Focus: [issue of November 4, 2022]
France 24
Oysterman of Hopeland, LA - NTL B-Roll Mississippi River Gulf Outlet
Oysterman of Hopeland, LA - NTL B-Roll Mississippi River Gulf Outlet
HURRICANE KATRINA DAMAGE (2005)
THIS IS QUALITY FOOTAGE OF HURRICANE KATRINA AFTERMATH TAKEN A FEW MONTHS AFTER THE POWERFUL HURRICANE MOVED THROUGH THE GULF STATES. THIS FOOTAGE WAS TAKEN IN OCEAN SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI.
Oysterman of Hopeland, LA - NTL B-Roll Mississippi River Gulf Outlet
Oysterman of Hopeland, LA - NTL B-Roll Mississippi River Gulf Outlet
8 p.m.: [program May 2, 2010]
A2 / France 2
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET. 09:00:07:10 INTV/W A WORKER AT ROBIN SEAFOOD ABOUT THE DESTRUCTION OF THE OYSTER AND CLUB HABITAT IN THE LAKE BORGNE REGION AS A RESULT OF THE MERGING OF LAKE BORGNE WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET DUE TO EROSION. INTV CUTAWAYS. 09:04:29:10 WS OF FISHING BOATS DOCKED ALONGSIDE A PIER. VS AS A CRATE OF CRABS ARE SEPARATED BY SIZE. 09:13:52:00 CU OF A DRAGONFLY RESTING ON A VERTICAL LIFT DRAWBRIDGE. 09:22:09:10 SU AL DALE. CUS OF DYING CYRUS TREES. CI: DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
LAKE BORGNE IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA IS THREATENED BECAUSE OF EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET. 05:00:18:12 INTV/W A LOCAL FISHERMAN WHO TALKS ABOUT THE EROSION CAUSED BY THE CANAL. 05:06:37:12 VS AS THE MAN PILOTS HIS BOAT ALONG THE RIVER. VS AS MR MAYO AND MR SAVOY RIDE IN A BOAT ON THE CANAL. 05:14:08:10 INTV/W MR SAVOY ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET (MRGO). TRAVELLING SHOTS OF THE CANAL. VS OF EGRETS AND OTHER MARSH BIRDS NESTING AND FLYING OVER THE SWAMP. CI: ANIMALS: BIRDS. DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET. 09:00:07:10 INTV/W A WORKER AT ROBIN SEAFOOD ABOUT THE DESTRUCTION OF THE OYSTER AND CLUB HABITAT IN THE LAKE BORGNE REGION AS A RESULT OF THE MERGING OF LAKE BORGNE WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET DUE TO EROSION. INTV CUTAWAYS. 09:04:29:10 WS OF FISHING BOATS DOCKED ALONGSIDE A PIER. VS AS A CRATE OF CRABS ARE SEPARATED BY SIZE. 09:13:52:00 CU OF A DRAGONFLY RESTING ON A VERTICAL LIFT DRAWBRIDGE. 09:22:09:10 SU AL DALE. CUS OF DYING CYRUS TREES. CI: DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET. 09:00:07:10 INTV/W A WORKER AT ROBIN SEAFOOD ABOUT THE DESTRUCTION OF THE OYSTER AND CLUB HABITAT IN THE LAKE BORGNE REGION AS A RESULT OF THE MERGING OF LAKE BORGNE WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET DUE TO EROSION. INTV CUTAWAYS. 09:04:29:10 WS OF FISHING BOATS DOCKED ALONGSIDE A PIER. VS AS A CRATE OF CRABS ARE SEPARATED BY SIZE. 09:13:52:00 CU OF A DRAGONFLY RESTING ON A VERTICAL LIFT DRAWBRIDGE. 09:22:09:10 SU AL DALE. CUS OF DYING CYRUS TREES. CI: DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET. 09:00:07:10 INTV/W A WORKER AT ROBIN SEAFOOD ABOUT THE DESTRUCTION OF THE OYSTER AND CLUB HABITAT IN THE LAKE BORGNE REGION AS A RESULT OF THE MERGING OF LAKE BORGNE WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET DUE TO EROSION. INTV CUTAWAYS. 09:04:29:10 WS OF FISHING BOATS DOCKED ALONGSIDE A PIER. VS AS A CRATE OF CRABS ARE SEPARATED BY SIZE. 09:13:52:00 CU OF A DRAGONFLY RESTING ON A VERTICAL LIFT DRAWBRIDGE. 09:22:09:10 SU AL DALE. CUS OF DYING CYRUS TREES. CI: DISASTERS: ENVIRONMENTAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
DISAPPEARING BAYOU
BG MATERIAL FOR A CS ON THE RAPID EROSION OF MARSHLAND IN SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 06:00:20 INTV/W AN ELDERLY CAJUN BAYOU DWELLER ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LAND BENEATH THE ENCROACHING MEXICAN GULF. 06:08:32 TIGHT SHOT OF A SIGN FOR THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET CANAL. ZOOM OUT TO WS REVEALS A CARGO BARGE CRUISING ALONG THE CANAL. JOHN QUINONES SU. POV FTG FROM A MOTORBOAT BEING PILOTED INTO THE GULF BY AN OLD FISHERMAN. CI: DISASTERS: MARINE. ECOLOGY: COASTAL EROSION. ECOLOGY: CONSERVATION. SCENICS: CANAL.
DISAPPEARING BAYOU
BG MATERIAL FOR A CS ON THE RAPID EROSION OF MARSHLAND IN SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 06:00:20 INTV/W AN ELDERLY CAJUN BAYOU DWELLER ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LAND BENEATH THE ENCROACHING MEXICAN GULF. 06:08:32 TIGHT SHOT OF A SIGN FOR THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET CANAL. ZOOM OUT TO WS REVEALS A CARGO BARGE CRUISING ALONG THE CANAL. JOHN QUINONES SU. POV FTG FROM A MOTORBOAT BEING PILOTED INTO THE GULF BY AN OLD FISHERMAN. CI: DISASTERS: MARINE. ECOLOGY: COASTAL EROSION. ECOLOGY: CONSERVATION. SCENICS: CANAL.
DISAPPEARING BAYOU
BG MATERIAL FOR A CS ON THE RAPID EROSION OF MARSHLAND IN SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 06:00:20 INTV/W AN ELDERLY CAJUN BAYOU DWELLER ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LAND BENEATH THE ENCROACHING MEXICAN GULF. 06:08:32 TIGHT SHOT OF A SIGN FOR THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET CANAL. ZOOM OUT TO WS REVEALS A CARGO BARGE CRUISING ALONG THE CANAL. JOHN QUINONES SU. POV FTG FROM A MOTORBOAT BEING PILOTED INTO THE GULF BY AN OLD FISHERMAN. CI: DISASTERS: MARINE. ECOLOGY: COASTAL EROSION. ECOLOGY: CONSERVATION. SCENICS: CANAL.
DISAPPEARING BAYOU
BG MATERIAL FOR A CS ON THE RAPID EROSION OF MARSHLAND IN SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 06:00:20 INTV/W AN ELDERLY CAJUN BAYOU DWELLER ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LAND BENEATH THE ENCROACHING MEXICAN GULF. 06:08:32 TIGHT SHOT OF A SIGN FOR THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET CANAL. ZOOM OUT TO WS REVEALS A CARGO BARGE CRUISING ALONG THE CANAL. JOHN QUINONES SU. POV FTG FROM A MOTORBOAT BEING PILOTED INTO THE GULF BY AN OLD FISHERMAN. CI: DISASTERS: MARINE. ECOLOGY: COASTAL EROSION. ECOLOGY: CONSERVATION. SCENICS: CANAL.
DISAPPEARING BAYOU
BG MATERIAL FOR A CS ON THE RAPID EROSION OF MARSHLAND IN SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 06:00:20 INTV/W AN ELDERLY CAJUN BAYOU DWELLER ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LAND BENEATH THE ENCROACHING MEXICAN GULF. 06:08:32 TIGHT SHOT OF A SIGN FOR THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET CANAL. ZOOM OUT TO WS REVEALS A CARGO BARGE CRUISING ALONG THE CANAL. JOHN QUINONES SU. POV FTG FROM A MOTORBOAT BEING PILOTED INTO THE GULF BY AN OLD FISHERMAN. CI: DISASTERS: MARINE. ECOLOGY: COASTAL EROSION. ECOLOGY: CONSERVATION. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET (MRGO). 02:00:28:10 AERIALS OF THE MRGO AND SWAMPS THAT SEPARATE IT FROM LAKE BORGNE. 02:19:00:11 AERIALS OF FISHING BOATS CRUISING ON THE WATERWAY. MORE AERIALS OF WETLANDS. 02:29:03:14 AERIALS OF SILT ERUPTING FROM A PIPELINE AS THE CANAL IS DREDGED. CI: AIR VIEWS: CANAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET (MRGO). 02:00:28:10 AERIALS OF THE MRGO AND SWAMPS THAT SEPARATE IT FROM LAKE BORGNE. 02:19:00:11 AERIALS OF FISHING BOATS CRUISING ON THE WATERWAY. MORE AERIALS OF WETLANDS. 02:29:03:14 AERIALS OF SILT ERUPTING FROM A PIPELINE AS THE CANAL IS DREDGED. CI: AIR VIEWS: CANAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET (MRGO). 02:00:28:10 AERIALS OF THE MRGO AND SWAMPS THAT SEPARATE IT FROM LAKE BORGNE. 02:19:00:11 AERIALS OF FISHING BOATS CRUISING ON THE WATERWAY. MORE AERIALS OF WETLANDS. 02:29:03:14 AERIALS OF SILT ERUPTING FROM A PIPELINE AS THE CANAL IS DREDGED. CI: AIR VIEWS: CANAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
LOUISIANA CANALS
COVER VIDEO ON THE THREAT TO LAKE BORGNE FROM EROSION CAUSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GULF OUTLET (MRGO). 02:00:28:10 AERIALS OF THE MRGO AND SWAMPS THAT SEPARATE IT FROM LAKE BORGNE. 02:19:00:11 AERIALS OF FISHING BOATS CRUISING ON THE WATERWAY. MORE AERIALS OF WETLANDS. 02:29:03:14 AERIALS OF SILT ERUPTING FROM A PIPELINE AS THE CANAL IS DREDGED. CI: AIR VIEWS: CANAL. SCENICS: CANAL.
US Bush - Bush visits Gulf Port, meets business leaders
NAME: US BUSH 200905N TAPE: EF05/0844 IN_TIME: 11:03:07:24 DURATION: 00:01:37:08 SOURCES: POOL DATELINE: Gulf Port - 20 Sep 2005 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. US President George W. Bush getting off Air Force One 2. Bush being greeted on tarmac 3. Various of crowd in tent and Bush seated with local officials 4. SOUNDBITE (English) George W. Bush, US President: "There is no doubt in my mind that out of the rubble and out of the huge heaps of timber that used to be homes, a better Mississippi will emerge." 5. Audience clapping 6. SOUNDBITE (English) George W. Bush, US President: "We're trying to get this recovery going by ploughing through the paperwork requirements as fast as possible so that we can reduce the frustrations here." 7. Bush with audience applauding 8. SOUNDBITE (English) George W. Bush, US President: "The can-do spirit is seeing progress being made. And inside this tent is a can-do spirit of taking a horrible situation in this part of the world and making it better. And so I am impressed." 9. Bush ending speech STORYLINE: Passing by massive piles of debris left by Hurricane Katrina and flying over miles of homes reduced to rubble, US President George W. Bush pledged on Tuesday that he will help clean up the devastated Gulf Coast region even as it braces for another possible hit from Hurricane Rita. Bush said he has seen progress in his five visits to the hurricane zone, but the towering roadside mounds of downed trees, flattened homes and broken furniture in sight of the presidential motorcade showed that a lot of work remains. Speaking to local government and business leaders during a visit to the Gulf Port, Bush said "There is no doubt in my mind that out of the rubble and out of the huge heaps of timber that used to be homes, a better Mississippi will emerge." The gathering in an air-conditioned tent set up in a hurricane-damaged outlet shopping centre was the first meeting of Governor Haley Barbour's Commission on Recovery, Rebuilding and Renewal. Bush praised what he called their "can-do spirit" and said he was glad to see local leaders heeding his call to lead the recovery plan. After Mississippi, Bush flew to New Orleans for a briefing aboard the USS Iwo Jima on Hurricane Rita, as the storm lashed the Florida Keys. The Iwo Jima and other Navy and Coast Guard ships were scheduled to head out to sea on Wednesday to ride out Rita according to the Pentagon. Bush, who was to tour a Folger's coffee plant in Louisiana, signed an emergency declaration for the Florida Keys.
United States Senate 1100 - 1200
SENATE FLOOR DEBATE: The Senate will convene and begin a period of morning business. Thereafter, resume consideration of H.R. 4939, the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act. 11:01:29.4 Quorum call. 11:05:59.7 mr. kennedy: mr. president, i 11:06:00.0 had offered the senator from washington a previous occasion to file an amendment, 3688. i would ask if its appropriate now to set aside the -- it's not 11:06:20.8 appropriate?n i would call for the regular order? the presiding officer: without objection, the amendment is now pending. 11:06:32.8 mr. kennedy: pending. 11:06:37.4 mr. president, i think for any of us who had the chance last evening to look at the national news, virtually the story that led all of the national networks was the new concern that our 11:06:53.8 public health officials and worldwide public health officials have with regard to the dangers of avian flu, a pandemic, so to speak. we listened to our secretary of h.h.s. talk about the numbers of 11:07:10.2 americans that would be affected. some two million americans would be affected. there was the whole issue, the question about even the potential of closing down airlines, khroeusing -- closing 11:07:26.6 airports, the dangers that would be there in the workplace, the health dangers that we would be faced with. i think that this is something that we have in our committee 11:07:41.0 been very, very concerned about. and i pay special commendation to the chairman of our health committee, senator burr, who had a whole set of series not only on the dangers of avian flu and also on the dangers of 11:07:57.7 bioterrorism. there are some very important kind of common threats that come from bioterrorism and from an avian flu kind of danger. obviously the first thing one nation has to do is it has to 11:08:14.0 try and detect these dangers, these pathogens in these countries where they may be developing and secondly be able to detect them here at home. that's why it's so important the development and the support for a public health system. 11:08:28.4 and then there is the real challenge in terms of containment, trying to contain these, any of these dangers that are out there. and then obviously is the treatment, the treatment for individuals that are affected. and those can be either treating 11:08:45.7 individuals who are affected or try to provide a vaccine for individuals that, so the dangers to those individuals would be minimized. and that is all under the rubric 11:09:00.7 under the development of a national plan, a national plan. and i'm going to come back to that in just a moment, because we here in the united states have not had that kind of developed, effective plan that i 11:09:16.6 think would be necessary to try and deal with the central challenge. but this amendment, mr. president, is a very simple but a vital amendment, and it is absolutely a linchpin in any kind of battle against the dangers of an avian flu or any 11:09:33.2 kind of flu. and that is if we're expecting our drug industry to be able to develop the vaccines and we have given a good deal of flexibility to the food and drug 11:09:46.7 administration that in these kinds of emergencies to be able to give approval to these vaccines that might not have been and probably would not have been given the kind of safety, evaluations that other 11:10:05.1 prescriptions would have undertaken, we have to say, well, who is going to receive those vaccines or those treatments? and primarily they will be individuals that we call first responders. 11:10:21.1 and what are they going to do? they are going to go into the infected area and try and contain it. so it is one thing to put hundreds of millions and billions of dollars in terms of developing these vaccines or these treatments to try and minimize the health impact by 11:10:39.4 the dangers of avian flu. but if we are going to ask these first responders to go in and risk their lives, their health and the economic stability and security of their family, then we ought to be willing to say to 11:10:55.9 these individuals, if you are going to get sick and if you are going to lose your job, or if there is going to be dangers to your health as you are be the front-line defenders for the rest of the society, that we are going to compensate you for the 11:11:11.3 kind of loss of income that you're going to have as a result of taking this kind of vaccine. that's what this amendment does. it provides for a compensation program for first responders, 11:11:28.3 for our firefighters and for our police. now you can say, well, is this 11:11:33.7 really necessary? is it necessary? all we have to do is look at history and we will find that when you do not have a compensation program, you do not have the kinds of volunteers for first responders that are 11:11:47.1 willing to take on these kinds of challenges. so this is what this amendment does. it's a very limited amendment. and that is the reason that i think it is so important. and you can ask, well, is this 11:12:05.6 really an emergency or not. no one could look at the news last night and see the lead story on all three networks and say there is a real danger this is coming at you and say we ought to treat this as business as usual. 11:12:21.2 that is why i believe this amendment is appropriate on this supplemental. now, mr. president, the administration seems to be suffering from a condition that could be called c. k- d.d. -- c.d.d., competence deficit 11:12:37.7 disorder. whether iraq or the katrina crisis, the administration has been incompetent on the issues of dealing with the avian flu. our "help" committee has analyzed the administration's regular failure to prepare for a flu pandemic, and today we are 11:12:54.0 releasing a report showing they failed to take the steps needed to see that america is ready for this major national challenge. they failed to invest in the hospital surge capacity, in needed information technology and the public health surveillance and training 11:13:09.5 programs needed for an effective response. and the endless challenges in the pandemic flu plan are a symbol of the failure. the preparations of the avian flu have been in such prolonged disarray that they are releasing their third new plan this week. 11:13:26.2 the bush administration has known for the need of a plan to prepare for the flu pandemic since the day it took office. but 2001 one came and went without a plan. then 2002 and 2003 and 2004 and almost all of 2005, and still no plan. 11:13:41.7 in each of these years, the warnings of a potential pandemic grew louder but were ignored. this, mr. president, chart shows the warnings that have been there. here's from may 2002, the world health organization's. authorities must understand the 11:14:02.1 potential pandemic influenza. 2000, federal and state plans do not address the key interests surrounding the purchase and distribution of vaccines and antivirals. 11:14:13.4 then we had the series of outbreaks. look, december 2003, outbreak in south korea. outbreak in 2004 in vietnam. outbreak in 2006 of avian flu in britain. these are all the outbreaks in the most recent years. these were the warnings. 11:14:29.1 institute of medicine in 1992, policy-makers must realize and understand the magnitude of the influenza pandemic. now, mr. president, what have other nations done on the pandemic? 11:14:45.7 first, let's just look at other countries around the world in developing a comprehensive plan for the pandemic. here we have got in october 1997, we had a program by the japanese, canada in february 11:15:04.5 2004. here's czechoslovakia in april 2004. february 2005, hong kong. march of 2005, great britain. i have, mr. chairman, i'm not going to include them in the records, but let me just show 11:15:21.6 the extent of the british pandemic flu program. i've illustrated this at other times during the similar discussions. here's the canadian plan. these are enormously 11:15:37.4 comprehensive programs. they are programs to deal in rural areas, in urban areas, the training program. and not only are they programs, but they are being implemented. ours, mr. president, was in november 2005, and it's been 11:15:53.5 incomplete, and the administration has sent a second plan for us now. now, mr. president, what is basically that we are trying to do? 11:16:08.4 what is the -- let me just show one other chart that indicates this isn't just a, what i believe, mr. president, here is a g.a.o. report, november 2000. federal and state influenza plans do not address the key issues surrounding the purchase and distribution of vaccines and 11:16:27.3 antivirals. 2002. june 2005, the draft plan does not establish the actions the 11:16:31.8 federal government would take to purchase and distribute the vaccine during an influenza pandemic. this is the g.a.o., june of 2005. and, mr. president, that is the current situation. we have in the legislation, 11:16:50.4 resources to be able to purchase the vaccines in the emergency. but we do not have a compensation program.n we have a compensation program 11:17:03.8 in name, but that is all that it is. it is not funded. well, you can say, well, we'll try and find a way to fund it in the future. just ask that to the down-winders out in utah. tell that to my friend senator hatch who has been absolutely 11:17:19.6 brilliant in terms of looking after those individuals whose lives were so affected by the experiments in terms of nuclear materials so many years ago. he to his great credit developed a program. 11:17:34.3 i welcome the opportunity to work with him to try to affect those people whose help in many instances had absolutely been destroyed by these expoajers that were in the national interest, as we developed various nuclear weapons. here's our majority leader, 11:17:51.7 mr. president, who has said too many health workers have been deterred from receiving the smallpox vaccine in part because of the uncertainties about what would happen and how they would provide for themselves if they suffered a serious adverse reaction to the vaccine. 11:18:11.0 that states it as clearly, succinctly as one could possibly say it. we do not have a grarn teed -- guaranteed compensation program in this legislation or in any other place in our health care 11:18:26.6 system. this provides a down payment for the compensation program. now, you can say, well, senator, why should we do that for this particular program? 11:18:41.1 all we have to do, mr. president, is look at other vaccine programs, other public health programs for swine flu, for childhood vaccines, and after congress acted for smallpox, we had a compensation plan for those injured by 11:18:57.7 experimental vaccine, but for the flu we only have an empty sham of a compensation with no -- mr. president, that is what this amendment does. it provides some $289 million 11:19:14.8 for the development of that compensation program. it is effectively the same kind, although they are effectively the same kinds of programs which have been essential in the past. 11:19:32.0 if we expect our front line responders to be willing to take experimental vaccines and to risk their lives for the common good of the community that may very well be threatened by avian 11:19:49.7 flu or bioterrorism, individuals who are well trained as front line responders ought to have the kind of assurance that if they take an experimental drug and they go out there to protect the public, that if something is 11:20:04.0 going to happen to them, that there will be a compensation fund to compensate them for their health care needs and their immediate needs if that should turn out to be the case. nothing more, nothing less. that's essentially what this amendment does. 11:20:24.2 mr. president, this is -- i see our floor managers. i'm grad to accommodate whatever -- i'm glad to accommodate whatever they want. 11:20:40.3 i'd like to get a yea or nay vote at some time. i know they've got a full program. so i'm glad to either ask for the yeas and nays now, which i would ask -- i'd ask for the yeas and nays. i'd ask for the yeas and nays 11:20:55.3 now. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. mr. cochran: mr. president, if the senator would yield to respond, checking with the chairman and ranking member of the appropriations subcommittee on labor, health and human 11:21:12.3 service futding -- funding to see what the reaction is to the funding, they're having a hearing as we speak over in the appropriations committee, so i feel obliged to get their advice and counsel as to what response ought to be made, if any, to the 11:21:28.1 senator's amendment. we have no objection to 11:21:30.7 proceeding to have a vote on the amendment, but i think the senate's entitled to know what the reaction might be. mr. kennedy: that's fine, understandable, mr. president. i'll wait until i hear from the chairman or the ranking member. 11:21:47.0 i don't intend to extend the discussion. i think it's pretty understandable. but i'll be glad to follow the leader when he lets us know when they want to come back and address complete action on it. i'll be available. 11:22:02.7 mr. cochran: mr. president, i thank the senator very much for that indulgence. if others wish to offer amendments, i'm prepared to ask unanimous consent to temporarily lay aside the senator from massachusetts' amendment to permit other amendments to be offered. i do ask unanimous consent for that purpose. the presiding officer: without 11:22:17.7 objection. mrs. murray: mr. president? the presiding officer: -- a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. a senator: mr. president, i'd like to have a moment to speak about two amendments that are germane. ms. landrieu: mr. president, i'd 11:22:41.9 like to bring up for a brief discussion my amendment,3750. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from 11:23:11.4 louisiana, miss landrieu, proposes an amendment numbered 3750. ms. landrieu: i ask the pending amendment can be set aside -- not set aside, but i dispense with the reading of the 11:23:25.7 amendment for a brief discussion. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: mr. president, this amendment that i offer tries to move forward a very difficult situation that we're faced with in louisiana about how to protect not just the new orleans city proper but the 11:23:45.2 greater metropolitan area and parts of south louisiana from flooding in the future. and as you know, mr. president, because you've been gracious enough to be one of the senators to go down and walk through the neighborhoods and see the flooding, and as you know, being 11:23:59.7 a firsthand witness, it one just the hurricanes, both katrina and rita, but it was the breaking of levee systems. some of those levees were long industrial canals that serviced this great port, which together 11:24:15.9 with the south louisiana port is the largest port system in america. some of these levees were along the lake, and some of these levees were along what we call the london avenue canal. there was a project that was designed and structure by the 11:24:32.7 corps of engineers back in the 1930's and 1940's called the mississippi river gulf outlet. i think you actually stood on that levee, mr. president, and looked to see where that breech occurred. this avenue was thought at the 11:24:51.5 time that we built it and designed it like so many large civil works projects that we've done in this nation to be a positive thing, to help expand the opportunities for the poor, shorten trade and commerce, and 11:25:06.8 for awhile it did serve that purpose. but what's happened, mr. president, over the decades is that it has caused such erosion in the great expanse of marshland that it was placed in 11:25:21.9 or the t marsh was drenged through to create -- dredged through to create it that it really is causing, according to everyone that has looked at how the flooding occurred in our area, it's causing just serious, not only environmental damage, 11:25:38.1 but now a real threat to life and property. so there's been an effort under way between port first, between parish officials in saint bernard, the business community to try to come up with a way to close the mississippi river gulf 11:25:54.5 outlet but to do it in a way that protects the parish of saint bernard parish primarily and the lower ninth ward, as well as trying to give some 11:26:09.7 period of time for the few businesses that are along the gulf outlet to make arrangements to move. my amendment would simply provide a minimal amount of money, $3.5 million, for the corps of engineers to develop a 11:26:26.9 closure plan because the 11:26:30.5 consensus at home is that the mississippi river gulf outlet, which is demonstrated here on the map, which served at one time as a very important shipping channel, but its 11:26:45.8 importance to shipping has greatly diminished as it's threat to the environment has substantially increased. because we haven't had the federal or state resources to actually protect these marsh 11:27:00.2 lands the way we should, this channel has become quite wide, much wider than any of us had anticipated, even the corps, and the possibilities of flooding have been increased because the channel has been expanded and 11:27:17.5 these marshes have been eroding for many different factors, not just this. so this very modest $3.5 million would allow a study. the studies have actually been conducted, but plan, not really 11:27:33.7 a study, because the studies are completed, but a plan to actually close this. this will then become part of our overall protection system for this region. again the point is we're not just building levies to protect south louisiana and south 11:27:53.2 mississippi and other costal places. it's a combination of some levees, some coastal restoration and some smart navigation channel work or rework that is integrated, much more of a 11:28:07.2 sophisticated, coordinated approach than in the past. so i just offer this amendment by way of explanation to show that the studies have been done. there's been a lot of evaluation over the past storms, and this will allow the corps to come up with a plan to close mrgo, 11:28:30.9 provide for good opportunities for shipping, provide for environmental protection, and most importantly protect south dakota bernard parish and the 11:28:40.3 lower part of the new orleans parish and new orleans east from flooding in the future. so that is the amendment, and i'd like to go on to the next one, if i could. i'd like the call up amendment 11:28:56.2 3752. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from louisiana, ms. landrieu, proposes an amendment numbered 3752. ms. landrieu: i ask the clerk to dispense with the reading of the amendment. the presiding officer: without 11:29:10.7 objection. ms. landrieu: this next amendment is a one-year grant of $8.5 million to the port of new orleans to mitigate the increased cost resulting from loose of deep draft navigation access to certain facilities in the port. 11:29:25.8 this is sort of part "b" of this amendment. as we work to create a plan to close this from large deep-draft vessels. now, they still have access obviously from the industrial -- i mean, inner harbor canal lock, through the giww. 11:29:49.3 we still have to find a way to help offset some of the costs to some of these companies that are located here as a transitional plan so that we can make these 11:30:08.7 arrangements that the corps is recommending for safety of the port facilities and the people around it. so that's basically what 3752 will accomplish. 11:30:21.0 as i've said before, this was created back in decades ago when we didn't realize the environmental impact. it's caused not just problems for hurricane katrina and rita, but it's in large measure what prompted a great deal of flooding back in the 1965 betsy 11:30:38.9 hurricane, which was one of the worst in this region well before katrina and rita. so we've known for a long time that this has to be done, and with these two amendments, mr. president, i believe that 11:30:52.8 the port can have some money for the transition. the corps can get the plans done to ready the closure, and we'll be well on our way to actually protecting a great number of people at a minimal expense to the federal government or to the 11:31:09.4 local and state governments and have a great benefit for shipping the environment and the community that lives along this industrial channel. i thank the chairman for the time to discuss the amendments, and we'll just follow his 11:31:26.5 direction as to when these 11:31:28.2 amendments can come up for a vote. i yield back my time. mr. cochran: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: , mr. president, to respond to the senator's comments, in looking at the list of amendments that are not germane, this appears to be -- 11:31:47.2 these two amendments appear to be not germane, post-cloture and therefore not in order. we're checking to see what the reaction is from the authorizing committee. what that would amount to is 11:32:00.0 this is an autoryisation that has -- the language amounts to an authorization of a water project that has not been approved by the committee that has legislative jurisdiction over the issues. so we're awaiting a response and a reaction from the legislative 11:32:16.8 committee to the amendments, and so i suggest we move on to other amendments that may be in order. the kennedy amendment was temporarily laid aside so the senator could discuss her two amendments, and having done so, 11:32:32.5 think we can return to the kennedy amendment. and then let the senate work its will on the amendment. the senator has asked for the yeas and nays on his amendment. we could proceed the a vote. 11:32:48.1 we were trying to get a reaction from the chairman of the appropriations subcommittee, having jurisdiction over the pandemic influenza vaccine issue.n the labor, health and human services appropriations subcommittee, they're having a 11:33:03.2 hearing right now and we haven't had a response to our inquiry about their reaction to this. we also think the leader's entitled to notice that this could be subject to a recorded volt to get the reaction as to whether this is the time to do 11:33:20.1 that or if they're available to discuss it, if the leader wants to discuss the issue. so awaiting those advices, i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. 11:33:36.3 quorum call: 11:35:56.8 the presiding officer: the 11:35:57.5 senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: i ask unanimous consent the order for the quorum be rescinded. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cochran: mr. president, i understand that two other amendments have now been cleared for the consideration of the senate, and i ask unanimous consent to call up amendment 11:36:12.9 number 3713. the presiding officer: is there objection? hearing none, so ordered. the amendment is pending. mr. cochran: mr. president, i ask that reading of the amendment be dispensed with. this is an amendment that was 11:36:27.9 offered last evening by the distinguished senator from north carolina, mr. burr. it, as i say, has been cleared on both sides. i ask that the amendment be modified with the modifications at the desk. the presiding officer: is there 11:36:43.2 objection to the modification? hearing none, so ordered. and the amendment is modified. is there further debate on the amendment as modified? if not, all in favor say aye. opposed, same sign. in the opinion of the chair, the 11:37:00.2 ayes have t. the ayes have it and the amendment's adopted. mr. cochran: i move to reconsider the vote. a senator: move to lay it on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cochran: mr. president, i'm now advised that we can call up amendment -- an amendment senator kennedy regarding democracy in iraq. 11:37:14.9 therefore, i call up amendment number 3686 on behalf of senator kennedy and others regarding democracy in iraq. the presiding officer: without objection, the pending amendments are set aside, and the clerk will report. 11:37:31.9 the clerk: the senator from mississippi, mr. cochran, for mr. kennedy, proposes an amendment numbered 3686. mr. cochran: mr. president, i ask that further reading of the amendment be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cochran: and i send a modification to the desk. 11:37:47.9 the presiding officer: is there objection to the modification? without objection, the amendment is so modified. mr. president, i also send a colloquy between senators kennedy and mcconnell and leahy to the desk. 11:38:01.3 i have done that, and i ask that it appear at the appropriate place in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. is there further debate on the amendment as modified? hearing none, all in favor say aye. opposed, same sign. 11:38:17.1 in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it, and the amendment's adopted. mr. cochran: move, i move to reconsider the vote. mrs. murray: lay it on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cochran: mr. president, i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. 11:38:35.7 quorum call 11:59:56.4 before? 11:59:59.0 a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from massachusetts ken can i i understand there's an agreement we vote at noon time. am i correct. if i could get one minute left? the presiding officer: --
HURRICANE KATRINA AFTERMATH / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN HOUSTON, TEXAS
FTG OF FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN TOURING THE ASTRODOME AND MEETING WITH EVACUEES IN HOUSTON, TEXAS FOR COVERAGE OF THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON AT THE BUSH / CLINTON KATRINA FUND SPEAKERS: GEORGE H.W. BUSH, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES BILL CLINTON, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES [*] (JOINED IN PROGRESS) BUSH: ... Senator Obama from Illinois is here. Our secretary of HHS, I think, is here -- Mike Leavitt -- he was in the other room. He may have gone -- but he's doing a great job. We also have Rick Perry here, our governor. I'm looking very -- oops, right in front of me. Mayor Bill White -- right here; Judge Echols -- over here; and a number of congressmen -- Gene Green, Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee. And I'm just delighted that they are all here. We just had an amazing briefing from some of the local officials talking about the feeding of more than 30,000 evacuees here in Houston. And Barbara and I have never been more proud of our hometown than we were listening to the incredible job that the citizens and the organizations are doing here. When the president asked President Clinton and me last week to suit up again to help raise money, this time for tragedy at home, our answer was an immediate, "Yes, of course." And, first, we have discovered that we get along pretty well, surprising the heck out of a lot of people but we do. And I'm proud to say it here in my hometown. But, mainly, we're most anxious to roll up our sleeves and get to work. The money's been pouring in for weeks to groups such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army and the United Way and -- I hate to go on because I'm going to hurt some feelings -- but so many organizations have pitched in. And, as a result, hundreds of thousands of refugees are being housed, clothed and fed. We're announcing today a fund that will take this outpouring of generosity on to the next level. Recovery is going to take years. We need to help these Gulf Coast communities and, of course, the great city of New Orleans, help them get back on their feet, and we need to help their citizens get their lives back. And it's going to take all of us working together -- the public, the nonprofits, the private sector -- to accomplish our goal. The job is too big, it is too overwhelming for any one group. And so we conferred with the three governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama and decided to establish the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund. We will turn this money over to the governors who will then decide how best to use it. We felt strongly that the governors needed funds at their disposal, since they are the ones who will be most responsible for rebuilding their states. And standing behind us today -- or with us today is a group of CEOs who came here to help pledge their support. All of them are being -- they're national in scope, all of them being incredibly generous. But I don't think anyone would mind if I singled out the chairman and CEO of Wal-Mart, Lee Scott, who is right here. He told us that they gave the Bush-Clinton fund a total of $23 million... (APPLAUSE) ... $15 million from the company and then $8 million more from the Walton family, the marvelous philanthropists that they are. And this is just a small part of what this one company is doing -- singled out how they're getting the people that were with Wal-Mart -- get an immediate job when they can get away from the ravages of New Orleans. Several of our local leading philanthropists are here. Drayton McLane, who owns the Astros; our own, Jim McInvale, Mattress Mac; everyone here in Houston is eager to help. And we'll be announcing later on this afternoon a local fund- raising effort to help take care of the evacuees here in Houston. And now I just want to say thanks to President Clinton. I can't keep up with the man. He's an Energizer bunny the way he travels and works, doing work both here and abroad. But he's taken the time to show his own personal interest and support for all of this and he's leading it and, Bill, we're very grateful you're here, sir. (APPLAUSE) CLINTON: Thank you very much, Mrs. Bush, Governor, Judge, Mayor, Senator Obama, members of Congress, ladies and gentlemen. First of all, I guess I should say on behalf of all of us that nothing we do can be an adequate response to the agony that we have seen, the suffering of people of Louisiana and Mississippi and Alabama, in New Orleans and Mobile and Biloxi and Gulfport, and little places like Bay St. Louis and rural parishes in Louisiana and other places along the Gulf Coast. But I am very grateful to all of the folks who have given. I, too, want to thank Lee Scott and Wal-Mart. And I want to mention something that they are doing because this, I hope, will give some guidance to our members of Congress -- Hillary and Senator Obama and our House members who are here -- go back to work and wonder what they should do. They still have over 20 stores that are closed and so when the employees of those stores are relocated to other communities, even in other states, they're given a job at the nearest Wal-Mart store, wherever they go, wherever they locate anywhere in America. Now, most companies don't have that many outlets. So I think one of the things we ought to ask ourselves is what could we do to give incentives for people to get jobs where they have to relocate. A lot of these people are going to be out of their homes for a year. And Mayor Morial -- former mayor of New Orleans, now the head of the Urban League -- thank you for being here, sir. I'd like to also thank John Wren, the Omnicom Corporation, who's pledged $3 million plus his employee match. And my old friend, Troy Spence (ph) and Judy Truvalci (ph), who are doing a lot of our advertising work; waste management, Eddie Trapper (ph), Rolonda Boonster (ph) -- I thank all of you. Entergy, which is not here, but they are really working hard and they're helping; Microsoft. The Association for a Better New York has made a contribution to our fund because they're grateful for what people did for New York after 9/11. And I thank Bill Rudin, the Wasserman Foundation in L.A., Dillard's department store and several others. I would like to say that President Bush and I decided that we should the gate from our library visitation to this fund, and we asked the other presidential libraries to do it, and they all said yes. And this is a pretty busy time, right at the end of the year, right before school starts. So we should ordinary -- we're trying to give ordinary folks a way to do that. Let me just say one other thing, the reason we decided to do this is that not that we don't think the governments will do their part. I think Congress will go back and pass the generous aid package. I think the president will sign it. I think the administration will do their best to implement it. But after the (inaudible) earthquake, the Congress appropriated over $16 billion over a period of a few years to help California come back. But the difference here is you've got, as we were talking in the earlier room, probably this is the first time since the great Mississippi's flood of 1927 -- this many people totally dislocated, and there's no way they can all be taken care of. And as an extraordinary number of us in New Orleans -- almost 30 percent -- are living below the poverty line, we need to have a fund where we can fill in the blanks and help people that are otherwise going to be totally overlooked. So I thank President Bush for -- as he said suiting up again. I hope we're going to do some good. I thank all the people who have come. Just the other night on Larry King when I called in -- you're going to do it tonight, I think -- people just called in just called in. A woman came up to Hillary and me at the New York State Fair -- working at the concessions -- with $50 in small bills -- said, "I can't get off work to go e-mail this. Please take it and put it in the fund." So we just got to keep doing this. And just remember, a lot of these people, they have no cars, no homes, no clothes, no nothing. They depend on us to give them a future, and we'll do what we can. Thank you, and bless you all. (APPLAUSE) BUSH: My role is to thank everyone for coming, Gene (ph) tells me, which I'm delighted to do. (LAUGHTER) President Clinton singled out perfectly some individuals. I want to single out one former Houstonian -- came over from Louisiana. A man of God but he's also a great wrestler, a former pro-football player, my friend Ernie Ladd down here. (APPLAUSE) You know Ernie, don't you? The Cat. But anyway, we're delighted he's here. (AUDIO BREAK) BUSH: I'm not an engineer. I have no idea why it was built to a category 3. The main thing -- what we're trying to do is to help people that are hurting. And we can feel (ph) back and find engineers that should have done it differently. We can blame somebody else. That's one of the big things you do after a football game, you know, what went wrong. We want to go forward. And I don't know anything about that but I bet you they're a lot of people working on it now to make it see that that kind of thing doesn't happen again. But we've all been through hurricanes. I did. I was in the offshore drilling business. I remember going down to Cameron and seeing bodies thrown on a work boat down there. And they came together in that little town, tried to make things better, and that's what we're going to do here nationally for New Orleans. QUESTION: What do you think of the criticism that's being leveled at the government? BUSH: The president can take it. (LAUGHTER) In the sense that what do I think as a father? I don't like it. But what do you think is -- as one who was president, and I expect President Clinton feels the same way, it goes with the territory. And I don't want to personalize this, but we're very, very proud of him, of course -- and Barbara is. And if somebody wants to tell Barbara about the things that are going wrong -- the president's doing wrong, I suggest you wear your flack jacket. (LAUGHTER) QUESTION: (inaudible) BUSH: Where are you? (LAUGHTER) CLINTON: Let him say... BUSH: He went into a foxhole. CLINTON: No, I've got your back back here. BUSH: OK. CLINTON: Let me say, in response to your first question, we had some people killed in the flood toward the end of my first term in the New Orleans area. And there was a study done for strengthening the levee system. And I believe that we began to do that along toward the end of my second term when the study was completed and the funding. What happened to it, I don't know. But there have been constant efforts to upgrade the system. Now, on the other question you asked, I have a slightly different take on this. I think there should be an analysis of what happened. And I have some strong feelings about how I think FEMA ought to be organized and operated. But the time to do that, in my opinion, is after some time passes. Right now, you still have people -- we're still finding bodies there. And there still may be some people alive there. And, you know, we had a 9/11 Commission, we may have a Katrina commission. We may have these things. But I think the first thing we've got to do is to remember that these people are -- what they're going through. And now it seems that we're all in harness and we're all working on it. I think it's an appropriate thing to look into but not at this time. What I do think should be focused on now is, what is the Congress going to do when they get back. How are we going to find jobs for these people? Where are they really going to live? Do they need some cash right away? Those are the things that I think should be done. I personally would like -- I hope the Congress will defer the schedule that was before it, including the estate tax issue and all that. I'd like to see it all deferred and I'd like to see the needs of these folks faced now. They feel, a lot of them, that -- they're poor, and they feel lost and they don't feel like they got any swat. And one of the reasons that George and I agreed to do this is because we saw something halfway around the world in the tsunami and all of a sudden here it was in our backyard. And a lot of the people have a lot in common. And so I have no problem with you going through this whole thing about -- and if somebody asked me what I think -- how I think the emergency management structure of the government should be organized, I'd be happy to give an answer. But I just think right now we need to focus on the suffering of the people and how to alleviate it and where to go from here. (UNKNOWN): Thank you all very much. END
HURRICANE KATRINA AFTERMATH / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN HOUSTON, TEXAS
FTG OF FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN TOURING THE ASTRODOME AND MEETING WITH EVACUEES IN HOUSTON, TEXAS FOR COVERAGE OF THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON AT THE BUSH / CLINTON KATRINA FUND SPEAKERS: GEORGE H.W. BUSH, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES BILL CLINTON, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES [*] (JOINED IN PROGRESS) BUSH: ... Senator Obama from Illinois is here. Our secretary of HHS, I think, is here -- Mike Leavitt -- he was in the other room. He may have gone -- but he's doing a great job. We also have Rick Perry here, our governor. I'm looking very -- oops, right in front of me. Mayor Bill White -- right here; Judge Echols -- over here; and a number of congressmen -- Gene Green, Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee. And I'm just delighted that they are all here. We just had an amazing briefing from some of the local officials talking about the feeding of more than 30,000 evacuees here in Houston. And Barbara and I have never been more proud of our hometown than we were listening to the incredible job that the citizens and the organizations are doing here. When the president asked President Clinton and me last week to suit up again to help raise money, this time for tragedy at home, our answer was an immediate, "Yes, of course." And, first, we have discovered that we get along pretty well, surprising the heck out of a lot of people but we do. And I'm proud to say it here in my hometown. But, mainly, we're most anxious to roll up our sleeves and get to work. The money's been pouring in for weeks to groups such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army and the United Way and -- I hate to go on because I'm going to hurt some feelings -- but so many organizations have pitched in. And, as a result, hundreds of thousands of refugees are being housed, clothed and fed. We're announcing today a fund that will take this outpouring of generosity on to the next level. Recovery is going to take years. We need to help these Gulf Coast communities and, of course, the great city of New Orleans, help them get back on their feet, and we need to help their citizens get their lives back. And it's going to take all of us working together -- the public, the nonprofits, the private sector -- to accomplish our goal. The job is too big, it is too overwhelming for any one group. And so we conferred with the three governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama and decided to establish the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund. We will turn this money over to the governors who will then decide how best to use it. We felt strongly that the governors needed funds at their disposal, since they are the ones who will be most responsible for rebuilding their states. And standing behind us today -- or with us today is a group of CEOs who came here to help pledge their support. All of them are being -- they're national in scope, all of them being incredibly generous. But I don't think anyone would mind if I singled out the chairman and CEO of Wal-Mart, Lee Scott, who is right here. He told us that they gave the Bush-Clinton fund a total of $23 million... (APPLAUSE) ... $15 million from the company and then $8 million more from the Walton family, the marvelous philanthropists that they are. And this is just a small part of what this one company is doing -- singled out how they're getting the people that were with Wal-Mart -- get an immediate job when they can get away from the ravages of New Orleans. Several of our local leading philanthropists are here. Drayton McLane, who owns the Astros; our own, Jim McInvale, Mattress Mac; everyone here in Houston is eager to help. And we'll be announcing later on this afternoon a local fund- raising effort to help take care of the evacuees here in Houston. And now I just want to say thanks to President Clinton. I can't keep up with the man. He's an Energizer bunny the way he travels and works, doing work both here and abroad. But he's taken the time to show his own personal interest and support for all of this and he's leading it and, Bill, we're very grateful you're here, sir. (APPLAUSE) CLINTON: Thank you very much, Mrs. Bush, Governor, Judge, Mayor, Senator Obama, members of Congress, ladies and gentlemen. First of all, I guess I should say on behalf of all of us that nothing we do can be an adequate response to the agony that we have seen, the suffering of people of Louisiana and Mississippi and Alabama, in New Orleans and Mobile and Biloxi and Gulfport, and little places like Bay St. Louis and rural parishes in Louisiana and other places along the Gulf Coast. But I am very grateful to all of the folks who have given. I, too, want to thank Lee Scott and Wal-Mart. And I want to mention something that they are doing because this, I hope, will give some guidance to our members of Congress -- Hillary and Senator Obama and our House members who are here -- go back to work and wonder what they should do. They still have over 20 stores that are closed and so when the employees of those stores are relocated to other communities, even in other states, they're given a job at the nearest Wal-Mart store, wherever they go, wherever they locate anywhere in America. Now, most companies don't have that many outlets. So I think one of the things we ought to ask ourselves is what could we do to give incentives for people to get jobs where they have to relocate. A lot of these people are going to be out of their homes for a year. And Mayor Morial -- former mayor of New Orleans, now the head of the Urban League -- thank you for being here, sir. I'd like to also thank John Wren, the Omnicom Corporation, who's pledged $3 million plus his employee match. And my old friend, Troy Spence (ph) and Judy Truvalci (ph), who are doing a lot of our advertising work; waste management, Eddie Trapper (ph), Rolonda Boonster (ph) -- I thank all of you. Entergy, which is not here, but they are really working hard and they're helping; Microsoft. The Association for a Better New York has made a contribution to our fund because they're grateful for what people did for New York after 9/11. And I thank Bill Rudin, the Wasserman Foundation in L.A., Dillard's department store and several others. I would like to say that President Bush and I decided that we should the gate from our library visitation to this fund, and we asked the other presidential libraries to do it, and they all said yes. And this is a pretty busy time, right at the end of the year, right before school starts. So we should ordinary -- we're trying to give ordinary folks a way to do that. Let me just say one other thing, the reason we decided to do this is that not that we don't think the governments will do their part. I think Congress will go back and pass the generous aid package. I think the president will sign it. I think the administration will do their best to implement it. But after the (inaudible) earthquake, the Congress appropriated over $16 billion over a period of a few years to help California come back. But the difference here is you've got, as we were talking in the earlier room, probably this is the first time since the great Mississippi's flood of 1927 -- this many people totally dislocated, and there's no way they can all be taken care of. And as an extraordinary number of us in New Orleans -- almost 30 percent -- are living below the poverty line, we need to have a fund where we can fill in the blanks and help people that are otherwise going to be totally overlooked. So I thank President Bush for -- as he said suiting up again. I hope we're going to do some good. I thank all the people who have come. Just the other night on Larry King when I called in -- you're going to do it tonight, I think -- people just called in just called in. A woman came up to Hillary and me at the New York State Fair -- working at the concessions -- with $50 in small bills -- said, "I can't get off work to go e-mail this. Please take it and put it in the fund." So we just got to keep doing this. And just remember, a lot of these people, they have no cars, no homes, no clothes, no nothing. They depend on us to give them a future, and we'll do what we can. Thank you, and bless you all. (APPLAUSE) BUSH: My role is to thank everyone for coming, Gene (ph) tells me, which I'm delighted to do. (LAUGHTER) President Clinton singled out perfectly some individuals. I want to single out one former Houstonian -- came over from Louisiana. A man of God but he's also a great wrestler, a former pro-football player, my friend Ernie Ladd down here. (APPLAUSE) You know Ernie, don't you? The Cat. But anyway, we're delighted he's here. (AUDIO BREAK) BUSH: I'm not an engineer. I have no idea why it was built to a category 3. The main thing -- what we're trying to do is to help people that are hurting. And we can feel (ph) back and find engineers that should have done it differently. We can blame somebody else. That's one of the big things you do after a football game, you know, what went wrong. We want to go forward. And I don't know anything about that but I bet you they're a lot of people working on it now to make it see that that kind of thing doesn't happen again. But we've all been through hurricanes. I did. I was in the offshore drilling business. I remember going down to Cameron and seeing bodies thrown on a work boat down there. And they came together in that little town, tried to make things better, and that's what we're going to do here nationally for New Orleans. QUESTION: What do you think of the criticism that's being leveled at the government? BUSH: The president can take it. (LAUGHTER) In the sense that what do I think as a father? I don't like it. But what do you think is -- as one who was president, and I expect President Clinton feels the same way, it goes with the territory. And I don't want to personalize this, but we're very, very proud of him, of course -- and Barbara is. And if somebody wants to tell Barbara about the things that are going wrong -- the president's doing wrong, I suggest you wear your flack jacket. (LAUGHTER) QUESTION: (inaudible) BUSH: Where are you? (LAUGHTER) CLINTON: Let him say... BUSH: He went into a foxhole. CLINTON: No, I've got your back back here. BUSH: OK. CLINTON: Let me say, in response to your first question, we had some people killed in the flood toward the end of my first term in the New Orleans area. And there was a study done for strengthening the levee system. And I believe that we began to do that along toward the end of my second term when the study was completed and the funding. What happened to it, I don't know. But there have been constant efforts to upgrade the system. Now, on the other question you asked, I have a slightly different take on this. I think there should be an analysis of what happened. And I have some strong feelings about how I think FEMA ought to be organized and operated. But the time to do that, in my opinion, is after some time passes. Right now, you still have people -- we're still finding bodies there. And there still may be some people alive there. And, you know, we had a 9/11 Commission, we may have a Katrina commission. We may have these things. But I think the first thing we've got to do is to remember that these people are -- what they're going through. And now it seems that we're all in harness and we're all working on it. I think it's an appropriate thing to look into but not at this time. What I do think should be focused on now is, what is the Congress going to do when they get back. How are we going to find jobs for these people? Where are they really going to live? Do they need some cash right away? Those are the things that I think should be done. I personally would like -- I hope the Congress will defer the schedule that was before it, including the estate tax issue and all that. I'd like to see it all deferred and I'd like to see the needs of these folks faced now. They feel, a lot of them, that -- they're poor, and they feel lost and they don't feel like they got any swat. And one of the reasons that George and I agreed to do this is because we saw something halfway around the world in the tsunami and all of a sudden here it was in our backyard. And a lot of the people have a lot in common. And so I have no problem with you going through this whole thing about -- and if somebody asked me what I think -- how I think the emergency management structure of the government should be organized, I'd be happy to give an answer. But I just think right now we need to focus on the suffering of the people and how to alleviate it and where to go from here. (UNKNOWN): Thank you all very much. END
HURRICANE KATRINA AFTERMATH / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN HOUSTON, TEXAS
FTG OF FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON IN TOURING THE ASTRODOME AND MEETING WITH EVACUEES IN HOUSTON, TEXAS FOR COVERAGE OF THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA / FORMER PRESIDENTS GEORGE BUSH AND BILL CLINTON AT THE BUSH / CLINTON KATRINA FUND SPEAKERS: GEORGE H.W. BUSH, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES BILL CLINTON, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES [*] (JOINED IN PROGRESS) BUSH: ... Senator Obama from Illinois is here. Our secretary of HHS, I think, is here -- Mike Leavitt -- he was in the other room. He may have gone -- but he's doing a great job. We also have Rick Perry here, our governor. I'm looking very -- oops, right in front of me. Mayor Bill White -- right here; Judge Echols -- over here; and a number of congressmen -- Gene Green, Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee. And I'm just delighted that they are all here. We just had an amazing briefing from some of the local officials talking about the feeding of more than 30,000 evacuees here in Houston. And Barbara and I have never been more proud of our hometown than we were listening to the incredible job that the citizens and the organizations are doing here. When the president asked President Clinton and me last week to suit up again to help raise money, this time for tragedy at home, our answer was an immediate, "Yes, of course." And, first, we have discovered that we get along pretty well, surprising the heck out of a lot of people but we do. And I'm proud to say it here in my hometown. But, mainly, we're most anxious to roll up our sleeves and get to work. The money's been pouring in for weeks to groups such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army and the United Way and -- I hate to go on because I'm going to hurt some feelings -- but so many organizations have pitched in. And, as a result, hundreds of thousands of refugees are being housed, clothed and fed. We're announcing today a fund that will take this outpouring of generosity on to the next level. Recovery is going to take years. We need to help these Gulf Coast communities and, of course, the great city of New Orleans, help them get back on their feet, and we need to help their citizens get their lives back. And it's going to take all of us working together -- the public, the nonprofits, the private sector -- to accomplish our goal. The job is too big, it is too overwhelming for any one group. And so we conferred with the three governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama and decided to establish the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund. We will turn this money over to the governors who will then decide how best to use it. We felt strongly that the governors needed funds at their disposal, since they are the ones who will be most responsible for rebuilding their states. And standing behind us today -- or with us today is a group of CEOs who came here to help pledge their support. All of them are being -- they're national in scope, all of them being incredibly generous. But I don't think anyone would mind if I singled out the chairman and CEO of Wal-Mart, Lee Scott, who is right here. He told us that they gave the Bush-Clinton fund a total of $23 million... (APPLAUSE) ... $15 million from the company and then $8 million more from the Walton family, the marvelous philanthropists that they are. And this is just a small part of what this one company is doing -- singled out how they're getting the people that were with Wal-Mart -- get an immediate job when they can get away from the ravages of New Orleans. Several of our local leading philanthropists are here. Drayton McLane, who owns the Astros; our own, Jim McInvale, Mattress Mac; everyone here in Houston is eager to help. And we'll be announcing later on this afternoon a local fund- raising effort to help take care of the evacuees here in Houston. And now I just want to say thanks to President Clinton. I can't keep up with the man. He's an Energizer bunny the way he travels and works, doing work both here and abroad. But he's taken the time to show his own personal interest and support for all of this and he's leading it and, Bill, we're very grateful you're here, sir. (APPLAUSE) CLINTON: Thank you very much, Mrs. Bush, Governor, Judge, Mayor, Senator Obama, members of Congress, ladies and gentlemen. First of all, I guess I should say on behalf of all of us that nothing we do can be an adequate response to the agony that we have seen, the suffering of people of Louisiana and Mississippi and Alabama, in New Orleans and Mobile and Biloxi and Gulfport, and little places like Bay St. Louis and rural parishes in Louisiana and other places along the Gulf Coast. But I am very grateful to all of the folks who have given. I, too, want to thank Lee Scott and Wal-Mart. And I want to mention something that they are doing because this, I hope, will give some guidance to our members of Congress -- Hillary and Senator Obama and our House members who are here -- go back to work and wonder what they should do. They still have over 20 stores that are closed and so when the employees of those stores are relocated to other communities, even in other states, they're given a job at the nearest Wal-Mart store, wherever they go, wherever they locate anywhere in America. Now, most companies don't have that many outlets. So I think one of the things we ought to ask ourselves is what could we do to give incentives for people to get jobs where they have to relocate. A lot of these people are going to be out of their homes for a year. And Mayor Morial -- former mayor of New Orleans, now the head of the Urban League -- thank you for being here, sir. I'd like to also thank John Wren, the Omnicom Corporation, who's pledged $3 million plus his employee match. And my old friend, Troy Spence (ph) and Judy Truvalci (ph), who are doing a lot of our advertising work; waste management, Eddie Trapper (ph), Rolonda Boonster (ph) -- I thank all of you. Entergy, which is not here, but they are really working hard and they're helping; Microsoft. The Association for a Better New York has made a contribution to our fund because they're grateful for what people did for New York after 9/11. And I thank Bill Rudin, the Wasserman Foundation in L.A., Dillard's department store and several others. I would like to say that President Bush and I decided that we should the gate from our library visitation to this fund, and we asked the other presidential libraries to do it, and they all said yes. And this is a pretty busy time, right at the end of the year, right before school starts. So we should ordinary -- we're trying to give ordinary folks a way to do that. Let me just say one other thing, the reason we decided to do this is that not that we don't think the governments will do their part. I think Congress will go back and pass the generous aid package. I think the president will sign it. I think the administration will do their best to implement it. But after the (inaudible) earthquake, the Congress appropriated over $16 billion over a period of a few years to help California come back. But the difference here is you've got, as we were talking in the earlier room, probably this is the first time since the great Mississippi's flood of 1927 -- this many people totally dislocated, and there's no way they can all be taken care of. And as an extraordinary number of us in New Orleans -- almost 30 percent -- are living below the poverty line, we need to have a fund where we can fill in the blanks and help people that are otherwise going to be totally overlooked. So I thank President Bush for -- as he said suiting up again. I hope we're going to do some good. I thank all the people who have come. Just the other night on Larry King when I called in -- you're going to do it tonight, I think -- people just called in just called in. A woman came up to Hillary and me at the New York State Fair -- working at the concessions -- with $50 in small bills -- said, "I can't get off work to go e-mail this. Please take it and put it in the fund." So we just got to keep doing this. And just remember, a lot of these people, they have no cars, no homes, no clothes, no nothing. They depend on us to give them a future, and we'll do what we can. Thank you, and bless you all. (APPLAUSE) BUSH: My role is to thank everyone for coming, Gene (ph) tells me, which I'm delighted to do. (LAUGHTER) President Clinton singled out perfectly some individuals. I want to single out one former Houstonian -- came over from Louisiana. A man of God but he's also a great wrestler, a former pro-football player, my friend Ernie Ladd down here. (APPLAUSE) You know Ernie, don't you? The Cat. But anyway, we're delighted he's here. (AUDIO BREAK) BUSH: I'm not an engineer. I have no idea why it was built to a category 3. The main thing -- what we're trying to do is to help people that are hurting. And we can feel (ph) back and find engineers that should have done it differently. We can blame somebody else. That's one of the big things you do after a football game, you know, what went wrong. We want to go forward. And I don't know anything about that but I bet you they're a lot of people working on it now to make it see that that kind of thing doesn't happen again. But we've all been through hurricanes. I did. I was in the offshore drilling business. I remember going down to Cameron and seeing bodies thrown on a work boat down there. And they came together in that little town, tried to make things better, and that's what we're going to do here nationally for New Orleans. QUESTION: What do you think of the criticism that's being leveled at the government? BUSH: The president can take it. (LAUGHTER) In the sense that what do I think as a father? I don't like it. But what do you think is -- as one who was president, and I expect President Clinton feels the same way, it goes with the territory. And I don't want to personalize this, but we're very, very proud of him, of course -- and Barbara is. And if somebody wants to tell Barbara about the things that are going wrong -- the president's doing wrong, I suggest you wear your flack jacket. (LAUGHTER) QUESTION: (inaudible) BUSH: Where are you? (LAUGHTER) CLINTON: Let him say... BUSH: He went into a foxhole. CLINTON: No, I've got your back back here. BUSH: OK. CLINTON: Let me say, in response to your first question, we had some people killed in the flood toward the end of my first term in the New Orleans area. And there was a study done for strengthening the levee system. And I believe that we began to do that along toward the end of my second term when the study was completed and the funding. What happened to it, I don't know. But there have been constant efforts to upgrade the system. Now, on the other question you asked, I have a slightly different take on this. I think there should be an analysis of what happened. And I have some strong feelings about how I think FEMA ought to be organized and operated. But the time to do that, in my opinion, is after some time passes. Right now, you still have people -- we're still finding bodies there. And there still may be some people alive there. And, you know, we had a 9/11 Commission, we may have a Katrina commission. We may have these things. But I think the first thing we've got to do is to remember that these people are -- what they're going through. And now it seems that we're all in harness and we're all working on it. I think it's an appropriate thing to look into but not at this time. What I do think should be focused on now is, what is the Congress going to do when they get back. How are we going to find jobs for these people? Where are they really going to live? Do they need some cash right away? Those are the things that I think should be done. I personally would like -- I hope the Congress will defer the schedule that was before it, including the estate tax issue and all that. I'd like to see it all deferred and I'd like to see the needs of these folks faced now. They feel, a lot of them, that -- they're poor, and they feel lost and they don't feel like they got any swat. And one of the reasons that George and I agreed to do this is because we saw something halfway around the world in the tsunami and all of a sudden here it was in our backyard. And a lot of the people have a lot in common. And so I have no problem with you going through this whole thing about -- and if somebody asked me what I think -- how I think the emergency management structure of the government should be organized, I'd be happy to give an answer. But I just think right now we need to focus on the suffering of the people and how to alleviate it and where to go from here. (UNKNOWN): Thank you all very much. END