Birds
CUs of eggs and white pelican hatchings in nest (0:14). CU of ring-billed gull (0:24). MCS of cormorants perched on branches of dead tree (0:11). CS of gull killing hatching (0:07). CS of two cormorants in nesting site, CS of four eggs in nest, CUs of hatchling struggling out of egg (1:11).
HOME INVASION DEATH
Daytona Beach police are searching for a home invasion robber who gunned down a well known businessman in his home last night. Police say Alan Robertson and his wife were confronted by the gunman when they arrived at their Pelican Bay home after nine p-m. Thhe suspect was leading the couple through their home and into the garage when the garage door opener somehow activated, startling the gunman. Robertson apparently tried to jump the suspect, and was shot during the struggle.
HC-110 35mm; 1 inch
ANIMALS A LA CARTE
BP GULF OIL SPILL ***Pelican
FTG FOR COVERAGE OF THE BRITISH PETROLEUM COMPANY (BP) OIL RIG EXPLOSION / DISASTER / AND MASSIVE OIL SPILL IN THE GULF OF MEXICO / FTG OF GUTMAN OIL SPILL BOAT TOUR / GREAT OILY PELICAN ON BEACH STRUGGLING TO WALK B-ROLL Dmac in at 14:41 / BEACH CLEANUP B-ROLL / GUTMAN ON SAT PHONE CALLING ANIMAL HOTLINE
The eye of the condor
A2 / France 2
US Oil Spill 2
AP-APTN-0930: US Oil Spill 2 Sunday, 6 June 2010 STORY:US Oil Spill 2- REPLAY Operation underway to rescue pelicans, spill cam and local reax LENGTH: 03:20 FIRST RUN: 0130 RESTRICTIONS: Part No Access NAmerica/Internet TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/BP HANDOUT/ABC STORY NUMBER: 801882 DATELINE: Various - 4/5 June 2010 LENGTH: 03:20 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NAMERICA/INTERNET SHOTLIST: (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 5 JUNE 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Barataria Bay, Louisiana 1. Pan from marsh to pelican carcass 2. Pelican stuck in oil 3. Plaquemines Parish coastal zone manager PJ Hahn taking pelican out of oil 4. Hahn and another man place oil-covered pelican into bag (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 5 JUNE 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Grand Isle, Louisiana 5. Wide of crews rescuing bird 6. Mid of rescue boat 7. Close-up of oil in water 8. Wide of pelicans and other birds 9. Wide of rescue team running after bird that can no longer fly 10. Various of rescue team with birds in hands 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Sam Marye Lewis,International Bird Rescue: "It's very sad to see the mothers and the rookery and the very oiled mothers sitting on the eggs; that's just very sad, I believe, for all of us." 12. Mid of workers with bird 13. SOUNDBITE (English) Kayla Dibenedetto, US Fish and Wildlife: "It's an adrenaline rush but we know we're doing our job and that's what we're here to do and it feels great to be able to get one at a time." 14. Wide of workers chasing bird (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) BP - AP Clients Only Gulf of Mexico - 5 June 2010 15. Various underwater video from oil spill site (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) ABC - No Access N.America/Internet Theodore, Alabama - 5 June 2010 16. SOUNDBITE (English) Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, Incident Commander for oil spill: "Well the worst case I can see is that the discharge related to what we can't contain goes forward until we have the relief wells drilled, which will be some time in early August." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 4 June 2010 17. Various of workers cleaning oil 18. Wide of dead fish (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) ABC - No Access N.America/Internet Orange Beach, Alabama - 5 June 2010 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Bob Fryar, Senior Vice-President for BP: "The cap that we put on to the LMRP (Lower Marine Riser Package), that operation has gone extremely well. Over the last 24 hours we've been able to collect over 6,000 barrels of oil, so we're very pleased with that operation." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 5 June 2010 20. Wide of foot steps in oil covered water (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) ABC - No Access N.America/Internet Orange Beach, Alabama - 5 June 2010 21. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Kennon, Mayor of Orange Beach: "But it's really aggravating for someone to walk in here whose never been to our town to put on a pretty, rosy picture when it's just not the case." (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 6 JUNE 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 5 June 2010 22. Wide of fishing trawler pulling oil covered boom through water STORYLINE The wildlife apocalypse along the Gulf Coast that many have feared for weeks is fast becoming a terrible reality. Pelicans struggle to free themselves from oil, thick as tar, that gathers in hip-deep pools, while others stretch out useless wings, feathers dripping with crude. Dead birds and dolphins wash ashore, coated in the sludge. Seashells that once glinted pearly white under the hot June sun are stained crimson. Scenes like this played out along miles of shoreline on Saturday, nearly seven weeks after a BP rig exploded and the wellhead a mile below the surface began belching millions (m) of gallon of oil. The oil has steadily spread east, washing up in greater quantities in recent days, even as a cap placed by BP over the blown out well began to collect some of the escaping crude. The cap, resembling an upside-down funnel, has captured about 252,000 gallons of oil, according to Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, the government's point man for the crisis. If earlier estimates are correct, that means the cap is capturing from a quarter to as much as half the oil spewing from the blowout each day. But that is a small fraction of the 23 million (m) to 47 million (m) gallons government officials estimate have leaked into the Gulf since the April 20 explosion that killed 11 workers, making it the nation's largest oil spill ever. BP officials are trying to capture as much oil as possible without creating too much pressure or allowing the build-up of ice-like hydrates, which form when water and natural gas combine under high pressures and low temperatures. In Louisiana, along the beach at Queen Bess Island, oil pooled several feet deep, trapping birds against unused containment boom. With no oil response workers on Queen Bess, Plaquemines Parish coastal zone management director PJ Hahn decided he could wait no longer, pulling an exhausted brown pelican from the oil, the slime dripping from its wings. Meanwhile, off Grand Isle, Louisiana a large group of biologists and fish and wildlife agents were out on the water looking for oil-covered birds. The officials rescued the birds that could no longer fly. Speaking about the rescue efforts, Kayla Dibenedetto from the US Fish and Wildlife agency said "it's an adrenaline rush but we know we're doing our job and that's what we're here to do and it feels great to get one at a time." After six weeks with one to four birds a day coming into Louisiana's rescue centre for oiled birds at Fort Jackson, 53 arrived on Thursday and another 13 Friday morning, with more on the way. Federal authorities say 792 dead birds, sea turtles, dolphins and other wildlife have been collected from the Gulf of Mexico and its coastline. Yet scientists say the wildlife death toll remains relatively modest, well below the tens of thousand of birds, otters and other creatures killed after the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska's Prince William Sound. The numbers have stayed comparatively low because the Deepwater Horizon rig was 50 miles off the coast and most of the oil has stayed in the open sea. The Valdez ran aground on a reef close to land, in a more enclosed setting. Experts say the Gulf's marshes, beaches and coastal waters, which nurture a dazzling array of life, could be transformed into killing fields, though the die-off could take months or years and unfold largely out of sight. The damage could be even greater beneath the water's surface, where oil and dispersants could devastate zooplankton and tiny invertebrate communities at the base of the aquatic food chain. President Barack Obama pledged on Saturday in his weekly radio and Internet address to fight the spill with the people of the Gulf Coast. His words for oil giant BP PLC were stern: "We will make sure they pay every single dime owed to the people along the Gulf coast." But his reassurances offer limited consolation to the people who live and work along the coasts of four states, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, now confronting the oil spill first-hand. In Orange Beach, Alabama, Bob Fryar, a senior vice president for BP, said the company was pleased with the results from the cap. Still residents and officials alike were expressing frustration over BP's handling of the crisis. "It's really aggravating for someone to walk in here whose never been to our town to put on a pretty, rosy picture when it's just not the case," Tony Kennon, mayor of Orange Beach, Alabama, said. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-06-10 0549EDT
BIRDS GETTING SICK (01/23/1998)
DOZENS OF BIRDS ARE APPARENTLY SICK IN JACKSONVILLE, BELIEVED TO BE FROM POISONING FROM THE ST. JOHNS RIVER.
+US Oil
AP-APTN-2330: +US Oil 2 Sunday, 23 May 2010 STORY:+US Oil 2- WRAP Oil reaches wetlands ADDS Secretary of Interior Salazar on BP LENGTH: 03:03 FIRST RUN: 2330 RESTRICTIONS: Pt No Access North America/Internet TYPE: English/Natsound SOURCE: ABC/AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 646407 DATELINE: Various - 22/23 May 2010 LENGTH: 03:03 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET SHOTLIST ++NEW (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 23 MAY 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Houston, Texas - 23 May 2010 1. US Interior Secretary Ken Salazar at press conference 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ken Salazar, US Interior Secretary: "Since the incident began I promised that we would keep our boot on BP's neck and in the past few weeks we have absolutely been doing that. We have demanded that BP not challenge the 75 (m) million (US) Dollar cap and BP has agreed to do that. We have demanded that BP increases transparency by posing live video on their website and they are doing that. We have requested further transparency from BP and we will continue to demand further transparency from BP. We demanded that BP began using a less toxic dispersant and we are currently in the 72-hour window we gave them in which to respond." (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 22 MAY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Grand Isle, Louisiana - 22 May 2010 3. Work crews cleaning up oil on the beach 4. Workers cleaning oil from beach 5. Various of oil on beach ++NEW (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 23 MAY 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Houston, Texas - 23 May 2010 6. Salazar at press conference 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ken Salazar, US Interior Secretary: "The rest of the responses including keeping the oil from coming near shore and non-shore and dealing with these ecological values, BP again is a responsible party and is on the hook to do everything that needs to happen. If we find that they are not doing what they are supposed to be doing we will push them out of the way, appropriately and we will move forward to make sure that everything is being done to protect the people of the gulf coast the ecological values of the gulf coast and the values of the American people." (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 22 MAY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Grand Isle, Louisiana - 22 May 2010 8. Oil on beach ++NEW (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 23 MAY 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Houston, Texas - 23 May 2010 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ken Salazar, US Interior Secretary: "I have no question that BP is throwing everything at the problem to try to resolve it because this is an existential crisis for one of the world's largest companies, so they are throwing everything that they can at the problem. Do I have confidence that they know exactly what they are doing? No, not completely and that is why we have the department of energy and its laboratory secretary too, Doctor Marshall McNutt, NASA and a number of other agencies that are here providing input and providing oversight to make sure that this problem does not worsen, and to make sure that ultimately this pollution is contained and controlled and that this well is killed." (FIRST RUN 0530 - NEWS UPDATE - 23 MAY 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 22 May 2010 10. Wide of bird refuge, zoom in to oil on shore 11. Mid of oil-stained eggs 12. Wide of birds, zoom in to eggs 13. Wide of birds ++NEW (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 23 MAY 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS NORTH AMERICA/INTERNET Buras, Louisiana - 23 May 2010 14. Workers cleaning pelican at Fort Jackson Wildlife Rehabilitation Center 15. Workers putting pelican into cage STORYLINE Obama administration officials continued defending their response to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster while criticising that of BP PLC, which leased the offshore rig and is responsible for the cleanup. US Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said on Sunday that he has doubts about how BP is handling the oil spill crisis. "Do I have confidence that they know exactly what they are doing? No, not completely," Salazar said. However, he added that BP was "throwing everything that they can at the problem". "If we find they're not doing what they're supposed to be doing, we'll push them out of the way appropriately," Salazar said. But federal officials have acknowledged that BP has expertise that they lack in stopping the deep-water leak. A mile-(1.6-kilometre) long tube operating for about a week has siphoned off more than half a (m) million gallons (1.9 (m) million litres) in the past week, but it began sucking up oil at a slower rate over the weekend. Even at its best the effort did not capture all the oil leaking, and the next attempt to stanch the flow won't be put into action until at least Tuesday. BP refused to provide day-by-day figures on how much oil the tube was diverting. At least six (m) million gallons (22.7 (m) million litres) of crude have spewed into the Gulf, though some scientists have said they believe the spill already surpasses the 11 (m) million-gallon (41.64 (m) million litre) 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill off Alaska as the worst in US history. Meanwhile, in Barataria Bay, orange oil had made its way a good 6 inches (15 centimetres) onto the shore, coating grasses and the nests of brown pelicans in mangrove trees. The pelicans struggled to clean the crude from their bodies, splashing in the water and preening themselves. Pelican eggs were glazed with rust-coloured gunk, and new hatchlings and nests were also coated with crude. Pelicans are especially vulnerable to oil. Not only could they eat tainted fish and feed it to their young, but they could die of hypothermia or drowning if they're soaked in oil. Just six months ago, the birds had been removed from the federal endangered species list. Wildlife officials tried to rescue oil-soaked pelicans on Sunday, but they suspended their efforts after spooking the birds. They weren't sure whether they would try again. Officials have considered some drastic solutions for cleaning the oil, like burning or flooding the marshes, but they may have to sit back and let nature take care of it. Plants and pelican eggs could wind up trampled to death by well-meaning humans. If the marshes are too dry, setting them ablaze could burn plants to the roots and obliterate the wetlands. Flooding might help by floating out the oil, but it also could wash away the natural barriers to flooding from hurricanes and other disasters, much like hurricanes Katrina and Rita washed away marshlands in 2005. State and federal officials spent millions rebuilding the much-needed buffer against tropical storms. The spill's impact now stretches across 150 miles (240 kilometres), from Dauphin Island, Alabama to Grand Isle, Louisiana. It is unclear if the area can even be cleaned, or if the birds can be saved. It is also unknown how much of the Gulf Coast will end up looking the same way because of a well that has spewed untold (m) millions of gallons (litres) of oil since the offshore rig exploded more than a month ago. US President Barack Obama has named a special independent commission to review what happened. The spill began after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana on April 20, killing 11 workers - the rig sank two days later. Salazar and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano were to lead a Senate delegation to the region on Monday to fly over affected areas and keep an eye on the response. The leak may not be completely stopped until a relief well is dug, a project that could take months. Another effort that BP said will begin on Tuesday at the earliest will shoot heavy mud, and then cement, into the blown well, but that
TS ALBERTO - STEINHATCHEE (6-13-2006)
THE EAST SIDE OF THE EYE OF TROPICAL STORM ALBERTO IN STEINHATCHEE, FLORIDA.
JINDAL GRANDE TERRE PRESSER
GOV BOBBY Jindal visit to Grande Terre, LA where he comes across a pelican covered in oil that's barely alive. Also broll of oil/globs on the beach. This is followed by press conf 17;26;46 CU of OIL ON SAND 17;27;06 SHOT OF JINDAL STEPPING DOWN ONTO BEACh 17;27;24 JINDAL HELPING OTHERS DOWN TO BEACH JINDAL 17;29;02 I want to first of all thank senator Vitter and counsel john for being here from Jefferson parish. 17;28;09 we're here on east grand terre isle - this is the site of state's first sand dredge 17;28;21 three weeks ago made request to us amry corps engineers to build sand booms to protect our coastline - we could have protected 4000 miles coastline from re-protecting with booms 17;28;35 impt bc want to fight on barrier isle rather than oil coming through to wetlands 17;28;45 took weeks to get response instead of waiting we actually had a dredge under contract - 30 mil coastal restoration project - we told dredge start building boom - weren't going to wait for bp 17;29;06 when it's done will be over 3 miles - impt - heavy oil coming here. If boom wasn't here oil would have gotten past this and into island. So impt to fight oil on barrier isle. 17;29;26 LA has over 7000 miles of wetland.s gulf's nursery. 17;29;45 A week ago today they approved six permits and told bp to pay for onen. A total of six segments. I'm here to send a message to bp today 17:29:57 fed gov told bp to go out for the five. We told gov to make bp responsible We have not gotten satisfactory response . we said sign contracts or get out of way and let us get it done 17:30:24 state is mobilizing dredges today. We've asked army corps of engineers to release dredges that are under contract to them. The reason this is so important is that if we had approval three weeks ago we would have ten miles built today its important we get this done. You can see the oil here instead of in the wetlands. You see the dead bird and you can see an oil browned pelican over here 17:31:15 you can see it in the bottle right there. You are seeing they oil coming off the shore. We are about one hundred miles from spill and you are seeing the oil here already 17:32:04 cu pelican covered in oil. 17:32:16 this is so sad you see the young bird here and you see the adult brown pelican to our right. The state's official bird. Just recently taken off the endangered species list. Yu see it here, on cat island. The biologists are coming out to clean up the bird and try to release it. But you go to cat island and see nests with eggs and young, but sometimes its' too late for the young. Many might die. We're concerned about the future of these birds. 17:33:16 that's why its so important for us to make sure the oil dose not reach these wetlands. It's an important place for these pelicans. Important for the entire country, migratory birds. 17:33:41 this is tragic sad. And why we are fighting for our way of life. 17:33:51 this one pic has everything. Why were fighting so hard for our state. About our way of life. Not just econ, checks , it's about our way of life. Generations who have grown up fishing off these coasts. 17:34:18 this is Americas wetlands and if you look at what the oil is doing we are so impatient to do everything we can to fight and protect way of life 17:34:38 the reality is we shouldn't have to choose safe domestic production of energy and preservation of wild life. They can coexist. 17:35:02 it didn't work in this case. Need to figure out if they need better regulations, response plans. The fed needs to do a better job of overseeing industry so no repeat of this accident. 17:35:25 we all are in support of alternative renewable energy. But we need hydrocarbons for foreseeable future. Lets not become more dependent on foreign countries. 17:35:53 my request to the what is do everything you need to do job. Don't take a day longer than you need. People will loose jobs if moratorium goes longer than predicted. They don't know if they will be here.if this will go longer or shorter. 17:36:28 the biologists are on their way. 17:36:36 the reason this is so sad is many of us know these areas like back of our hands. We shouldn't have to see this oil coming into our wetlands. That's why we are not waiting for bp. We are ordering the dredges to be organized 17:37:03 cu on pelican in water/oil 17:37:13 this isn't hypothetical, this is oil hitting la shore as we speak. Thankfully state built this boom so we don't get more oil inside these populated areas. 17:37:35 this is heartbreaking. Angers every louisianian who sees this. If this wasn't fortified this would be behind us getting into the wetlands 17:37:57 it saddens us. This is our state bird. No reason oil should be hitting our wildlife/fisheries. We should nto have to choose between oil. 17;38;08 SHOT OF PELICAN IN OIL 17;38;54 SHOT OF PELICAN IN MUCK 17:38:24 im not taking anything away from bp's reponsiblity. I support fed to doing what they need to do. I don't want them to take a day loner than they need to. 17:38:45 you have some of same people being impacted at risk of losing jobs. 17:38:55 continued cu of pelican in oil 17:39:00 SHOT OF MUCK 17:39:01 we don't want another spill, more oil. one drop of iil is one too many 17:39:10 our coastal leaders like this that appears even though you don't' see it. 17:39:39 cu of coast 17:40:35 cu pelican drenched with oil, walking 17;40;38 SHOT OF PELICAN DRENCHED IN OIL 17:40:52 cu water, waves with bird covered in oil struggling to move (very good) 17:41:19 Jindal gets back in helicopter 17:42:06 aerial view from helicopter CONTINUED: (not jindal until 18:04:14 ) Things have improved from your Friday visit mr president Our visit to east there was a perfect example. The state went ahead to build barriers. And we see its working. 18:00:00 we see its working out of our inner marsh which is so crucial 18:00:00 we have been pushing bp . and finally the feds gave the go ahead for the rest of the plan. I have two reactions. Finally, and 40 percent is 40 percent. When the other 60 percent. 6:01 and three, even for this 40 percent bp is playing games not sending the state a check. They need to order, not ask, but order. We need to treat this like a war. That's the response it deserves. We all are here in la. The question is when bp will starts. 18:02:15 18:02:19 your'e only as strong as your weakest link 18:02:30 you heard the gov. this is threatening their way of life. The enemy isnt to coming in form of ships and tanks but oil. Its ben 45 days and bps proving its not up to the task. 18:02:58 the oil is beneath the surface we need to use every asset. Bp needs to step up to the plate. We are doing psa announcements. Sign contracts and get job done. One final message for president, he has said hed doing whatever it takes. I ask him to get fully engaged. Tell bp to sign contracts. Get the job done. Protect south la. But 30 % of fisheries from estuaries. 18:03:50 this is a battle for the whole united states. Lets win this battle and not stop JINDAL 18:04:14 two things. In terms of fed. They should be in charge of cleanup effort. Bp is a responsible party but fed should be telling them what to do. This is bp's oil but this is our coast line. We 're the ones who are going to live with the enviro damage. 18:04:45 it is time for fed gov to be in charge of this. 18:04:54 he said maybe not a lot of oil in water, big ocean, I read it was attributed to him. The fact he wants to get back to his life. I want him or his successor to come and see this and talk to fishermen who cant go out today. Talk too marina owners. This should be his busiest time of year. Who ever is in charge of b should come here themselves. Look at pelicans 18:05:40 talk to families who are hurting. Act responsibly. A week ago today the fed told me to start. We want you to do first sand dredging project. But not one dime has been giving to state not one dredge. Who ever is in charge needs to see for himself. 18:06:18 like I said whether it is him or his successor he needs to do a lot better than hes done. What confidence do I have that hed be replaced by better ceo? Tell them to come down here and stop making this kind of statements. They sound idiotic to us. Anyone who lives here, knows these coasts, these are the most 18:07:01 idiotic statements ive ever heard. But at the end of the day doent matter whos running the company. They need to see for themselves. I know he apologized for his last statement, but sorry for inconveniencing him but we are permanently changing peoples lifestyles down here. This is nnot an inconvenience for birds, louisianians who are directly impacted 18:07:46 let me say something ..we have been through katrina, gustav. Are we going to overcome this? We are absolutely going to overcome this. We are going to get thru this. It will be a marathon but we will do what it takes to repair damage. There is no option but to win this war. It will be tough and we will have to hold fed gov and bop responsiblibe 18:08:37 two things. I talked to white hosue this morning. They received a letter. I have talked to white house about it. I wrote letter bc if you look at impact.could impact up to ten thousand jobs depending how long they extend this moratorium. Some of the same families being put out of work could be threatened again by moratorium 18:09:23 same families shouldn't be made victims a second time. If it takes time for them to do well, they should take time but not one day longer than that takes. What we are hearing from companies is if they are hearing from companies and employers .the might lose their job. Companies might delay or cancel exploration projects that employ thousands of employees 18:10:18 I fully understand if it take a little time I understand. But it should not take an arbitrary amount of time. I don't want to see another spill, another drop. Obviously this was not done safely but as a country we should not have to choose between energy production and our coast. 18:11:06 there was serious concern as far as shallow exploration. So let me look at what they announce because I haven't seen that. We haven't gotten updates. But 18:11:25 on behalf of my state we are concerned of impacts on people economy. We absolutely demand safe energy production. If they need redundant bops, mms, inspections, detailed prevention plans they should do that. But whatever the fed gov needs they should do that quickly and safely . we as a country need affordable and safe energy. This is an issue Important for la but all of us 18:12:17 ill be meeting with admiral Allen today. This isn't about individuals. This is about getting job done. We have seen admiral . we got a new captain in charge or response. Admiral Allen added, so theres been changing personnel. Our bp point of contact has changed. Id make two points. This is not about individuals but holding organizations responsible. Holidng bp responsible. We aren't asking for a dime. But holding them responsible. 18:13:22 not about personalities but about making sure institutions do what they are supposed to . buck stops with the ceo. The ceo of bp its up to him to make sure move forward. The folks that have been here processing the claims -one of the things we asked coast guard to do though is to make sure the personnel coast guard didn't change. We don't want a new person in after one gets familiar with the place. Keep the personnel here for at least 60 days. During Katrina people replaced 18:14:29 in addition to coast guard personnel, there is some concern that people with open claims . they are worried about that . if they can have continuity that's better. Make sure nothing gets dropped. Its not fair that these people have to come back again because a new person is there. Make sure there is continuity. 18:15:15 they shouldn't have to start process over because there's a new case worker.
SICK SARASOTA BIRDS (04/02/1996)
Another strange malady is striking sea life along the west coast. Birds along the barrier islands of Sarasota are primarily affected. 40-cormorants and loons have been brought to the Pelican Man's Bird Sanctuary over the last five days. Dolphins and turtles are dying, as well. This latest round comes as scientists are struggling to find a reason for the deaths of 94 manatees.
US UK BP
AP-APTN-1830: US UK BP Sunday, 6 June 2010 STORY:US UK BP- REPLAY Wildlife suffers in oil spill, BP chief Hayward LENGTH: 02:58 FIRST RUN: 1230 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION/BBC/BP HANDOUT STORY NUMBER: 647558 DATELINE: Various - 4/5/6 June 2010 LENGTH: 02:58 BBC - NO ACCESS UK/2 MINUTES TOTAL USE ++MUST CREDIT "ANDREW MARR SHOW, BBC1"++ AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1230 NEWS UPDATE - 06 JUNE 2010) BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico - 6 June 2010 1. Various underwater video from site showing oil escaping ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1230 NEWS UPDATE - 06 JUNE 2010) BBC - NO ACCESS UK ++MUST CREDIT "ANDREW MARR SHOW, BBC1"++ London, UK - 6 June 2010 2. BP's chief executive Tony Hayward arriving at BBC Television Centre 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP: "From the very beginning we have launched what is the world's largest ever environmental spill response. We are battling on three fronts: in the sub-sea to contain now using the cap; on the surface to contain the oil off shore; and along the shore to defend the shoreline. As we speak the containment cap is producing around 10-thousand barrels of oil a day to the surface, which is being processed on the surface." (Q: So what sort of proportion is that of coming out?) "At the moment it is difficult to say but we would expect it to be the majority, probably the vast majority of the oil." 4. Wide of Hayward being interviewed, UPSOUND: BBC presenter Andrew Marr: "So you think this cap will get most of the oil?" 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP: "That is our hope. We are optimising the operation, we have a further containment system to implement in the course of this coming week, which will be in place by next weekend, so when those two are in place, we would very much hope to be containing the vast majority of the oil. 6. Wide of Hayward being interviewed, UPSOUND: BBC presenter Andrew Marr: "The reports that I have seen up to now suggest that perhaps about a quarter of the oil is being got by this capping system, but you think it's much more than that?" 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP: "As I said 48 hours ago, it's going to take us 48 to 72 hours to optimise this. We're in that process. Over the last 24 hours we have produced 10-thousand barrels a day to surface. The plume is reduced we have to determine by how much and there is more to go. And as I said there is a second containment system to be introduced next weekend and by the end of the month there will be a more permanent containment system in place ahead of the relief wells getting there in August." (FIRST RUN 2330 AMERICAS PRIME NEWS - 05 JUNE 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Barataria Bay, Louisiana, US - 5 June 2010 8. Pan from marsh to pelican carcass 9. Pelican stuck in oil 10. Man trying to take hold of pelican covered in oil (FIRST RUN 0030 NEWS UPDATE - 06 JUNE 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Barataria Bay, Louisiana, US - 4 June 2010 11. Various of workers cleaning oil 12. Wide of dead fish STORYLINE A containment cap placed over the damaged oil well in the Gulf of Mexico offered a small sign of progress on Sunday, as BP's chief executive said he was hopeful the cap would capture "the vast majority" of the leaking oil. BP PLC chief executive Tony Hayward told the BBC on Sunday that over the last 24 hours, the cap placed on the leak near the sea floor had trapped about 420-thousand gallons (1.6 (m) million litres) of oil. It's not clear how much is still escaping - an estimated 500-thousand gallons (1.9 (m) million litres) to one (m) million gallons (3.8 (m) million litres) a day. BP hope a second containment system will be in place by next weekend. Hayward also said on Sunday that he won't step down over the oil spill, and predicted his company will recover from the disaster. Speaking on BBC television's "Andrew Marr Show", he said he had the "absolute intention of seeing this through to the end." He said BP was committed to restoring the Gulf Coast to the state it was in before the spill started. Hayward also said his company had been left devastated by the disaster, and conceded that safety standards across the oil industry must dramatically improve in response. But he said BP would survive, and would come back strongly. Hayward declined to say whether it would pay a dividend to shareholders scheduled to be paid at the end of July. He said the decision would be taken by BP's board at the end of next month. The next step in the containment operation is for BP engineers to attempt to close vents on the cap that were deliberately allowing streams of oil to escape the system so water cannot get inside. When water and gas combined in an earlier containment box, it formed a frozen slush that foiled the system. The federal government's official leading the response to the crisis, Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, said the goal is to gradually increase the amount of the oil being captured. BP plans to eventually use an additional set of hoses and pipes to increase the amount of oil being trapped, but the ultimate solution remains a relief well that should be finished by August. The urgency of that task was apparent along the Gulf Coast nearly seven weeks after the BP rig exploded, killing 11 workers. The oil has steadily spread east, washing up in greater quantities in recent days. Pelicans struggled to free themselves from oil, thick as tar, while others stretched out useless wings, feathers dripping with crude. Dead birds and dolphins are washing ashore, coated in the sludge. Government officials estimate that roughly 22 (m) million (83 (m) million litres) to 48 (m) million gallons (182 (m) million litre) have leaked into the Gulf since the April 20 explosion. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-06-10 1432EDT
Europe Weather 4 - WRAP Heavy snowfalls in London and Brussels; stranded passengers
NAME: EUR WEATHER4 20070208Ix TAPE: EF07/0160 IN_TIME: 10:40:37:16 DURATION: 00:03:27:19 SOURCES: AP/SKY DATELINE: Various, 8 Feb 2007 RESTRICTIONS: see script SHOTLIST AP Television London, UK 1. Wide of Buckingham Palace, snow on ground 2. Palace guard, snow falling 3. Tourists standing under umbrella in heavy snowfall 4. Various of cavalry outside Buckingham Palace, as snow falls 5. Boy building snowman at top of Primrose Hill 6. Child sledding and others walking up hill with plastic sheeting 7. Mother pushing boy along in sledge 8. More of people on top of Primrose Hill SKY - No Access UK/Ireland/CNNi London, UK 9. Camel in enclosure at London Zoo approaching camera 10. Mid of group of flamingoes 11. Mid of pelican 12. Wide of group of pelicans 13. Close-up of flamingo SKY - No Access UK/Ireland/CNNi London area, UK 14. Aerial tracking shot of snow-covered London area 15. Aerial of people gathered in fields having snowball fights SKY - No Access UK/Ireland/CNNi London area, UK 16. Aerial of people jumping in snow, waving 17. Aerial zoom into snowboarder coming down hill, then falling SKY - No Access UK/Ireland/CNNi Luton, UK ++MUTE++ 18. Wide of Luton Airport terminal, snow on ground SKY - No Access UK/Ireland/CNNi Luton, UK ++MUTE++ 19. Close-up of computer screen reading (English) "London Luton Airport advises passengers that due to adverse weather conditions all check-in has been indefinitely suspended. Please contact your airline for further information." 20. Wide of people waiting in airport terminal, pan AP Television Brussels, Belgium 21. Various of children walking through Cinquantenaire Park as snow falls 22. Wide of men clearing snow 23. SOUNDBITE: (French) Mustaffa, park worker: "For the children, I think it's nice. They come here with their parents, they play and they have fun, I guess. They also come with their teachers, as you can see over there, and it does them good. It might be cold but you shouldn't complain about the weather. When it's hot, people say it's too hot, when it's cold, it's too cold and when it rains, people never leave home, so you should enjoy all the seasons." 24. Wide of flowers covered in snow 25. Close-up of flowers covered in snow 26. Wide of snowy park 27. Wide exterior of European Commission building with snow on ground 28. Mid of EU (European Union) flags with snow falling STORYLINE; Despite heavy snowfall shutting down five British airports, disrupting train services and causing chaos on the roads on Thursday, some people in the London area were able to make the most of the weather. People of all ages gathered in snow-covered fields and parks to participate in snowball fights, build snowmen, sled and even snowboard. Tourists visiting central London were undeterred from visiting Buckingham Palace and were lucky enough to see the cavalry of Queen Elizabeth II. Even animals at London Zoo, some more used to sunnier climates, seemed unperturbed by the snow. The Met Office issued a severe weather warning for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and an industry group warned the transport failures could cost the economy hundreds of millions of pounds (US dollars). Officials said that Luton and Stansted airports remained closed and advised travellers to contact their airlines before leaving home. Three other airports; Bristol, Birmingham and Cardiff reopened by 1030GMT after workers cleared snow from the runways. The Midland Mainline train service said it was cancelling some Thursday evening trains out of London due to the weather. More than 100 schools across south and mid Wales and in East Anglia were closed. In Hampstead, northwest London, and across the capital, children built snowmen and threw snowballs. Forecasters predicted up to six inches (15 centimetres) of snow could fall over parts of the Midlands, Wales and Northern Ireland. London and southern England were expected to see up to two inches (five centimetres) of snow. And in the Belgian capital, Brussels, residents woke up to heavy snowfall. In the parks, school children enjoyed the thick blanket of snow, while park attendants worked hard to clear paths and cycleways. Outside the European Commission building, some people struggled into work whilst others paused to take photographs. Keyword-severe weather -ssow
ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: HURRICANE PREMIERE
TAPE_NUMBER: EN0002 IN_TIME: 10:40:08 LENGTH: 04:23 SOURCES: APTN/UNIVERSAL RESTRICTIONS: No re-use/re-sale of film/video clips without clearance, No access Internet FEED: SCRIPT: xfa Story: The Hurricane Location: New York Date: January 10 2000 DENZEL WASHINGTON was joined by the true life inspiration for his latest film THE HURRICANE at the movie's premiere last night. The very special premiere took place at the United Nations headquarters in New York. RUBIN "HURRICANE" CARTER was wrongfully imprisoned for 20 years. His fight for justice has been taken onto the big screen by Canadian Academy Award winning director, NORMAN JEWISON (IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT, A SOLDIER'S STORY, MOONSTRUCK, FIDDLER ON THE ROOF). Carter was of course immortalized in Bob Dylan's famous song, "Hurricane," a plea for the former boxer's release. Carter's dreams of winning the middleweight boxing title were destroyed when he was arrested along with another man for the murders of three people in a New Jersey bar. Wrongfully accused, Carter and John Artis were convicted and sentenced to three life terms in prison, where Carter decided to channel his despair by writing his own story from his cell. Last night, the two men saw their struggle played out on the big screen alongside the actors who starred in the film. The movie tells how although his autobiography, The Sixteenth Round, was published, Carter remained behind bars, finding inner peace by withdrawing from the outer world and national interest that surrounded the case, including the impassioned pleas by Bob Dylan and Mohammed Ali. Years later, an alienated American youth living in Canada (played by VICELLOUS REON SHANNON MIGHTY DUCKS 2) finds direction and purpose for the first time in his life after reading Carter's book. He gets into correspondence with the former boxer and becomes convinced of his innocence. Enlisting the help of his social activist guardians, Terry Swinton (JOHN HANNAH SLIDING DOORS, THE MUMMY), Lisa Peters (DEBORAH KARA UNGER THE GAME, PAYBACK, SUNSHINE) and Sam Chaiton (LIEV SCHREIBER A WALK ON THE MOON, SCREAM, SCREAM 2), together they mount a fulltime campaign to get Carter released. Reluctant to join in at first, Carter is soon won over by their passion and commitment to his cause, proclaiming "Hate put me in prison, love is gonna bust me out." Carter continued his campaign for justice and eventually walked out a free man. The screenplay was written by ARMYAN BERNSTEIN (ONE FROM THE HEART) and DAN GORDON (MURDER IN THE FIRST) based on Carter's autobiography and "Lazarus and the Hurricane" by Sam Chaiton and Terry Swinton and it was produced by Bernstein's company, BEACON COMMUNICATIONS. The movie also stars DAVID PAYMER (AMISTAD, MR SATURDAY NIGHT, MUMFORD), DAN HEDAYA (THE USUAL SUSPECTS, THE FIRST WIVES CLUB), HARRIS YULIN (CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER, BEAN), CLANCY BROWN (STARSHIP TROOPERS) AND ROD STEIGER (THE PAWNBROKER, DOCTOR ZHIVAGO, IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT). Denzel Washington is America's top black dramatic actor. Constantly looking for new challenges, his portrayals of true life heroes include STEVE BIKO in CRY FREEDOM and MALCOLM X in SPIKE LEE's film of the same title. Other roles include CRIMSON TIDE, THE SIEGE, FALLEN, COURAGE UNDER FIRE, THE PELICAN BRIEF AND MO' BETTER BLUES. He won his Academy Award for GLORY. For further information contact Universal Films in America on: 1 818 777 2692. SHOTLIST: CLIP TRAILER; WS UNITED NATIONS ; WS POSTER ; CU POSTER ; ARRIVAL RUBIN CARTER AND DIRECTOR NORMAN JEWISON ; SOT JOHN ARTIS (WHO WAS ALSO ARRESTED AND JAILED WITH RUBIN) ; CA RUBIN ; SOT RUBIN ; CLIP FILM ; SOT VICELLOUS REON SHANNON (LESRA MARTIN BESIDE HIM) ; BROLL RUBIN AND DENZEL WASHINGTON ; SOT DIRECTOR NORMAN JEWISON ; WASHINGTON AND RUBIN BROLL ; SOT WASHINGTON ; CA POSTER ; SOT RUBIN ; CLIP FILM?
US Oil
AP-APTN-0930: US Oil Monday, 7 June 2010 STORY:US Oil- REPLAY US official warns battle to contain oil spill may linger into autumn LENGTH: 03:16 FIRST RUN: 0130 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 647586 DATELINE: Various - 6 June 2010 LENGTH: 03:16 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST Barataria Bay, Louisiana 1. Various of tide washing up thick oil 2. Close of thick oil on beach 3. Various of a dead pelican lying on beach covered in oil 4. Various of baby pelicans huddled together, covered in oil 5. Various of crab crawling along oil covered beach 6. Various of Plaquemines Parish coastal zone management director, P.J. Hahn, reaching into water and pulling out hands covered in thick oil 7. SOUNDBITE (English) P.J. Hahn, Plaquemines Parish coastal zone management director: "Well, it's critical right now to get these passes cut off, to keep this heavy oil from coming through. The dilemma that we have and that we saw today, on today's trip, is that the oil is actually heavy oil travelling below the surface. So, one of the things we want to do is be able to build these barrier islands and that's going to be critical in trying to keep this oil out. Unfortunately, we started that procedure four weeks ago, and had we been able to start the procedure four weeks ago we would have probably been able to stop that oil that's now coming in to the Barataria area." 8. Close of Hahn holding dead fish, covered in oil 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dave Marino, boat captain from Myrtle Grove, Louisiana: "The area we're in right now, this is some of the best fishing in the whole region, and the oil's coming in - just wave after wave. It's hard to stomach, it really is." Venice, Louisiana 10. Various of coast guards on boat filling up tank with fuel 11. Close of "US Coast Guard" written on side of vessel 12. Wide of coast guard command post 13. Mid of "US Coast Guard, Mobile Incident Command Post" written on side of container 14. Wide of trucks 15. Wide exterior of hotel 16. Close of "No Vacancy" board on hotel sign 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Annette Sylve, The Lighthouse Lodge and Villas: "We've been booked from day one. Okay, I mean we are booked for a year or until this is over with, okay. It's hard but I'm trusting God to help these people resolve this big old problem." 18. Mid of man by food store 19. Close of US flag with the words (English): "Thanks BP for nothing, Obama stand up for us" 20. Wide of people sitting on bench outside food store STORYLINE A special cap was capturing more and more of the crude pouring from a damaged well in the Gulf of Mexico, but that glimmer of hope was tempered on Sunday as the official overseeing the US government's response said the battle to contain the leak was likely to stretch into the autumn. Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, closely monitoring the inverted funnel-like cap to see if it can make a serious dent in the flow of new oil, said he didn't want to risk offering false encouragement. Speaking on CBS' "Face the Nation" Allen said the cap would trap only so much of the oil, and relief wells being drilled would not be completed until August, with oil continuing to spew out. The prospect that the crisis could stretch beyond the summer was devastating to residents along the Gulf, who are seeing thicker globs of oil show up in increasing volume all along the coastline. Plaquemines Parish coastal zone management director P.J. Hahn said the thick oil was causing devastation to local wildlife. Hahn said a new plan to increase protection on the coast, including beachfront barriers, was "critical" to keep the heavy oil out. Since it was placed over the busted well on Thursday, the cap has been siphoning an increasing amount of oil. On Saturday, it funnelled about 441,000 gallons (1.7 million litres) to a tanker on the surface, up from about 250,000 gallons (946,325 litres) it captured on Friday. But it's not clear how much is still escaping from the well that federal authorities at one point estimated was leaking between 500,000 gallons (1.9 million litres) and 1 million gallons (3.8 million litres) a day. Since the spill began nearly seven weeks ago, roughly 23 million gallons (87 million litres) to 49 million gallons (185 million litres) of oil have leaked into the Gulf. As BP continues their efforts to contain the leak, increasing quantities of thick oily sludge have been making its way farther east, washing up on some of the region's hallmark white-sand beaches and coating marshes in black ooze. An observation flight spotted a sheen of oil 150 miles (240 kilometres) west of Tampa. Cleanup crews have been struggling to keep pace and many Gulf residents have become increasingly frustrated. As the oil comes ashore from Louisiana to Florida, pelicans struggle to free themselves from oil that gathers in hip-deep pools, while dead birds and dolphins wash up along the shore. Boat captain Dave Marino, from Myrtle Grove in Louisiana, said oil was seeping in to some of the best fishing spots. "It's hard to stomach, it really is," he added. In Venice, Louisiana, one hotelier said she was booked up, but not by tourists and fisherman, but with response workers. Nearby, local stores, usually packed with fisherman, are half empty. BP chief executive Tony Hayward told the BBC on Sunday that he believed the cap was likely to capture "the majority, probably the vast majority" of the oil gushing from the well. The gradual increase in the amount being captured is deliberate, in an effort to prevent water from getting inside and forming a frozen slush that foiled a previous containment attempt. BP engineers must next try to close vents on the containment cap that are allowing oil to escape and preventing that water intake. On Sunday, BP said it had closed one of four vents that are allowing oil to escape and preventing that water intake. The company said some of the remaining vents may remain open to keep the cap system stable. Hayward told the BBC that the company hopes a second containment system would be in place by next weekend. Allen told CBS that the oil would stop flowing only when the existing well is plugged with cement once the relief wells have been completed. Once the cap is fully operational, if it is ultimately successful, it could capture a maximum of 630-thousand gallons (2.4 million litres) of oil a day. Besides installing the containment cap, BP officials have said they want a second option for siphoning off oil by next weekend. The plan would use lines and pipes that previously injected mud down into the well, one of several failed efforts over the past six-plus weeks to contain the leak, and instead use them to suck up oil and send it to a drilling rig on the ocean surface. BP also wants to install by late June another system to help cope with hurricanes that could roar over the site of the damaged well. When finished, there would be a riser floating about 300 feet (91 meters) below the ocean's surface, far enough below the water so it would not be disturbed by powerful hurricane winds and waves but close enough so ships forced to evacuate could easily reconnect to the pipes once the storm has passed. None of these fixes will stop the well from leaking; they're simply designed to capture what's leaking until the relief wells can be drilled. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-07-10 0633EDT
US Oil
AP-APTN-0930: US Oil Tuesday, 22 June 2010 STORY:US Oil- REPLAY Head of spill fund, offshore drilling case, whistleblower, wildlife LENGTH: 03:07 FIRST RUN: 0230 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 649096 DATELINE: Various - 21 June 2010/ Recent LENGTH: 03:07 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS NAMERICA/INTERNET BBC 1's PANORAMA PROGRAMME - NO ACCESS UK - ++MUST ONSCREEN COURTESY BBC 1 PANORAMA++ BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Grand Isle, Louisiana, US - 21 June 2010 1. Various of oil on marshes 2. Various tracking shots of boom 3. Various of pelicans in water and on shore 4. Boat moving on water 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Steve Martarano, Spokesman, US Fish and Wildlife Service: "We've been sending 55 boats a day out, and since almost day one, once the oil hit this area, we feel like we've really made inroads in a lot of the heavily oiled birds that we were seeing, and we were getting in about 60-70 birds a day into the triage centre here in Grand Isle, and now it's to the tune of about 7 or 8, less than 10." 6. Pelicans in water ABC - NO ACCESS NAMERICA/INTERNET Houston, Texas, US - 21 June 2010 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kenneth Feinberg, Fund Administrator: "The top message is the message conveyed to me by the president and the administration. We want to get these claims out quicker, we want to get these claims out with more transparency so people will have more certainty as to what they're going to receive, and we want to do it in the next couple of weeks so that people down in the Gulf who are in desperate financial straits as a result of this spill are receiving financial compensation." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY New Orleans, Louisiana, US - 21 June 2010 8. Wide pan exterior of court house 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Walter Leger Junior, Fishing Industry Attorney: "The impact of what we're dealing with in court today is tremendous. First they're just devastated by the damages to those who make their living in the seafood industry. The moratorium could have even a greater economic impact, not just on some of the fishing industry people who work part time in the oil industry, but in every aspect of the economy here in Louisiana." 10. Protester holding banner 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Catherine Wannamaker, Southern Environmental Law Centre: "This is a system that we know has had major regulatory failures. There are new risks that we know about now that we didn't know about before the Deepwater Horizon spill. And we think that in that circumstance a six month moratorium is appropriate." BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico, US - 21 June 2010 12. Underwater shot of oil gushing out of well BBC 1, PANORAMA - NO ACCESS UK - MUST ONSCREEN COURTESY BBC1, PANORAMA Unknown location, Recent 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tyrone Benton, oil rig worker: "We saw a leak on the pod." BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico, US - 19 June 2010 14. Underwater shot of oil and gas spewing from broken, but capped, well head BBC 1, PANORAMA - NO ACCESS UK - MUST ONSCREEN COURTESY BBC1, PANORAMA Unknown location, Recent 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tyrone Benton, oil rig worker: "They have a control room where they could turn off that pod and turn on the other one, so that they won't have to stop production." ++SOUNDBITE SEPARATED BY WHITE FRAME, AS INCOMING++ (Q"So they found a problem and instead of fixing it, they just shut down the broken bit?") "Yes, they just shut it down and worked off another pod." BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico, US - 19 June 2010 16. Underwater shot of robotic arms moving around well head 17. Underwater shot of Remote Operated Vehicles (ROV) working at well head STORYLINE Along the Louisiana coast on Monday, some workers reported progress in the cleanup effort of the Gulf oil spill. On Barataria Bay off the coast of Louisiana, thick globs of oil that washed onto marshy islands a week ago had disappeared, leaving a mass of stained bushes and partly yellowed grasses. Blackened lengths of boom surrounded the islands, which were still teeming with brown pelicans, gulls and other seabirds, some with visible signs of oil on their plumage. Nearby, shrimp boats that have been transformed into skimmers hauled absorbent booms across the water's surface, collecting some of the remaining oil. The number of oil-soaked birds in the area is down significantly, from 60 or 70 a day at the triage centre on Grand Isle to more like seven or eight, said Steve Martarano, a spokesman for the US Fish and Wildlife Service. "We've been sending 55 boats a day out pretty much since day one, when the oil hit this area, and so we feel like we've really made inroads," he said. Also on Monday, the administrator of a 20 (b) billion US dollar fund to compensate victims of the spill pledged to speed payment of claims as a federal judge considered whether to lift a six-month moratorium on new deepwater drilling. Kenneth Feinberg, who has been tapped by the White House to run the fund, said many people are in desperate financial straits and need immediate relief. "We want to get these claims out quicker," he said. "We want to get these claims out with more transparency." Feinberg, who ran the claim fund set up for victims of the September 11, 2001 attacks, said BP has paid out over 100 (m) million US dollars so far. Various estimates place total claims so far in excess of 600 (m) million US dollars. BP said it has spent two (b) billion US dollars fighting the spill for the last two months and compensating victims, with no end in sight. It's likely to be at least August before crews finish two relief wells that are the best chance of stopping the flow of oil. US President Barack Obama's administration has been struggling to show it is responding forcefully to the spill, which has gushed anywhere from 68 (m) million to 126 (m) millions gallons (309 (m) million to 573 (m) million litres) of oil into the Gulf. As part of that effort, the Interior Department halted the approval of any new permits for deepwater drilling and suspended drilling at 33 existing exploratory wells in the Gulf. But a lawsuit filed by Hornbeck Offshore Services of Covington, Louisiana, claims the government arbitrarily imposed the moratorium without any proof that the operations posed a threat. Hornbeck says the moratorium could cost Louisiana thousands of jobs and (m) millions of dollars in lost wages. "The moratorium could have even a greater economic impact, not just on some of the fishing industry people who work part time in the oil industry, but in every aspect of the economy here in Louisiana," said fishing industry attorney, Walter Leger Junior. After hearing two hours of arguments Monday in New Orleans federal court, Judge Martin Feldman said he will decide by Wednesday whether to overturn the moratorium. Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal's office filed a brief supporting the plaintiffs' suit. A lawyer for the state told Feldman that the federal government did not consult Louisiana officials before imposing the moratorium, in violation of federal law. Catherine Wannamaker, a lawyer for several environmental groups that support the moratorium, said six months is a reasonable time for drilling to be suspended while the government studies the risks and regulations governing the industry. Meanwhile, the British Broadcasting Corporation broadcast what it said was an interview with a former Deepwater Horizon worker who claims he identified a leak in the oil rig's safety equipment weeks before the explosion. Tyrone Benton told BBC's "Panorama" programme he spotted a leak in one of the control pods which helped operate the so-called "blowout preventer," a failsafe mechanism which was supposed to shut off the flow from the well in the event of a catastrophic failure. The preventer malfunctioned when the rig exploded on April 20, allowing oil to gush out. Benton said the problem wasn't immediately fixed - despite e-mails sent to both BP, which ran the rig, and Transocean Ltd., which owned it. Instead, the pod was shut down and a second one was relied upon to operate the preventer. Benton said he didn't know if the faulty pod was ever turned back on before the disaster. In a statement, BP said it was aware of the allegations, but that Transocean was responsible "for both the operation and maintenance" of the blowout preventer. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-22-10 0544EDT
US Oil 2
AP-APTN-0930: US Oil 2 Friday, 4 June 2010 STORY:US Oil 2- WRAP BP trying to cap leak under Gulf of Mexico, underwater shots LENGTH: 03:31 FIRST RUN: 0330 RESTRICTIONS: Part No Access NAmerica/Internet TYPE: English/Nat SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 647400 DATELINE: Varous - 1 May, 3 June 2010 LENGTH: 03:31 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY ABC - NO ACCESS N/AMERICA/INTERNET BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY NATIONAL CENTRE FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: (FIRST RUN 1830 NORTH AMERICA PRIME NEWS - 3 June 2010) BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico - 3 June 2010 1. Underwater video of shears moving towards leaking pipes ++MUTE++ 2. Underwater video of shears cutting pipe ++MUTE++ (FIRST RUN 0330 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico - June 3, 2010 3. Underwater video showing cap being placed on pipe ++MUTE++ 4. Underwater video of oil escaping from pipe and cap ++MUTE++ (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY East Grand Terre Island, Louisiana - 3 June, 2010 5. Various of oil covered birds stuck in oil lick 6. Wide of oil on beach 7. Wide aerials of coast (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS N/AMERICA/INTERNET East Grand Terre Island, Louisiana - 3 June, 2010 8. Various of oiled pelican struggling to walk (FIRST RUN 1830 NORTH AMERICA PRIME NEWS - 3 JUNE 2010) NATIONAL CENTRE FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY Boulder, Colorado - 3 June 2010 9. Animation showing one scenario of where the oil might go if the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico is in a typical configuration (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Boulder, Colorado - 3 June, 2010 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Synte Peacock, National Centre for Atmospheric Research: "It has to go somewhere. The ocean is always moving, it's full of eddys and currents. It doesn't stay still, it's not going to stay still." (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS N/AMERICA/INTERNET Gulf of Mexico - 1 May, 2010 11. Various of underwater video obtained by ABC purported to show previously unreleased video of oil escaping from leak on May 1 (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) ABC - NO ACCESS N/AMERICA/INTERNET Florida - 3 June, 2010 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Ian McDonald, Florida State University: (SOUNDBITE BEGINS ON SHOT 8) "An accurate casualty report is the key to victory. We need to know how much is out there, how rapidly it's coming at the responders. That's a basic part of all of this." (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Dauphin Island, Alabama - 3 June, 2010 13. Workers inspecting beach 14. Oil on beach 15. Various of workers cleaning up oil on beach 16. Set up shot of beachgoer Kennedy Kelly with oil on her hand 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Kennedy Kelly, Beachgoer: "It feels like sticky and stuff." 18. Kelly showing oil stuck to her finger (FIRST RUN 0130 AUSTRALIA NZ PRIME NEWS - 04 JUNE, 2010) AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY Grassy Key, Florida - June 3, 2010 19. Yellow protective booms on the Gulf side of Florida Keys Dolphin Research Centre 20. Various of dolphin in the water inside one of the lagoons 21. Birds perched near protective boom 22. SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Stella, Spokeswoman for Florida Keys Dolphin Research Centre "We're praying, we're keeping our fingers crossed that the worst of it will bypass the Florida Keys. To date, the Florida Keys have not had a huge negative impact from it." 23. Mid of dolphins in water STORYLINE BP sliced off a pipe with giant shears in the latest bid to curtail the worst spill in US history, but the cut was jagged and placing a cap over the gusher deep in the Gulf of Mexico proved to be a challenge. Live video showed an inverted funnel-like cap slightly wider than a pipe being manoeuvred into place on Thursday night over the oil spewing from the busted well. However, the gushing oil made it very difficult to tell if the cap was fitting well. BP spokesman Toby Odone said he had no immediate information on whether the cap was successfully attached. A rubber seal on the inside will attempt to keep oil from escaping, though engineers acknowledge some crude will still come out. BP PLC turned to the giant shears after a diamond-tipped saw became stuck in the pipe halfway through the job, yet another frustrating delay in the six-week-old spill. If the cap can be put on successfully, BP will siphon the oil and gas to a tanker on the surface. This latest attempt is risky because slicing away the section of the 20-inch (51-centimetre)-wide riser removed a kink in the pipe, and could temporarily increase the flow of oil by as much as 20 percent. Crews will also use methanol to try to prevent ice-like crystals from forming on the inside of the cap. Meanwhile, newly disclosed internal Coast Guard documents from the day after the explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon rig about 50 miles (80 kilometres) off the Louisiana coast indicated that US officials were warning of a leak of 336-thousand gallons (1,271,860 litres) per day of crude from the well in the event of a complete blowout. The well didn't have such a failure. But the volume turned out to be much closer to that figure than the 42-thousand gallons (158,982 litres) per day that BP first estimated. Weeks later that was revised to 210-thousand gallons (794,913 litres). Now, an estimated 500-thousand gallons (1,893,000 litres) to 1 (m) million gallons (3.8 million litres) of crude is believed to be leaking daily. Anywhere between 21 million (m) gallons (80 million (m) litres) and 46 million (m) gallons (174 million (m) litres) of oil has spewed into the Gulf, according to government estimates. The Centre for Public Integrity, which initially reported the Coast Guard logs, said it obtained them from Republican Darrell Issa, ranking Republican on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. The logs also showed early in the disaster that remote underwater robots were unable to activate the rig's blowout preventer, which was supposed to shut off the flow from the well in the event of such a catastrophic failure. It comes as US network ABC broadcast what it claimed was unreleased video of oil gushing from the leak as early as May 1. Experts say an accurate reading of just how much oil has spilled from the leak could be vital to the recovery operation. "An accurate casualty report is the key to victory," Dr Ian McDonald, from the Florida State University said on Thursday. Computer models released on Thursday showed oil could wind up on the East Coast of the United States by early July, and even get carried on currents across the Atlantic Ocean, by Bermuda and toward Europe. The models showed oil entering the Gulf's loop current, then going around the tip of Florida and as far north as Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Researchers with the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) cautioned that the models were not a forecast, and it's unlikely any oil reaching Europe would be harmful. The NCAR scientists cautioned that the simulation was not a forecast because it is "impossible to accurately predict the precision location of the oil weeks or months from now." The damage to the environment was chilling on East Grand Terre Island along the Louisiana coast, where workers found birds coated in thick, black goo. Video from the scene showed Brown pelicans drenched in thick oil, struggling and flailing in the surf. Meanwhile the US Coast Guard completed protective oil booming at a Dolphin Research Centre in the Florida Keys Thursday, as a precaution following discovery of an oil sheen and tar balls a few miles offshore. While tests so far have indicated that the oil is not from from the Deepwater Horizon spill, hundreds of feet of yellow protective booming was installed outside the dolphin lagoons. Experts believe that eventually, the Gulf's loop current will bring oil to the Keys and elsewhere in Florida, and officials have vowed to protect the region's unique marine and plant life. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 06-04-10 0531EDT
US Oil Aftermath
AP-APTN-0930: US Oil Aftermath Wednesday, 28 July 2010 STORY:US Oil Aftermath- REPLAY Reaction as Gulf region heads into 100th day of spill, analyst LENGTH: 03:35 FIRST RUN: 0230 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: Eng/Natsound SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 652571 DATELINE: Various - Various/File LENGTH: 03:35 US COAST GUARD HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: US COAST GUARD HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Gulf of Mexico - 20 April 2010 ++NIGHT SHOT++ 1. Aerial of burning oil rig AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Gulf of Mexico - 21 April 2010 ++DAY SHOTS++ 2. Aerial of fire aboard oil rig AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Buras, Louisiana - 17 June 2010 3. Aerial shot of barges setup near oil-stained wetlands AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: South of Venice, Louisiana - 7 June 2010 4. Close-up of oil in Gulf of Mexico, diver seen under water AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 5 June 2010 5. Close-up pelican stuck in oil AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE Washington, DC - 16 June 2010 6. STILL: Bob Dudley, BP's managing director and current point man on oil spill recovery, who will replace Tony Hayward, with BP's outgoing CEO Tony Hayward 7. STILL: Dudley outside the White House BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Gulf of Mexico - 15 July 2010 8. Underwater view of oil spewing from wellhead 9. Underwater view of same, a few minutes later after the well was capped and oil stopped flowing AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY New Orleans, Louisiana - 27 July 2010 10. Customers inside Acme Oyster House 11. Employee shucking oysters 12. Oysters on tray 13. Sign outside restaurant reading "Please wait in line to be seated" 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lucien Gunter, Acme Oyster House: "Who'd have thought that 100 days of an oil spill would, you know, really kind of put us in a situation that after 100 years of business, you know, we're worried about what's going on. We're working hard to make sure that we can continue to (bring) product into restaurants. But most importantly, when you talk about the fishermen who are the backbone of what we do. We are worried about them and worried about how they are going to continue to recover through this ordeal and where that's going to lead the state of the Gulf and all the estuaries, and what toll that's going to take on seafood in general." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY FILE: Pass Christian, Mississippi - 2 June 2010 15. Various of workers processing prawns (shrimp) just unloaded from fishing boats AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY New Orleans, Louisiana - 27 July 2010 16. Wide of a meeting of the Louisiana Oysters Task Force 17. Mid shot of a member of task force seated at table 18. SOUNDBITE: ( English) Al Sunseri, P&J Oyster Company: "As far as seafood and the oyster beds, which I am a part of, it's just another day, and looking forward to a day where we can have some kind of normalcy." 19. Task force member seated at meeting 20. Member holding packet of info on the oyster fishing industry 21. SOUNDBITE: ( English) Daniel Coulon, Vice Chairman, Louisiana Oysters Task Force: "For us, it means that we've been out of business for 100 days, and we're hoping that it's not 100 years." 22. Wide shot of idled fishing boats 23. Mid of boats 24. Young boy on dock 25. Tulane Energy Institute Associate Director Eric Smith working at desk 26. Close up of Smith's face 27. SOUNDBITE: ( English) Eric Smith, Associate Director, Tulane Energy Institute: "I think what you're going to see is that, while there will be effects for a couple of years after this, oil patches on the ocean floor and things like that, the visible oil will pretty much be dispersed within another quarter, ninety days." AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana - 26 July 2010 28. Pan up along coastline STORYLINE: One hundred days ago this Wednesday, an unforeseen explosion aboard a rig in the Gulf of Mexico set off the worst offshore spill in US history. The blast sank TransOcean's massive superstructure, killed eleven workers, and unleashed a seemingly endless flow of oil from the ocean's depths. Now, more than three months later, (m) millions of barrels of oil have spilled into the Gulf, causing massive disruption to the lives of its residents, their businesses, and the sea life they depend on. The broken well head was firmly capped nearly two weeks ago, completely stanching the flow, and officials estimate they'll be able to kill the well entirely within the next several weeks. However, the final environmental, economic, and emotional toll this disaster will take on its victims is virtually anybody's guess and certainly defies a timeline. The last one hundred days have idled entire communities in Louisiana and Mississippi that are dependant on the fishing and tourism industries. "For us, it means that we've been out of business for 100 days, and we're hoping that it's not 100 years," said Daniel Coulon, the Vice Chairman of the Louisiana Oysters Task Force, which held a meeting on Tuesday to discuss the state of their business. The 100 day mark for these oyster fisherman is just another day on the calendar. "(We're) looking forward to a day where we can have some kind of normalcy," said Al Sunseri, who works for the P&J Oyster Company in New Orleans. The city's restaurants are working hard to serve customers and keep seafood on tables, but owners remain anxious and still fear that one day the supply will run out. Even so, there are positive signs. Associate Director of Tulane's Energy Institute Eric Smith says it could be a matter of a few months before the oil floating on the water is gone. "What you're going to see is that, while there will be effects for a couple of years after this, oil patches on the ocean floor and things like that, the visible oil will pretty much be dispersed within another quarter, ninety days," said Smith. Scientists do know that more than 600 miles (950 kilometres) of coastline has been oiled so far. They estimate that between 107 (m) million gallons (405 (m) million litres) and 184 (m) million gallons (700 (m) million litres) spewed into the Gulf before the cap stopped the flow. So far, officials say they have recovered 34.6 (m) million gallons (130 (m) million litres) of oily water using skimmer boats and burned about 11.1 (m) million gallons (42 (m) million litres) off the sea surface. The departure of Tony Hayward, outgoing CEO of BP which leased and operated TransOcean's Deepwater Horizon rig and at first led the cleanup effort before the US government stepped in, is welcome news to many along the Gulf who feel Hayward botched the response job from the beginning. On Tuesday, BP announced that an American, Bob Dudley, would take the helm of the oil and gas giant starting October 1st. Dudley is the first American CEO of BP, and the company's first hope at reinventing itself in the shadow of the spill. Tuesday, BP reported a record 17 (b) billion dollar quarterly loss. It was BP's ROV (remote operated vehicle) underwater cameras that gave the world a look at the disaster unfolding one mile below the surface of the ocean. For days and weeks on end, people stared at a streaming flow of dark brown oil that stumped industry and government experts alike, who were trying to figure out just how much was coming out - and how fast. While those cameras are still up and running, the images now seem clean by comparison, more blue, little to no brown. The images of soiled birds, endangered turtles, stained marshes, and tar-balled beaches are still fresh, and there may be more to come. But, in large part, over the first one hundred days, the vast majority of the oil has remained offshore, held up in skimmers, burned off into the air, tied up in subsurface plumes and dispersant, or it simply remains floating out there somewhere. Scientists say more than 770,000 gallons (2.9 (m) million litres) of chemical dispersant were used to break up the oil, and they worry the oil-dispersant mixture could contaminate the food chain and deplete oxygen. However, experts say there are also signs that the oil beneath the surface is biodegrading quickly. The next one hundred days will undoubtedly focus most on cleanup and well kill efforts as the region struggles to reach a new normal way of life. The hurricane season remains a looming, unpredictable threat, but the Gulf Coast can at least take solace in the fact that the oil's not flowing any more. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 07-28-10 0653EDT
+US Oil Well 3
AP-APTN-1830: +US Oil Well 3 Sunday, 19 September 2010 STORY:+US Oil Well 3- WRAP Blown-out BP well sealed once and for all, file, reax; ADDS thanksgiving LENGTH: 03:14 FIRST RUN: 1830 RESTRICTIONS: See Script TYPE: Eng/Nats SOURCE: VARIOUS STORY NUMBER: 658485 DATELINE: Various - 19 Sep 2010/ Recent/File LENGTH: 03:14 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY BP HANDOUT - AP CLIENTS ONLY POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE: Gulf of Mexico - 21 April 2010 1. Aerial shot of fire aboard oil rig (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE: Buras, Louisiana - 17 June 2010 2. Aerial shot of barges set up near oil-stained wetlands (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE: South of Venice, Louisiana - 7 June 2010 3. Close-up of oil in Gulf of Mexico, diver seen under water (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE: Barataria Bay, Louisiana - 5 June 2010 4. Close-up of pelican stuck in oil (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) BP Handout - AP Clients Only FILE: Gulf of Mexico - 15 July 2010 5. Underwater view of oil spewing from wellhead (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only FILE: Grand Isle, Louisiana - Recent 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Thad Allen, Incident Commander: "Frankly, this oil spill went beyond just physical damage. We were threatening people's way of life, how people have grown up, how they were raised, the watermen that operate down here, this is very traumatic to this area." (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Golden Meadow, Louisiana - Recent 7. Various of Toney Dardar's shrimp shop 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Toney Dardar, Shrimper: ++STARTS ON PREVIOUS SHOT++ "I'm still stumped, where is the oil to begin with, where is this? If it is mixed in the water where is it going to kill? I mean, what is it going to do?" (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Grand Isle, Louisiana - recent 9. Mid of Dr William Pinsky at his desk 10. Close up of hand on mouse 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr William Pinsky, Ochsner health centre: "I don't think we realised it was going to be that big. Certainly we expected some sort of effect but that is Katrina levels or more than Katrina levels." (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Bay Jimmy, Louisiana -16 September 2010 11. Various of clean up crew working out of boat cleaning oil from grasses in swamp 12. SOUNDBITE (English) PJ Hahn, coastal development director for Plaquemines Parish: "Yeah, it gets you really upset, it really pisses you off when you come out here and you hear people saying the oil has been picked up, it's over, the spill is finished. It's not finished. We still got a lot of oil left out out here to pick up." 13. Close of murky water (FIRST RUN 1630 EUROPE PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Gulf of Mexico - September 18 2010 14. Wide of DDIII vessel 15. Various of workers on DDIII vessel ++NEW (FIRST RUN 1830 NORTH AMERICA PRIME NEWS - 19 SEPTEMBER 2010) AP Television - AP Clients Only Port Sulphur, Louisiana - 19 September 2010 16. Various of church service 17. SOUNDBITE (English) Father Gerry Stapleton, Local Priest: "That was difficult for them, because many of them are working sixty-eighty hours a week and all of the sudden not to be able to go out there in the Gulf was, that was a bit of a shock to many, that was a bit of a shock to many." 18. Interior church shot of service 19. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Alexis, Shrimper: "I'm just worried about the long term, just see what it does long term in different areas, because the areas that got really affected, you know, not all areas got affected - so we just worried about areas that are affected, and see which direction it's going to go in." 20. Various of shrimpers and boats in harbour ++MUTE++ STORYLINE: The leaking Deepwater Horizon oil well was finally killed off on Sunday. A permanent cement plug sealed BP's well nearly 2.5 miles (4 kilometres) down in the Gulf of Mexico, five agonising months after an explosion sank a drilling rig and led to the worst offshore oil spill in US history. Retired Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, the federal government disaster supremo, described BP's well as 'effectively dead'. He said a pressure test to ensure the cement plug would hold was completed at 5:54 am (10:54 GMT). He said the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement has confirmed that the cementing operation was successful. "We can now state definitively that the Macondo Well poses no continuing threat to the Gulf of Mexico," Allen said. The gusher was contained in mid-July after a temporary cap was successfully fitted atop the well. Mud and cement were later pushed down through the top of the well, allowing the cap to be removed. But the well could not be declared dead until a relief well was drilled so that the ruptured well could be sealed from the bottom. The relief well intersected the blown-out well on Thursday, and crews started pumping in the cement on Friday. The explosion on board the rig on 20 April, 2010, killed 11 workers, and set loose 206 million gallons of oil (one (b) billion litres), causing an environmental and economic nightmare for people who live, work and play along the hundreds of miles of Gulf shoreline from Florida to Texas. It also started civil and criminal investigations and brought increased governmental scrutiny of the oil and gas industry, including a costly moratorium on deepwater offshore drilling that is still in place. Gulf residents will be feeling the pain for years to come. There is still plenty of oil in the water, and some continues to wash up on shore. Many people are still struggling to make ends meet with some fishing grounds still closed to fishing. Shrimpers who are allowed to fish are finding it difficult to sell their catch because of the perception that the seafood is not safe to eat and tourism along the Gulf has taken a hit. "I'm still stumped, where is the oil to begin with, where is this? If it is mixed in the water where is it going to kill? I mean what is it going to do?," Toney Dardar, a shrimper in Golden Meadow, Louisiana said. "I'm just worried about the long term, just see what it does long term in different areas," said Michael Alexis, another shrimper from Port Sulphur, Louisiana, who is worried about his livelihood. Many along the coast of Louisiana are also exasperated hearing that the oil has supposedly been cleaned up. "It really pisses you off when you come out here and you hear people saying the oil has been picked up, it's over, the spill is finished. It's not finished, we still have a lot of oil out here to pick up," PJ Hahn, coastal development director for Plaquemines Parish. And BP has its own clearing up job - the disaster has taken a toll on the once mighty oil giant. The British company's share price took a nosedive after the explosion, though it has recovered somewhat. It has already paid out more than eight (b) billion dollars in cleanup costs and promised to set aside another 20 (b) billion for a victims' compensation fund. And the company could face tens of (b) billions of dollars more in government fines and legal costs from hundreds of pending lawsuits. BP took some of the blame for the Gulf oil disaster in an internal report issued earlier this month, acknowledging among other things that its workers misinterpreted a key pressure test of the well. But in a possible preview of its legal strategy, it also pointed the finger at its partners on the doomed rig. BP was a majority owner of the well that blew out, and it was leasing the rig that exploded from owner Transocean Ltd. All AP Television video will be delivered in 16X9 from 10th November 2010. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 09-19-10 1521EDT
December 15, 2006 FULL TRANSCRIPT: PRES. GW BUSH PARTICIPATES IN CEREMONY FOR 2006 RECIPIENTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDALOF FREEDOM - STIX RS14/X85/Slugged: 0940 WH X85 (FULL LOG) THE PRESIDENT: Please be seated. Thank you all for coming. Welcome. Mr. Vice President, members of my Cabinet, Laura and I are please you could join us on this special occasion. We're delighted to welcome our distinguished honorees, as well as their families and friends to the White House. Thanks for coming. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is our nation's highest civil honor. The Medal recognizes high achievement in public service, science, the arts, education, athletics, and other fields. Today we honor 10 exceptional individuals who have gained great admiration and respect throughout our country. Norman Y. Mineta personifies the terms, public servant and patriot. He served as an Army intelligence officer, the mayor of San Jose, California, 10-term U.S. congressman, and a Cabinet member under Presidents of both parties. He was my Secretary of Transportation. No Secretary of Transportation ever served longer, or confronted greater challenges, than Norm Mineta. On September the 11th, 2001, he led the effort to bring thousands of commercial and private aircraft swiftly and safely to the ground. Norm was calm and he was decisive in a moment of emergency. He showed those same qualities in the months and years afterward, ably transforming his department to face the dangers of a new era. Norman Mineta's whole life has been an extraordinary journey. At the age of 10, he was sent with his mom and dad to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans. Such wrongful treatment could have left a person bitter, but not Norm Mineta. Instead he has given his country a lifetime of service, and he's given his fellow citizens an example of leadership, devotion to duty, and personal character. Mr. Secretary, you're a good friend and a great man, and our country honors you. (Applause.) With us today is Warren O'Neil, who will accept the Medal of Freedom on behalf of his brother, John Jordan "Buck" O'Neil. Buck O'Neil passed away in October, after a baseball career spanning more than seven decades. He joined the Negro League in 1938, as a first baseman for the Kansas City Monarchs. Buck O'Neil won two batting titles and played on nine championship teams, and as a manager, guided the Monarchs to four league titles. After finishing his playing career, Buck O'Neil joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout, and later as the first African American coach in the major leagues. He never did slow down. For the rest of his life, he was active in baseball -- not just from the stands or the dugout. In July of this year, he took a turn at bat in a minor-league All-Star game in Kansas City. They wisely pitched around him -- (laughter) -- he drew a walk -- at the age of 94 years old. (Laughter.) Buck O'Neil is also remembered as one of the game's best historians and ambassadors. He was the driving force behind the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum; he was proud to be its chairman. But he once said: "It never should have been, a Negro League. Shouldn't have been." Buck O'Neil lived long enough to see the game of baseball, and America, change for the better. He's one of the people we can thank for that. Buck O'Neil was a legend, and he was a beautiful human being. And we honor the memory of Buck O'Neil. (Applause.) One day in 1961, Ruth Colvin of Syracuse, New York, read a disturbing statistic in the morning newspaper. She learned that more than 11,000 people in her hometown could not read. Ruth wondered, "Why isn't somebody doing something about it?" Ruth decided that she would do something. Working out of her basement, she formed a network of citizens willing to donate their time as reading tutors. Before long, that network reached beyond Syracuse, and beyond New York -- and it had a name: Literacy Volunteers of America. Over the years, the volunteers have helped hundreds of thousands of adults learn the reading and language skills they need to build a better life. Ruth rightly says, "The ability to read and write is critical to personal freedom and the maintenance of a democratic society." Ruth's good influence has continued to grow. She travels the world promoting literacy with her husband and best friend, Bob. She started literacy campaigns on multiple continents. Ruth has also made many dear friends, including another great crusader for literacy -- my mother. (Laughter.) Ruth's children, Terry and Linda, know what I know -- that you better listen to your mother. (Laughter.) Ruth has said, "I am, and always have been, a volunteer." More than that, Ruth Colvin is a person of intelligence and vision and heart. And she has earned the gratitude of many, and the admiration of us all. Congratulations. (Applause.) Like Ruth, Dr. Norman C. Francis has dedicated his life to education. He achieved early distinction as the first African-American to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law. In 1968 he became president of his alma mater, Xavier University, in New Orleans, and he is today the longest-serving university president in the United States. Dr. Francis is known across Louisiana, and throughout our country, as a man of deep intellect and compassion and character. He's an Army veteran. He led the United Negro College Fund. He was chairman of the board of the Educational Testing Service, and he holds 35 honorary degrees. (Laughter.) Last year, after Hurricane Katrina did great damage to the Xavier campus, Dr. Francis vowed the university would overcome and reopen its doors by January -- and he kept that pledge. Dr. Francis continues to help the people of Southeast Louisiana as the leader of the Louisiana Recovery Authority. As they continue to rebuild from the devastation of the hurricanes, the people of the Pelican State will benefit from the leadership of this good man. And all of us admire the good life and remarkable career of Dr. Norman C. Francis. (Applause.) Joshua Lederberg has always seemed ahead of his time. He was researching genetics when the field was scarcely understood. He was studying the implications of space travel before there were astronauts. And even three decades ago, he was warning of the dangers of biological warfare. All of his life, people have seen something special in this rabbi's son from Montclair, New Jersey. Someone who knew him in college said, "You could tell that Joshua was in the lab because you could hear the breaking glass." (Laughter.) "He was so young, bursting with potential." He earned his Ph.D. in his early 20s. And at the age of 33, he won the Nobel Prize. Dr. Lederberg has remained at the top of the scientific field, as a professor, researcher, and writer. As a columnist, and advisor to many administrations, he brought clear, independent thinking and wisdom to matters of public policy -- especially in national security and nonproliferation. For his brilliant career, his high ethical standards, and his many contributions to our country, the United States thanks Dr. Joshua Lederberg. (Applause.) Americans first came to know Natan Sharansky as a voice for freedom inside an empire of tyranny. As a Jew applying to immigrate to Israel, he was refused and harassed by the Soviet regime. Natan Sharansky became a leading dissident and advocate for human rights, and after a show trial he was sentenced to a gulag for 10 years. The authorities may have hoped the world would forget the name Sharansky. Instead, leaders like President Reagan and Ambassador Kirkpatrick spoke often of his persecution, and the case of Natan Sharansky became a symbol of the moral emptiness of imperial communism. Today the Soviet Union is history, but the world still knows the name Sharansky. As a free man, he's become a political leader in Israel, winning four elections to the Knesset and serving more than eight years in the Cabinet. He remains, above all, an eloquent champion for liberty and democracy. Natan reminds us that every soul carries the desire to live in freedom, and that freedom has a unique power to lift up nations, transform regions, and secure a future for peace. Natan Sharansky is a witness to that power, and his testimony brings hope to those who still live under oppression. We honor Natan Sharansky for his life of courage and conviction. (Applause.) The struggle between freedom and tyranny has defined the past hundred years, and few have written of that struggle with greater skill than Paul Johnson. His book, Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Eighties, is a masterful account of the grievous harm visited on millions by ideologies of power and coercion. In all his writings, Paul Johnson shows great breadth of knowledge and moral clarity, and a deep understanding of the challenges of our time. He's written hundreds of articles and dozens of books, including The History of the Jews, The History of Christianity, The Quest for God, and The Birth of the Modern. Obviously, the man is not afraid to take on big subjects. (Laughter.) Eight years ago he published A History of the American People, which, Henry Kissinger said, was "as majestic... in scope as the country it celebrates." In the preface, Paul Johnson called Americans "the most remarkable people the world has ever seen." He said, "I love them and I salute them." That's a high tribute from a man of such learning and wisdom. And America returns the feeling. Our country honors Paul Johnson, and proudly calls him a friend. (Applause.) One of America's unique gifts to the world is a music called the blues. And in that music two names are paramount -- B.B. King, and his guitar, Lucille. (Laughter.) It has been said that when John Lennon was asked to name his great ambition, he said, "to play the guitar like B.B. King." Many musicians have had that same goal, but nobody has ever been able to match the skill, or copy the sound of The King of the Blues. He came up the hard way in the Deep South; living alone when he was nine years old; walking miles to school, and picking cotton for 35 cents a day. Barely out of his teens, he made his first trip to Memphis, Tennessee, with his guitar and $2.50 in his pocket. He made his name on Beale Street, and his studio recordings made him a national favorite. B.B. King has sold more than 40 million records. He won 14 Grammys. He has a place on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He's influenced generations of musicians from blues to rock, and he's performed in venues from roadside nightclubs to Carnegie Hall. He's still touring, and he's still recording, and he's still singing, and he's still playing the blues better than anybody else. In other words: The thrill is not gone. (Laughter.) America loves the music of B.B. King, and America loves the man, himself. Congratulations. (Applause.) William Safire joined the White House staff nearly 38 years ago, as a speechwriter to the President. President Nixon once introduced Bill this way: "This is Safire, absolutely trustworthy ... But watch what you say, he's a writer." (Laughter.) Writing has been at the center of Bill Safire's eventful life, going back to his days in the U.S. Army and as a PR man in New York. As a young speechwriter drafting remarks for a New York City official, he used the word "indomitable." When they asked Bill to find a better speech-word, he suggested "indefatigable." (Laughter.) They fired him. (Laughter.) We're a little more lenient about speechwriting here. (Laughter.) From the White House, Bill moved to The New York Times, where he spent more than 30 years as a columnist who was often skeptical about our government, but never cynical about our country. He always was committed to the cause of human freedom. His wit and style and command of English earned him another spot -- his own page in the Times Magazine every Sunday. Bill has said that his "On Language" column attracts more mail than any of his other work. People write me letters about language, too. (Laughter.) Bill Safire has also written novels and a respected political dictionary. He won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. He's a voice of independence and principle, and American journalism is better for the contributions of William Safire. Congratulations. (Applause.) David McCullough has won the Pulitzer Prize, twice -- for Truman and John Adams, two of the most successful biographies ever published. In person and on the printed page, David McCullough shares the lessons of history with enthusiasm and insight. He has written definitive works on the Johnstown Flood, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the digging of the Panama Canal. His first book came out nearly 40 years ago; all of his books are still in print. David McCullough is also, for millions of Americans, the voice of history, as the narrator of Ken Burns's The Civil War and other films. For those who question the importance of history, David likes to quote Harry Truman, who said, "The only thing new in the world is the history you do not know." David McCullough reminds us that "The laws we live by, the freedoms we enjoy, the institutions that we take for granted . are all the work of other people who went before us." He's a passionate man about our responsibility to know America's past, and to share it with every new generation. He's fulfilled that duty in his own career, with splendid results. This chronicler of other times is one of the eminent Americans of our own time. The nation owes a debt of gratitude to a fine author and a fine man, David McCullough. (Applause.) Now the military aide will read the citations for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. (The citations are read.) THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all for coming. Congratulations to our honorees. Laura and I would like to invite you to a reception here to pay tribute to some of the finest citizens the Almighty has ever produced. God bless you all. (Applause.)
December 15, 2006 FULL TRANSCRIPT: PRES. GW BUSH PARTICIPATES IN CEREMONY FOR 2006 RECIPIENTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDALOF FREEDOM - STIX RS14/X85/Slugged: 0940 WH X85 (FULL LOG) THE PRESIDENT: Please be seated. Thank you all for coming. Welcome. Mr. Vice President, members of my Cabinet, Laura and I are please you could join us on this special occasion. We're delighted to welcome our distinguished honorees, as well as their families and friends to the White House. Thanks for coming. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is our nation's highest civil honor. The Medal recognizes high achievement in public service, science, the arts, education, athletics, and other fields. Today we honor 10 exceptional individuals who have gained great admiration and respect throughout our country. Norman Y. Mineta personifies the terms, public servant and patriot. He served as an Army intelligence officer, the mayor of San Jose, California, 10-term U.S. congressman, and a Cabinet member under Presidents of both parties. He was my Secretary of Transportation. No Secretary of Transportation ever served longer, or confronted greater challenges, than Norm Mineta. On September the 11th, 2001, he led the effort to bring thousands of commercial and private aircraft swiftly and safely to the ground. Norm was calm and he was decisive in a moment of emergency. He showed those same qualities in the months and years afterward, ably transforming his department to face the dangers of a new era. Norman Mineta's whole life has been an extraordinary journey. At the age of 10, he was sent with his mom and dad to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans. Such wrongful treatment could have left a person bitter, but not Norm Mineta. Instead he has given his country a lifetime of service, and he's given his fellow citizens an example of leadership, devotion to duty, and personal character. Mr. Secretary, you're a good friend and a great man, and our country honors you. (Applause.) With us today is Warren O'Neil, who will accept the Medal of Freedom on behalf of his brother, John Jordan "Buck" O'Neil. Buck O'Neil passed away in October, after a baseball career spanning more than seven decades. He joined the Negro League in 1938, as a first baseman for the Kansas City Monarchs. Buck O'Neil won two batting titles and played on nine championship teams, and as a manager, guided the Monarchs to four league titles. After finishing his playing career, Buck O'Neil joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout, and later as the first African American coach in the major leagues. He never did slow down. For the rest of his life, he was active in baseball -- not just from the stands or the dugout. In July of this year, he took a turn at bat in a minor-league All-Star game in Kansas City. They wisely pitched around him -- (laughter) -- he drew a walk -- at the age of 94 years old. (Laughter.) Buck O'Neil is also remembered as one of the game's best historians and ambassadors. He was the driving force behind the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum; he was proud to be its chairman. But he once said: "It never should have been, a Negro League. Shouldn't have been." Buck O'Neil lived long enough to see the game of baseball, and America, change for the better. He's one of the people we can thank for that. Buck O'Neil was a legend, and he was a beautiful human being. And we honor the memory of Buck O'Neil. (Applause.) One day in 1961, Ruth Colvin of Syracuse, New York, read a disturbing statistic in the morning newspaper. She learned that more than 11,000 people in her hometown could not read. Ruth wondered, "Why isn't somebody doing something about it?" Ruth decided that she would do something. Working out of her basement, she formed a network of citizens willing to donate their time as reading tutors. Before long, that network reached beyond Syracuse, and beyond New York -- and it had a name: Literacy Volunteers of America. Over the years, the volunteers have helped hundreds of thousands of adults learn the reading and language skills they need to build a better life. Ruth rightly says, "The ability to read and write is critical to personal freedom and the maintenance of a democratic society." Ruth's good influence has continued to grow. She travels the world promoting literacy with her husband and best friend, Bob. She started literacy campaigns on multiple continents. Ruth has also made many dear friends, including another great crusader for literacy -- my mother. (Laughter.) Ruth's children, Terry and Linda, know what I know -- that you better listen to your mother. (Laughter.) Ruth has said, "I am, and always have been, a volunteer." More than that, Ruth Colvin is a person of intelligence and vision and heart. And she has earned the gratitude of many, and the admiration of us all. Congratulations. (Applause.) Like Ruth, Dr. Norman C. Francis has dedicated his life to education. He achieved early distinction as the first African-American to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law. In 1968 he became president of his alma mater, Xavier University, in New Orleans, and he is today the longest-serving university president in the United States. Dr. Francis is known across Louisiana, and throughout our country, as a man of deep intellect and compassion and character. He's an Army veteran. He led the United Negro College Fund. He was chairman of the board of the Educational Testing Service, and he holds 35 honorary degrees. (Laughter.) Last year, after Hurricane Katrina did great damage to the Xavier campus, Dr. Francis vowed the university would overcome and reopen its doors by January -- and he kept that pledge. Dr. Francis continues to help the people of Southeast Louisiana as the leader of the Louisiana Recovery Authority. As they continue to rebuild from the devastation of the hurricanes, the people of the Pelican State will benefit from the leadership of this good man. And all of us admire the good life and remarkable career of Dr. Norman C. Francis. (Applause.) Joshua Lederberg has always seemed ahead of his time. He was researching genetics when the field was scarcely understood. He was studying the implications of space travel before there were astronauts. And even three decades ago, he was warning of the dangers of biological warfare. All of his life, people have seen something special in this rabbi's son from Montclair, New Jersey. Someone who knew him in college said, "You could tell that Joshua was in the lab because you could hear the breaking glass." (Laughter.) "He was so young, bursting with potential." He earned his Ph.D. in his early 20s. And at the age of 33, he won the Nobel Prize. Dr. Lederberg has remained at the top of the scientific field, as a professor, researcher, and writer. As a columnist, and advisor to many administrations, he brought clear, independent thinking and wisdom to matters of public policy -- especially in national security and nonproliferation. For his brilliant career, his high ethical standards, and his many contributions to our country, the United States thanks Dr. Joshua Lederberg. (Applause.) Americans first came to know Natan Sharansky as a voice for freedom inside an empire of tyranny. As a Jew applying to immigrate to Israel, he was refused and harassed by the Soviet regime. Natan Sharansky became a leading dissident and advocate for human rights, and after a show trial he was sentenced to a gulag for 10 years. The authorities may have hoped the world would forget the name Sharansky. Instead, leaders like President Reagan and Ambassador Kirkpatrick spoke often of his persecution, and the case of Natan Sharansky became a symbol of the moral emptiness of imperial communism. Today the Soviet Union is history, but the world still knows the name Sharansky. As a free man, he's become a political leader in Israel, winning four elections to the Knesset and serving more than eight years in the Cabinet. He remains, above all, an eloquent champion for liberty and democracy. Natan reminds us that every soul carries the desire to live in freedom, and that freedom has a unique power to lift up nations, transform regions, and secure a future for peace. Natan Sharansky is a witness to that power, and his testimony brings hope to those who still live under oppression. We honor Natan Sharansky for his life of courage and conviction. (Applause.) The struggle between freedom and tyranny has defined the past hundred years, and few have written of that struggle with greater skill than Paul Johnson. His book, Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Eighties, is a masterful account of the grievous harm visited on millions by ideologies of power and coercion. In all his writings, Paul Johnson shows great breadth of knowledge and moral clarity, and a deep understanding of the challenges of our time. He's written hundreds of articles and dozens of books, including The History of the Jews, The History of Christianity, The Quest for God, and The Birth of the Modern. Obviously, the man is not afraid to take on big subjects. (Laughter.) Eight years ago he published A History of the American People, which, Henry Kissinger said, was "as majestic... in scope as the country it celebrates." In the preface, Paul Johnson called Americans "the most remarkable people the world has ever seen." He said, "I love them and I salute them." That's a high tribute from a man of such learning and wisdom. And America returns the feeling. Our country honors Paul Johnson, and proudly calls him a friend. (Applause.) One of America's unique gifts to the world is a music called the blues. And in that music two names are paramount -- B.B. King, and his guitar, Lucille. (Laughter.) It has been said that when John Lennon was asked to name his great ambition, he said, "to play the guitar like B.B. King." Many musicians have had that same goal, but nobody has ever been able to match the skill, or copy the sound of The King of the Blues. He came up the hard way in the Deep South; living alone when he was nine years old; walking miles to school, and picking cotton for 35 cents a day. Barely out of his teens, he made his first trip to Memphis, Tennessee, with his guitar and $2.50 in his pocket. He made his name on Beale Street, and his studio recordings made him a national favorite. B.B. King has sold more than 40 million records. He won 14 Grammys. He has a place on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He's influenced generations of musicians from blues to rock, and he's performed in venues from roadside nightclubs to Carnegie Hall. He's still touring, and he's still recording, and he's still singing, and he's still playing the blues better than anybody else. In other words: The thrill is not gone. (Laughter.) America loves the music of B.B. King, and America loves the man, himself. Congratulations. (Applause.) William Safire joined the White House staff nearly 38 years ago, as a speechwriter to the President. President Nixon once introduced Bill this way: "This is Safire, absolutely trustworthy ... But watch what you say, he's a writer." (Laughter.) Writing has been at the center of Bill Safire's eventful life, going back to his days in the U.S. Army and as a PR man in New York. As a young speechwriter drafting remarks for a New York City official, he used the word "indomitable." When they asked Bill to find a better speech-word, he suggested "indefatigable." (Laughter.) They fired him. (Laughter.) We're a little more lenient about speechwriting here. (Laughter.) From the White House, Bill moved to The New York Times, where he spent more than 30 years as a columnist who was often skeptical about our government, but never cynical about our country. He always was committed to the cause of human freedom. His wit and style and command of English earned him another spot -- his own page in the Times Magazine every Sunday. Bill has said that his "On Language" column attracts more mail than any of his other work. People write me letters about language, too. (Laughter.) Bill Safire has also written novels and a respected political dictionary. He won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. He's a voice of independence and principle, and American journalism is better for the contributions of William Safire. Congratulations. (Applause.) David McCullough has won the Pulitzer Prize, twice -- for Truman and John Adams, two of the most successful biographies ever published. In person and on the printed page, David McCullough shares the lessons of history with enthusiasm and insight. He has written definitive works on the Johnstown Flood, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the digging of the Panama Canal. His first book came out nearly 40 years ago; all of his books are still in print. David McCullough is also, for millions of Americans, the voice of history, as the narrator of Ken Burns's The Civil War and other films. For those who question the importance of history, David likes to quote Harry Truman, who said, "The only thing new in the world is the history you do not know." David McCullough reminds us that "The laws we live by, the freedoms we enjoy, the institutions that we take for granted . are all the work of other people who went before us." He's a passionate man about our responsibility to know America's past, and to share it with every new generation. He's fulfilled that duty in his own career, with splendid results. This chronicler of other times is one of the eminent Americans of our own time. The nation owes a debt of gratitude to a fine author and a fine man, David McCullough. (Applause.) Now the military aide will read the citations for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. (The citations are read.) THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all for coming. Congratulations to our honorees. Laura and I would like to invite you to a reception here to pay tribute to some of the finest citizens the Almighty has ever produced. God bless you all. (Applause.)
December 15, 2006 FULL TRANSCRIPT: PRES. GW BUSH PARTICIPATES IN CEREMONY FOR 2006 RECIPIENTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDALOF FREEDOM - STIX RS14/X85/Slugged: 0940 WH X85 (FULL LOG) THE PRESIDENT: Please be seated. Thank you all for coming. Welcome. Mr. Vice President, members of my Cabinet, Laura and I are please you could join us on this special occasion. We're delighted to welcome our distinguished honorees, as well as their families and friends to the White House. Thanks for coming. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is our nation's highest civil honor. The Medal recognizes high achievement in public service, science, the arts, education, athletics, and other fields. Today we honor 10 exceptional individuals who have gained great admiration and respect throughout our country. Norman Y. Mineta personifies the terms, public servant and patriot. He served as an Army intelligence officer, the mayor of San Jose, California, 10-term U.S. congressman, and a Cabinet member under Presidents of both parties. He was my Secretary of Transportation. No Secretary of Transportation ever served longer, or confronted greater challenges, than Norm Mineta. On September the 11th, 2001, he led the effort to bring thousands of commercial and private aircraft swiftly and safely to the ground. Norm was calm and he was decisive in a moment of emergency. He showed those same qualities in the months and years afterward, ably transforming his department to face the dangers of a new era. Norman Mineta's whole life has been an extraordinary journey. At the age of 10, he was sent with his mom and dad to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans. Such wrongful treatment could have left a person bitter, but not Norm Mineta. Instead he has given his country a lifetime of service, and he's given his fellow citizens an example of leadership, devotion to duty, and personal character. Mr. Secretary, you're a good friend and a great man, and our country honors you. (Applause.) With us today is Warren O'Neil, who will accept the Medal of Freedom on behalf of his brother, John Jordan "Buck" O'Neil. Buck O'Neil passed away in October, after a baseball career spanning more than seven decades. He joined the Negro League in 1938, as a first baseman for the Kansas City Monarchs. Buck O'Neil won two batting titles and played on nine championship teams, and as a manager, guided the Monarchs to four league titles. After finishing his playing career, Buck O'Neil joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout, and later as the first African American coach in the major leagues. He never did slow down. For the rest of his life, he was active in baseball -- not just from the stands or the dugout. In July of this year, he took a turn at bat in a minor-league All-Star game in Kansas City. They wisely pitched around him -- (laughter) -- he drew a walk -- at the age of 94 years old. (Laughter.) Buck O'Neil is also remembered as one of the game's best historians and ambassadors. He was the driving force behind the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum; he was proud to be its chairman. But he once said: "It never should have been, a Negro League. Shouldn't have been." Buck O'Neil lived long enough to see the game of baseball, and America, change for the better. He's one of the people we can thank for that. Buck O'Neil was a legend, and he was a beautiful human being. And we honor the memory of Buck O'Neil. (Applause.) One day in 1961, Ruth Colvin of Syracuse, New York, read a disturbing statistic in the morning newspaper. She learned that more than 11,000 people in her hometown could not read. Ruth wondered, "Why isn't somebody doing something about it?" Ruth decided that she would do something. Working out of her basement, she formed a network of citizens willing to donate their time as reading tutors. Before long, that network reached beyond Syracuse, and beyond New York -- and it had a name: Literacy Volunteers of America. Over the years, the volunteers have helped hundreds of thousands of adults learn the reading and language skills they need to build a better life. Ruth rightly says, "The ability to read and write is critical to personal freedom and the maintenance of a democratic society." Ruth's good influence has continued to grow. She travels the world promoting literacy with her husband and best friend, Bob. She started literacy campaigns on multiple continents. Ruth has also made many dear friends, including another great crusader for literacy -- my mother. (Laughter.) Ruth's children, Terry and Linda, know what I know -- that you better listen to your mother. (Laughter.) Ruth has said, "I am, and always have been, a volunteer." More than that, Ruth Colvin is a person of intelligence and vision and heart. And she has earned the gratitude of many, and the admiration of us all. Congratulations. (Applause.) Like Ruth, Dr. Norman C. Francis has dedicated his life to education. He achieved early distinction as the first African-American to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law. In 1968 he became president of his alma mater, Xavier University, in New Orleans, and he is today the longest-serving university president in the United States. Dr. Francis is known across Louisiana, and throughout our country, as a man of deep intellect and compassion and character. He's an Army veteran. He led the United Negro College Fund. He was chairman of the board of the Educational Testing Service, and he holds 35 honorary degrees. (Laughter.) Last year, after Hurricane Katrina did great damage to the Xavier campus, Dr. Francis vowed the university would overcome and reopen its doors by January -- and he kept that pledge. Dr. Francis continues to help the people of Southeast Louisiana as the leader of the Louisiana Recovery Authority. As they continue to rebuild from the devastation of the hurricanes, the people of the Pelican State will benefit from the leadership of this good man. And all of us admire the good life and remarkable career of Dr. Norman C. Francis. (Applause.) Joshua Lederberg has always seemed ahead of his time. He was researching genetics when the field was scarcely understood. He was studying the implications of space travel before there were astronauts. And even three decades ago, he was warning of the dangers of biological warfare. All of his life, people have seen something special in this rabbi's son from Montclair, New Jersey. Someone who knew him in college said, "You could tell that Joshua was in the lab because you could hear the breaking glass." (Laughter.) "He was so young, bursting with potential." He earned his Ph.D. in his early 20s. And at the age of 33, he won the Nobel Prize. Dr. Lederberg has remained at the top of the scientific field, as a professor, researcher, and writer. As a columnist, and advisor to many administrations, he brought clear, independent thinking and wisdom to matters of public policy -- especially in national security and nonproliferation. For his brilliant career, his high ethical standards, and his many contributions to our country, the United States thanks Dr. Joshua Lederberg. (Applause.) Americans first came to know Natan Sharansky as a voice for freedom inside an empire of tyranny. As a Jew applying to immigrate to Israel, he was refused and harassed by the Soviet regime. Natan Sharansky became a leading dissident and advocate for human rights, and after a show trial he was sentenced to a gulag for 10 years. The authorities may have hoped the world would forget the name Sharansky. Instead, leaders like President Reagan and Ambassador Kirkpatrick spoke often of his persecution, and the case of Natan Sharansky became a symbol of the moral emptiness of imperial communism. Today the Soviet Union is history, but the world still knows the name Sharansky. As a free man, he's become a political leader in Israel, winning four elections to the Knesset and serving more than eight years in the Cabinet. He remains, above all, an eloquent champion for liberty and democracy. Natan reminds us that every soul carries the desire to live in freedom, and that freedom has a unique power to lift up nations, transform regions, and secure a future for peace. Natan Sharansky is a witness to that power, and his testimony brings hope to those who still live under oppression. We honor Natan Sharansky for his life of courage and conviction. (Applause.) The struggle between freedom and tyranny has defined the past hundred years, and few have written of that struggle with greater skill than Paul Johnson. His book, Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Eighties, is a masterful account of the grievous harm visited on millions by ideologies of power and coercion. In all his writings, Paul Johnson shows great breadth of knowledge and moral clarity, and a deep understanding of the challenges of our time. He's written hundreds of articles and dozens of books, including The History of the Jews, The History of Christianity, The Quest for God, and The Birth of the Modern. Obviously, the man is not afraid to take on big subjects. (Laughter.) Eight years ago he published A History of the American People, which, Henry Kissinger said, was "as majestic... in scope as the country it celebrates." In the preface, Paul Johnson called Americans "the most remarkable people the world has ever seen." He said, "I love them and I salute them." That's a high tribute from a man of such learning and wisdom. And America returns the feeling. Our country honors Paul Johnson, and proudly calls him a friend. (Applause.) One of America's unique gifts to the world is a music called the blues. And in that music two names are paramount -- B.B. King, and his guitar, Lucille. (Laughter.) It has been said that when John Lennon was asked to name his great ambition, he said, "to play the guitar like B.B. King." Many musicians have had that same goal, but nobody has ever been able to match the skill, or copy the sound of The King of the Blues. He came up the hard way in the Deep South; living alone when he was nine years old; walking miles to school, and picking cotton for 35 cents a day. Barely out of his teens, he made his first trip to Memphis, Tennessee, with his guitar and $2.50 in his pocket. He made his name on Beale Street, and his studio recordings made him a national favorite. B.B. King has sold more than 40 million records. He won 14 Grammys. He has a place on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He's influenced generations of musicians from blues to rock, and he's performed in venues from roadside nightclubs to Carnegie Hall. He's still touring, and he's still recording, and he's still singing, and he's still playing the blues better than anybody else. In other words: The thrill is not gone. (Laughter.) America loves the music of B.B. King, and America loves the man, himself. Congratulations. (Applause.) William Safire joined the White House staff nearly 38 years ago, as a speechwriter to the President. President Nixon once introduced Bill this way: "This is Safire, absolutely trustworthy ... But watch what you say, he's a writer." (Laughter.) Writing has been at the center of Bill Safire's eventful life, going back to his days in the U.S. Army and as a PR man in New York. As a young speechwriter drafting remarks for a New York City official, he used the word "indomitable." When they asked Bill to find a better speech-word, he suggested "indefatigable." (Laughter.) They fired him. (Laughter.) We're a little more lenient about speechwriting here. (Laughter.) From the White House, Bill moved to The New York Times, where he spent more than 30 years as a columnist who was often skeptical about our government, but never cynical about our country. He always was committed to the cause of human freedom. His wit and style and command of English earned him another spot -- his own page in the Times Magazine every Sunday. Bill has said that his "On Language" column attracts more mail than any of his other work. People write me letters about language, too. (Laughter.) Bill Safire has also written novels and a respected political dictionary. He won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. He's a voice of independence and principle, and American journalism is better for the contributions of William Safire. Congratulations. (Applause.) David McCullough has won the Pulitzer Prize, twice -- for Truman and John Adams, two of the most successful biographies ever published. In person and on the printed page, David McCullough shares the lessons of history with enthusiasm and insight. He has written definitive works on the Johnstown Flood, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the digging of the Panama Canal. His first book came out nearly 40 years ago; all of his books are still in print. David McCullough is also, for millions of Americans, the voice of history, as the narrator of Ken Burns's The Civil War and other films. For those who question the importance of history, David likes to quote Harry Truman, who said, "The only thing new in the world is the history you do not know." David McCullough reminds us that "The laws we live by, the freedoms we enjoy, the institutions that we take for granted . are all the work of other people who went before us." He's a passionate man about our responsibility to know America's past, and to share it with every new generation. He's fulfilled that duty in his own career, with splendid results. This chronicler of other times is one of the eminent Americans of our own time. The nation owes a debt of gratitude to a fine author and a fine man, David McCullough. (Applause.) Now the military aide will read the citations for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. (The citations are read.) THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all for coming. Congratulations to our honorees. Laura and I would like to invite you to a reception here to pay tribute to some of the finest citizens the Almighty has ever produced. God bless you all. (Applause.)
December 15, 2006 FULL TRANSCRIPT: PRES. GW BUSH PARTICIPATES IN CEREMONY FOR 2006 RECIPIENTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDALOF FREEDOM - STIX RS14/X85/Slugged: 0940 WH X85 (FULL LOG) THE PRESIDENT: Please be seated. Thank you all for coming. Welcome. Mr. Vice President, members of my Cabinet, Laura and I are please you could join us on this special occasion. We're delighted to welcome our distinguished honorees, as well as their families and friends to the White House. Thanks for coming. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is our nation's highest civil honor. The Medal recognizes high achievement in public service, science, the arts, education, athletics, and other fields. Today we honor 10 exceptional individuals who have gained great admiration and respect throughout our country. Norman Y. Mineta personifies the terms, public servant and patriot. He served as an Army intelligence officer, the mayor of San Jose, California, 10-term U.S. congressman, and a Cabinet member under Presidents of both parties. He was my Secretary of Transportation. No Secretary of Transportation ever served longer, or confronted greater challenges, than Norm Mineta. On September the 11th, 2001, he led the effort to bring thousands of commercial and private aircraft swiftly and safely to the ground. Norm was calm and he was decisive in a moment of emergency. He showed those same qualities in the months and years afterward, ably transforming his department to face the dangers of a new era. Norman Mineta's whole life has been an extraordinary journey. At the age of 10, he was sent with his mom and dad to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans. Such wrongful treatment could have left a person bitter, but not Norm Mineta. Instead he has given his country a lifetime of service, and he's given his fellow citizens an example of leadership, devotion to duty, and personal character. Mr. Secretary, you're a good friend and a great man, and our country honors you. (Applause.) With us today is Warren O'Neil, who will accept the Medal of Freedom on behalf of his brother, John Jordan "Buck" O'Neil. Buck O'Neil passed away in October, after a baseball career spanning more than seven decades. He joined the Negro League in 1938, as a first baseman for the Kansas City Monarchs. Buck O'Neil won two batting titles and played on nine championship teams, and as a manager, guided the Monarchs to four league titles. After finishing his playing career, Buck O'Neil joined the Chicago Cubs as a scout, and later as the first African American coach in the major leagues. He never did slow down. For the rest of his life, he was active in baseball -- not just from the stands or the dugout. In July of this year, he took a turn at bat in a minor-league All-Star game in Kansas City. They wisely pitched around him -- (laughter) -- he drew a walk -- at the age of 94 years old. (Laughter.) Buck O'Neil is also remembered as one of the game's best historians and ambassadors. He was the driving force behind the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum; he was proud to be its chairman. But he once said: "It never should have been, a Negro League. Shouldn't have been." Buck O'Neil lived long enough to see the game of baseball, and America, change for the better. He's one of the people we can thank for that. Buck O'Neil was a legend, and he was a beautiful human being. And we honor the memory of Buck O'Neil. (Applause.) One day in 1961, Ruth Colvin of Syracuse, New York, read a disturbing statistic in the morning newspaper. She learned that more than 11,000 people in her hometown could not read. Ruth wondered, "Why isn't somebody doing something about it?" Ruth decided that she would do something. Working out of her basement, she formed a network of citizens willing to donate their time as reading tutors. Before long, that network reached beyond Syracuse, and beyond New York -- and it had a name: Literacy Volunteers of America. Over the years, the volunteers have helped hundreds of thousands of adults learn the reading and language skills they need to build a better life. Ruth rightly says, "The ability to read and write is critical to personal freedom and the maintenance of a democratic society." Ruth's good influence has continued to grow. She travels the world promoting literacy with her husband and best friend, Bob. She started literacy campaigns on multiple continents. Ruth has also made many dear friends, including another great crusader for literacy -- my mother. (Laughter.) Ruth's children, Terry and Linda, know what I know -- that you better listen to your mother. (Laughter.) Ruth has said, "I am, and always have been, a volunteer." More than that, Ruth Colvin is a person of intelligence and vision and heart. And she has earned the gratitude of many, and the admiration of us all. Congratulations. (Applause.) Like Ruth, Dr. Norman C. Francis has dedicated his life to education. He achieved early distinction as the first African-American to graduate from the Loyola University College of Law. In 1968 he became president of his alma mater, Xavier University, in New Orleans, and he is today the longest-serving university president in the United States. Dr. Francis is known across Louisiana, and throughout our country, as a man of deep intellect and compassion and character. He's an Army veteran. He led the United Negro College Fund. He was chairman of the board of the Educational Testing Service, and he holds 35 honorary degrees. (Laughter.) Last year, after Hurricane Katrina did great damage to the Xavier campus, Dr. Francis vowed the university would overcome and reopen its doors by January -- and he kept that pledge. Dr. Francis continues to help the people of Southeast Louisiana as the leader of the Louisiana Recovery Authority. As they continue to rebuild from the devastation of the hurricanes, the people of the Pelican State will benefit from the leadership of this good man. And all of us admire the good life and remarkable career of Dr. Norman C. Francis. (Applause.) Joshua Lederberg has always seemed ahead of his time. He was researching genetics when the field was scarcely understood. He was studying the implications of space travel before there were astronauts. And even three decades ago, he was warning of the dangers of biological warfare. All of his life, people have seen something special in this rabbi's son from Montclair, New Jersey. Someone who knew him in college said, "You could tell that Joshua was in the lab because you could hear the breaking glass." (Laughter.) "He was so young, bursting with potential." He earned his Ph.D. in his early 20s. And at the age of 33, he won the Nobel Prize. Dr. Lederberg has remained at the top of the scientific field, as a professor, researcher, and writer. As a columnist, and advisor to many administrations, he brought clear, independent thinking and wisdom to matters of public policy -- especially in national security and nonproliferation. For his brilliant career, his high ethical standards, and his many contributions to our country, the United States thanks Dr. Joshua Lederberg. (Applause.) Americans first came to know Natan Sharansky as a voice for freedom inside an empire of tyranny. As a Jew applying to immigrate to Israel, he was refused and harassed by the Soviet regime. Natan Sharansky became a leading dissident and advocate for human rights, and after a show trial he was sentenced to a gulag for 10 years. The authorities may have hoped the world would forget the name Sharansky. Instead, leaders like President Reagan and Ambassador Kirkpatrick spoke often of his persecution, and the case of Natan Sharansky became a symbol of the moral emptiness of imperial communism. Today the Soviet Union is history, but the world still knows the name Sharansky. As a free man, he's become a political leader in Israel, winning four elections to the Knesset and serving more than eight years in the Cabinet. He remains, above all, an eloquent champion for liberty and democracy. Natan reminds us that every soul carries the desire to live in freedom, and that freedom has a unique power to lift up nations, transform regions, and secure a future for peace. Natan Sharansky is a witness to that power, and his testimony brings hope to those who still live under oppression. We honor Natan Sharansky for his life of courage and conviction. (Applause.) The struggle between freedom and tyranny has defined the past hundred years, and few have written of that struggle with greater skill than Paul Johnson. His book, Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Eighties, is a masterful account of the grievous harm visited on millions by ideologies of power and coercion. In all his writings, Paul Johnson shows great breadth of knowledge and moral clarity, and a deep understanding of the challenges of our time. He's written hundreds of articles and dozens of books, including The History of the Jews, The History of Christianity, The Quest for God, and The Birth of the Modern. Obviously, the man is not afraid to take on big subjects. (Laughter.) Eight years ago he published A History of the American People, which, Henry Kissinger said, was "as majestic... in scope as the country it celebrates." In the preface, Paul Johnson called Americans "the most remarkable people the world has ever seen." He said, "I love them and I salute them." That's a high tribute from a man of such learning and wisdom. And America returns the feeling. Our country honors Paul Johnson, and proudly calls him a friend. (Applause.) One of America's unique gifts to the world is a music called the blues. And in that music two names are paramount -- B.B. King, and his guitar, Lucille. (Laughter.) It has been said that when John Lennon was asked to name his great ambition, he said, "to play the guitar like B.B. King." Many musicians have had that same goal, but nobody has ever been able to match the skill, or copy the sound of The King of the Blues. He came up the hard way in the Deep South; living alone when he was nine years old; walking miles to school, and picking cotton for 35 cents a day. Barely out of his teens, he made his first trip to Memphis, Tennessee, with his guitar and $2.50 in his pocket. He made his name on Beale Street, and his studio recordings made him a national favorite. B.B. King has sold more than 40 million records. He won 14 Grammys. He has a place on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He's influenced generations of musicians from blues to rock, and he's performed in venues from roadside nightclubs to Carnegie Hall. He's still touring, and he's still recording, and he's still singing, and he's still playing the blues better than anybody else. In other words: The thrill is not gone. (Laughter.) America loves the music of B.B. King, and America loves the man, himself. Congratulations. (Applause.) William Safire joined the White House staff nearly 38 years ago, as a speechwriter to the President. President Nixon once introduced Bill this way: "This is Safire, absolutely trustworthy ... But watch what you say, he's a writer." (Laughter.) Writing has been at the center of Bill Safire's eventful life, going back to his days in the U.S. Army and as a PR man in New York. As a young speechwriter drafting remarks for a New York City official, he used the word "indomitable." When they asked Bill to find a better speech-word, he suggested "indefatigable." (Laughter.) They fired him. (Laughter.) We're a little more lenient about speechwriting here. (Laughter.) From the White House, Bill moved to The New York Times, where he spent more than 30 years as a columnist who was often skeptical about our government, but never cynical about our country. He always was committed to the cause of human freedom. His wit and style and command of English earned him another spot -- his own page in the Times Magazine every Sunday. Bill has said that his "On Language" column attracts more mail than any of his other work. People write me letters about language, too. (Laughter.) Bill Safire has also written novels and a respected political dictionary. He won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. He's a voice of independence and principle, and American journalism is better for the contributions of William Safire. Congratulations. (Applause.) David McCullough has won the Pulitzer Prize, twice -- for Truman and John Adams, two of the most successful biographies ever published. In person and on the printed page, David McCullough shares the lessons of history with enthusiasm and insight. He has written definitive works on the Johnstown Flood, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the digging of the Panama Canal. His first book came out nearly 40 years ago; all of his books are still in print. David McCullough is also, for millions of Americans, the voice of history, as the narrator of Ken Burns's The Civil War and other films. For those who question the importance of history, David likes to quote Harry Truman, who said, "The only thing new in the world is the history you do not know." David McCullough reminds us that "The laws we live by, the freedoms we enjoy, the institutions that we take for granted . are all the work of other people who went before us." He's a passionate man about our responsibility to know America's past, and to share it with every new generation. He's fulfilled that duty in his own career, with splendid results. This chronicler of other times is one of the eminent Americans of our own time. The nation owes a debt of gratitude to a fine author and a fine man, David McCullough. (Applause.) Now the military aide will read the citations for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. (The citations are read.) THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all for coming. Congratulations to our honorees. Laura and I would like to invite you to a reception here to pay tribute to some of the finest citizens the Almighty has ever produced. God bless you all. (Applause.)