1950s INDUSTRIAL
MACHU PICHU, INCAN RUINS WITH LLAMAS
A day in the world
A2 / France 2
BS REVEALER PICHU CLUES
Peru German Tourist
German tourist dies in Machu Pichu
1970s South America
South America - Machu Pichu - valley
Peru Hunger - Machu Pichu residents hunger strike to demand share of tourist trade
TAPE: EF03/0973 IN_TIME: 23:48:50 DURATION: 2:55 SOURCES: APTN/Channel 2 RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Machu Pichu, 29 Oct 2003 SHOTLIST: POOL FILE Machu Pichu, Peru 1. Wide shot of Machu Pichu ruins 2. Close up of ruins 3. Pan of ruins 4. Wide shot of Machu Pichu mountains 5. Medium shot of ruins 6. Close up of people in ruins Channel 2 Machu Pichu, Peru - October 28th, 2003 7. Pan of ruins entrance 8. Tourists entering Machu Pichu 9. Strikers standing in front of Machu Pichu sanctuary 10. Tourists arriving at Machu Pichu 11. Tourists walking in front of strikers 12. Police talking to strikers 13. SOUDBITE (Spanish) Daniel Seminario, Machu Pichu resident: "Brothers and Sister tourists, I want you all to know what you bring to our sanctuary, our district Machu Pichu does not receive a cent." 14. Pan of strikers talking to tourists 15. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Maricarmen Zoraide, Spanish Tourist: "I think this it's very unfair that the government doesn't give absolutely anything to these people in the region, these people are the ones that own all this history and something needs to be given to them." 16. Tourist signing a document in support of strikers APTN Lima, Peru - October 29, 2003 17. Various of Machu Pichu mayor 18. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Oscar Valencia, Machu Pichu Mayor "It's really sad to know that Machu Pichu and its people are sitting on a gold mine and they don't receive anything." STORYLINE: Residents of Peru's famous Machu Pichu ruins are staging a hunger strike to call for some of the revenue generated by tourism to benefit the local community. The strikers, who have been sitting at the entrance of the ruins for six days, are demanding that the government and Peru's national institute of culture (INC) give the local people at least ten percent of the profits of the entrance to the ruins. According to local residents, all the money from entrance fees is taken by the INC. Machu Pichu receives approximately 1,500 to 2,000 tourists daily, which generates high quantities of waste. Machu Pichu's municipality cannot transport trash to Cuzco because of its low income. The strikers say the historical ruins generate 35 million dollars a year for large companies, while residents and small towns around the area do not receive one cent. They argue that some of the small communities surrounding the Machu Pichu area have no electricity, schools or water and live in complete poverty. Machu Pichu's mayor, Oscar Valencia met with government authorities in Peru's capital Lima, to discuss these issues and to demand a percentage of the profits from tourism into the ruins. The mayor will have an opportunity to speak to congress on November 4, 2003. Mach Pichu acquired fame after its discovery in 1911 by US professor Hiram Bingham. The Incas civilization led an empire in Machu Pichu for a whole century, extending the culture to Colombia and north of Argentina. The empire fell during the arrival of the Spanish in 1532. Machu Pichu was abandoned a decade later, but was left intact by the Spanish conquerors. The area is the principal archeological location in South America. The National Institute of Culture (INC) informed that approximately 239 thousand people visited the ruins during the first 8 months of 2003.
SJT - PERU/ TENSE SITUATION AND FRENCH BLOCKED
A2 / France 2
Peru Mudslide - Landslides in Peru shut down Machu Picchu train
NAME: PER MUD 260304N TAPE: EF04/0348 IN_TIME: 10:55:09:22 DURATION: 00:02:47:18 SOURCES: APTN/Channel 9 DATELINE: 26 March 2004 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: Channel 9 Aguas Calientes - March 26, 2004 1. Tourists walking to evacuate the mudslide area 2. Tourists walk by the railroad 3. Wagon taking tourists from area 4. Various shots of tourists being taken from area 5. Railroad workers near the affected segment of the railroad 6. Workers trying to clear the railroad 7. Heavy machinery used to clear the railroad 8. Rocks and debris from mudslide 9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Romulo Dlegado, Guide: "They haven't found a proper solution so myself and the other guide, we're gathering a group of people and evacuating them by foot from Machu Pichu to the highway - some 38 kilometres walking distance." 10. Group of tourists walking along railway 11. Helicopter used for evacuation 12. Group of guides go to meet with tourists APTN Machu Picchu - February, 2004 13. Wide of Machu Pichu 14. Aerial footage of Machu Pichu STORYLINE: Landslides have blocked the railway leading to the mountaintop Inca ruins at Machu Picchu in Peru, leading the rail company to shuttle 700 stranded tourists back by helicopter while crews clear the line. Heavy rains triggered several landslides on Wednesday night, a national rail spokeswoman said. The company flew back about 380 tourists on Thursday before continued rain grounded the helicopters. The flights - free of cost to the tourists - were to resume on Friday, weather permitting. Meanwhile, workmen were expected to clear the tracks on Friday, allowing the five-hour train service from the former Inca capital of Cuzco to resume on Saturday. The Incas ruled Peru for about a century before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors, constructing stone-block cities and roads and developing a highly organised and militarised society. The Incas abandoned Machu Picchu around 1545, as Spanish soldiers began to topple their empire. Residents fled to Cuzco or to the surrounding jungles to survive. The mysterious, partially reconstructed citadel set some 500 kilometres (310 miles) southeast of Lima in jungle-shrouded mountains, is South America's top archaeological site. It draws 300,000 foreign visitors each year.
1970s South America
South America - church - rooftops - Peru - near Machu Pichu
Peru Tourism
AP-APTN-0930: Peru Tourism Saturday, 16 February 2013 STORY:Peru Tourism- Authorities deny danger of kidnapping after US warning to tourists LENGTH: 01:39 FIRST RUN: 0030 RESTRICTIONS: Part No Access Peru TYPE: Spanish/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/CANAL 7 STORY NUMBER: 879685 DATELINE: Various - 15 Feb 2013/FILE LENGTH: 01:39 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY CANAL 7 - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION-AP CLIENTS ONLY Lima, Peru - 15 February 2013 1. Wide of Peruvian newspapers spread out 2. Mid of newspaper headline reading: (Spanish) "United States warns of possible kidnappings in Cuzco and Machu Picchu." 3. Wide of Peruvian Congress building CANAL 7 - AP CLIENTS ONLY Lima, Peru - 15 February 2013 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Juan Jimenez, Peruvian Prime Minister: "This information has not been corroborated by the Peruvian authorities. Peru is a sovereign country, a country with its own security systems, of course, this information is not confirmed." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Lima, Peru - 15 February 2013 5. Close of newspaper headline reading: (Spanish) "United States warns of possible kidnappings in Cuzco and Machu Picchu." CANAL 7 - AP CLIENTS ONLY Lima, Peru - 15 February 2013 6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Juan Jimenez, Peruvian Prime Minister: "The government is making every effort to protect the lives of its citizens, to protect its heritage and, of course, to protect all tourists, from whatever country they come from. Tourism is a very important activity for the country, we want tourism to stay, tourism is an industry that gives work to Peruvians. What we are doing is protecting the lives of all tourists." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Cusco region, Peru - May 2010 7. Various of tourists boarding train that will take them to the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu 8. Various of Machu Picchu STORYLINE: The Peruvian government objected on Friday to the US Embassy warning its citizens of a potential kidnapping threat in the Cuzco region - which includes the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu. An embassy official said that credible evidence exists of a threat from a Peruvian rebel group. But the Peruvian prime minister dismissed the claims and said this was not corroborated by the government's security experts. "Peru is a sovereign country, a country with its own security systems, of course, this information is not confirmed," Juan Jimenez said. The embassy official confirmed a report in the Peruvian newspaper La Republica that said leaders of the cocaine-financed Shining Path band discussed kidnapping foreigners, principally Americans, in intercepted communications. Tens of thousands of Americans visit Peru each year. "The government is making every effort to protect the lives of its citizens, to protect its heritage and, of course, to protect all tourists from whatever country the come from. Tourism is a very important activity for the country, we want tourism to stay, tourism is an industry that gives work to Peruvians," said Jimenez. The embassy warning that mentioned Peru's biggest tourist attraction was posted on the US Embassy's Facebook page on Thursday and was dated 13 February. It was also posted on the embassy's website. It said a "criminal organisation may be planning to kidnap US citizen tourists in the Cuzco and Machu Pichu area". Possible targets and methods are not known and the threat is credible at least through the end of February 2013, according to the travel warning. The warning says US Embassy personnel are barred from visiting Machu Pichu and nearby Cuzco unless on official business, which is restricted. The US State Department designated the Maoist-inspired Shining Path a foreign extremist organisation in 1997. Its members now number about 500 and have become an increasingly potent and disciplined fighting force, funding itself by taxing drug traffickers in Peru's coca-growing heartland. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-02-16-13 0949GMT
[Short set: OFF FRENCH TOURISTS INJURED AT MACHU PICCU]
FR3 / France 3
Peru Tourists 5 - Clear skies allow helicopter airlifts of stranded tourists
NAME: PER TOU5 20100128I TAPE: EF10/0089 IN_TIME: 10:58:17:00 DURATION: 00:01:44:14 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Machu Pichu - 28 Jan 2010 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST 1. Medium of pilot in helicopter flying to evacuate people 2. Medium pulls out to wide of flooded river next to roadway 3. Peruvian military member putting out stairs and exiting as helicopter lands 4. Wide of helicopter in landing area and military personnel on ground 5. Medium of tourists and military personnel around helicopter 6. Medium of tourists waiting to be evacuated 7. Medium of tourists lining up with military personnel passing by 8. Wide of tourists arriving to be evacuated 9. Medium of worker cutting through fallen tree 10. Tight of chainsaw 11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marc Yeterian, French hotel owner "This is part of our support to the operation to evacuate the people. Here up there on the rise, we have our heliport that we are using for the light helicopters and so they can easily operate we are clearing the trees following the pilots'' request." 12. Wide of workers clearing trees 13. Wide of military directing helicopter to landing 14. Medium of washed out train tracks 15. Wide of floodwater and submerged train tracks 16. Pan of washed out train track 17. Wide of train yard STORYLINE: Skies cleared over the fabled Machu Picchu citadel on Thursday, speeding the evacuation of thousands of stranded tourists, many of whom were left to eat from communal pots and sleep outdoors after flooding and mudslides cut access to the area. Helicopters had taken 700 people by mid-afternoon from the remote village, the closest to the ancient Inca ruins 8,000 feet up in the Andes mountains. About 2,000 travellers were trapped in the town for days, strapping resources and testing traveller''s patience. Authorities say if the weather holds, they may be able to have all tourists out by Saturday. The Machu Picchu site is closed and will remain so for weeks until the government can repair highway and railroad tracks washed out by mudslides and the raging Urubamba River. Tourists grew frustrated in recent days over chaotic relief efforts, price-gouging and scarce food, but the mood lightened Thursday as the weather cleared, helicopters descended from the skies and soldiers brought order to the evacuation. With the site wedged between a sheer, shaggy-green mountainside and the raging Urubamba River, difficult terrain and bad weather had slowed rescue efforts throughout the week. However, clear skies finally allowed operations to begin at 0800 local time (1300 GMT) on Thursday and Peru''s transport minister said helicopters managed to ferry out more than 300 tourists by midday (1700 GMT). US authorities sent six helicopters stationed in Peru for drug interdiction and police training to join at least four Peruvian military and several private choppers in the rescue. More than 11-hundred tourists were already flown out through Wednesday but at least 15-hundred remained stranded by Wednesday night. The evacuation efforts were complicated by the arrival of hundreds more tourists on the Inca trail hiking path, a popular four-day trek that ends in Machu Picchu. The mudslides, sparked by heavy rains, killed a total of five people in the Cuzco region, including an Argentine trekker and her guide who were crushed while camping on the Inca trail on Tuesday.
SJT - EXPO MACHU PICCHU
A2 / France 2
SJT - V2 KILIMANJARO EPISODE 3
A2 / France 2
Peru Airlift - Clear skies allow helicopter airlift of stranded tourists
NAME: PER AIRLIFT 20100129I TAPE: EF10/0091 IN_TIME: 10:04:36:00 DURATION: 00:03:02:12 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Machu Pichu - 28 Jan 2010 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Pilot in helicopter flying to evacuate people 2. Zoom out to wide of flooded river next to roadway 3. Peruvian military official putting out stairs and exiting as helicopter lands 4. Wide of helicopter in landing area and military personnel on ground 5. Tourists and military personnel around helicopter 6. Tourists waiting to be evacuated 7. Mid of tourists lining up with military personnel passing by 8. Wide of tourists arriving to be evacuated 9. Worker cutting through fallen tree 10. Tight shot of chainsaw 11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marc Yeterian, French hotel owner "This is part of our support to the operation to evacuate the people. Here up there on the rise, we have our heliport that we are using for the light helicopters and so they can easily operate we are clearing the trees following the pilots'' request." 12. Wide of workers clearing trees 13. Military directing helicopter to landing 14. Mid of washed out train tracks 15. Wide of floodwater and submerged train tracks 16. Pan of washed out train track 17. Wide of train yard 18. Helicopter with United States and European representatives arriving in Machu Picchu area to help with stranded foreigners 19. Various of US and European representatives, accompanied by Peruvian officials 20. Tourists lined up to be evacuated 21. Various of tourists stranded in Machu Picchu waiting to be evacuated 22. Various of locals and tourists clearing sand, mud and debris left by overgrown river 23. Various of strong currents in Urubamba River STORYLINE: Skies cleared over the fabled Machu Picchu citadel on Thursday, speeding the evacuation of thousands of stranded tourists, many of whom were left to eat from communal pots and sleep outdoors after flooding and mudslides cut access to the area. Representatives from foreign embassies in Lima arrived on Thursday in the area to look after citizens of their respective countries stranded by the bad weather conditions. Helicopters ferried 975 people out of a remote village on Thursday, the closest to the ancient Inca ruins 8,000 feet up in the Andes mountains. Peru''s Chief Cabinet Minister Javier Velasquez told Lima''s RPP radio that only 600 tourists remain in the village. More than 2,000 travellers were trapped in the town for days, strapping resources and testing travellers'' patience. Authorities say if the weather holds, they may be able to have all tourists out by Saturday. The Machu Picchu site is closed and will remain so for weeks until the government can repair highway and railroad tracks washed out by mudslides and the raging Urubamba River. Dozens of ragged-looking, middle-aged tourists lined up outside the train station, where they waited to make the walk of a few hundred yards to a makeshift helicopter clearing. Younger backpackers played soccer with locals and lent a hand stacking sandbags and clearing train tracks to pass the time. The evacuation was being carried out by age, oldest first. The elderly and children were among the 1,131 tourists evacuated through Wednesday. Tourists have grown frustrated in recent days over chaotic relief efforts, price-gouging and scarce food, but the mood lightened Thursday as the weather cleared, helicopters descended from the skies and soldiers brought order to the evacuation. When on Sunday mudslides destroyed the railway, the only form of transit into Machu Picchu Pueblo, many hotels and restaurants hiked prices exorbitantly, separating wealthier tourists who could afford to pay extra from those who spent days sleeping in train cars and waiting for delayed food shipments. Many backpackers who ran out of money when ATMs ran dry slept in the central plaza. Some 400 Americans were said to be among those stranded. Schultz said most Americans paid for beds and bought their own food, while those that slept in the streets were typically Argentines and other South American backpackers. Stranded tourists quickly outstripped resources in the village of 4,000 people. Wedged between a sheer, verdant mountainside and the raging Urubamba River, difficult terrain and bad weather have slowed rescue efforts. Rain prevented helicopters from landing in the town until after midday both Tuesday and Wednesday, but clear skies allowed operations to begin early on Thursday. Evacuation efforts have been complicated by the arrival of hundreds more tourists on the Inca trail hiking path, a popular four-day trek that ends in Machu Picchu. Some 250 more tourists reached the village on Wednesday and more could arrive on Thursday, though the head porter of Llama Path tourist agency, Fredy Condori, told the AP that almost all those who set out on the path on Monday turned back when they heard the citadel was closed. Authorities closed the Inca trail on Tuesday after a mudslide killed two people. Also stuck were 150 local porters who carry tourists'' packs and equipment for as little as 8 US dollars a day, said Jose Antonio Gongora, owner of tour agency Llama Path. Authorities were keeping them from returning along a river on foot.
IN THE RETRO: THE 7 WONDERS OF THE WORLD
A2 / France 2
ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: GOLDIE HAWN
TAPE_NUMBER: EN9929 IN_TIME: 10:37:45 LENGTH: 01:10 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: FEED: SCRIPT: xfa STORY: GOLDIE HAWN LOCATION: LIMA DATE: JULY 16TH GOLDIE HAWN turned up at a hospital in Lima at the weekend, accompanied by husband KURT RUSSELL. They were there on behalf of the charity Smile, which pays for operations on children born with hare lips. The actress and her husband visited one of the wards at the Hospital Maria where they were filmed with children suffering the affliction. The film will be used to raise awareness of the problem in the States and to raise funds to enable the operation in Latin America. The actors were accompanied by their three children and planned to visit some of the famous tourist spots in Peru like Machu Pichu. Hawn began her entertainment life as a gogo dancer before becoming the archetypal blonde dingaling on a late'60s variety show, LaughIn. In 1969, her first featured film role, in Cactus Flower, won her a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Strong performances in Butterflies Are Free and in Steven Spielberg's first theatrical feature, The Sugarland Express, cemented her reputation. She took away critical kudos for her performance in Shampoo; as Private Benjamin, in 1980, the comedienne had a megahit and another Oscar nomination (she also served as executive producer). As a producer, Hawn has a longterm, multipicture deal with Disney's Hollywood Pictures. As an actress, the 50plusyearold shows no sign of letting up: In 1996, she teamed with Diane Keaton and Bette Midler in the runaway success The First Wives Club, and capped off the year with a winning performance in Woody Allen's musical Everyone Says I Love You; 1999 witnessed a comic turn opposite Steve Martin in the unfortunate remake The OutofTowners. On the personal front, she and Kurt Russell have been together since 1986. SHOTLIST: WS GOLDIE HAWN HUGS CHILD ; KURT RUSSELL CARRIES CHILD INTO THEATRE ; HAWN AND RUSSELL IN OPERATING THEATRE ; HAWN AND RUSSELL WALK OUT ; RUSSELL AND HAWN GET INTO CAR ; HAWN AND RUSSELL IN CAR ?
Redif zoom perou (see linked record of 09/06/2019)
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)