY AFFORDABLE AND RELIABLE SOURCE 11:57:03 OF ENERGY IN THE UNITED STATES AND THAT IT IS A GOOD SOURCE, AT 11:57:06 LEAST OVER THE NEXT 20 OR 30 YEARS, IT IS A GOOD SOURCE THAT 11:57:09 WE SHOULDN'T CRIPPLE, WOULD YOU NO THE AGREE? 11:57:12 WELL, I THINK THAT'S WHY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IS 11:57:14 COMMITTED TO DEVELOPING THOSE TECHNOLOGIES, TO USE COAL AS 11:57:18 CLEANLY AS POSSIBLE. I WOULD ENCOURAGE YOU TO WORK 11:57:19 WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY TO MAKE SURE 11:57:22 THEY DON'T SHUT DOWN YOUR SUPPLY FOR THOSE PURPOSES AND OTHER 11:57:25 PURPOSES. THANK YOU. 11:57:27 THANK YOU. THANK YOU. 11:57:28 AT THIS TIME, I RECOGNIZE THE GENTLEMEN FROM OHIO -- NO, FROM 11:57:37 TEXAS, DR. BURGESS. THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN. 11:57:41 DOCTOR CHU, APPRECIATE YOU BEING HERE AND APPRECIATE HOW GENEROUS 11:57:44 YOU HAVE BEEN WITH YOUR TIME OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS TO VISIT 11:57:47 WITH MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE OUTSIDE OF THE COMMITTEE ROOM. 11:57:52 IN RESPONSE TO A QUESTION FROM THE GENTLEMEN FROM MISSISSIPPI 11:57:57 ABOUT ANWAR AND WHETHER OR NOT THE PRESIDENT WOULD CONSIDER 11:57:59 THAT, YOU SAID THERE WERE OTHER SITES FROM ALASKA THAT THE 11:58:03 PRESIDENT WAS LOOKING AT. IN ALL ON ESSTI, HIS BACKGROUND 11:58:07 AS A COMMUNITY ORGANIZER, YOU ARE THE ENERGY EXPERT. 11:58:10 ARE YOU HELPING HIM WITH THAT? WELL, IT IS ACTUALLY THIS IS 11:58:18 THE DOMAIN OF THE SECRETARY OF INTERIOR. 11:58:20 SO IT IS THE SECRETARY OF INTERIOR THAT WOULD BE HELPING 11:58:23 HIM WITH THAT. HE HAS SOME PETROLEUM PEOPLE 11:58:26 THAT ARE HELPING HIM MAKE THAT DECISION? 11:58:28 I WOULD THINK SO, YES. WE HAVE TO FIND THAT OUT. 11:58:32 WE CAN HELP HIM. NOW, ALSO MENTIONED, PREVIOUS 11:58:36 ANSWER TO A PREVIOUS QUESTION, YOU SAID OIL CAN'T BE OUR ONLY 11:58:40 SOLUTION. WE HAVE 2% OF RECEIPT SERVES AND 11:58:46 25% OF THE CONSUMPTION. A RESOURCE WHERE WE DO HAVE 11:58:49 SIGNIFICANT RESERVES IS NATURAL GAS. 11:58:51 IN MY PART OF TEXAS, WE HAVE V NEW TECHNOLOGY THAT ALLOWS 11:58:57 RECOVERY OF NATURAL GAS FROM AREAS THAT ARE PREVIOUSLY 11:58:59 THOUGHT TO BE