ELECTION AIRCHECKS 1984 12:00-1:00AM
POLITICS
1964 REPUBLICAN CONVENTION ROLL CALL. GOVERNOR RONALD REAGAN. ELECTRONIC BOARD WITH CONVENTION RESULTS. REPUBLICAN NOMINEES FOR PRESIDENT. GOLDWATER WINNING BY LARGE VICTORY. YOUNG REPUBLICAN LICKS HIS LIPS, NERVOUS APPREHENSION OF ELECTION OUTCOME. GOLDWATER SUPPORTERS CHEER.
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN AT FORT MYER (1986)
B-ROLL OF PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN’S WEEKLY RADIO ADDRESS BROADCAST FROM FORT MYER. REAGAN TRANSCRIPT: “My fellow Americans: We're broadcasting live today from Fort Myer, a military installation just outside Washington. And before me at this moment, looking tall and impressive, are members of the honor guard of the five branches of the military service: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard. These proud units appear at special ceremonies and are always on hand to help me greet foreign heads of state at the White House. And believe me, the leaders of other nations have often commented on the snap, the polish, and the soldierly bearing of these troops. In fact, I sometimes think a few of our visitors are a little envious of ``The Gipper,'' as our uniformed sons and daughters pass by in review. Well, okay, in my case, our uniformed grandsons and granddaughters. [Laughter] But today we're all on hand at Fort Myer to celebrate a very special date in America's official calendar: Armed Forces Day. Today we set aside a few moments to pay tribute to the millions of Americans serving their nation in the cause of freedom all over the globe. Many of them are listening to me now, and as Commander in Chief I want to remind each of you in uniform how grateful your country is to you. Let me assure you that the millions of Americans going about their usual Saturday schedule and listening now join me in saying to you, ``Thanks -- thanks for being there, for keeping our homes and children safe, for keeping America free and at peace.'' Now, I know you here with me and most members of the armed services listening at the moment aren't in your dress uniforms, and maybe -- and I'm sure it only happens every now and then -- your shoeshines aren't quite as bright as the ones I'm looking at here. But I know the sense of military professionalism, love of country, and commitment to freedom is just as strong. It's because of that patriotism and professionalism that you've left your homes and communities to become part of an extraordinary military tradition. Unlike so many other traditions, America's military history has been largely one not just of great battlefield victories but victories in the name of something beyond conquest or self-interest. Here in America we've been fortunate to be the keeper and custodian of a dream -- a dream that began this nation, a dream that millions of people hope to share in someday. And every member of America's Armed Forces has a special part in keeping that dream alive. The dream, of course, is freedom, and truly those of you in uniform today are freedom's honor guard. The new patriotism that's alive in our nation today is reflected in these young people joining our military services. They're better educated, better trained, and as highly motivated as any time in our history. These young Americans look to a future they know will be free as long as America remains strong and her people resolute. But this revitalization of our military was a long time coming, the result of a lengthy legislative battle here in Washington. Time after time in the postwar era, the American people have made it clear that those who trifle with our national security and oppose adequate military budgets will be held responsible on election day. And it's this kind of support from the American people that got a consistently reluctant Congress to vote the appropriations necessary to rebuild America's defenses. But old habits die hard, and much of what we've achieved is now in jeopardy. As one Congressman described the inconsistency, ``We are marching down the mountain we have been marching up.'' You see, the House of Representatives recently passed a military budget that is wholly inadequate, a throwback to the seventies, a budget that is a breach of faith with our Armed Forces and our allies and would send exactly the wrong signal to the Soviets and their satellites. So, today I not only want to ask every American to join me in saluting our young Americans in uniform, I want to reiterate that the best way to ensure their lives are never placed in jeopardy is to send a message to Washington and to the world, a message that says the American people are committed to national defense and that we stand behind those who wear our country's uniform. We owe a great debt to those on freedom's first line of defense -- men like Captain Lorence and Captain Ribas-Dominicci, Air Force pilots who recently lost their lives in the raid on Libyan terrorists. We honor them today and all the members of freedom's honor guard. And we say thank you to you, our Armed Forces, and pledge our support for adequate military expenditures, a strong defense, and the dream of world freedom and peace. Until next week, thanks for listening, and God bless you.”
Reporters: [show of 29 October 2016]
France 24
News Clip: Mattox
Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 6:30 A.M.
RONALD REAGAN / NICARAGUA ELECTION REACTION
INTV/W FORMER PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN ABOUT THE ELECTION IN NICARAGUA. 15:57:40:00 INTV/W REAGAN. HE SAYS HE IS PLEASED WITH THE RESULTS OF THE ELECTION. HE SAYS THE US SHOULD NOW HELP REBUILD NICARAGUA. 16:03:57:00 REVERSAL. 16:04:32:00 COVERAGE OF A SOCCER GAME. CI: PERSONALITIES: REAGAN, RONALD.
DN-LB-642 Beta SP
DOCUMENTARIES & NEWSREELS
LE 20H: [broadcast of December 17, 2012]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN AND BURNLEY NOMINATION (1987)
B-ROLL OF PRESIDENT REAGAN WITH JAMES BURNLEY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NOMINEE IN THE ROSE GARDEN OF THE WHITE HOUSE. TRANSCRIPT: The President. I'm delighted to announce today my nominee for the post of Secretary of Transportation, James Burnley. Jim came to Washington in 1981, where he first served as Director of VISTA and then went to the Justice Department as an Associate Deputy Attorney General. He then moved over to Transportation where he served first as General Counsel and then Deputy Secretary. Now, obviously, this sort of upward mobility represents a remarkable Washington success story. In just a few short years, Jim has moved from being a prominent North Carolina trial lawyer to a United States Cabinet nominee, and there's certainly a reason for this success. Jim's had a longtime interest in and solid grasp of public policy. Since his days in the Yale University Political Union -- where, by the way, he reminds me he had to listen to a speech from a certain newly elected Governor of California -- [laughter] -- Jim has shown not just sound political instincts -- he also belonged to the Conservative Party in the Union -- but a desire to enter public service and influence our national life. Add to his grasp of public policy his personal integrity and easy manner, and you can understand how he earned his reputation as both a sound policymaker and excellent administrator. I'm also delighted to tell you today that Mimi Dawson is our nominee for Deputy Secretary of Transportation. Mimi, too, brings considerable experience and is a remarkable success story. She worked on the Hill for 11 years. Before leaving, she worked closely on the agenda for the Senate Commerce Committee, which as you know has responsibility for transportation. Since 1981 Mimi has been a member of the FCC, where she's been a leading expert on common carrier issues, particularly deregulation of the telecommunications marketplace, including the economic effect of mergers and acquisitions. And Jim, I'm sure you feel fortunate, as do I, to have an individual with Mimi's wide-ranging background and solid accomplishments as second in command at DOT. I know that Jim and Mimi will push ahead even further on such critical issues as airline safety, privatization of public transportation, space commercialization and industry, and general transportation safety. And that list represents a tall order for both of them. But with the continued help of all of you here, I have no doubt that together we will prevail. Jim, you're on. Mr. Burnley. Mr. President, I'm deeply honored by your decision to nominate me to serve as the next Secretary of Transportation, and I am also very pleased that you will simultaneously be submitting Mimi Dawson's nomination to replace me as Deputy Secretary. The only constant in transportation in recent years has been the rate of very rapid change. Twenty percent of our gross national product is generated by transportation, and our expanding economy depends on continuing dynamic growth in our transportation industries. Thus, even with the progress that the administration and Congress have made in the last 6 years, we still face many transportation challenges in this country. We have a very strong team at the Department and a solid foundation as a result of the farsighted leadership of your former Secretaries, Elizabeth Dole and Drew Lewis. And I'm looking forward to the opportunity to consult and work cooperatively with both the Congress and the transportation community to ensure the safest, most efficient transportation system possible. Ms. Dawson. Thank you, Jim. Thank you, Mr. President. I would like to say how deeply honored I have been over the last 6 years to serve you as a member of the Federal Communications Commission. We have dealt with a lot of very difficult issues there, and I think they helped me to be able to offer to Jim Burnley an opportunity to bring him a great deal of help in the many serious, challenging issues which face us at the Department of Transportation. I look forward to this challenge, and I'll look forward to working with many of you and, of course, with Members of Congress and, most of all, my new boss. Thank you.
GIULANI/REAGAN
00:00:00:15 SOT Rudy Giuliani: Ronald Reagan was a leader, which is a combination of being a visionary and a practical person who can achieve results. (0:11) /
RONALD REAGAN NEWS CONFERENCE
BARS. CUTAWAYS. VS OF A PRESS CONFERENCE W/ RONALD REAGAN. GOVERNOR REAGAN COMMENTS ON THE RESULTS OF THE RECENT MID TERM ELECTIONS. HE SAYS THE ELECTIONS WILL BODE WELL FOR THE REPUBLICAN PARTY. HE SAYS HE HAS NOT CLOSED THE DOOR ON A 1980 PRESIDENTIAL BID. HE SAYS THE US SHOULD DEVISE A MASTER PLAN TO COUNTER THE MASTER PLANS FOR COMMUNIST NATIONS. REAGAN COMMENTS ON ECONOMIC ISSUES. HE SAYS THE CARTER ADMINISTRATION'S ECONOMIC PROGRAM WILL NOT WORK. HE CALLS FOR REDUCED GOVERNMENT SPENDING. HE DISCUSSES THE REEMERGENCE OF RICHARD NIXON. HE NOTES THE ECONOMIC EXPANSION IN JAPAN OVER THE LAST 20 YEARS. CUTAWAYS. CI: PERSONALITIES: CARTER, JIMMY (ABOUT). PERSONALITIES: NIXON, RICHARD (ABOUT). PERSONALITIES: REAGAN, RONALD.
ELECTION AIRCHECKS 1984 7:00-8:00PM
NEW TRANSPORTATION SECRETARY (1987)
B-ROLL OF PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN AND THE NEW TRANSPORTATION SECRETARY, JAMES BURNLEY, IN THE ROSE GARDEN. TRANSCRIPT: The President. I'm delighted to announce today my nominee for the post of Secretary of Transportation, James Burnley. Jim came to Washington in 1981, where he first served as Director of VISTA and then went to the Justice Department as an Associate Deputy Attorney General. He then moved over to Transportation where he served first as General Counsel and then Deputy Secretary. Now, obviously, this sort of upward mobility represents a remarkable Washington success story. In just a few short years, Jim has moved from being a prominent North Carolina trial lawyer to a United States Cabinet nominee, and there's certainly a reason for this success. Jim's had a longtime interest in and solid grasp of public policy. Since his days in the Yale University Political Union -- where, by the way, he reminds me he had to listen to a speech from a certain newly elected Governor of California -- [laughter] -- Jim has shown not just sound political instincts -- he also belonged to the Conservative Party in the Union -- but a desire to enter public service and influence our national life. Add to his grasp of public policy his personal integrity and easy manner, and you can understand how he earned his reputation as both a sound policymaker and excellent administrator. I'm also delighted to tell you today that Mimi Dawson is our nominee for Deputy Secretary of Transportation. Mimi, too, brings considerable experience and is a remarkable success story. She worked on the Hill for 11 years. Before leaving, she worked closely on the agenda for the Senate Commerce Committee, which as you know has responsibility for transportation. Since 1981 Mimi has been a member of the FCC, where she's been a leading expert on common carrier issues, particularly deregulation of the telecommunications marketplace, including the economic effect of mergers and acquisitions. And Jim, I'm sure you feel fortunate, as do I, to have an individual with Mimi's wide-ranging background and solid accomplishments as second in command at DOT. I know that Jim and Mimi will push ahead even further on such critical issues as airline safety, privatization of public transportation, space commercialization and industry, and general transportation safety. And that list represents a tall order for both of them. But with the continued help of all of you here, I have no doubt that together we will prevail. Jim, you're on. Mr. Burnley. Mr. President, I'm deeply honored by your decision to nominate me to serve as the next Secretary of Transportation, and I am also very pleased that you will simultaneously be submitting Mimi Dawson's nomination to replace me as Deputy Secretary. The only constant in transportation in recent years has been the rate of very rapid change. Twenty percent of our gross national product is generated by transportation, and our expanding economy depends on continuing dynamic growth in our transportation industries. Thus, even with the progress that the administration and Congress have made in the last 6 years, we still face many transportation challenges in this country. We have a very strong team at the Department and a solid foundation as a result of the farsighted leadership of your former Secretaries, Elizabeth Dole and Drew Lewis. And I'm looking forward to the opportunity to consult and work cooperatively with both the Congress and the transportation community to ensure the safest, most efficient transportation system possible. Ms. Dawson. Thank you, Jim. Thank you, Mr. President. I would like to say how deeply honored I have been over the last 6 years to serve you as a member of the Federal Communications Commission. We have dealt with a lot of very difficult issues there, and I think they helped me to be able to offer to Jim Burnley an opportunity to bring him a great deal of help in the many serious, challenging issues which face us at the Department of Transportation. I look forward to this challenge, and I'll look forward to working with many of you and, of course, with Members of Congress and, most of all, my new boss. Thank you.
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
INTV/W RETIRING SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS O'NEILL (D-MASS) ABOUT HIS DECISION TO RETIRE. HE ALSO TALKS ABOUT THE RESULTS OF THE 1986 GENERAL ELECTIONS. 22:51:35:00 0'neill talks about the republican defeats in the general election. and says president ronald reagan tried to make sdi (strategic defense initiative) an issue but "it didn't sell". he says that reagan's programs on trade and agriculture really hurt reagan. two shot and reversals of charles gibson. CI: PERSONALITIES: O'NEILL, THOMAS. PERSONALITIES: REAGAN, RONALD (ABOUT).
Press conference by Barack Obama
LCI
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN w/ CARTOONISTS (1987)
B-ROLL OF RECOGNITION CEREMONY OF POLITICAL CARTOON DRAWINGS THAT TURNS TO HEATED QUESTION ANSWER SESSION WITH PRESS REGARDING THE IRAN CONTRA AFFAIR. REAGAN TRANSCRIPT: Etta Hulme, members of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists, distinguished guests, it's a pleasure to welcome America's editorial cartoonists here to the White House this morning. I know cartoonists are an independent lot who often march to the beat of a different drummer. Of course, sometimes when I see the way some of you draw me, I wonder if it's just a different drummer you're marching to. Maybe it's the ``Tune Tones.'' [Laughter] But it's a tribute to the hard work and careful organizing of Etta and her staff that all of you free spirits have arrived here today at the right time and in the right place. Next week I want Etta to show you where you should arrive on the question of contra aid. [Laughter] Anyway, to Etta and to all of you, let me just say: Thank you for coming. As you know, this is the second time that we've had editorial cartoonists here during this term. Last May I had some of you over for lunch. We're still looking for the missing silverware. [Laughter] And I'd like to know who drew the graffiti on the hall wall. [Laughter] I don't want you to erase it; I just want you to sign it. [Laughter] But cartoonists occupy, seriously, a special place in my heart. I hope Gary Trudeau will remember that it's heart, not brain, heart. [Laughter] Still, as you may have heard, I like to draw cartoons and caricatures myself. So, when I see a particularly good one in the newspapers, particularly one of myself, I want to throw a bouquet -- or something. [Laughter] Don't get me wrong; I don't mean that personally. After all, for me, politics is forgive and, as you may have heard, sometimes forget. [Laughter] Seriously though, one thing that I, and no politician, will ever forget is the importance of the work that each of you does. Cartoons show America politics from a special angle -- irony, wit, satire, outrage, as well as, occasionally, sympathy and affection. These are the qualities that animate your work. And it's these special qualities, captured in your illustrations, that have become so much a part of our political culture from our country's very first days. Cartoonists' drawings of the Boston Massacre helped ignite the fire of the American Revolution. A century later, the cartoons of Thomas Nast helped wash the soil of corruption from the fabric of democracy. As Boss Tweed said, and I'll quote: ``I don't care a straw for newspaper articles. My constituents don't know how to read, but they can't help seeing them darned pictures.'' Now, actually, he didn't say ``darned,'' but Presidents have a few restrictions now that weren't imposed on him. Political cartoonists have helped every one of us express our feelings about the great national events of our day. Who can forget Bill Mauldin's mourning Lincoln? Bill drew for all Americans a picture of the grief that ached in our hearts after the tragic loss of a young President. Yes, you are part of our national debate and our national experience. Your humor helps give America's political dialog its characteristic way of humanity. And in doing that, you keep us here in Washington from taking ourselves too seriously, and I can't think of any greater service to the national sanity than that. Yes, it's hard to believe now, but just 30 years ago one leading journal of opinion ran an article entitled ``The Decline and Fall of the Editorial Cartoonist.'' A cartoonist for the Army Times, John Stampone, saw the article. And John was determined that a profession that had been so much a part of our country's history would not be wiped out. And the result -- your organization. At first there were just 83 members. Today there are over 300 all across the United States and in Canada and Mexico, as well. Far from being an extinct or even endangered species, your profession is thriving now as never before. Here at the White House during my Presidency, we've taken notice of your work -- more notice than it's ever received, I think, in the past years. In fact, since my first days in Washington, our News Summary office has produced a weekly anthology of editorial cartoons. It's called ``The Friday Follies.'' For me, and probably for most of the White House staff, it's the most eagerly awaited document of the week and gives new meaning to TGIF. But let me put one rumor to rest. It's not true that ``The Follies'' is the only reason we don't schedule state dinners on Friday nights. I don't need all night to stew over them. So, this is why I've asked you here today: to say thanks for all that you've meant to American life, thanks for the laughs and thanks for the groans and thanks for the insights. Thanks also for what you'll mean in the years ahead. If someone were to ask what's the difference between the United States and the Soviet Union, I guess one answer would be that in the United States editorial cartoonists can publish pictures lampooning Ronald Reagan, while in the Soviet Union cartoonists must publish pictures lampooning Ronald Reagan. [Laughter] Yes, you're an integral part of our free society, and your vitality is a sign of the vitality of freedom itself. As I said, I enjoy your work. But since you're so free at critiquing the job I'm doing, I thought that it would be only fair, now that I have the chance, to take a shot at critiquing your work. I know you can dish it out, but can you really take it? Now, I have here a random selection of some cartoons from ``The Follies,'' and I'll just offer a few words about each. Since we're interested in promoting family values, I'll use language other than what you're accustomed to hearing from your editors. Before I begin, I'd like to add that the signatures on the cartoons have been deleted to protect the innocent and the guilty. Now, this first one is not one of that display. I just put that there to thank you all for doing this for me. And I assure you it's going to be framed, and it will be hung in a place of honor. And it's sure to wind up in a Presidential library. But, Etta, could I ask you to lend a hand? Don't let that get away from us. Now, first cartoon -- now, in case some of you can't read, that says, ``Let me clarify the last clarification of the previous clarification on the earlier clarification of the '85 tax issue.'' [Laughter] But that isn't what's important. What's important is where I'm pointing. [Laughter] I've tried everything I can to get my hair to stand up the way you've pictured it -- [laughter] -- and it just won't take. Now, the second cartoon -- here you've got me looking a little upset, and you've got the White House falling down. And that's Howard Baker with the tool kit. And I'm saying, ``Oh, good, you must be the handyman we called.'' But if you were close enough, you'd see that I look a little upset, and that's probably because I just found out Howard doesn't do windows. [Laughter] The third cartoon -- well, in the balloon it says, ``Economic Recovery.'' Now, I'm having trouble recognizing the fellow in the chair, but the crapshooter on the floor -- I got him right away. [Laughter] Yes, sir, he's still recovering from the last election. [Laughter] Now, we're to the fourth cartoon. Now, this one is titled ``The Great Communicator.'' But as you can see, there's been some mistake there. They left the balloon blank, so I think that -- [laughter] -- by filling it in -- I forgot what I was going to say. [Laughter] Now, I guess, we come to number five. And this one must be a reprint from an old Hollywood publicity piece. It's funny it hasn't gotten brown around the edges lately. But what I have it here for is, I'm going to ask Ted Turner to colorize it. [Laughter] I must confess I rather like that last one. You may try to guess the cartoonist. I'll give you a hint. It wasn't Tip O'Neill. Thank heavens he never learned to draw. In my West Wing study with my other cartoons, I also have a number that are particularly special to me. They are the get-well messages that many of you sent me after I had a little accident not far from here in late March of 1981. For me, they're a daily reminder of your sensitivity, compassion, and devotion to the Nation's welfare. So, let me leave you with two pieces of advice: first, keep drawing; second, take it easy on the old boy. And if I could suggest a subject for all of you right now, it's that monkey business that's going up on the Hill with regard to your money and how the Government's going to take it away from you. I think that'd be a fine thing. So, thanks for stopping by. God bless all of you. Keep it up. Reporter. Mr. President, General Secord says North says he told you about the contra aid diversion. Is that right? [Laughter] The President. Sam [Sam Donaldson, ABC News], you're interrupting Etta. Ms. Hulme. Hey, Sam, who invited you here? Q. Etta, did Colonel North tell you? [Laughter] Ms. Hulme. We're not quite through here. Q. We can't hear. Mr. President, we can't hear you. What was your answer? Q. Turn the mike up. Ms. Hulme. Turn the mike on? Is the mike not on? Now is the mike on? Now the mike's on. We have a question before I make a presentation. Is it true that you had us here in the Rose Garden because you heard we drew on the walls? [Laughter] But I would like to present you with this book, ``The Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year,'' that's signed by many of our members. And we appreciate your invitation today. The President. Well, thank you very much. Ms. Hulme. Thank you. The President. Thank you all. And if you'll promise to draw a picture of Sam, I'll answer his question. [Laughter] Q. General Secord testified that North told him that he, North, had told you about the contra aid diversion. The President. Well, then he was misinformed. I did not know that there was any excess money until the day before I told all of you that Ed Meese came in and said he had found a memo that indicated there was additional money. I did not know about it. And I did not know -- and I'm still waiting to know -- where did that money go. Q. But you flatly deny all this? Q. What did you know about what Secord was doing, sir? What did you know about what Mr. Secord was up to over those 2 years? The President. Well, I knew that Mr. Secord is a private citizen, was engaged with other private citizens in trying to get aid to the contras and so forth. And there's nothing against the law in that. And I'm very pleased that American people felt that way. Q. -- -- military aid, sir? The President. What? Q. Military aid? Q. I move this meeting be adjourned. The President. A motion to adjourn is always in order. You've just voted. Thank you. Q. What about Gary Hart dropping out? What do you have to say about Hart? He made a hard decision this morning.
[External plateau: the mid-term elections in the United States]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
ELECTION AIRCHECKS 1984 8:00-9:00PM
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
INTV/W RETIRING SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS O'NEILL (D-MASS) ABOUT HIS DECISION TO RETIRE. HE ALSO TALKS ABOUT THE RESULTS OF THE 1986 GENERAL ELECTIONS. 22:51:35:00 0'neill talks about the republican defeats in the general election. and says president ronald reagan tried to make sdi (strategic defense initiative) an issue but "it didn't sell". he says that reagan's programs on trade and agriculture really hurt reagan. two shot and reversals of charles gibson. CI: PERSONALITIES: O'NEILL, THOMAS. PERSONALITIES: REAGAN, RONALD (ABOUT).
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
INTV/W RETIRING SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS O'NEILL (D-MASS) ABOUT HIS DECISION TO RETIRE. HE ALSO TALKS ABOUT THE RESULTS OF THE 1986 GENERAL ELECTIONS. 22:51:35:00 0'neill talks about the republican defeats in the general election. and says president ronald reagan tried to make sdi (strategic defense initiative) an issue but "it didn't sell". he says that reagan's programs on trade and agriculture really hurt reagan. two shot and reversals of charles gibson. CI: PERSONALITIES: O'NEILL, THOMAS. PERSONALITIES: REAGAN, RONALD (ABOUT).
TF1 20 hours: [show of 3 November 2004]
TF1 News (Private - August 1982 ->)
REAGAN NOMINATES GINSBURG (1987)
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN ANNOUNCING THE NOMINATION OF DOUGLAS H. GINSBURG TO BE AN ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT. TRANSCRIPT: The President. I am announcing today that, in accordance with my duty under the Constitution, I intend to nominate and ask the Senate to confirm Judge Douglas Ginsburg of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for the position of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ginsburg is a highly regarded member of the legal profession. His career as a Federal judge, as Assistant Attorney General of the United States, as a senior official at the Office of Management and Budget, as a distinguished professor at Harvard Law School, and as a former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall makes him eminently qualified to sit on our highest court. Just as importantly, Judge Ginsburg is highly respected by his peers across the political spectrum. When I nominated him to the U.S. Court of Appeals last year, he was unanimously confirmed by the Senate and won lavish praise not just from conservatives but from liberals, as well. Judge Ginsburg is, as I am, as every justice I've nominated has been, a believer in judicial restraint; that is, that the proper role of the courts is to interpret the law, not make it. In our democracy, our elected representatives make laws, and unelected judges interpret the laws. And that's the foundation of our system of government. Above all, judges must be guided by our most fundamental law: the Constitution. Every judge that I appoint must understand that he or she serves under the Constitution, not above it, and Judge Ginsburg is such a judge. Throughout his professional career, Judge Ginsburg has shown that he also believes, as I do, that the courts must administer fair and firm justice, while remembering not just the rights of criminals but, equally important, the rights of the victims of crime and the rights of society. Too often, judges have reinterpreted the Constitution and have made law enforcement a game in which clever lawyers can try to find ways to trip up the police on the rules. This is not what our Founding Fathers intended when they framed our Constitution 200 years ago. They knew that among the most vital duties of government was to ``ensure domestic tranquility.'' They drafted a Constitution and gave us a system that was true to that duty, while protecting the rights of all Americans. I believe that Judge Ginsburg will take a tough, clear-eyed view of this essential purpose of the Constitution, while remaining sensitive to the safety of our citizens and to the problems facing law enforcement professionals. Much has been said about my agenda for the courts. I want courts that protect the rights of all citizens. No one has rights when criminals are allowed to prey on society. Judge Ginsburg understands that, and that's why I am nominating him. That's why I have selected each of the people I have put forward for the Supreme Court. In taking up this nomination, I hope we can all resolve not to permit a repetition of the campaign of pressure politics that has so recently chilled the judicial selection process. It is time for the Senate to show that it will join with me in defending the integrity and independence of the American system of justice. And a good way to begin would be by holding hearings promptly. When Justice Powell announced his retirement 4 months ago, he made it plain that he believed it would be unfair to the parties with cases before the Supreme Court, and unfair to the remaining members of the Court, to be left without nine full-time Justices. He graciously stepped down from the Court to enable the President and the Congress to select his replacement before this October term began. But as a result of the longest delay in starting hearings to fill a vacant seat on the Court since the custom of taking testimony from Supreme Court nominees first began in 1939, the Nation's highest court is still operating at less than full strength over 4 months later. The long delay in scheduling hearings for Judge Bork had other results, as well. Since June 1987, when Justice Powell resigned, the work of the Supreme Court has grown even more burdensome. All during the months of July, August, and September, nearly one-third of the literally hundreds of cases that the remaining eight Justices reviewed for hearing were criminal cases. Throughout this time, the empty seat on the Supreme Court has been a casualty in the fight for victims' rights and the war against crime. During the last 25 years, the average time between nomination and the start of hearings has been less than 18 days. In fact, in the entire 200-year history of our country, since the nomination of John Jay, the average start-to-finish time from a President's appointment to confirmation or other action by the Senate has been only 24 days. One Senator has boasted that the reason for the 70-day delay in beginning Judge Robert Bork's hearings was to allow time to gear up the political campaign against him. And that was, very simply, a disservice to the Court and to the Nation. If these hearings take longer than 3 weeks to get going, the American people will know what's up. It's time to put the national interest ahead of partisan political interests. No excuses about the press of other business before the Senate Judiciary Committee. There's no more important business before that committee than to bring the Supreme Court up to full strength. The Senate has a duty in this regard, just as I do. So, this is my call to the Senate today: Let us all resolve that the process of confirming a Supreme Court nominee will never again be distorted. Alexander Hamilton wrote that ``the complete independence of the courts of justice is essential in the Constitution.'' Let us resolve this time that guarding that independence will be the Senate's highest priority. The American people want this. They have a right to expect it. By selecting Judge Ginsburg, I've gone the extra mile to ensure a speedy confirmation. I've been impressed by the fact that in academia, in government, and on the bench Judge Ginsburg has been enormously popular with colleagues of all political persuasions. A word that many have used to describe Douglas Ginsburg is ``unpretentious.'' Now, that's quite a compliment for a judge. [Laughter] But I guess that's just one reflection of a man who believes profoundly in the rule of law. In the last analysis, it is just such men and women who ensure the continued respect for our constitutional system. And that's why I'm so pleased to nominate Judge Douglas Ginsburg to the highest court of our nation. Let me say in closing, it is up to all of us to see to it that Senate consideration of Judge Ginsburg's nomination is fair and dispassionate and, above all, prompt. I believe America is looking for a sign that this time the process will protect the independence of our judiciary as the framers of the Constitution intended. I urge Senator Biden and Senator Thurmond and the other members of the Senate Judiciary Committee to join me in the spirit of bipartisan cooperation and to demonstrate this spirit by meeting during this coming week to schedule hearings on this nomination. And now, I believe that Judge Ginsburg, who already has one supporter in the group, has a few words to say. Judge Ginsburg. Thank you, Mr. President. I want to express my deep appreciation for the confidence you've placed in me and nominating me to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. I just want to say that I'm looking forward to the confirmation process and, upon confirmation, to taking a place in the Court and playing a part in the work that it does that's so important in our system of government. Thank you again.
ELECTION AIRCHECKS 1984 10:00-11:00PM
POST ELECTION / BUSH AND QUAYLE AT THE WHITE HOUSE (1988)
B-ROLL OF PRESIDENT ELECT GEORGE H. W. BUSH AND HIS WIFE BARBARA ARRIVING AT THE WHITE HOUSE TO VISIT PRESIDENT AND FIRST LADY REAGAN