COUNTRY MUSIC
JONATHAN REBEL, A PUPPET BASSETT HOUND SINGING NOBODY KNOWS THE TROUBLE I'VE SEEN. BOBBY RINGS DOORBELL AND TALKS TO DOG.
Myrtle - Beach - Tornado
THREE TORNADOES TOUCH DOWN IN SOUTH CAROLINA.
UK Briefing Vaccine
Prof Van Tam: I've told my mum to get ready for vaccine
PENTAGON-AFGHANISTAN BRIEFING HO
ENTERTAINMENT DAILY: ENT2- JONATHAN WILKES
TAPE_NUMBER: EF01/0146 IN_TIME: 14:30:07 LENGTH: 02:24 SOURCES: APTN/VIRGIN RECORDS RESTRICTIONS: Shots 1, 3, 7 & 9 = VIRGIN RECORDS, No re-use/re-sale without clearance FEED: VARIOUS (THE ABOVE TIME-CODE IS TIME-OF-DAY) SCRIPT: xfa Title: Jonathan Wilkes Date: January 2001 Location: Dublin, Ireland They say that the entertainment business is all about who you know, and it looks like there's no exception to that rule when it comes to JONATHAN WILKES. You may not have heard his name yet, but you no doubt soon will do. With a very familiar British regional accent, and with devilish eyebrows, it comes as no surprise that Wilkes is the best friend and flatmate of none other than ROBBIE WILLIAMS. His first single "Just Another Day" is not due for release in Europe until March but APTN caught up with the young singer when he was about to get on stage at the recent Dublin Childline concert. The song was written by Eliot Kennedy, the musical genius behind such big names as the Spice Girls, Take That, Boyzone, 5ive and S Club 7, and the video features Wilkes running around a beach with a bunch of his friends - but not our Robbie. Wilkes decided to become a singer when his hopes of becoming a professional football player were dashed when he was told he wasn't good enough. So, he asked his best pal Robbie for help and it wasn't long before Wilkes was performing to record company executives who started a bidding war for the youngster. Innocent Records finally landed the deal with the young singer and now it looks as though the world is Wilkes' oyster. With not only Robbie Williams and Eliot Kennedy behind him but also songwriters Bryan Adams and Guy Chambers, it looks like the world is set for another singing superstar. SHOTLIST: 1.Clip ' Just Another Day ' 2.sot Jonathan Wilkes 3.Clip ' Just Another Day ' 4.b-roll Robbie Williams & Jonathan Wilkes at Q Awards 6.sot Jonathan Wilkes 7.clip ' Just Another Day ' 8.sot Jonathan Wilkes 9.clip 'Just Another Day' ?
The guest of 8:20 am: the big interview: program of September 09, 2022
Radio France: filmed programmes
Interview with John Loftus pt 1
INTERVIEWER: Tell me your full name and spell it. 10:01:10>>> JOHN LOFTUS: John Loftus L-O-F as in Frank T- U- S as in Sam. INTERVIEWER: And do you have a title or a role? 10:10:17>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Ah former federal prosecutor and historian. INTERVIEWER: How did you come to be interested in a topic as specific as the topic anti-Semitism? 10:20:25>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I was working for the Attorney General of the United States when I really first came across Antisemitism. I had been assigned to do the CIA cases and the Nazi war crimes cases. Then one day I discovered that many of the Nazi's I'd been assigned to prosecute were on the CIA payroll and had been covered up for years. I ended up being a whistle blower, appeared on 60 minutes, and testifying before congress. Um it was only when I was working on those Nazi war crimes cases did I realize the extent of Antisemitism not only in Europe but in the United States. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE 11:10:21>>> JOHN LOFTUS: As I went through State Department and American Intelligence files I found a lot of direct references that could be called Antisemitism. You know references like oily Jews in State Department reports. You know outright anti-Semitic language. I think it was very common among Ivy league campuses in the 20's and 30's to have a certain anti-Semitic background. And a lot of that permeated the State Department when they went on. Also the fact that many of the Arabic scholars came from very conservative Christian missionary schools in the Middle East. Brought with them a very tainted background on how they perceived Israel. INTERVIEWER: How did this affect the US policies? 11:55:23>>> JOHN LOFTUS: For a long time it was ambivalent. The American people always supported Israel. But for the better part of the 20th century we had a different foreign policy in the State Department and Intelligence Community. And there response was whatever you might say in public about liking the Jews it really is in America's long-term national interest to obtain the cheap and consistent supply of oil. The Arabs had it the Jews didn't. It's as simple as that. it really wasn't about Antisemitism or bigotry it was about greed. You know the old joke if Moses had turned right and settled in Kuwait we probably would have made Israel the 51st state but Israel had no oil and became expendable to American and European reproach --- with the Arabs. INTERVIEWER: But you don't really believe that that's the case that Israel should be seen as expendable INAUDIBLE? 12:50:28>>> JOHN LOFTUS: The American public certainly doesn't see Israel as expendable or as an irritant or in fact the proof is that we non Jews consistently elect congressmen and senators who give more of our tax dollars to Israel every year than any other nation on earth. The American people are solidly on Israel's side. The problem is multinational oil companies sometimes have greater access to the corridors of power than the average citizen. INTERVIEWER: Why do you think the American people are solidly on the side of Israel? 13:22:29>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Well I think the American people understand the basic truth of the situation. Here was a people who belong on their land. They're a democracy. The only democracy in the Middle East. Um and we've always had a soft heart for the underdog. INTERVIEWER: Why do you think despite all the soviet spies outright spies INAUDIBLE and yet Jonathan pollard there seems to be a quiet refusal to adjust the case what is so mysterious? 13:59:25>>> JOHN LOFTUS: My next book is about Jonathan Pollard. I'm using his case to illuminate what's going on in the Middle East now. Pollard wanted to be a knight on a white horse and save Israel. He knew that America was holding back information. And what he did was wrong and stupid but pollard wandered into a mind field. He was being framed by the soviets for a terrible intelligence disaster that coincidentally happened the same time. we lost all our agents behind the iron curtain. America had gone blind. We were not prepared for a soviet attack. The soviets made it appear as if Jonathan Pollard gave that information to Israel and then a Russian spy in Israel leaked it back. So many people at the time including me we thought that Jonathan Pollard was a serial killer you know . It turns out it was a complete fraud and every one had been taken. The real betrayers were Aldridge Ames and Robert Hanssen 2 highly placed officials inside our own bureaucracy. 15:03:02>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So instead of studying the drunken wasp and the Russians sent us to chase the Jew boy and everybody fell for it. So but the Russian frame wasn't Pollard's only problem he had problems with some right wing politicians in Israel as well. And they had been lobbying for years to keep him locked up. so it's a very complex story. I'm going to be breaking a lot of it in my new book and some magazine articles that will be published in June. INTERVIEWER: Please repeat that answer. 15:55:05>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Jonathan Pollard really was a young man who blundered into a 3 way cross fire and didn't know. he was aware that US intelligence was withholding promised information from Israel. Um that were actually (PAUSE) So what he did was wrong and stupid but you know his intentions were to help Israel by sending soviet information um soviet supplies to terrorist groups. Primarily that was his goal. The soviets in turn framed Pollard for something else. The real reason his sentence was so extreme was that we were tricked by the soviets into believe that Jonathan Pollard had given Israel a list of all our agents inside Russia. And that a Russian agent in Israel then got a hold of information passed it to Moscow. And in the course of a few months every spy we had behind the iron curtain was captured or killed. It was the worst intelligence disaster in American history. And all the evidence pointed to Jonathan pollard. We couldn't admit that in court because it would ah we couldn't reveal that America had gone blind. That the Russians could attack without warning. We had no intelligences assets left. 17:13:02>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So that was the reason for the sudden change an attitude and why everyone went after him. to us he was a serial killer. It turns out pollard didn't do it. Um the real traders were a drunken wasp inside the CIA named Aldridge Ames and his counter part in the FBI named Robert Hanssen. They had both arrested and have now confessed that they sold the news. But the intelligence community doesn't want to admit a blunder of this magnitude. And so pollard ah is sitting in jail. He should have received a sentence of 15 years out in 3. he's now on his 18th year in prison. INTERVIEWER: As far as the Israel situation today what do you think is motivating the State Department and it's policy? 18:09:25>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Well I think it was. the State Department's policy towards Israel has pretty much Arab appeasement. After 9/11 all that's changed. Israel has quietly been working as a major player in the American wind up to the war with Iraq. Um last summer the king of Jordan allowed us to set up a joint Israeli American airbase on the border with Iraq. And for 6 months we had Israeli pilots flying those Apache helicopters that we gave Israel and they had been mapping the terrain every night all across Iraq looking for missile sites buried, weapon things. And it was very, very helpful. But 3 months later we started to insert American special forces on the ground all over Iraq. Again with Israel's help. Israel has actually had 2 sites in the negative where they've been secretly training American troops in urban warfare at night against biological and chemical weapons. 19:11:17>>> JOHN LOFTUS: And the training has been invaluable. Um American technology has evolved rapidly even since the Afghanistan's war and we've taken a couple of pages out of some of the Israeli strategy book., INTERVIEWER: Do you have no more contacts with Intelligence? 19:31:08>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Um for the last 20 years I have been a lawyer for every whistle blower in the pentagon and the CIA and um I have to screen material before publication but ah you know my clients pay me a dollar a piece. So I have about 500 senior people in the intelligence community that give me information. So I'm probably the worst paid lawyer in America but I'm among the best informed. There is very little that I don't hear about at some point. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE USS Liberty? 20:06:28>>> JOHN LOFTUS: The myth was that ah you know that Israel hit the ship by accident. INTERVIEWER: Start with Israel hit? 20:13:27>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Oh. There have been a lot of myths about the Israel ah. There have been a lot of myths about Israel's attack on the USS Liberty. Ah many members on the crew feel that the, the liberty was intentionally attack to disguise an ongoing Israeli atrocity. Israelis say that publicly that the attack was a mistake. The truth is something else. In my last book The Secret War Against the Jews I interview people on all sides. What happened is that the Liberty was sent off the coast of Israel to monitor Israeli military communications and to give them to the Arabs. We were helping the Egyptians to prepare a counter attack. What the and Lyndon Johnson wanted to throw the Arabs a bone give them a little intelligence help under the table so they'd still stay friends with us. The, Lyndon Johnson didn't know that the Israelis had a spy on the Egyptian general staff. 21:18:00>>> JOHN LOFTUS: And learned of the Liberty's role within a few hours. A hot debate took place in the tunnel in Israel and ah about what to do about the Liberty. One faction wanted to sink the ship. One bomb would have put it in the bottom of the Mediterranean in seconds. But then the Ramatcall Isaac Rubin said Lyndon Johnson might be at war with Israel but the American people are not. And Rubin wanted to compromise. In order to save Israeli lives they would have to put the Liberty spy gear out of commission but it had to be done with a minimum loss of American lives. That's why the raid on the Liberty took place in 3 different stages. The first group of planes buzzed the ship and um so the American sailors would have time to get below decks and button themselves up out of harms way. the scorned group put maypon rockets on the spying antennas on top of the ship and burned them all out. the third group came in torpedo boats but they only fired one torpedo precisely into the one water tight hold where the Liberty spy computer was. So every piece of espionage gear was knocked out. 90 % of the American crew survived. It was the best the Israelis could do. then the Israelis called in their American counter part and told them what they had done to the Liberty and why. And Lyndon Johnson asked the government of Israel to pretend it was all a mistake. Johnson reimbursed Israel under the table for all the compensation it paid for the ship. INTERVIEWER: Do you see any comparison in the Arab in the wake of the 9/11 attacks? 23:07:22>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I think there are a lot of parallels between modern Antisemitism and pre World War II Antisemitism. Um after World War I um the a fisal(?) was prepared to have a Jewish national home established and they would publish papers and Mecca Madean was saying we should welcome the Jews back it would be good for industry and they have a right to live in this land. British intelligence was furious and so they organized anti-Semitic riots systematically in the 20's and 30's to create enough of an uproar to force a reversal in British policy. So that Antisemitism was really engineered from the outside. There were ah Syrian fanatic named Isadine was sent down in the 30's to lead a terrorist attack against Israel. In fact they've named the Isadine a Hamas brigades after him. He's INTERVIEWER: Inaudible? 24:02:06>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Yeah Acasam. Isidine A, Isidine Ahasam is the sort of the patriot saint if you will of Islamic terrorists and very few people realize that many of these early programs were organized by French and British, primarily British intelligence against the greaman(?), against the, the Jews. Then the Germans came in. there was a militant Nazi party flourishing in Egypt um that later became known as the Muslim brotherhood. It really had Nazi roots. Even after the war there was a, a Nazi propagandist who was allowed to move to Cairo to keep the movement flourishing. I see it more of an evolution that Antisemitism is cyclical. And it always comes back if someone is willing to make a profit off it. And there have nations have have funded anti-Semitic movements, anti-Israeli movements for a long, long time. the classic case is Yassar Arafat. What's his real name? Most people don't know. it's Abdullah Husani. His clan was the Nazi clan of Jerusalem. Their home was bulldozed and is now part of the great plaza facing the western wall. 25:19:23>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So first they worked for the Nazi. And then in the 50's they defected and went to work for the communists. And now of course Arafat is a noble prize winner. But ah the whole concept of Antisemitism if fundamentally repugnant to Islam. If ah you go back and read the sins of the prophet Mohamed Rea you find a very different view. Mohammed honored Jews. He married a Jew, he forbade prosecution of Jews, he would stand up and bow when a Jewish passed. The Koran says explicitly that the children of Israel shall live in their land till the end of time when Allah will gather them all together. And Mohamed specifically said the Jews will have their holy place in the West meaning Jerusalem while we will have ours in the East meaning Mecca. Um in the several first centuries of the Calafet(?) there was an extraordinary bond between the Jews and the Muslims. They were both people of the book. They were the only 2 societies on earth that required literacy to practice their faiths. 26:24:15>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So there was a great deal of interplay and cooperation between them. when we Christians were having our dark ages the Jews and Muslims were having a golden age. If you wanted to go to law school or med school you went to a Muslim in Spain and were taught by a Jewish professor. That was the age of Momoties(?). It wasn't perfect but it was a, a very splendid society. Then about 3 centuries ago the Arab Muslims decided they could control (PHONE) INTERVIEWER: Ok 27:00:10>>> JOHN LOFTUS: About 3 centuries ago the Arab dictators decided they could control their people better if they banned the printing press. Now the Muslim faith depended upon literacy. And Mohamed said the Koran is a beautiful but ambiguous poem. It can be interpreted in 72 different ways and 71 of them will be false. Well if you can't read the Hadith encyclopedia of all the witnesses that knew Mohammed during his life you can't understand it. What happened when they banned the printing press was that the peasants were easy to control but they were also easier to manipulate religiously. They could take quotes from the Koran out of context and make it appear as though Mohamed favored the persecution of Jews. Ah and it was a very successful campaign. In any religious the Tarah (PAUSE)and the Koran you can take passages out of context and give them a very different spin. So for 300 years one group in particular the Whabies totally abused the Koran to stand it on its head and to use it as an instrument of warfare and a mandate for anti-Semitism. Whabieism was condemned as a heracy(?) more than 60 times for the Muslims but it prospered largely because the Whabies attacked Mecca and Medina and ah established a new kingdom the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 28:26:01>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So here we have quite frankly one of the greatest groups of bigots of all time blessed with an unimaginable wealth. It was as if David Duke captured the state of Texas and used it to export the Klu Klux Klan. The Klu the Whabieism ah is the Klu Klux Klan of the Muslim world. They were 1.2 billion Muslims only 15% of them are Arabs. Only a tiny percentage are Whabies. But their enormous wealth has had a huge impact on the world. Only 2 nations every really practiced Whabieism Saudi Arabia and the Taliban. And um what the Saudis have been doing is taking their oil money and exporting Whabieism across America around the world. 80% of American mosque are financially dependent on Saudi subsidies for their survival. In return the Saudis get to name who the religious instructors are. They set things called the World Association of Muslim Youth. So Bin Ladin's brothers were the coordinators of it. 29:28:17>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So it was a talent spotting outfit from the most extreme elements of the Arab society. The Saudi approach was very simple ah we're gonna bribe our clerks into looking the other way while we go to Paris to go to brothels. We're also going to bribe the terrorist into staying out of Saudi Arabia and go blow up someone else. And so on 9/11 we found out that we were someone else. And all the years and years of turning a blind eye to Saudi support for terrorism suddenly evaporated. One intelligence official told me that ah we knew for years that the Saudis were funding terrorism but they were selling us oil at a discount besides they were only killing Jews. They weren't killing Americans. Well that kind of bigoted indifference yeah lay amid the rubble on September 11th. But that was the genuine attitude. You know we knew the Saudis were doing but we'd close our eyes to it. Did we know that the Saudis were hiring groups to attack Israel? Absolutely we knew it all. INTERVIEWER: If it wasn't for the US policy in the Middle East it would have been someone else had the US not been as a supporter of Israel is that accurate do you believe? 30:45:12>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I think that from the Saudi point of view and the Whabie point of view the ultimately enemy really isn't Israel it's western democracies. It's modernism. You know whether it's in France or Britain that these societies the societies have to be destroyed. They want total right wing Muslim domination of the world. That is literally what they believe in. and they are willing to use any means including terrorism to attain it. Not all Saudis. half of the royal Saudi family are very friendly to us. They keep selling us their oil and their kids go to college here. But the right wing group that's now coming into power is extremely right wing. And they have been behind some of the most violent acts in recent years. So I've rounded up a group of lawyers in America last April and I said why don't we file a lawsuit against the Saudi loyal family a class action on behalf of all the victims of 911 I'll give you all the evidence and line up all the experts. And I'll do it for free I do all my legal work for free. But ah so we did it on august 15th we filed a 1 trillion dollar lawsuit against the Saudi royal family, Saudi banks, Saudi charities. They had a whole system for money laundering that directly supported the attackers on 911. INTERVIEWER: Were there any warnings that the State Department and the intelligence community heard? 32:18:00>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Well prior to 911 it wasn't that we failed to connect the dots we were telling the people out in the field don't send us anymore dots. And we all there was a hold on any investigation of the Saudis and the Saudis link to terrorism. Oliver North said every time that I tried to do something about terrorist in the Middle East I was told to stop because it'll embarrass he Saudis. The Saudi oil wealth and its alliance with out State Department was so pervasive that there was an article of faith in the CIA and the FBI a good way to ruin your career is to talk about the Saudis and terrorism. Everybody at senior levels knew and they were doing their best to suppress it. To keep a lid on it the story. So there will be a day of reckoning as people start, if congress is really serious about investigation how we came to this they we find scores of FBI and CIA agents who say you know I tried to warn them and no one would listen. Al Qaeda expert John O'Neil went around Washington banging on doors saying this man Osmo Bin Laden is a mad man he's going to attack America he's gonna kill people and the Saudis are funding it. And everyone told him to go away. So John quit the FBI in disgust and 2 weeks later he was at new job as chief of security at the twin trade towers and died in the attack. 33:44:19>>> JOHN LOFTUS: The irony is that the person best equipped to blow the lid on how the bureaucrats in Washington were covering up the Saudi al Qaeda was himself killed by Al Qaeda on 911. INTERVIEWER: Inaudible 34:16:10>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Yeah I think the Saudi point of view was that they would fund any group that would be anti Israel. See Israel had done something that really offended the Saudis. Whatever else they may have done the Israelis took every Palestinian kid and put him in school. From kindergarten to university. 16 new universities on the West Bank alone. So for the first time in 300 years Israel created a literate Arab class. The literacy rate among Palestinians is 97%. Among the highest in the entire Arab world. The Palestinians were exposed to western business practices, western values to democracy. And it looked as the soviet union collapsed that no one was funding terrorism that a peace treaty might appear and there was a brief lull of Oslo where it looked like there might be a Palestinian nation at peace with Israel and it would be the first Arab democracy. 35:10:12>>> JOHN LOFTUS: King Fahad was determined to stop that. he said next to the Jews we hate the Palestinians the most. The Palestinians would be a cancer in the Arab world because they would be a self ruling people that couldn't be under the thumbs of the dictators. So what the Saudis did was to go around run up all the groups that had previously been funded by the communist and take them over. Groups like the Palestinian Islamic jihad came on the Saudi payroll in the 80's. and Islamic jihad's role was not just to kill Jews but to kill any Palestinian who was willing to work with Israel for peace or to recognize the state of Israel. So every time that Israel and the Palestinians got close to a peace agreement the Saudis would wreck it by funneling more money through their charity pipelines. And groups like Islamic jihad would send in suicide bombers to blow the peace apart. So the Saudi strategy was to block the creation of a Palestinian state. They were betraying their Arab brothers. They had to do it secretly through a cutout through charities and fund groups like Hamas and Islamic jihad to wreck the peace process. A very cynical strategy. INTERVIEWER: So it's not the Americans and the Israelis INAUDIBLE? 36:26:08>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Yes democracy will be a cancer in the Arab peninsula. As soon as the first Arab democracy is established very state will ah clamor. Ah who would ever elect the Saudi royal family to be their rulers. They have no popular support. I think ah as we establish a western democracy in Iraq that will greatly change the entire political structure of that land. You'll have a chain of secular Muslim states from turkey through Iraq, through Jordan and it will cut the Arabia peninsula down the middle and the separate the rouge states of Iran and Syria. And how long will their dictators last ah with American funded propaganda on their borders beating radio and TV signals in. I think the world is gonna be changing very rapidly. I think that America's finally recognizing that we don't need the oil as much as we need good strong democracies in the Middle East. We need more Israel's. Let the people decide their own lives. INTERVIEWER: When it comes to the war on terror how do you see it concerning the US and Israel. Is one side showing too much restraint, not enough? 37:52:10>>> JOHN LOFTUS: Historically America has always twisted Israel's arm to show restraint on its war on terrorism. Um and I think that Israel has done remarkable. I mean sending in ground troops to Jenin was nothing short of heroic you know that we would minimize civilian causalities um despite the Arab propaganda there was a massacre in Jenin um it turns out there wasn't it was a massive hoax. The American approach in Afghanistan was not to send in ground troops but to use smart bombs. You know had we gone into a Jenin situation we would have leveled it. and then poked with a crater that there were al Qaeda there. Um so there are differences in approach. The new American strategy in the Iraq war is pretty sophisticated though. In Afghanistan we had ah green berets on horseback in with the tribesmen with cell phones and they would call up to the B52 bomber 5 miles up to drop bombs ahead of them. well in Iraq the real key technology is that we're not using cell phones we're using palm pilots. A little device you point it at an Iraqi tank 5 kilometers away and press a button. A laser beam measures it's coordinates, automatically dials up to the B-52 and instantly programs the smart bomb computer. And the smart bomb then steers itself down 5 miles and hits within 3 meters of the center of the tank. 39:11:14>>> JOHN LOFTUS: So there will be fewer civilian causalities because of these tremendous technological advances. But ah in the long run the only way to stop terrorism is to cut off the funding. Terrorism is a very expensive industry. And it is an industry. It takes a million dollars per operation on average. It's not just the cost of you know dynamite and a suicide bombers belt. You have to have the safe house, the trainers, the recruiters, transportation, documents. Very expensive and if we want terrorism to stop we have to tell the Saudis to stop funding it. We have to clamp down those nations like ah Afghanistan and Iraq that have become safe havens for terrorism. Now there are fewer and fewer places on the planet where terrorist can regroup, set up training schools and find a safe haven for killing. So we're changing the rules. We're not twisting Israel's arm anymore we're twisting Arab arms to become democratic states because nations that have democracies very rarely indulge in terrorism or engage in war. INTERVIEWER: Can you talk about pre world war II Arab sympathy versus today's views towards them? 40:30:14>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I think before world war II the Arabian peninsula was a loose conglomeration of you know clans the British called them tribes with flags. But they generally had no sense of pan Arab nationalism that was largely created by the British foreign office to try and group all the Arabs back together. The idea was to drive the French out of Syria and ah you know make Arabia safe for the British oil companies. I think that the Antisemitism that existed was actually imported in many ways. Inside Palestine for example most of the Palestinians had gotten along well with the Jews. They were happy to see more Jewish immigration because it was bringing in jobs. It was a literally an empty land. Years of plagues and um had decimated Jerusalem for example ah up until the civil war all that was there was the old city. And um it could hold 6 times as many inhabitants. With Jewish immigration came renovations and you know sewer systems and water lines and it ended the plagues that use to ah to discriminate the populations. 41:45:01>>> JOHN LOFTUS: The Arab populations actually moved into Israel along with waves of Al-- - because there was work there and an incredible amount of religious tones. Ah many people don't realize that between 1948 when the Jordanians seized the city and 67 the Jews were persecuted. Jewish homes were burned down. Families that had lived in a Jewish home for centuries their synagogues were destroyed. Jews were not allowed to worship at all. In 67 when Israel took Jerusalem they opened up the temple to people of all faiths for free access. I think it was the very compassionate and tolerant nature of Israeli society had a dramatic impact on their peace with their Arab neighbors. But again terrorism had to be exported. And back in the 20's they would bring people in from Iraq for terrorism or from Syria. Um Arafat ah really operated almost entirely from foreign bases except for one brief 3 year period he wasn't even in Palestine. INTERVIEWER: What do you think is motivating the Israeli Palestinian conflict today from within? 43:10:10>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I'm a cynic. I think that money is at the root of all racism. Arafat for example is all about money. I mean he'll any flavor you want. he was a Nazi once now he's a communist now he's you know pro American. The Israeli counsel general told me that Arafat doesn't ever want to have a Palestinian nation because if he does he won't be able to steal 20% of the PA's budget he'll have an opposition party. He'll have budgets. He'll have accountability and audits. So Arafat ironically is betraying his own people to wreck peace plans. Every time they get close his goal is the status quo to enrich his clan. He's about the money. The money has an impact. There's a huge amount of unemployment among Palestinian youth and let's face it a lot of teenage boys are near social anyways its just the age they go through. And if someone says to them we're gonna give your family 35,000 dollars and you'll be a hero. You'll be a suicide bomber um your family will be taken care of for life and instead of being an unemployed bum you'll be this your family will revere you forever. Well some teenage boys will find that attractive because of the money. You take their money away and it won't happen. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE? 44:43:21>>> JOHN LOFTUS: The average Palestinian does just want to live their lives and coexist in peace. When I was doing interviews in the West Bank the refrain was very typical. All the people I spoke to said we don't want Arab extremist we don't want Jewish extremist we want the tourist back. They want jobs for their kids. They want a livelihood. The terrible price as people like Arafat and the Saudis have sandbagged the peace process and after Oslo the interfata has caused a huge loss in Palestinian income um by building a barrier around Israel to keep the Palestinians tradesmen out. It's causing a huge depression on Palestinian society. And poverty breeds hatred and fear. And there's just so many lives being split up and young kids get suckered into believing. Sometimes old nations too. France and Germany should be extremely embarrassed by their recent conduct. INTERVIEWER: INAUDIBLE how could the US defeat this? 46:00:26>>> JOHN LOFTUS: In the short run the United States will obtain the INAUDIBLE of Arab radicals but so what. The real answer in the long run is education. That's why for several years I was the first Irish catholic president of the flora Holocaust museum. We have to education kids of all races and religions. That we must have a common bond against genesis. I think that by resorting freedom of speech and the press and resorting full pubic education throughout the Arab peninsula that alone will have a major impact. For example now the polls shows that 83% of the population of Iran wants the Mulas gone. They want to live in a democratic western society because they see it on TV. As much as we laugh at TV it has had a major impact on the Arab world. That ah you know the mulas tried to ban the satellite dishes in Iran because the kids were finding out there was oil in Iran. They wanted to know where the money was going. 47:01:02>>> JOHN LOFTUS: I think ah you know as much as we knock CNN as the crescent news network it is penetrating Arab society. We need to more of that. I tell my Jewish friends that I think that Jews don't have the genes for public relations. There something missing in your DNA code. There should be you know Arab language broadcasting so that Israel's position gets out. we should have an organized effort to countenance the vast waves of lies that come out. um Israel now was the initiator of the 67 war and the 73 war. Absurd. A lot of kids don't know that the the UN withdrew broke every promise to Israel in 67. allowed the blockade action blockade the straits of Tehran. Refused to allow a ship to go I the panama canal even to carry Israel goods. Even if it was owned by a Christian being sent to another Christian. Every international agreement was violated. But Arab propaganda has had a tremendous effect. We've had an entire generation of bigots raised in the Middle East. And it's gonna take a long while for that to change.
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Sound Bite: Robert Downey Jr. I’ve had a production company and I’m gonna have another one. This was my buddy Dido who is just such a character who’s just such a character wrote this book that you could say was a boo, it was a serious of vignettes. My buddy Jonathan Elias who really is the guy who nobody, you know often times in movie the person who really sparked the idea is never mentioned at the junket. Jonathan Elias, Jonathan Elias. I said were going to have to develop this that means I have to talk to someone that is really producing and that was Trudy. Financing, up, down, the whole who-ha and then Sting.
UK US - Excerpt of interview with Rice and Straw
NAME: UK US 20060402I TAPE: EF06/0281 IN_TIME: 10:20:18:08 DURATION: 00:04:07:06 SOURCES: ITV'S JONATHAN DIMBLEBY PROGRAMME DATELINE: Liverpool - 1 April 2006 RESTRICTIONS: Must Credit/No Library Rights MUST CREDIT "ITV1'S JONATHAN DIMBLEBY PROGRAMME" NO LIBRARY ACCESS SHOTLIST 1. British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw and US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer: "Excuse me, you don't link those mistakes that you've made in any degree to the suffering today, the killing today in Iraq, you don't think if you'd done it differently we might be spared that today?" 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleezza Rice, US Secretary of State "Well, you know history will tell because you can never tell. And I'm enough of an historian to know that things that look like brilliant strategy in the immediate period later look like terribly mistaken or in fact really mistaken strategies." 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "Yeah, but we're getting the." 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleezza Rice, US Secretary of State: "And ones that at the time looked like mistakes later have turned out to have been exactly the right to do so I'll let history judge those things." 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "We have senior Iraqis talking about civil war, indeed we have the American ambassador to Iraq saying that Iraq now, and I quote him exactly 'is really vulnerable to civil war'. Do you accept what he says?" 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleezza Rice, U.S. Secretary of State "Of course it's vulnerable when you have people like Zarqawi (Jordanian-born leader of al-Qaida in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi) trying to stimulate civil war and trying to foment civil war. Of course it's vulnerable when it's had years of sectarian tension where people settle their differences by, just give me a moment, where people settle their differences either by violence or by repression and are now trying to do that by politics and by compromise but we have to look at the alternative and the alternative is that these people would continue to live in the captivity of a tyrant, that Saddam Hussein would continue to threaten his neighbours and his own people, that period is over and the Iraqis are now on a course, a very difficult course, toward a more democratic future and that's something that we should celebrate, difficult as it is, it is better than the alternative." 8. Wide of the room 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Secretary "But I was, I was present in the cabinet room in Downing Street on two or three occasions at least when we had detailed discussions with the prime minister and groups of Iraqi experts about the ethnic make-up of Iraq and of course the whole history of what had happened from the time of his liberation...." 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, journalists "So you, so you knew there was a risk." 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Secretary "Of course we knew there was risk." 12. Wide shot of the room 13. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleezza Rice, US Secretary of State "The United States very much wants to try people and get them out of Guantanamo but I'm." 14. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "But you may not be able to get them out of Guantanamo, they may stay there indefinitely" 15. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleezza Rice, US Secretary of State "Until we can try people or until we can release them to their governments we're most certainly not going to release them on the general population." 16. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "So there's, there's no, there's no time limits..." 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleeza Rice, US Secretary of State "Well, let's remember why people are in Guantanamo." 18. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "The United States in the end does reserve from your perspective the right to take pre-emptive military action against Iran if you feel that is the only way to ensure that they comply with what you regard as the proper outcome." 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleeza Rice, US Secretary of State "Let me be very clear and go to the bottom line. Iran is not Iraq. I know that's what's on people's minds. Iran is not Iraq. The circumstances are different, we don't have 12 years of Security Council resolutions, a case in which a state attacked its neighbour, tried to annex its neighbour, as it did with Kuwait where we were still in a state of war after the armistice of 1991. I just want to be very clear, Iran is not Iraq. However, the president of the United States doesn't take his options off the table. We are committed to a diplomatic course because we believe that a diplomatic course can work." 20. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "So when your good friend Jack Straw says it's inconceivable that military action would be taken and he cannot imagine circumstances, are you with him or are you saying: 'Hang about, we do reserve that option?" 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Affairs Secretary: "She is of a different position, a slightly different position.." 22. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleeza Rice, US Secretary of State "I do have a slightly different position." 23. Wide of the room UPSOUND (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "We know that George Bush, the president, refers to his father as 41, is it true that he refers to you as 44?" 24. Close up of Rice laughing 25. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleeza Rice, US Secretary of State "Well, not, not that I've heard. I'm very happy doing this and I'll be a very happy academic someday." 26. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "And you won't accept under any circumstances any nominations for the presidency? 27. SOUNDBITE (English) Condoleeza Rice, US Secretary of State "Jonathan, I don't know how many ways to say no. I think I've said it many times. 28. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Dimbleby, interviewer "That must be very disappointing for you that she won't say yes, because you admire her so much you'd like her as president, wouldn't you?" 29. SOUNDBITE (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Secretary "That's a matter for the American people but above all for Secretary Rice." 30. Wide of the room STORYLINE US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Sunday said in an interview to be broadcast on British television that the United States was "committed" to pursuing a diplomatic solution to the Iranian nuclear crisis. In an interview with ITV1's Jonathan Dimbleby programme, recorded in Liverpool on Saturday, she acknowledged widespread concerns that the current standoff between the UN Security Council and Iran could lead to the US taking pre-emptive military action. But she stressed that "Iran is not Iraq. I know that's what's on people's minds. The circumstances are different". "I just want to be very clear, Iran is not Iraq. However, the president of the United States doesn't take his options off the table; we are committed to a diplomatic course because we believe that a diplomatic course can work," she went on to say. When questioned about recent comments made by the US ambassador to Iraq about the situation in that country, Rice said that although Iraq was "vulnerable" to civil war, the current situation it was still better than the alternative. "Of course it's vulnerable when you have people like Zarqawi trying to stimulate civil war and trying to foment civil war...but we have to look at the alternative and the alternative is that these people would continue to live in the captivity of a tyrant," she said. Rice was being interviewed together with her British counterpart, Jack Straw, who admitted that prior to the invasion of Iraq in March 2003, the British government had been aware of the possible threat of a spiralling religious conflict following the military intervention.
INTERVIEW W/ DICK CHENEY ON BIN LADEN KILLING - MIXED
JON KARL INTERVIEW WITH VICE PRESIDENT DICK CHENEY ON THE KILLING OF OBL / OSAMA BIN LADEN. MIXED / SWITCHED ABC NEWS - WORLD NEWS WITH DIANE SAWYER "DICK CHENEY INTERVIEW" INTERVIEW WITH DICK CHENEY CORRESPONDENT: JONATHAN KARL PRODUCER: SIMMONS (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) JONATHAN KARL: 10:00:01 (approx) Mr. Vice President, thank you for taking time to talk to us on this day of all days. What went through your mind when you heard the news? DICK CHENEY: 10:00:06 Well, I first heard about it last night-- when the first press reports started coming in. You know, those of us who've been involved over the years in the counterterrorism program and dealing with 9/11 and so forth so of-- capturing Osama bin Laden was the ultimate goal. The ultimate objective. It doesn't solve all the problems by any means, but it's clearly been a priority for the last two administrations. And I think like most Americans I felt a great sense of satisfaction when I found out that we'd in fact captured and killed him. JONATHAN KARL: 10:00:41 Did you think about all those that have dedicated their lives to this? I mean obviously to this and the larger war on terror, but this? DICK CHENEY: 10:00:49 Well-- this, but it's-- it's-- I thought about the-- literally thousands of-- young Americans who put their lives on the line. Some of 'em even as we speak here today. But-- and-- and who've sacrificed everything in-- Afghanistan and Iraq-- in the pursuit of the safety and security and freedom of the American people. 10:01:17 And it's very hard to not think about them when you think about something like this. It's not just Bin Laden or just those that are involved in the counterterrorism effort. We've gotta cast the net broader than that. But I think it's a-- very special tribute that we all owe to the bravery and courage of the men and women in the intelligence and military business who performed so well to finally get it done. 10:01:44 It's taken a long time. They never gave up. They never backed off. They just kept pluggin' along until they got it right. And it also looks, at least on a preliminary basis, based on press accounts, that a lot of the things that we did early on fed into this ultimate success. And I think that means positive things too about the overall policy approach. JONATHAN KARL: 10:02:06 Have you spoken to President Bush about it? DICK CHENEY: 10:02:11 I have not. Not yet. Talked to Steve Adler this morning but I-- I expect to talk to President Bush about it too. JONATHAN KARL: 10:02:18 You heard I'm sure the President say last night that one of the first things he did was bring Leon Panetta in and tell him to make the capture or killing of Bin Laden the top priority. Does the President deserve credit? DICK CHENEY: 10:02:30 Well, I think the administration clearly deserves credit for the success of the operation. If you look at it from the perspective of the President, he's gotta make the basic judgment to tell the force to go execute. In this case the raid. And-- wrestle with deciding, you know, is this good enough intelligence. Can we act on it? And from what I can tell it looks to me like you know, we all owe him the same sense of satisfaction that I'm sure they feel. JONATHAN KARL: Was that a change though, making Bin Laden the top priority? DICK CHENEY: 10:03:08 No, I don't think it was a change. I think it'd been a top priority since-- well, even before 9/11. Certainly was since 9/11, after 9/11 for-- the Bush administration. And-- I'm sure it was for the Obama administration as well too. JONATHAN KARL: We're also hearing that a key piece of intelligence very early on came out of the interrogation program, the CIA's interrogation program: The nom de guerre of the courier. DICK CHENEY: Right. JONATHAN KARL: Some reports have it coming from KSM. You know, that interrogation program that is now defunct. DICK CHENEY: 10:03:44 Well, it's an enhanced interrogation program that we put in place back in our first term. And I don't know the details. All I know is what I've seen in the newspaper at this point, but it wouldn't be surprising if in fact that program produced results that ultimately contributed to the success of this venture. 10:04:09 But it's a-- I think important to look at this as a continuum. I mean it's not just on one day you get up, bang, and you got Osama bin Laden. It's the kind of thing where an awful lot of people over a long period of time, thousands have worked this case and worked these issues and followed up on the leads and captured bad guys and interrogated them and so forth. 10:04:34 So I think it could be looked upon as a collective effort by our military and intelligence personnel-- and by a lot of our civilian leaders. And in the final analysis we demonstrated conclusively that the American government takes very seriously our responsible to bring justice, if you will, or to bring to justice somebody like Bin Laden who's committed this terrible outrage, killing-- 3,000 Americans on 9/11. 10:05:06 And I think the way for us to think about it is-- is to think about it as part of a collective effort. It started in the Clinton administration, was carried forward very aggressively in the Bush administration and now the Obama administration with the-- the results that we're all very pleased to see today. JONATHAN KARL: 10:05:25 Where-- where the goal has never, never changed in terms of the ultimate goal-- DICK CHENEY: I think that's-- JONATHAN KARL: --being al Qaeda. Getting Bin Laden? DICK CHENEY: 10:05:32 You can talk about, you know, how you state the goal. We always thought about in terms of defending the nation successfully for the seven and a half years after 9/11 for preventing any further mass casualty attacks. And at the heart of that effort, obviously, was goin' after Bin Laden. AndI think that's-- I think everybody had the same basic ultimately objective. JONATHAN KARL: Did you ever get close? Did you ever think you were almost there? That you were gonna get him? DICK CHENEY: 10:05:59 I can't say that. I mean, you know, you-- you work it so hard, day in and day out. You get reports. Some of which turned out not to be true. But ultimately, you know, what happened was is what needed to happen. You had success plowed on success plowed on success that ultimately led to his capture. JONATHAN KARL: And are we safe for now? DICK CHENEY: I think so. (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) DICK CHENEY: But it's a kind of situation where we need to preserve our sense of vigilance, if you will. It'd be a big mistake for us now to assume, "There. That's taken care of. It's all over with." Al Qaeda's a big organization and they're very active now in the Arabian peninsula down in Yemen. There's every reason to believe there'll be further attacks attempted against the United States. And for us to spend so much time patting ourselves on the back because we got Bin Laden that we miss the next attack would be a terrible tragedy. We need to stay just as vigilant as we have been. We need to continue to emplace those policies that produced the intelligence that we needed in order to be able to successfully complete this mission. JONATHAN KARL: 10:07:17 All right, Mr. Vice President. Great to see you in New York and great to-- DICK CHENEY: Great to-- JONATHAN KARL: --see you-- DICK CHENEY: --see you. JONATHAN KARL: --(UNINTEL) about and thank you so much for your time. DICK CHENEY: Thank you. (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) * * *END OF AUDIO* * * * * *END OF TRANSCRIPT* * * ---------------------------------------------------------------
1980s TV SHOWS
INTERVIEW RETURNS: David Susskind Gloria, you wanted to say something. Gloria I wanted to respond to Joe when he said where is the church? Well, Joe, we are the church. And we are we have to be instrumental in bringing about these changes within the church. The church is in a period of limbo that, you know, they they don't know where this homosexuality is going to, to go. But it's very similar to what happened when Catholics who sung suddenly becoming divorced and there were hundreds and hundreds of Catholic men and women who were divorced and yet were living good Catholic lives and wanted to raise their children as Catholics. And they they brought pressure to bear where the change had come about. David Susskind The church is noticeably intolerant of homosexuals. And there's such urgent other problems that I don't think that one has immediate priority. Why don't we get to your own lives? You've come to terms with your children. Does that include their being able to bring their lovers to the house. Gloria Oh, yes. My daughter brings her friend to my house. She comes and spends weekends with us. They live out of state with my two grandchildren. So she is welcome at my home as my daughter is welcome at my home. David Susskind You reach the point where you can tell friends about your job. Amy Ashworth Yes, I do better. We have a gay phone in the house. And when the plumber comes and he goes to the phone to use it as a no that's my gay phone. And later we have wonderful Bob Benov hotline for parents of gays in her home. David Susskind Oh, you have a hotline. You work for the parents of gays and lesbians. That's correct. What do you call it? I'm about to kill my child. What do Amy Ashworth you know we get calls when Do you have your meetings? We have calls? Do you have a group, you know where we are. We have calls of people who feel troubled, and wonderful. People who who call, and then we have people who visit them, and then they come to the parents group, and then they feel so much better. Because when you go to the parents group, you're no longer alone. The stereotypes fall down, we have gay and lesbian speakers who come from every profession, all telling the same story, like our children did, that they felt different at a certain age. And they really have one choice, being honest about themselves, their own true nature of staying in the closet. Arthur David, can I answer a question you asked before? Do we do I do my wife and I include our daughter in with group affairs? In other words, my daughter brings her lover when she's invited to weddings, and they come as a couple to bar mitzvahs. They come as a couple David Susskind is that a little bit awkward? Arthur No, not at all. David Susskind Weddings above the Bob Benov that happens in my family. Arthur The reason it's not awkward, is because people are relay us do we tell relations? We don't go around? Listen, my daughter is a lesbian. But they ask questions after that, you know, we noticed that your daughter comes with the same girl all the time, and so on and so forth. And they come as a couple he said, Yes. Did they live together? Yes. Then they don't know what to ask. And they don't know what to say they're embarrassed. You never say they never asked? Is she a lesbian? They don't have to ask. And they they've known my daughter all her life. They've loved her all her life. And at this point, they say, hey, it's it seems like a very normal thing. They we don't say, Hey, your daughter or son should do that. And I don't say that. We would like that. David Susskind Did you ever taken on some Manish a characteristic Arthur not at all David Susskind dressing differently? Arthur Not at all. She's never changed the way she dressed. She's always dressed the same. And now the question is always asked in a relationship like that, whether it's two males or two females, one is dominance. And one is the macho one who other acts the part of the woman and vice versa. One is a butch and the other one that's not so they have the same problems that any normal married couple Bob Benov It's two people relating together is what it is. Arthur And another thing I must raise this point before one is the man and one is No. Bob Benov Two people, two people, David Susskind every couple I have known heterosexual and certainly homosexual. One is the leader. One is the manage one and the other is the female. Bob Benov I don't know how to people. David Susskind I just know Amy Ashworth Look at marriage. It's more shared these days. It really is where you listen to the one and and the David Susskind I'm not talking about not listening or listening. Not talking about one tends to say that well, that's just fell down. You pick it up. I mean, one is stronger, stronger. Joe We'll accept that. But that's in every relationship. Bob Benov Male and female? David Susskind Yeah. Well, what do you quibble? You say stronger. Arthur Anyway, I quibble. David, I must bring this out. Just past this. September, my wife and I celebrated our 45th anniversary. Ah, thank you. And I want a few I've lost a few and a few got rained out. In other ways. It's not a case that you always win or you always lose if you're doing your marriage never last 45 years. If it's a good relationship, it will last because life does not go on and an even plane and a one is always dominant on one is always submissive at some point, that thing has to blow out. Because you cannot destroy David Susskind You are making an immediate equation between a heterosexual marriage and a homosexual one Arthur So yeah, yes, I definitely am. Immediately, because let me say another thing as I hasn't there is more sex. That is practice and a heterosexual marriage than in a homosexual marriage. Because in many cases, it's in the homosexual groupings and follow what you will. It's a case of love. It's a case of companionship, it's a case of need, and if people are married, and the only, I mean, heterosexual marriage, and I only need is sex that matters as the last either it's human relationship and Bob Benov human relationships. That's people relating to each other on a daily basis, even talking about the family reaction. My reaction was a little bit different than author's. My son Jonathan lives in Atlanta, and he's been living with the same person for seven years now. And they have been invited to the family bar mitzvahs and they always come. They traveled from Atlanta and come up to New York for the bar mitzvah. If there's a wedding, they will be invited. And they attend together. And they're introduced not as you know, two people together. They're introduced as a couple. That's Jonathan and his mate, Lewis. That's who it is. And the family accepts it. My entire family knows it, and they accept it. And no, and there's, David Susskind you suggest, uniformly you suggest that your children, homosexual, lesbian children have single love relationships. And there is a body of literature that suggests that homosexuals tend to be promiscuous. Gloria That seems to be the image that they have no David Susskind There is scientific data about that, you know? Bob Benov Everything could be named scientific data Amy Ashworth 10% of the population of the gay population is promiscuous. 90% of the heterosexual David Susskind You just made that up? Amy Ashworth No, I think it is Amy Ashworth Bob Benov 50% of marriages dissolve. Yeah. And I would suggest that most of those two solutions require some promiscuity, or David Susskind tactic you veered away from an answer to an equivocation. I'm saying that there is a literature that suggests that homosexuals for good and sufficient reasons society given them a hard time, parents refusing to accept it, and so forth, tend to be promiscuous, have multiple affairs simultaneously. Arthur I'm a mathmatician, among amongst other things, or when I went through school, and so I took statistics both in the economics department and in the math department. And one of my professors gave a definition. And he said that statistics is the same as a bikini bathing suit. What it reveals is very interesting, but what it hides is vital. And otherwise, I'll take any set of figures and I will prove anything you want out of the same set of figures by David Susskind If your children. Live promiscuously with their males and with the women where it's alleged Bob Benov No, definitely not. none of my children have been promiscuous, not heterosexuals, and not the homosexuals. That is not to say that all of my children have lasting one on one relationships continuously. Two of my sons have lasting long term relationships. Two of them have not. And other two, one is heterosexual and homosexual. And it happens to be in both cases. So I think that the what you cited before as the statistic is, again, one of the misinterpreted things that people accept, just because they're accepting David Susskind that it's valid, but your lucky experience will come right back to you, Joe, after we pause.
OBAMACARE HRG-GRUBER APOLOGIZES (COLD OPEN)
I'd like to begin by apologizing sincerely for the offending comments that I've made. Washington Jonathan Gruber Obamacare Consultant SOT (Jonathan GruberObamacare Consultant) I'd like to begin by ap ...
Mom 'n Pop
BEN FRANKLIN 5 AND DIME IN MASSILLON, OHIO FORCED OUT OF BUSINESS BY MALLS AND COMPETITION FROM BIGGER STORES.
INTERVIEW W/ DICK CHENEY ON BIN LADEN KILLING - CHENEY ISO
JON KARL INTERVIEW WITH VICE PRESIDENT DICK CHENEY ON THE KILLING OF OBL / OSAMA BIN LADEN. ISOLATED CAMERA ON CHENEY. ABC NEWS - WORLD NEWS WITH DIANE SAWYER "DICK CHENEY INTERVIEW" INTERVIEW WITH DICK CHENEY CORRESPONDENT: JONATHAN KARL PRODUCER: SIMMONS (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) JONATHAN KARL: 14:13:08 (approx) Mr. Vice President, thank you for taking time to talk to us on this day of all days. What went through your mind when you heard the news? DICK CHENEY: 14:13:13 Well, I first heard about it last night-- when the first press reports started coming in. You know, those of us who've been involved over the years in the counterterrorism program and dealing with 9/11 and so forth so of-- capturing Osama bin Laden was the ultimate goal. The ultimate objective. It doesn't solve all the problems by any means, but it's clearly been a priority for the last two administrations. And I think like most Americans I felt a great sense of satisfaction when I found out that we'd in fact captured and killed him. JONATHAN KARL: 14:13:48 Did you think about all those that have dedicated their lives to this? I mean obviously to this and the larger war on terror, but this? DICK CHENEY: 14:13:56 Well-- this, but it's-- it's-- I thought about the-- literally thousands of-- young Americans who put their lives on the line. Some of 'em even as we speak here today. But-- and-- and who've sacrificed everything in-- Afghanistan and Iraq-- in the pursuit of the safety and security and freedom of the American people. 14:14:24 And it's very hard to not think about them when you think about something like this. It's not just Bin Laden or just those that are involved in the counterterrorism effort. We've gotta cast the net broader than that. But I think it's a-- very special tribute that we all owe to the bravery and courage of the men and women in the intelligence and military business who performed so well to finally get it done. 14:14:51 It's taken a long time. They never gave up. They never backed off. They just kept pluggin' along until they got it right. And it also looks, at least on a preliminary basis, based on press accounts, that a lot of the things that we did early on fed into this ultimate success. And I think that means positive things too about the overall policy approach. JONATHAN KARL: 14:15:13 Have you spoken to President Bush about it? DICK CHENEY: 14:15:18 I have not. Not yet. Talked to Steve Adler this morning but I-- I expect to talk to President Bush about it too. JONATHAN KARL: 14:15:25 You heard I'm sure the President say last night that one of the first things he did was bring Leon Panetta in and tell him to make the capture or killing of Bin Laden the top priority. Does the President deserve credit? DICK CHENEY: 14:15:37 Well, I think the administration clearly deserves credit for the success of the operation. If you look at it from the perspective of the President, he's gotta make the basic judgment to tell the force to go execute. In this case the raid. And-- wrestle with deciding, you know, is this good enough intelligence. Can we act on it? And from what I can tell it looks to me like you know, we all owe him the same sense of satisfaction that I'm sure they feel. JONATHAN KARL: Was that a change though, making Bin Laden the top priority? DICK CHENEY: 14:16:15 No, I don't think it was a change. I think it'd been a top priority since-- well, even before 9/11. Certainly was since 9/11, after 9/11 for-- the Bush administration. And-- I'm sure it was for the Obama administration as well too. JONATHAN KARL: We're also hearing that a key piece of intelligence very early on came out of the interrogation program, the CIA's interrogation program: The nom de guerre of the courier. DICK CHENEY: Right. JONATHAN KARL: Some reports have it coming from KSM. You know, that interrogation program that is now defunct. DICK CHENEY: 14:16:51 Well, it's an enhanced interrogation program that we put in place back in our first term. And I don't know the details. All I know is what I've seen in the newspaper at this point, but it wouldn't be surprising if in fact that program produced results that ultimately contributed to the success of this venture. 14:17:16 But it's a-- I think important to look at this as a continuum. I mean it's not just on one day you get up, bang, and you got Osama bin Laden. It's the kind of thing where an awful lot of people over a long period of time, thousands have worked this case and worked these issues and followed up on the leads and captured bad guys and interrogated them and so forth. 14:17:41 So I think it could be looked upon as a collective effort by our military and intelligence personnel-- and by a lot of our civilian leaders. And in the final analysis we demonstrated conclusively that the American government takes very seriously our responsible to bring justice, if you will, or to bring to justice somebody like Bin Laden who's committed this terrible outrage, killing-- 3,000 Americans on 9/11. 14:18:13 And I think the way for us to think about it is-- is to think about it as part of a collective effort. It started in the Clinton administration, was carried forward very aggressively in the Bush administration and now the Obama administration with the-- the results that we're all very pleased to see today. JONATHAN KARL: 14:18:32 Where-- where the goal has never, never changed in terms of the ultimate goal-- DICK CHENEY: I think that's-- JONATHAN KARL: --being al Qaeda. Getting Bin Laden? DICK CHENEY: 14:18:39 You can talk about, you know, how you state the goal. We always thought about in terms of defending the nation successfully for the seven and a half years after 9/11 for preventing any further mass casualty attacks. And at the heart of that effort, obviously, was goin' after Bin Laden. AndI think that's-- I think everybody had the same basic ultimately objective. JONATHAN KARL: Did you ever get close? Did you ever think you were almost there? That you were gonna get him? DICK CHENEY: 14:19:06 I can't say that. I mean, you know, you-- you work it so hard, day in and day out. You get reports. Some of which turned out not to be true. But ultimately, you know, what happened was is what needed to happen. You had success plowed on success plowed on success that ultimately led to his capture. JONATHAN KARL: And are we safe for now? DICK CHENEY: I think so. (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) DICK CHENEY: But it's a kind of situation where we need to preserve our sense of vigilance, if you will. It'd be a big mistake for us now to assume, "There. That's taken care of. It's all over with." Al Qaeda's a big organization and they're very active now in the Arabian peninsula down in Yemen. There's every reason to believe there'll be further attacks attempted against the United States. And for us to spend so much time patting ourselves on the back because we got Bin Laden that we miss the next attack would be a terrible tragedy. We need to stay just as vigilant as we have been. We need to continue to emplace those policies that produced the intelligence that we needed in order to be able to successfully complete this mission. JONATHAN KARL: 14:20:24 All right, Mr. Vice President. Great to see you in New York and great to-- DICK CHENEY: Great to-- JONATHAN KARL: --see you-- DICK CHENEY: --see you. JONATHAN KARL: --(UNINTEL) about and thank you so much for your time. DICK CHENEY: Thank you. (OFF-MIC CONVERSATION) * * *END OF AUDIO* * * * * *END OF TRANSCRIPT* * * ---------------------------------------------------------------
CA: FAIRFIELD CHILD NEGLECT/DA-TORTURE 'SADISTIC'
**SEE JL-68WE FOR MORE INFORMATION**\n\n --SUPERS--\nWednesday\nFairfield, CA\n\nKrishna Abrams\nSolano County District Attorney \n\n --SOT--\nKrishna Abrams/Solano County District Attorney : "I've ...
Devil - Car
WOMAN CLAIMS A "DEVIL-LIKE" APPARITION APPEARS ON THE HOOD OF HER NEW FORD MUSTANG WHENEVER IT RAINS.
1990s NEWS
RETURN TO INTERVIEW: Robert Lipsyte: In talking about New York as a great subject for literature. Do you think Bonfire of the Vanities got it right? Alfred Kazin: It got it right, but mixed in with an awful lot of scorn and hatred for the poor populace. Tom Wolfe is a is a southern Confederate. And I think of that book as the Confederacy's one victory especially in New York. You know, Wolfe comes from Richmond, and he has a good solid wasp background. The book is very charming, very brilliantly done, but it's journalism, because he's dealing with types all the time, and then it hasn't escaped me that the one who comes out of the end, as the one innocent victim of everybody else is of course, this miserable wasp, who was originally shown as an adulterer and all sorts of types of crap. But nevertheless, he's perceived as being slightly more innocent than the others you know. it's a wicked book in both sense the of the word wicked. Robert Lipsyte: The problem, of course, is that that is the picture of New York that is being offered now to the country and the world. Alfred Hazan: Exactly. Robert Lipsyte: And it's not your picture of New York, Alfred Kazin: certainly not, certainly not. there were things in it because it made me laugh, but also it made me very mad. Sample the picture has, you know, it's as if Jonathan Swift, instead of writing Gulliver's Travels had written had written about the blacks and the Jews in the Bronx. That scene in which the Jewish judge is holding on to the back of the doors of black Maria, and the black friends inside, they are cursing each other and the violence, racial epithets. That's New York, according to Mr. Wolf. I don't think it is the real story of New York. There is there is still more feeling between people between the different types. But of course, New York is like Austria Hungary before the First World War, you know, with Koch, of course, as the Emperor Franz Yosef, God help us. You know, it does have this fantastic lineup of nations, of languages, of tribes. I have had experiences in New York with people. Do you know that I've been driven by taxi by an Eskimo from Alaska, by Hassad wearing the full regalia, for example, and who scared all the other taxi drivers whenever they looked at him. In fact, one while we were waiting for red light was so frightened, he went right through the red light. And in one way or another, you know, there is that incredible.. What bothers me about New York is that not only do I not know what language is being spoken in the subway, I don't know which language it is you see and that bothers me. I should like to think that, you know, it's something I might possibly get some more knowledge of, but it's out there. Robert Lipsyte: Do you think that, do you feel it's slipping out of your grasp? Alfred Kazin: definitely. I mean, I mean, I put it very simply. It's the kind of thing which only very tough, very cynical people like Tom Wolfe can really do justice to it. And it's no accident, that Wolfe's book sold tremendously you see. I mean, the fact is that New York does not, I mean who wrote about New York with love. It was O'Henry. It was even F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby. It was Nathaniel West. It was um well, Saul Bellow. It was Bernard Malamud. It was Richard Wright, even, it was most of all it was Ralph Ellison. But these people you see were writing about New York as a human thing, where people like Wolfe write about it as a sociological problem. And then of course, they talk about themselves as Balzac, you see, and they want everybody to be like themselves. Well, that's just nonsense. Alfred Kazin: What I miss about New York, frankly, more than anything else, is the lack of fraternity between the different tribes or different countries, different languages, that's something I'm not used to. In the old days, where I grew up, it was a matter of course, you know, the Italians and the Greeks, and the Russians, outside my Jewish neighborhood, we were all very much aware of each other, because we had all come over at the same time, so to speak, or rather, our parents or grandparents had, and we all recognized ourselves as children of the poor. And there was no, nothing demeaning about that at all on the contrary. Robert Lipsyte: let me let me read another line of yours that that really struck me. "The city arouses us with energy, by which it exhausts us". "here's almost something sexual in that, and also a sense of completion and defeat. Ultimately, the city uses us often." Alfred Kazin: It's perfectly true. INew York is, of course, after Paris, the sexiest city in the world, sex is always in the air. But in Paris, it means a love affair. Here, it means that one night stands as far as I'm concerned. It's something brutal and hurried about the whole thing here. But the energy is fantastic. During the war in England, I used to be told by Englishman who lived in New York, that they needed less sleep than anywhere else. And I said, and you get less sleep, they don't you? And they said we certainly do. New York is a capital of insomnia. But one way or another, that energy flows through the streets, you realize it, every time I come back, I realize I'm galvanized everybody has as luckily people walk, for example, down 42nd Street, pushing others out of the way. Even though the schedule like everybody's schedule is a very important thing. We all know that. There's a kind of desperation and getting to the thing as such, you know, this morning, the subway example, I watched a woman being pushed out by another woman by another woman, who said, very simply get out of my way. And that might say, could be the slogan for a great deal of New York living these days. Get out of my way out of my way. Robert Lipsyte 24:43 Would you read something for me? It's on page 219. Something else? Alfred Kazin: Well, thank you for knowing my books. Oh, well, you know, the page number. In New York retain so much of the world's tragedies is endless displacements and tragedies, yet no one walking in streets with attention. You can miss some very deep grooves of the human experience as the century of lay gaze on Shin rumbles to within. So it's exciting to be a writer here, as it is fruitful for an artist photographer to keep his eyes open. The subject never lets you off. There is so much humanity packed up in the streets so much friction, so much idiocy. So much learning artistry, appetite for living. So much crime with so much love making so much eating and drinking on the street. That is not altogether in human to shut our ears to the screams we hear in the night. Too much we say it as much of the time or too much" Robert Lipsyte: Thank you so very much. That's the Eleventh hour. I'm Robert Lipsyte.
1980s TV SHOWS
INTERVIEW RETURNS: David Susskind Amy, you and Bob have something in common to some gay, two sons gay. Now, why did the third one skip the problem? it's not a problem. Bob Benov No, I'm not kidding. It is not a problem. The problem is that people have to recognize and learn what homosexuality is and then No, no, it's not a problem. That's what the problem is, is people don't know what homosexuality is. They think it's something not normal, as somebody said before it is normal. It's just another orientation, it's a different orientation. The affectional object of your of your affection is is of the same sex and really doesn't have that much to do with sex. You don't ever have to take part in a sexual act to be homosexual, just as you don't have to be take part in a sexual act, to be heterosexual, a Catholic priest does not take part in the sexual act. That doesn't mean he's not heterosexual. And it doesn't mean he's not homosexual. The the act of sex has nothing to do with your sexual orientation. who you're attracted to, is what affects your sexual sexual orientation. And the fact that it's not a problem is the fact that I know what homosexuality is, it was a problem for me before. When I first found out as you David Susskind Joe said, he preferred cancer for his child. Bob Benov No, I have to tell you, I know, I've said Joe this before he told me, this was the day before he told me, he said, What would be worse than than being gay? And I said, I rather see I've cancer than be gay. I mean, that's the way I felt. Now you say, I said, myself, I'm trying to be loving, trying to be a Christian father, I was very active in the church. I just blew my mind. I couldn't believe that this thing could be happening to me, or to my son. And when I went to see my parish priest, he said to me, you know, I don't think anybody knows what it is where it comes from. I think it's a great mystery. And, and, but he said he has to go, that he has to get out of the house because he's going to influence my other two boys. Amy Ashworth This is what is so sad, right? That's the misconception. People think it's like, you catch it like measles. And this isn't so people have in a parent's group in Westchester, I have a mother who comes she has identical twins. One is a lesbian, the other isn't. And we simply don't ask anymore, or how come it's one of the mysteries. We do know that 10% of the population was is and will be gay. And gay people don't have to recruit because they have heterosexual parent David Susskind Well if our population is roughly 2 million 240 million people. You're saying the 24 million? That's right. Amy Ashworth Yes, they are. Then imagine their parents, you know, who are connected aunts, uncles, if I was often thinking if all gay and gay related and lesbian related people would wear green vote for one day, you would be amazed. David Susskind My wife once commented that if the homosexuals and lesbians went on strike, yeah, that will bring the beauty business to a halt. Interior Decorating you couldn't get? That's that's a myth. Joe We've met policeman, priests David Susskind Homosexual priests? Joe Yes, Doctors, accountants. Bob Benov there is an organization, City Police Department have recognized organization by the New York City Police Department of homosexual policeman. Amy Ashworth It's 10% across the board David Susskind Amy, you'reboasting. You think it's abnormal? Amy Ashworth I don't think it's abnormal. David Susskind Would you like For more of the population to be homosexual. Amy Ashworth No, all I want is for people to understand our children. And I'm not talking and doing this for our children. I do it for all lesbians and gay people. Because I think it's interesting. You are a lesbian, or you are gay, and you can be fine. You have no job, the loneliness of a gay teenager who doesn't have a home, it's the only minority that doesn't have their parents behind them. Everybody has their parents, but if you're gay or lesbian, you can't count on your family. And then he Bob Benov Amy said something that I think it's very important. I think that almost all gay people when they're struggling with their homosexuality and acknowledging it, feel the loneliness feel like they are alone completely, that there isn't a weather like them. And I know that I as a parent of a homosexual when I first found out my wife and I thought we were the only couple on Long Island who had a homosexual child Gloria when my daughter I was just talking to her before I came on the show and She, she does quite a bit of talking to different groups, gay groups, and she says, The loneliest thing in the world is the children or the women that do not have their families backing them. And she said the fact that she has her family behind her makes the world of difference in how she feels about herself, and how she could, you know, present herself to other people and help other people in, in the struggle of homosexuality. David Susskind What do you think homosexuality is? How it happens? Why it happens? Do you have any idea? Arthur If anybody would know that, it would be a very simple thing? Also, you ask both Amy and Bob, how come? How do they explain the fact that two children are and one isn't, and so on? That question is usually asked by homophobic people because they feel it's catching. And it's either catching like a disease or the fact that you're surrounded, or you're in association with a gay person, therefore, they are going to convince you or sell you, homosexuality. And in their cases, it proves it very conclusively brought up by the same parents living in the same home. In Amy's case, they sandwich one in between the royal males, he escaped, and the other two are. And the strangest thing, which he didn't tell you was is that the one son, even though already, the first one had already come out, he was afraid to come out after he had been the first one had been accepted, because he felt it would be too much of a blow now. Amy Ashworth A younger son knew he was gay, when the oldest he was 40. And that he couldn't accept himself, he found it very hard. David Susskind And he knew his older brother was homosexual as old. well why couldn't he accept it because you accepted the older brother Amy Ashworth Well because everybody has their own dream in life. And maybe that wasn't his dream. And four years later, he wrote us a letter and said, I refuse to be labeled as by society. But this is what I am. And it took me a while. And then I wrote him back. And I said, what hurts me the most is that we weren't there to help you, your loneliness. And he knew we were working for parents of gays Bob Benov I'll give you a better example of that. I have spoken openly and often about my son Jonathan being gay, and never spoke about my other son. And as a matter of fact, before I came on this program, when we were talking about it, that I finally spoke to my second son, because he was not out to his grandparents. He was out to everybody else David Susskind He declaired to come to come out Bob Benov To come out is to come out of the closet David Susskind come out of the grandparents didn't know he was homosexual Bob Benov still do not know still go. And I spoke to him. And I said, you know, I'm going to be on this program. And I really would like to talk about both of my sons, not just one. I said, you know, you're homosexual. I know you're homosexual. And you declare it, I said, why shouldn't you be out to your grandparents? Why shouldn't you? I think your brother is there. It can only make them think that you feel something is wrong about being homosexual. I said, Do you have a problem with your homosexuality? And he said, No, not at all? You know, I don't? I said, Well, then why not? declare to them? Let them know, honestly, all of you, and David Susskind why are you so proud of it? I mean, Bob Benov I'm not proud of the fact that they are homosexual David Susskind you want to educate, Bob Benov I'm proud that they are homosexual, acknowledge it, know what they are, and acknowledge it and are free about it. And I want the world to know what homosexuality is so that they won't be prejudiced against my children and others. Amy Ashworth They congtribute to society and we just want them to be looked upon as contributing people to society Bob Benov I want my son to be able to walk down the street with their mate holding hands as I walk on my wife. You know what I want? My son's to be able to have an apartment where they like, no matter who their maid is, just as I can have an apartment where I like, as long as I can pay the rent. And I want my children to be able to have any job that they're qualified for, no matter what their orientation is, just as I can get any job that I'm qualified for it. David Susskind I'm with you all the way except walking down the street. No, I don't walk hand in hand with that. I save that for private time. walking Bob Benov hand in hand holding hands only. Rarely, David Susskind risk is not the issue. Gloria The issue is your perception Bob Benov your perception, your perception of the people holding the David Susskind physical manifestations of a homosexual love affair. Bob Benov This has nothing to do with a love affair. And I walk down the street sometimes I hold Amy's hand if I'm working with friends is that a love affair? We have never had a love affair, I must declare that to everyone David Susskind Alright I withdraw, Amy Ashworth I want to to tell you something that our oldest son has been together with somebody for 13 years. And the beginning, he stayed with us for six months, that were the most wonderful months in our life, why he and Dick and I have respect for each other. We learn from each other. And if I family stays with me longer than a week, I go a little insanity, David Susskind Did you see any physical aspects of their love. Did they kiss? Did that bother you? Amy Ashworth No, that doesn't bother me. And they are like, you know, you don't feel like hand in hand, walking on the street. In the beginning, they weren't very overly affectionate. You know, and now it doesn't bother me if they are because what is wrong? When there was wealth, we seem to give medals to people because they kill so well. David Susskind You want to give a medals to two men walking down the street? I just think it's offensive to its general norm of behavior but Amy Ashworth Is it acceptable to be left handed, you know, red hair. I agree with you, I agree with you. I don't like people David Susskind You have your own standards of behavior. Bob Benov now what's, what's an issue is what you're considering a normal standard, you're having a double standard, you think it's perfectly normal for a man or woman to walk down the street and hold hands, but not normal for two men or two women. And that's really what's wrong. There's nothing offensive with holding hands. If you're talking about sexual activity. I think that's offensive, in public in any case, or excess of display of emotion, I think is offensive, no matter what the sex is of the people involved. That's something that belongs in private what people's sex is for people in private, not in public. But to display affection by holding hands, I think is ridiculous to say it's offensive, that what's offensive is to think that that's offensive. Arthur Just just thrown a little humorous note, I live in the village. And so gay people are bound down there. We have quite a few. And they tell a little story of this. Gay a man and his lover. We're walking down the street and in front of them. There was a heterosexual couple and they were arguing something fierce. So Joe talk turned to Bob. And he said, Bob, See, I told you those mixed marriages, they never work. David Susskind We'll be right back after a pause.
Entertainment: Hip Hop Immortals - Hip Hop Immortals
TAPE: EF03/0047 IN_TIME: 14:49:51 / 21:28:13 DURATION: 5:29 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: music/performance rights must be cleared DATELINE: 16th Jan 2003 SHOTLIST 1. Montage 2. SOT Jonathan Mannion "What I've sort of been saying about this show is that it documents moments in time that are never going to be duplicated again. History repeats itself in theme, but these moments and these artefacts are so incredible to see, these specific moments in time. Wearing the big dukie gold chains, and now it's platinum, and people's record collections. It's incredible to see the history and how far they've come, and really i'm just thankful to have made a contribution." 3. Montage 4. SOT Nitin Valakul "A lot of the ideas, if you've gone round and seen some of the work that I've done, it's a very different type of hip hop photography that probably nobody's ever seen before. It's very modern, it's bringing in conceptual, it's almost like taking the video and injecting all that into a still photograph, which is really cool. I think conceptually they've got such great things in the lyrics, which is brilliant, it brings up the whole image value. A lot of the other pictures you see are old school shots/portraits, and there's nothing wrong with that at all. I do those as well, but I like to work with ideas, concepts. Like this guy here: Texas Chain Saw Massacre, bad boy running through the forest. It's not very passive but...you know." 5. Eminem Montage 6. SOT Nitin Valakul "Eminem for example is very specific about how he likes to be seen and he generally comes up with the idea. So that's him, and I think he's got great foresight into where he's going and what he's doing, he's very smart about that. Other artists really don't mind and I generally come up with the ideas. So I'll present it to them, talk to them on the phone, and say "Dre, this is what I want to do, do you like it?" And he's like "Yep that's great." So long as it's saying the right thing and it's not diverting your thought pattern to something else, then it's absolutely fine, they'll agree to it. 7. Montage 8. SOT Jonathan Mannion "But really having done it since '96, and, knocking on wood, having done some of the major album covers that are out - I've done every Jay Z album, every Nelly, every Ja - with that being said I've known them when they were ultra hungry, and screaming out of car windows to their friends. It's unheard of now, they're in tinted out black limos trying to get a moment's peace, because it has become such an incredible media blitz on these people" 9. Montage 10. SOT Nitin Valakul "They have such a presence when you meet them especially when they're at their, i wouldn't say peak, because they're all still growing and evolving. But Eminem has a presence, Dre has a presence, Snoop Dog, Ice Cube, they all do. And I think what it is, all the character, everything they have, is all from the streets. It's life's lessons you know. 11. Montage 12. SOT Jonathan Mannion "Just as the early pioneers of hip hop kicked down the doors to be able to open the door to let other people in, I think that's what this show has done to address it. This is official, we're artists. It's not like: "He's a hip hop photographer." We're photographers trying to document this movement that's happening." 13.Montage TITLE HIP HOP IMMORTALS script Hip Hop Immortals is the largest Hip Hop photographic project ever: a unique photographic account of the 100 most influential artists in hip hop history. From the founding fathers of the 70's to the present day international icons, the masters have finally been brought together for a blockbuster book and exhibition at London's Proud Gallery. Seen through the lenses of forty of today's most talented and celebrated photographers, including David LaChapelle, Christian Witkin; NITIN VADUKUL, JONATHAN MANNION, Danny Clinch and Jesse Frohman, Hip Hop Immortals is the first time that so many leading lights in both hip hop and photography have come together to create such a pivotal piece of pop culture. The concept for the project dawned five years ago when Mark Suroff, brother Matthew Dean and best friend Derek Axelrod decided to record the musical, cultural and social phenomenon called Hip Hop. Realising that nothing existed that matched their vision, they decided to create a unique book and exhibition that both portrayed the evolution of Hip Hop, as well as presenting the best in Hip Hop photography. Adverts were placed; word was sent out; agents contacted - and within weeks over 500 photographers had submitted several thousand photographs. Then followed a painstaking yet ruthless selection and editing process as the list was culled down to the most influential artists and images - judged by criteria of record sales, online voting, media profile and quality of photography. Two years later, the best images of the most influential and important rappers had been brought together for the first ever role call of the Immortals of Hip Hop. Beautiful yet challenging images depict the players of the one of the world's most listened to forms of music. Dr Dre, Eminem, Lil' Kim, LL Cool J, Jay Z, Snoop Doggy Dog, Queen Latifah are just some of the icons represented at the exhibition. There are also portraits of some of Hip Hop's earliest pioneers, including LL Cool J, Afrika Bambaata and Grandmaster Flash. HIP HOP IMMORTALS VOLUME ONE starts 17-Jan-2003 until 23-Feb-2003
18 - Month - Old - Fall
18 MONTH OLD SURVIVES FALL FROM APARTMENT ON TOP OF A CHOCOLATE FACTORY.