NFL CONCUSSION LAWSUIT FTG P2
FTG OF PRESSERS AND SOTS ON THE NFL CONCUSSION LITIGATION 14:48:00 - Interviews 14:53:10 - Court exterior - news trucks - various arrivals 14:57:40 - Presser PHILADELPHIA, PA-Former NFL players and family members will be available for media interviews following oral arguments in the NFL concussion litigation on April 9th. The arguments, which are specific to the issue of preemption, will occur at 10am in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (601 Market St. in Philadelphia). The former players allege that the NFL deliberately and fraudulently concealed from its players the link between football-related head impacts and long-term neurological injuries, and are seeking to hold the League accountable for its misconduct. WHAT: Former NFL players and family members will be available to speak with media following April 9th oral arguments in the NFL concussion litigation. WHEN: Tuesday, April 9, 2013, immediately following oral arguments. The Court has scheduled a hearing to begin at 10am, and anticipate it will likely conclude by 12pm. WHERE: Hotel Monaco, Johannesburg North 433 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, Pa. 19106 Hotel Monaco is three blocks from the U.S. Federal Courthouse. Exit the Courthouse via the Market St. exit and turn left (traveling east) on Market St. Walk two blocks to N 5th St / Independence Mall E, and turn right (traveling south). Hotel Monaco will be on your left (at the corner of Chestnut St.). WHO: Mary Ann Easterling, widow of Ray Easterling, a former Atlanta Falcons safety who committed suicide after struggling for years with dementia and was later diagnosed with CTE. Dorsey Levens, a former NFL Pro Bowl running back for the Green Bay Packers, Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants. Levens was the executive producer and narrator of 2012's Bell Rung, a documentary examining the concussion crisis faced by professional football players. Lisa McHale, widow of Tom McHale, a former guard for nine seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. Tom was the second NFL player ever diagnosed with CTE. Eleanor Perfetto, widow of Ralph Wenzel, a former Pittsburgh Steelers and San Diego Chargers guard who died in June 2012 after a decades-long struggle with dementia. Perfetto testified before the House Judiciary Committee in 2009 on her husband's condition, demanding the NFL stop denying the link between football and long-term neurological injuries. Kevin Turner, a former Philadelphia Eagles running back who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease).
Nursing Home Rallies
PEOPLE WHO WORK IN THE STATE'S NURSING HOMES RALLY AND MARCH TO THE CAPITOL WEDNESDAY...THEY CLAIM TOO MANY LAWSUITS ARE SINKING HOMES INTO BANKRUPTCY. THEY WANT THE STATE TO STEP IN.
CONWAY ON OPIOID CRISIS AND COURT CASES
--SUPERS--\nWednesday\nWashington\n\nKellyanne Conway\nCounselor to the President\n\n --SOT--\nKellyanne Conway: "While we're closely watching all the litigation we're closely watching the multi-stat ...
The return of Quatennens... and DSK!
France 5
Haiti Crisis - Opposition rally in capital, rebels in second town
TAPE: EF04/0206 IN_TIME: 10:08:47:06 DURATION: 03:02:14 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Port-au-Prince/Gonaives - 15 Feb 2004 SHOTLIST: Gonaives 1. Wide shot armed rebels checking vehicle 2. Rebels checking car 3. Armed rebels at checkpoint 4. Rebels setting up barricade 5. Armed rebels getting into vehicles and leaving Port-au-Prince 6. Protestors chanting and running 7. Police arriving at demonstration 8. Police walking through crowd 9. Armed policemen waking through crowd 10. Police commander observing crowd 11. Policemen in vehicle driving by demonstration 12. Wide shot protestors walking and chanting 13. Set up Andre Apaid, opposition leader 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Andre Apaid, Opposition Leader: "We want them to deposit their guns under the correct circumstances. If they deposit them now they will be assassinated. What we say is we made a choice of peaceful and non-violent process. We have the proof - all of our shirts is in our pants, our bare two arms, we''re going to march, and you know because you have seen if you were here three days ago, that they have guns and rocks, protected by the police to aggress us. So we made a choice, I may die today, so I believe people who manoeuvre violence, or manoeuvre armed rebellion don''t come out in the street the way we''re doing today." 15. Demonstrators marching STORYLINE: Armed rebels in Haiti''s fourth largest city set up more barricades on Sunday, fearing an imminent attack by Haitian police. The rebels have sealed off Gonaives after rumours swept the country that police were planning a new assault to re-take the town over the weekend. Meanwhile, in the capital on Sunday, thousands of Haitians gathered to protest against the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide, putting more pressure on the embattled government. Three days ago a similar march ended abruptly when protestors were attacked by gangs of pro-Aristide supporters. Marchers began the demonstration in Petionville under heavy police guard, planning to conclude the protest in Port-au-Prince''s downtown. Andre Apaid, a principal leader of the opposition, declared the civil opposition has no ties to armed rebels in Gonaives, but he added that he understands their reluctance to disarm in the face of what he termed "threats by the government." Apaid was also accused by Aristide''s government on Saturday for violating US neutrality laws. The government says Apaid is a US citizen. Apaid said he was in litigation in the US over the issue of his nationality and would not comment further on the matter.
8 p.m.: [12 April 2023 broadcast]
A2 / France 2
Stéphane Séjourné
Radio France: filmed programmes
NEWT GINGRICH / NPC SPEECH (1995)
HOUSE SPEAKER GINGRICH SPEAKS TO THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB. GINGRICH COMMENTS ON: HIS NEW BOOK, ENGLISH AS THE COMMON LANGUAGE, WELFARE REFORM, THE FLAG DESECRATION AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION, AND THE JAPANESE AUTO AGREEMENT.
ERIC HOLDER NEWS CONFERENCE
ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER NEWS CONFERENCE Attorney General Eric Holder press conference on financial fraud DC Slug: 1015 HOLDER RS35 75 AR: 16x9 Disc # 880 NYRS: WASH2 (4522) 10:23:42 ERIC HOLDER: Good morning, and for the record, I am Eric Holder. Well, thank you all for -- for being here. I'm joined today by my colleagues from the Justice Department; Associate Attorney General Stuart Delery, Acting U.S. Attorney Stephanie Yonekura of the Central District of California. I also want to thank our distinguished state partners including, Attorneys General George Jepsen of Connecticut, Jim Hood of Mississippi, Greg Zoeller of Indiana, Kathleen Kane of Pennsylvania, and District of Columbia, Karl Racine. 10:24:18 We are here today to announce another major step forward in the Justice Department's ongoing effort to safeguard the American people from financial fraud and misconduct, to protect the integrity of our financial system, and to hold accountable any individual or institution that violates the law and abuses the public trust. 10:24:39 The Department of Justice has reached an agreement totaling nearly $1.4 billion with the credit rating agency Standard and Poor's Financial Services, or S&P, along with its parent corporation McGraw Hill Financial. This agreement will resolve the Justice Department's 2013 law suit against S&P in addition to suits gratifying 19 states as well the District of Columbia. Our lawsuit alleged that S&P engaged in a scheme to defraud investors in structured financial products known as Residential Mortgage-Back Securities, or RMBS, and Collaterized Debt Obligations or CDOs. On more than one occasion, the company's leadership ignored senior analyst who warned that the company had given top ratings to financial products that were failing to perform as advertised. As S&P admits under the settlement, company executives? complained that the company declined to downgrade underperforming assets because it was worried that doing so would hurt the company's business. Now, while this strategy may have helped S&P avoid disappointing its clients, it did major harm, major harm, to the larger economy, contributing to the worst financial crisis since the great depression. Under the terms of the settlement, S&P will pay a total of $1.375 billion, which will be divided between the federal government, 19 states, as well as the District of Columbia. 10:26:07 S&P has also agreed to comply with the Consumer Protection Statute of every state that is involved, as well as Washington D.C., and to respond, in good faith, to request for information or material concerning any possible violation of those laws. Finally, the company has agreed to a detailed statement the facts acknowledging the improper conduct that led to this settlement, contrasting what S&P said it was doing with what the company actually did. Now this conduct was uncovered by a thorough Justice Department investigation that began November of 2009 and precipitated a law suit the department filed nearly 2 years ago. I want to make special mention of Assistance US Attorney George Cardona who I think has done a superb job in this regard. Our suit alleged that from at least 2004 until 2007, S&P engaged in a scheme to defraud investors by knowingly issue ?- issuing completed credit ratings for CDOs that misrepresented their credit worthiness and understated their risks ultimately causing investors, including many federal insured financial institutions, to lose billions, billions, of dollars. 10:27:22 At the time, S&P claimed that its rating were independent, objective, and non-influenced by the company's relationship with the issuers who hired S&P to rate the securities in question. Well, in reality, the ratings were affected by significant conflicts of interest and S&P was driven by its desire for increased profits in market share to favor the issue -- favor the interest of issuers over investors. The settlement we have reached today not only makes it clear that this kind of conduct will never be tolerated by the Justice Department. It also underscores our strong and ongoing commitment to pursue any company or any entity that violated the law and contributed to the financial crisis of 2008. 10:28:10 We have been aggressive in working to address every part of the financial system that contributed to the crisis from those who originated loans to those who serviced them, securitized them, and rated them inappropriately. We've never hesitated to investigate and prosecute any individual, institution, or organization that attempted to exploit our markets and take advantage of the American people. And as I've made clear from the moment I took office as Attorney General 6 years ago today, we will never rest in our determination to use every legal tool at our disposal to achieve justice for all Americans. Now, this agreement also reaffirms that this justice department will never shrink from litigation no matter how difficult or complex and we have proven time and again, as we made clear when we initiated legal action against S&P 2 years ago, we will not be deterred and we will not be outlasted. No lawful -- unlawful conduct is too complicated to pursue in the financial institution, at home, or abroad is too powerful to be held accountable for wrong doing. I'd like to thank everyone whose tireless efforts over the past 6 years has made this resolution possible, including our investigators, prosecutors, support staff, U.S. Attorneys, state Attorneys General, and members of the President's Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force. It has been my honor to chair this task force since its launch in 2009, and I'm extremely proud, not only of the outstanding work it made possible in this case, but of the really remarkable track record that I think we have established in our ongoing efforts to bring perpetrators of financial fraud to justice. 10:29:52 So at this time I'd like to turn things over to the Associate Attorney General Stuart Delery who will provide additional details. 10:30:02 STUART DELERY: Thank you, Mr. Attorney General. During the lead up to the financial crisis S&P served as a gatekeeper in the world of sophisticated finance. S&P repeatedly promised that its ratings were objective, independent, and not influenced by S&Ps relationships with the investment banks that issued the securities it was rating. When the department brought this lawsuit, we alleged to the contrary that S&P limited, adjusted, and delayed updates to the ratings criteria and analytical models it used in order to preserve market share and profits. In addition, we contended that S&P issued inflated ratings on billions of dollars' worth of securities despite knowing that the quality of the underlying assets was impaired and that the ratings would not hold. Put simply, the department brought this case because S&P committed fraud and now, as part of today's settlement, S&P has agreed to a statement of facts that makes clear the (inaudible) of the departments law suit. Among other things, S&P has admitted that it promised investors that the fees it collected in connection with its ratings would not be a factor in giving those ratings, that nonetheless, as it was developing its ratings models its executives set explicit goals for maintaining and increasing S&P?s market share and interfered with the rollout of an updated rating model so as to protect the company's business interest. That many of the securities that S&P rated highly were based on packages of mortgages that relevant people within the company knew were likely to default and that as the financial crisis gave (inaudible) in 2007, S&P continued to issue and confirm positive ratings despite receiving streams of information that made abundantly clear that those ratings were not justified. Thus, just as the department alleged in filing its complaint in February of 2013, the admissions by S&P, after 2 years of litigation, now confirm that S&P misrepresented itself to the investors in the public putting profits ahead of unbiased ratings in a manner that fueled the over valuation of RNBS and contributed to the financial crisis. I want to draw particular attention to a few features of the resolution we're announcing here today. First, this resolution appropriately reflects the seriousness of S&Ps misconduct. S&P will pay by far the largest penalty ever recovered from a rating agency and the company will through the settlement pay substantially more than it earned from rating the securities at issue in our law suit. Defrauding the American people has consequences. Second, as the Attorney General said, this resolution proves yet again that those who violate the law cannot escape responsibility through aggressive litigation tactics designed to weaken our resolves and diminish our resources. S&P propounded sweeping discovery requests and in response the department produced some 290 million documents, more than in any other case in the department's history. During the investigation and litigation the parties took over 100 depositions and S&P also alleged that the department brought this case in retaliation for S&Ps decision to downgrade the government's credit rating that was simply wrong. In response, the department answered the allegation and after an exhausted 2 year phishing expedition, S&P has withdrawn the allegation and acknowledged that nothing in the mountains of information that has received from the government supports S&Ps claim of an improper motive, just as, of course, the department has said from the beginning. And this retraction will be reflected by (inaudible) S&P in a court filing. Third, the resolution also highlights the importance of a critical legal tool in our fight against financial fraud. The Financial Institutions Reformed Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, or FIRREA. An act with a wake of the savings and loan crisis, FIRREA allows the department to seek civil penalties for certain criminal violations effecting financial institutions including mail fraud, wire fraud, and bank fraud. In this case, the department once again has demonstrated the FIRREA is a powerful weapon for combating financial fraud and a vital tool for holding accountable those who violate the law. Finally, this settlement confirms the strength of the partnership between the states and The Department of Justice in fighting financial fraud. I want to thank the committed people from the governments of the 19 states and the District of Columbia that joined us to hold S&P accountable for its actions. Your commitment to this effort from the very beginning was crucial in achieving the strong result that we're announcing today. So throughout this investigation and litigation our team remains focused on holding accountable those who broke the law no matter what was thrown at them. Of course, perseverance in this -- in a case of this size requires personal sacrifices by many and I want to take this opportunity to recognize the department's many outstanding attorneys, investigators, staff, principally from the Civil Division and the Central District of California who built this case. I also want to recognize the department's superb technology professionals who tackled the challenge of maintaining, organizing, and disclosing data on a scale never previously experienced by this department. This case epitomizes what I see every day, which is the department's dedicated career professionals working tirelessly to protect the interest of the American people. Although there are many people who deserve personal recognition, I want to specifically acknowledge the contributions of two exceptional attorneys. First, former Associate Attorney General Tony West, my predecessor, whose vision and passion played a crucial role in getting us here to this point and, second, is the Attorney General mentioned, Assistant U.S. Attorney George Cardona. George performs much of the heavy lifting to litigate this case and did so with unyielding professionalism, sound judgment, and considering it all, remarkable good humor. So thank you very much. And now I'd like to introduce Connecticut Attorney General Jepsen. 10:36:37 GEORGE JEPSEN: Sorry (inaudible), I've been under the weather a little bit. For the first time a Wall Street ratings firm has been held accountable for its role in the 2008 financial collapse and the message is clear, no business is too big to be pocketed or politically connected to escape responsibility for its misconduct. We will leave no stone unturned in our efforts to protect the public from those who manipulate markets for their own financial advantage. The operative pronoun is we. Today's successful conclusion is made possible by the cooperation of team work of the Justice Department and a diverse 20 state coalition. Once again, state Attorneys General have demonstrated that we are capable of working together on a fully bipartisan basis to tackle national issues abroad public interest. I am especially proud of the outsized role that staff in the Connecticut office and the Attorney General played in bringing the settlement about. First, in developing the novel legal theory that frames the lawsuits filed by all 20 states plus Justice. Next, by working closely with Justice to build the evidentiary case against S&P and a constructed 20 state coalition and, finally, to serve as lead negotiators (inaudible). At this time I would like to recognize the incredible efforts of several people, notably my predecessor Dick Blumenthal, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal for bringing this case originally to George O'Connell. Where's George? When I talk about the novel legal theory that made this all possible, he's the principal architect of it. Assistance Attorney General Matthew Budzik who led the case -- right over there -- for Connecticut, created and nurtured the 20 state coalition, work with Justice to provide evidence and help negotiate the final deal. (Inaudible) partners in Justice who have been fantastic. Stuart Delery, George Cardona, you really have been wonderful to work with. And the other members of our 20 state coalition, without whom this not would have been possible. And, finally, recognition to Lucy Fedo and her colleagues such Adam Jerowski who represented standard (inaudible) they were tough but constructive and fair, so thank you very much. 10:38:54 JIM HOOD: Good morning. My name is Jim Hood. I'm Attorney General in Mississippi. I understand there were some media statements that I was involved in some of these negotiations while hunting. Let me say I didn't skip the negations on a hunting trip. I actually, my flight in Memphis was cancelled so I was unable to be there but I sat with an ear bud in my ear for six hours. A little the -- the -- the -- history of this litigation began in about 2010. Mississippi filed suits against several banks including the credit ratings agencies. Many of them were dismissed. They claimed they had a first amendment right. Richard Blumenthal, who is Attorney General at the time, called me and encouraged me to look at the Consumer Protection angle of our litigation, that is was an unfair deceptive trade practice under our Consumer Protection acts. We filed that litigation second -- following -- Connecticut having filed earlier and Mississippi filed, then Illinois. A couple years passed, we were in desperate straits in litigation and thank goodness the ? the Department of Justice and 16 other Attorneys General joined us in this litigation. It was a bipartisan effort in -- in -- in the litigation in handling this case but, you know, the federal government came in and handled the discovery of the documents, you know, and did a wonderful job of -- Stuart, my hats off to you for the patience that you showed with states in these negotiations and (inaudible). I've been an Attorney General for about 12 years, as Attorney General in Mississippi, and this is one of the best negotiations that I have seen between -- with the federal government working with the states. There was a great effort and with all of our resources brought to bear against one of the greatest violators and causes of our great recession, you know, the credit rating agencies portrayed themselves as if they pure as June Smith. You expected the banks to do some things slippery but, you know, the credit ratings agencies were supposed to be ones that we look to and so they -- they were reaping huge profits from approving these credit -- these CDOs and mortgage-back securities and, you know, we relied on that and so now it's good to see them held accountable. I know that the people in my state simply wanted us to extract enough penalty from them so that they would deterred, and other credit rating agencies in the future, from doing this kind of conduct and causing this type of recession in the future. I think we have done that at 1.375 billion, the states will share in half of that. And so, anyway, it's been a good negotiation and I think that we reached a fair result. I think the SCC now has regulations that will prevent this from occurring in the future. Thank you. UNKNOWN: We'll be (inaudible) to take any of your questions. QUESTION: I was wondering if you talk a bit about why it was so important that you secure this retraction of the allegation (inaudible) retaliation and it seems like (inaudible) negotiations. Why do that? 10:42:12 DELERY: Well, I think, what the statement of facts reflects is accountability by S&P for the conduct that led to the case. This case was originally bought -- brought after a long and detailed investigation. The department followed the facts and the law where it led and, in our view, it was important that the statement of facts -- which it does -- reflects the conduct for which we are holding S&P accountable and made clear that the allegations of a retaliation motive were simply unfounded based on all the information. And I think that the -- not only the statement of facts but the agreement by the company to make court filing withdrawing that defense is significant and reflects the fact that it had no merit in the first place. 10:43:08 HOLDER: Let me be clear about this, alright? This was important to me and this was important to this justice department and to all of the Attorneys General who worked on this case. The notion that somehow or other this was a suit brought in retaliation for a credit downgrade, is utter nonsense. 290 million documents have been examined. We can look at 290 million more and you'll find absolutely no indication that that was the reason why this investigation was begun, why this settlement was reached. Utter nonsense, and that was important to me. QUESTION: Mr. Holder, may I just follow up on that? One of the things that S&P said at the time was that the only action the government pursued was against it and not the other rating agencies. So the logical follow up question here is are you looking at the other rating agencies? 10:44:01 DELERY: We're not gonna comment now on what other investigations we may or may not have underway. I think what we can say is that financial fraud is a subject that has been and will continue to be a critical priority for the Department of Justice. We will continue to pursue those that we find are responsible for the conduct that gave rise to the financial crisis which has taken years for the country to recover from and our work on that project is ongoing and remains a priority. We'll continue to work on it. QUESTION: How much more time do you feel like you have now that we are 7 years out from (inaudible)? DELERY: I think what this case reflects is that the cases taken time to build and they take time to litigate and we're prepared, you know, through whatever comes to put in the time and the resources necessary to hold people accountable for the conduct that we find, that gave rise to the financial crisis, we'll continue to do that. We are not tiring in that commitment. 10:45:03 JEPSEN: It's a matter of public record that Connecticut and Mississippi filed suits against (inaudible) filing a suit against Standard and Poor's that case has been state (sic) pending the outcome resolution the current case is (inaudible) in court. QUESTION: (inaudible) does the money being provided to the states come with any strings attached or are there certain requirements as to how the 19 states plus the district is supposed to be using it? JEPSEN: It's resolved on a state by state basis. Each state decides how the money will be used. In Connecticut all the money's going to our general fund. QUESTION: As a follow up, how did you allocate the distribution among the states? What determined that? 10:45:46 JEPSEN: Well, these multi states which are growing in their frequency and complexity how money is gonna be divided up and where it's gonna go is always a question. In this case, California had the unusual situation of having a separate claim and so California is receiving a large amount of money, $210 million, if I recall of the 675 or whatever each states are getting because a very large portion of that will go to Calpers and resolution -- customer solution of Calper's separate law suit. The tradition -- the logging tradition of these multi states is that those on the executive committee will get a bumped up share and that's negotiated in and among the states. And so the five members of the executive committee -- negotiating committee -- which is Connecticut, Illinois, Mississippi, Delaware, and Tennessee, are getting slightly, somewhat more, than the states -- reflecting the non-involvement that we had in court. So the remaining 14 states will each get a -- the same number. I think it's around 22 million (inaudible) Connecticut bumped up. QUESTION: Attorney General Holder, will you announce the conclusion, the civil rights investigation into Gary Wilson, Antone Zimmerman before you leave office? 10:47:24 HOLDER: Yes, I've indicated in the past that's certainly my hope. Contrary to reports, I think that I've seen in the press over the last couple of weeks, there's nothing on my desk yet with regard to either component that we are investigating with regard to the shooting itself or the larger investigation into the police department. My hope is that I'll get -- we'll get this done and I'll be able to make an announcement before I leave. That's my intention. QUESTION: Attorney General, question (inaudible) relates to terrorism. You talked about -- (inaudible) of terrorist suspects you talked about re-entering programs here in the U.S. How is the Justice Department gonna deal with re-entry of terrorist suspects inside the U.S. and should the public be concerned about these suspects once they're released? 10:48:07 HOLDER: Well, you know, we try to make sure that the people who we are releasing are done so after careful examination by inter-agency process. QUESTION: I'm sorry, sir. I'm not asking about -- (inaudible) suspects who (inaudible) inside U.S. served their time and then are released. How do you deal re-entry of them back into American society and should the people in the public here be concerned about that? 10:48:29 HOLDER: Well, I mean, we'll go through a variety of things so that we try to minimize the possibility if they're going to go back to the fight such as it was. You know, these people get fairly long sentences. So they'll have a pretty substantial amount of time to consider what it is they did that got them into prison. I don't know if you call it the typical sentence but a sentence that you see a pretty fair number of times for people who engage in material support, is about 15 years. That's a long time to sit around and think about whether or not what you did is consistent with who you now are and where you want to -- how you want to conduct your life once you leave. Because the reality is, if you get out of prison after 15 years and go back to doing the same thing that put you in jail for 15 years will put you back in jail for, you know, another substantial sentence. QUESTION: General Holder, how much of the 1.4 billion settlement will be tax deductible to McGraw Hill at the federal level and state level? 10:49:31 DELERY: From the federal perspective, the entire amount coming to the federal government, which is $687.5 million, is a FIRREA penalty. All of it is a penalty. The IRS handles the tax treatment of that but it's all a penalty. QUESTION: (Inaudible) Holder, what is the exam (sic) of the Department of Justice probe into the IRS -- IRS targeting group seeking tax exempt status? (Inaudible) has reportedly talked with the DOJ but not to congress. Should we expect some kind of final report from DOJ soon? 10:50:05 HOLDER: Well, I said -- as I've said up here, on any number occasions about any number of investigations, that's something that I think we're gonna get to at the end of -- relatively -- relatively soon. These are matters that have been under investigation for some time. I'm satisfied with the progress that the Criminal division has done, the Civil Rights Division as well, and I expect that we'll have some final recommendations coming up relatively soon. QUESTION: Mr. Attorney General, in terms of -- reports came out that there were gonna be no charges against NewsCorp in the Hacking scandal inside the U.S. Just wondering how the Justice department came to that conclusion and if you're in support of it why you think it's the right decision? 10:50:47 HOLDER: That was something that was handled by our U.S. Attorney's office in New York and I can tell you that it was something taken extremely seriously. We looked at all of the evidence that was there and made a determination based on a very, very, thorough investigation that there was not an appropriate basis to bring charges. But I really want to make sure that everybody understands that that was something that was really investigated. I mean, really examined in a thorough way with the thought that if there was a basis, we would've -- we would've brought charges. QUESTION: Can I just ask you another question about Boston -- the jury selection process is taking a long time. There have been, I guess, now three requests for a change of venue. Why does the Justice Department believe it's important to have that trial in Boston? 10:51:34 HOLDER: Well, I think it's important to simply hold the trial in a place where a fair jury can be impelled and we are of the view that that can be done in Boston. The process is ongoing. A number of jurors have already been qualified, I understand and that process will continue until the judge reaches a number that he has set. So that periphery challenges can be exercised in an impartial, fair, jury can be impelled. But it's something that we're confident can be done -- can be done in Boston. QUESTION: (Inaudible) can you speak a little bit to last week's confirmation (inaudible)? 10:52:26 HOLDER: I know it's interesting that when Senator Leahy asked the nine people who were there for the second day of hearing, who here -- raise your hand if you don't think Loretta Lynch should be confirmed as Attorney General, no hands went up. And then the question is -- except for those people who were there to support Loretta's nomination -- what were the other people doing there and as we heard from testimony that they gave was to talk about things that, I guess, we've done, I've done, as Attorney General, things that President Obama has done, not particularly relevant, it seemed to me, to a determination as to whether or not Loretta would a good Attorney General. And I'll tell you, she's gonna be a great Attorney General. She will have the ability to be independent from the President but I will say this, you know, this notion that seems to, you know, permeate that hearing -- both the first day and the second day -- this notion is somehow -- this justice department has been politicized -- is totally inconsistent with the facts. You want to look at a politicized justice department you look at the one that I inherited, all right? You look at the way in which hiring was done here for political reasons. You look at all the other things that we had to deal with to rebuild this department that I grew up in and that I love. I will leave this department in a way that I found it when I came here back in 1976 with high moral, with people who are dedicated doing things only on the basis of the facts and the law and, you know, I think a little irresponsible of people on the hill to say that policy differences that we have with them of decision that we have made that are not consistent with how they view the world can be characterized as political. There's -- there have been no -- there's no politicization of this justice department. I'm proud of the work that we've done over the past six years, the historic things that we have done, and I would hope that some of the American people would not fall prey to interesting sound bites that simply have to be -- simply are inconsistent with the facts. (UNKNOWN): All right, thank you. (UNKNOWN): Thank you.
PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON / COUNCIL OF AMERICAS CONFERENCE (2000)
President Clinton addresses the Council of the Americas 30th Washington Conference. In his speech the president urged Congress to approve a one-point-seven (B) billion dollar administration package of aid. Most of the money would go to train and equip Colombia's military.
HOUSE OVERSIGHT CMTE HRG ON THE CENSUS 1100-END
1100 HSE OVERSIGHT CENSUS HRG REMOTE FS4 84 HOUSE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND REFORM HEARING ON THE 2020 CENSUS Providing the Census Bureau with the Time to Produce a Complete and Accurate Census On Thursday, September 10, 2020, at 11:00 a.m., Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, the Chairwoman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, will hold a hearing on the need for legislative action to extend the statutory deadlines for the Census in light of the coronavirus crisis. In response to a request from Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, the House passed statutory extensions as part of the Heroes Act in May. Chairwoman Maloney also introduced stand-alone legislation, the Fair and Accurate Census Act. However, in July, the Trump Administration abruptly reversed course. Instead of supporting its own request for legislation to extend the deadlines, it cut back operations aimed at reaching the hardest to count communities. On August 3, 2020, Director Dillingham announced that the Census Bureau would cut short Self-Response and Nonresponse Follow-up by a full month, and data processing operations by 60 days. On September 2, 2020, the Committee released an internal Census Bureau analysis that was presented to Secretary Ross on August 3, 2020-the same date the Administration announced that it was cutting short field and data processing operations. The document warned that forcing the Census Bureau to complete the Census without extending the statutory deadlines could significantly degrade its accuracy and completeness. On September 5, 2020, the Census Bureau echoed these concerns in a sworn declaration filed in federal litigation, stating the new schedule would require cutting 21 days from "expert matter review and software error remediation" and explaining "[t]hese changes increase the risk the Census Bureau will not identify errors during post processing in time to fix them." Citing the likelihood of "irreparable harm" as a result of inaccurate census data, the judge issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting the Commerce Department and Census Bureau from implementing the shortened Census schedule until a September 17 court hearing. WITNESSES J. Christopher Mihm Managing Director, Strategic Issues Team Government Accountability Office John H. Thompson Former Director Census Bureau (2013-2017) Stephen Roe Lewis Governor, Gila River Indian Community Stacey Carless Executive Director, NC Counts Coalition Hans A. von Spakovsky (Minority Witness) Senior Legal Fellow, Heritage Foundation
Further investigation Part 2
A2 / France 2
Jérémy André and Bruce Toussaint
France 5
HOUSE OVERSIGHT CMTE HRG ON THE CENSUS 1100-END SIDE
1100 HSE OVERSIGHT CENSUS HRG SIDE FS3 83 HOUSE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND REFORM HEARING ON THE 2020 CENSUS Providing the Census Bureau with the Time to Produce a Complete and Accurate Census On Thursday, September 10, 2020, at 11:00 a.m., Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, the Chairwoman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, will hold a hearing on the need for legislative action to extend the statutory deadlines for the Census in light of the coronavirus crisis. In response to a request from Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, the House passed statutory extensions as part of the Heroes Act in May. Chairwoman Maloney also introduced stand-alone legislation, the Fair and Accurate Census Act. However, in July, the Trump Administration abruptly reversed course. Instead of supporting its own request for legislation to extend the deadlines, it cut back operations aimed at reaching the hardest to count communities. On August 3, 2020, Director Dillingham announced that the Census Bureau would cut short Self-Response and Nonresponse Follow-up by a full month, and data processing operations by 60 days. On September 2, 2020, the Committee released an internal Census Bureau analysis that was presented to Secretary Ross on August 3, 2020-the same date the Administration announced that it was cutting short field and data processing operations. The document warned that forcing the Census Bureau to complete the Census without extending the statutory deadlines could significantly degrade its accuracy and completeness. On September 5, 2020, the Census Bureau echoed these concerns in a sworn declaration filed in federal litigation, stating the new schedule would require cutting 21 days from "expert matter review and software error remediation" and explaining "[t]hese changes increase the risk the Census Bureau will not identify errors during post processing in time to fix them." Citing the likelihood of "irreparable harm" as a result of inaccurate census data, the judge issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting the Commerce Department and Census Bureau from implementing the shortened Census schedule until a September 17 court hearing. WITNESSES J. Christopher Mihm Managing Director, Strategic Issues Team Government Accountability Office John H. Thompson Former Director Census Bureau (2013-2017) Stephen Roe Lewis Governor, Gila River Indian Community Stacey Carless Executive Director, NC Counts Coalition Hans A. von Spakovsky (Minority Witness) Senior Legal Fellow, Heritage Foundation
GUN ADS NEWS CONFERENCE (2000)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Andrew Cuomo joined City Mayors and Police Chiefs to condemn the gun industry's multi-million dollar ad campaign attacking the Clinton Administration and Mayors. Cuomo says the US government requires safety caps on aspirin bottles and should require safety locks on guns.
[Short set: OFF KAPORAL APPLICATION PLACEMENT RECEIVERSHIP]
FR3 / France 3
PATIENTS BILL OF RIGHTS (2001)
A bipartisan group of Congressmen say the American people have been waiting too long for a Patients Bill of Rights. The lawmakers have introduced legislation they believe will pass in Congress and the President will sign.
JEFF SESSIONS REMARKS OPIOID ANNOUNCEMENT
SHOT BY DANNY O'SHEA Attorney General Jeff Sessions and other law enforcement officials holds a press conference to reveal a new opioid policy announcement with Acting DEA Administrator Robert W. Patterson; Department of Justice Opioid Coordinator Mary Daly; Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine; West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey; Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel; Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro. Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks Announcing the Prescription Interdiction and Litigation Task Force Remarks as prepared for delivery. Good afternoon, and thank you all for being here. I want to start by thanking our Acting Associate Attorney General, Jesse Panuccio, our Acting DEA Administrator Patterson, and our state Attorneys General who have joined us here today: Patrick Morrissey of West Virginia, Brad Schimel of Wisconsin, Josh Shapiro of Pennsylvania, Ken Paxton of Texas, Leslie Rutledge of Arkansas, Sean Reyes of Utah, and my old friend Mike DeWine of Ohio. Each of them has made combating opioid abuse a priority and has shown outstanding leadership. I want to commend them for doing that-because today our nation is facing the deadliest drug epidemic in our history. And make no mistake, this is not business as usual. It is the resolute policy of this Administration and this Department of Justice to reduce these overdose deaths, to reduce addiction, and to reduce the amount of prescription opioids in this county. In 2016, an estimated 64,000 Americans lost their lives to drug overdoses. That is the highest ever recorded in our history, and follows a record increase in fatal overdoses. Preliminary data suggest that 2017 was even worse-albeit with a much smaller increase. The vast majority of these deaths are the result of opioids-prescription painkillers, heroin, and deadly new synthetic drugs like fentanyl. In the United States, I recently read that we consume the vast majority of the world's hydrocodone and more than 80 percent of its oxycodone. It is estimated that we use many times more opioids than is medically necessary for a population our size. Millions of Americans are living with an addiction. A recent study found that the opioid crisis has cost the United States $1 trillion since 2001. Last year alone it cost us $115 billion. The study estimates that over the next three years, it will cost us another half a trillion dollars. President Trump has made ending this crisis a priority for this administration, and he has taken action from the beginning of his presidency. Under his strong leadership, the Department of Justice has taken historic new actions to reverse the rising tide of addiction and death. In July, we brought charges against more than 120 defendants, including a number of doctors, for crimes related to prescribing or distributing opioids and other dangerous narcotics. A week later, I announced the seizure of AlphaBay, the largest criminal marketplace on the Internet. This site hosted some 220,000 drug listings - including more than 100 vendors advertising fentanyl - and was responsible for countless synthetic opioid overdoses, including the tragic death of a 13-year old in Utah. In August, I created the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit, a new data analytics program to help find evidence of overprescribing and opioid-related health care fraud. I then assigned 12 experienced Assistant United States Attorneys to opioid "hot-spots" to focus solely on investigating and prosecuting opioid-related health care fraud. By November they had begun issuing indictments. In October, the Department announced the first-ever indictments of Chinese nationals and their North American-based traffickers and distributers for separate conspiracies to distribute fentanyl and other opioids in the United States. Also in October, the DEA announced the establishment of six new enforcement teams focused on combatting the flow of heroin and illicit fentanyl into the U.S. These enforcement teams are based in communities facing some of the most significant challenges with heroin and fentanyl. In 2017, the DEA held two of its National Prescription Drug Takeback Days, when people can dispose of unnecessary and potentially dangerous drugs with no questions asked. In total, DEA took more than 900 tons of drugs out of American communities. In November, I ordered each of our 94 U.S. Attorney offices to designate an opioid coordinator-someone to customize our anti-opioid strategy in each district. Last month, I announced a new resource to target traffickers who sell drugs online called J-CODE: Joint Criminal Opioid Darknet Enforcement team. The J-CODE team will coordinate efforts across the FBI's offices all around the world - bringing together DEA, our Safe Streets Task Forces, drug trafficking task forces, Health Care Fraud Special Agents, and other assets - effectively doubling the FBI's investment into fighting against online drug trafficking. Also last month, I announced a 45-day surge of DEA Special Agents, Diversion Investigators, and Intelligence Research Specialists to focus on pharmacies and prescribers who are dispensing unusual or disproportionate amounts of drugs. Earlier this month, the DEA placed all fentanyl analogues not already regulated by the Controlled Substances Act into Schedule I - the category for substances with no currently accepted medical use - for at least two years. This makes it harder for people to acquire illicit fentanyl and easier for law enforcement to investigate and prosecute drug traffickers. Today, I am announcing our next steps. First of all, the Department has hired an experienced federal prosecutor to lead our anti-opioid efforts: Mary Daly. Mary previously served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of New York and the Eastern District of Virginia, where she supervised the Narcotics unit and was the opioid coordinator. Over her 13 years as a federal prosecutor, Mary has focused on the prosecution of transnational drug trafficking organizations. Mary will serve as Director of Opioid Enforcement and Prevention Efforts. She will help us formulate and implement initiatives, policies, grants, and programs relating to opioids, and coordinate these efforts with law enforcement. Second, we are attacking this crisis at its root: the diversion and overprescription of opioid painkillers. Today I am announcing the Prescription Interdiction & Litigation-or PIL-Task Force. The PIL Task Force will focus in particular on targeting opioid manufacturers and distributors who have contributed to this epidemic. We will use criminal penalties. We will use civil penalties. We will use whatever tools we have to hold people accountable for breaking our laws. The Task Force will work closely with the Department of Health and Human Services, and it will coordinate with law enforcement at all levels. The Task Force will examine potential legislative and regulatory changes in existing laws. I am also ordering the Task Force to examine existing state and local government lawsuits against opioid manufacturers to determine if we can be of assistance. In fact, we are already getting involved in these cases. I am announcing today that the Department will file a statement of interest in a lawsuit against a number of opioid manufacturers and distributors for allegedly using false, deceptive, and unfair marketing of opioid drugs. The federal government has borne substantial costs as a result of the opioid crisis. The Medicare prescription drug program, for example, paid more than $4 billion for opioids in 2016. The hard-working taxpayers of this country deserve to be compensated by those whose illegal activity contributed to those costs. And we will go to court to ensure that the American people receive the compensation they deserve. These are not our last steps. We will continue to attack the opioid crisis from every angle. And we will continue to work tirelessly to bring down the number of opioid prescriptions, reduce the number of fatal overdoses, and to protect the American people.
WHITE HOUSE BRIEFING
Tuesday, February 12, 2008 White House Briefing with Dana Perino STIX and CUTS RS06/ X84/ 1230 WH BRIEF X84.02 STIX 12:46:53 Good afternoon 12:46:59fun note - at 3pm President GW Bush makes remarks on African American Celebration 12:47:18briefing on what talks about: celebration of African American Month 12:47:30 talk about progress on racial equality 12:47:41highligh one risk on this progress 12:47:51in particular he will focus on nooses 12:48:00number of reports of nooses being displayed - 70 since December 06 12:48:12 talk about the shamefulness of this 12:48:18and make clear that jokes of this nature no place in country today. 12:48:44tools country needs to protect America. 12:48:54 add amendments to improve the bill QUESTIONS VENEZUELA AND OIL SUPPLY 12:49:21what you're referring to is private litigation that I won't comment on 12:49:33 will say that president continues to push forward to diversify alternative energy 12:50:00 when there is litigation ongoing different parties say anything to win argument and not something federal government will get involved int 12:50:19unclear what announcement was 12:50:24the president has said that he believes abbas and olmert committed to final agreement by end of year 12:50:39 back at anapolis conference and trip to middle east - there are going to be issues for both sides to work through. Important for leader to look at big picture 12:51:03 both foreign leaders met and had a good meeting. Hopefully they will continue to monitor and push them PALESTINIAN LAND BEING TAKEN??? 12:51:30we're clear that not sure if this was reiteration or what 12:51:45issues of security that Israel has to deal with 12:52:00 the president thinks both about Palestinians and israel 12:52:11wht we have to get through this year is final status agreement GENERAL CARTWRIGHT: CONCERNED OF RETURNING TO COLD WAR MINDSET WITH RUSSIAN AIRCRAFT CARRIERS 12:52:34haven't spoken to president about it - refer you to DOD ADMINISTRATION PROGRAMS FOR HOUSING CRISIS 12:53:16on housing crisis we started several initiatives for reforms 12:53:25we worked with sec of treasury and sec of housing to set up private organization to help those in need 12:53:41going to take that even further 12:53:45have to remember that these are contracts that freely entered into 12:53:57it's not in anyone's interest for economy to collapse because of housing market 12:54:09trying to figure out way to help those with loans and 12:54:18to work with private sector and congress 12:54:25president asked congress to take up this issue 12:54:35president just financed financial literacy council to have people take more responsibility and make sure they're making prudent decisions 12:55:03i think consumers out there educated about what can happen if you take subprime loan or not afford what committed to 12:55:21 I think that everybody out of this - will make better decisions TERRORISTS 12:56:08we're very much aware to keep terrorism on track AMBASSADOR AND NUCLEAR TECH. MISSING 12:56:29refer you to DOD INDIA AND NUCLEAR TESTING 12:57:00we believe nuclear power good for environment 12:57:09needs to think how diversify resources 12:57:17they are facing environmental problems - esp coal that is burned - problems in water 12:57:34this agreement one we did carefully through state dept INDIA AND DEALS WITH RUSSIA CHINA 12:58:01 I imagine state dept in talks with that MEXICO AND BORDER ISSUES 12:58:16i don't know of any event of this 12:58:25but president dedicated to peace with border region HUMAN RIGHTS IN MEXICO 12:59:07i don't think that that's accurate - president concerned about this issue - appreciates how aggressively calderon has been fighting that issue and drug issues ECONOMY 12:59:56one thing I have learned is that you can find economists to say anything 13:00:22it's not just the checks going into consumer spending 13:00:44the small businesses really ones to create the jobs GM BILLION DOLLAR LOSS AND BUYOUT? 13:01:08 auto industry going through tough times 13:01:27trying to restructure and I think over long term - auto industry is strong but issues to work through 13:01:49worker retraining programs, very important HOMELAND SECURITY WIRETAPPING AND TELEPHONE COMPANIES 13:03:03amendment that issues WMD's (senator bond) 13:03:25anyone in America requiring a wiretap - that's issue with courts CUTS 13:09:30 dana perino enters 13:09:35 side shot of perino from podium 13:09:59 shot of audience 13:10:07 closeup of audience member 13:10:23ws of perino with press in foreground 13:10:33side shot of perino at podium with cameras in foreground 13:10:44 shot of reporter 13:10:58shot of reporters listening 13:11:15 ws of perino with press and cameras in foreground 13:11:30 ms of perino at podium head-on 13:11:47 side shot of perino at podium with press and cameras in foreground 13:12:01 closer angled shot of perino at podium 13:12:58 shot of press another shot of press 13:13:22shot of perino; pan back to press 13:13:45 shot of press
Janet Reno Briefing (1995)
Attorney General Janet Reno Holds her weekly availablity for reports. EPA administrator Carol Browner also attended the briefing to discuss the Love Canal settlement. Other topics include COPS funding and the recent American Airlines plane crash in Colombia
[Short set: OFF - KAPORAL RECEIVERSHIP]
A2 / France 2
[Political crisis in Israel]
A2 / France 2
Zimbabwe Farmers - White farmers beaten for protesting seizure of land
NAME: ZIM FARMERS 20080701I TAPE: EF08/0678 IN_TIME: 10:30:56:12 DURATION: 00:02:19:13 SOURCES: SABC DATELINE: Harare - 30 June 2008 RESTRICTIONS: No Access SAfrica SHOTLIST 1. Wide of injured farmer Michael Campbell lying in a hospital bed in Avenue Clinic 3. Various of Campbell's face with signs of beating 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Campbell, Zimbabwean farmer: "Well, I should think it is because of the court case with the government. We're taking (them) on. It really seems to be a thorn in their flesh, this court case." 5. Close Campbell's beaten and bloodied ear 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Campbell, Zimbabwean farmer: "We've been told that we're mad men, taking on the government. But I don't think so." 7. Wide interior hospital with Ben Freeth, Michael Campbell's son-in-law, seated in the background, bandaged up 8. Close Freeth's badly beaten face, bleeding eye 9. Mid Freeth walking with the help of a doctor 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Ben Freeth, Zimbabwean farmer and son-in-law of Michael Campbell: "(They) put me in the back of my father-in-law's vehicle, tied me up and we were taken for miles. I don't know where we were. This was probably about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and it and it was dark by the time we got to where they dropped us. And then they started beating us, we were by a fire in the middle of the bush and there were about 50 people just beating us and singing Chimorenga songs and we were really badly beaten there and they said they were going to kill us." 11. Mid pan across Freeth's scarred back 12. Mid setup John Worsley-Worswick, spokesman for the Justice for Agriculture group 13. SOUNDBITE (English) John Worsley-Worswick, spokesman for the Justice for Agriculture group: "The SADC case is very benchmark. It is the initiation of litigation in the international arena off the back of farmers being forced out of the jurisdiction here in Zimbabwe, out of the courts here in Zimbabwe into the international arena." 14. Wide interior hospital STORYLINE: White farmers in Zimbabwe who had protested against the seizure of their land were badly beaten by Robert Mugabe's supporters on Sunday, the same day he was sworn in as Zimbabwe's president, following an internationally derided election. The South African Broadcasting Corporation on Monday interviewed two horrifically injured farmers, Michael Campbell and his son-in-law Ben Freeth, at the Avenue Clinic in the capital Harare on Tuesday, and they described what had happened. Michael Campbell's wife and a farm manager on another farm were also brutally beaten in the attacks, in Mashonaland West, a stronghold of Mugabe's ZANU-PF party, said Deon Theron, vice president of Zimbabwe's Commercial Farmers' Union. Most members of his union are white farmers. Three of those attacked on Sunday had appealed to a regional body and been granted temporary permission to stay on their farms, Theron said. Michael Campbell, his wife and his son-in-law, Ben Freeth said they were attacked on their farm in Chegutu, west of Harare, on Sunday afternoon and then forced into a truck by a mob. "(They) put me in the back of my father-in-law's vehicle, tied me up and we were taken for miles. I don't know where we were. This was probably about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon," Freeth told SABC on Monday. "It was dark by the time we got to where they dropped us. And then they started beating us, we were by a fire in the middle of the bush and there were about 50 people just beating us and singing Chimorenga songs and we were really badly beaten there and they said they were going to kill us," he added. All three were in hospital in Harare with head wounds, burns and broken bones. Campbell said he believed they were attacked because they had appealed to a regional Southern African Development Community (SADC) court to be allowed to stay on their farms. A farm manager nearby was attacked by another mob earlier in the day and was also in the hospital with serious injuries, Theron said. A third farm was also raided, but nobody was harmed. Mugabe claims the farm seizures that began in 2002 were to give land back to poor blacks, but many of the farms went to his ZANU-PF cronies. The seizures are blamed for the collapse of Zimbabwe's key agriculture sector, leading to a broader economic crisis. "The SADC case is very benchmark. It is the initiation of litigation in the international arena on the back of farmers having been forced out of the jurisdiction here in Zimbabwe, out of the courts here in Zimbabwe into the international arena," said John Worsley-Worswick, spokesman for the group Justice for Agriculture, a Zimbabwean group whose stated mission is "to secure justice, peace and freedom for the agricultural sector".