National Geographic and its decades of racism
SHARPEVILLE TRAGEDY
The protest in Sharpeville against the South African law requiring black citizens to carry passes ends in tragedy when the police fire on the demonstrators, resulting in deaths and injuries.
DN-B-058 Beta SP
News In Brief (Demonstrations against South African Govt.)
1960 Sharpeville Massacre
b&w, newsreel, March 22 1960, South Africa, audio - w/s large group of black South Africans in township of Sharpeville, various shots of crowd - some hold signs Freedom In Our Lifetime, line of South African police, tank down street, dead and injured blacks on group, ambulance on street, apartheid, civil rights - Sharpeville Massacre
3/22/81 C0068245 "SHARPEVILLE ANNIV." LN27536 23/3/81 S SOUTH AFRICA: SHARPEVILLE: FRIENDS AND RELATIVES TIDYING THE GRAVES OF BLACKS KILLED BY POLICE IN THE "SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE" 21 YEARS AGO. CUTS KEPT
3/22/81 C0068245 "SHARPEVILLE ANNIV." LN27536 23/3/81 S SOUTH AFRICA: SHARPEVILLE: FRIENDS AND RELATIVES TIDYING THE GRAVES OF BLACKS KILLED BY POLICE IN THE "SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE" 21 YEARS AGO. CUTS KEPT SOUTH AFRICA, SHARPEVILLE: SHARPEVILLE SIGN: VAR SHOTS BLACKS DIGGING UNDERGROWTH FROM GRAVES: VAR SHOTS GRAVESTONES: CLOSE - UP OF GRAVESTONE: CHILDREN AROUND GRANDDFATHER'S GRAVE" EKTA(SOF): UPITN / BREYTENBACH: 1'36": 60FT: S/23/3/81 SOUTH AFRICA - SHARPEVILLE SOUTH AFRICA - POLITICS 60 FT COL PT
STATE DEPARTMENT ON RASHID, NICARAGUA, SHARPEVILLE SIX (1988)
STATE DEPARTMENT DAILY BRIEFING TOPICS INCLUDE: -US WANTS TO EXTRADITE RASHID ON TERRORISM CHARGES -AID TO NICARAGUA -SOUTH AFRICA- SHARPEVILLE SIX
SOCIAL ISSUES
SOUTH AFRICA. SHARPEVILLE UPRISING. DOWNING OF U2 SPY PLANE. 16 NEW NATIONS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED NATIONS. 1960 GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEETING. ASWAN DAM. COMMUNICATIONS. ELECTRONICS.
Civilians protest against government laws and apartheid racial discrimination policies in South Africa.
African civilians protest in Sharpeville, South Africa. Civilians gather on a street outside a police station. They demonstrate against government apartheid laws and against policies which require the civilians to carry passes all the time. People holding boards and placards. A sign reads: 'Freedom in our lifetime'. Police fire at the demonstrators. Many people are killed and injured in the police action which became known as the Sharpeville massacre. Dead bodies and wounded men lying on the street. Location: Sharpeville South Africa. Date: March 21, 1960.
MINISTERS ARRIVE AT LANCASTER HOUSE
London. <br/> <br/>Various shots, some close ups, of the men and women standing outside large house in London wearing sashes with Sharpeville and Langa written on them. They stand in silent demonstration. <br/> <br/>Various shots of the Ministers including Duncan Sandys, Indian Premier Pandit Nehru and Premier of Canada Mr Robert Menzies arriving for talks at Lancaster House. <br/> <br/>(Orig.Neg.) <br/> <br/>Year found in the old record - 1962.
December of nelson mandela: retrospective of his life
PRETORIA - DAG SEES VERWOERD
Dag Hammerskjold sees Verwoerd. <br/> <br/>L/S of Pretoria showing the countryside. L/S of street with crowds on one side showing cars coming towards camera. C/U Crowds displaying notices and banners reading "Dag Don't for get Sharpeville" and "Release political Prisoners" on another L/S Street cars going past left to right. C/U Crowds displaying banners "Act on U.N.O. Resolution" L/S Car arriving official opens door. <br/> <br/>C/U Crowds displaying banners camera pans along crowd showing woman pointing. L/S of party as they leave car and walk towards house along balcony. Party walking along balcony towards camera headed by Mr. Hammerskjold (U.N.O. Secretary General) L/S of crowd displaying banners. L/S Mr. Hammerskjold and Prime Minister in doorway standing together. <br/> <br/>Cataloguer's note: For search purposes, Apartheid.
SHARPEVILLE ELECTIONS
ORIG COLOR 250 SOF / MAG. V.S. BLACK S. AFRICANS VOTING IN COMMUNITY COUNCIL ELECTIONS IN SHARPEVILLE, FIRST ELECTIONS IN WHICH BLACKS HAVE BEEN ALLOWED TO VOTE. INTS SCHOOL ROOM, BLACK YOUTHS LISTENING TO TEACHERS, V.S. OF THEM WORKING GARDEN. SU ELLIS. VO, MORE OF PEOPLE VOTING. CI: POLITICS: FOREIGN VOTING SO. AFRICA. CIVIL RIGHTS: SO. AFRICA. GEO: SHARPEVILLE SO. AFRICA.
SOCIAL ISSUES
SOUTH AFRICAN TOWN SHARPEVILLE, AFRICAN DEMONSTRATORS CLASH WITH POLICE, CITIZENS DEAD, FELLOW PROTESTERS HELPING WOUNDED MAN, POLICE PUTTING WOUNDED DEMONSTRATOR IN PADDY WAGON, LINE OF CASKETS, MASS FUNERAL FOR THE DEAD
SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE ANNIVERSARY - HD
Black South Africans gather for a march to mark the 5th anniversary of the Sharpeville Massacre, an anti-apartheid protest that turned violent when South African police fired on the protesters. Transferred from film, mastered in Apple Pro Res 422 HQ and Uncompressed, available in all forms of HD and SD.
PDA-B-003 Beta SP; 1 inch
REMEMBERING MANDELA
African unrest in 1960: Anti-apartheid demonstrations, assassination attempt on Verwoerd, and riots and arrest of Lumumba in Congo.
Riots and uneasy conditions in South Africa and Congo during the year 1960. South African natives demonstrate against apartheid racial discrimination and passbook requirements. Protestors at Sharpeville shown burning passbooks. Policemen fire at peaceful demonstrators in what became the Sharpeville massacre of May 31, 1960. Next scene shows attempted assassination of Premier Verwoerd by a white farmer. A photographer takes photos as an aide holds Verwoerd after he is shot. Next scene shows riots in Congo, Africa after elections. Rioters dispersed by local police forces. The United Nations peace keeping forces arrive in Congo. Premiere Patrice Lumumba arrested and policeman ties his hands with ropes. View of Colonel Mobutu Sese Seko in military uniform. Location: Africa. Date: 1960.
1980s NEWS
Dumisani Kumalo The last time I saw Mr. Mandela was in early June 1973. I was one of the few people other than his wife and prison guards who had been allowed to see him in the first 10 years that he had been in prison. Mr. Mandela had requested that I visit him so that he could express his condolences for the death of my fifth child. Nelson Mandela and I I will marry two sisters, Winnie Mandela and a younger sibling, my wife Dunya Nisa, we met on Robben Island, a cold, windswept rock of the coast of Cape Town, Mr. Mandela came to the visitors room with his head high. He was surrounded by four prison warders. There was a glass wall between us, but I could see that his palms were covered with calluses from the stones he had been breaking for 10 years. Amazingly, when Mr. Mandela began to speak, he never uttered a word of self pity. Instead, I left the prison feeling sorry for my own self, he had more hope than I did. I left my country four years later, in the time that has passed Mr. Mandela has become larger than life. His name is mentioned with reverence by people, millions who had not even born when he went to jail. They talk and sing of Comrade Mandela as if he was once walked among them, or even touch them. Finally, Mandela is free. But to appreciate the Mandela legend, one has to go back to the days even before South Africa was known as the land of apartheid. The year was 1940, 22 year old Holy Father, Nelson Mandela arrived in Johannesburg to work as a mine boy in the gold mines. This was the only way African men were allowed to come to the City of Gold. South Africa long dominated by the Dutch and English colonists was only interested in Africans for the cheap labor they provided in 1948. On the promise of strengthening already exists in segregation laws, the African Nationalist Party came to power, their aim total racial domination and separation. To make South Africa totally white and pure, apartheid was born. The word apartheid, and Africans English hybrid literally means partners. Over the next several years, Mandela became one of the leading anti apartheid activists, he led an organized campaign of strikes and boycotts in open defiance of the racist laws of the land. On March 21, 1960, the South African police shot and killed 69 people and maimed another 200 during a peaceful protest held in Sharpeville, a township south of Johannesburg, South Africa was never the same again. The whole country exploded. For the first time the struggle for freedom in South Africa caught the attention of the entire world. South Africa became ruled by the GM the ANC was banned. Nelson Mandela left the country without a passport and went overseas. Within his country, Mr. Mandela became a wanted man, the most wanted man in South Africa. The search for him intensified. After months of looting the police, Mandela was caught in 1962 and sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. It was the hope of the South African regime that the name Mandela would be wiped clean of the memories of the South African people. For many years, it was illegal to mention Nelson Mandela's name, even in private to circulate his picture or to repeat any words he had ever uttered. But Mr. Mandela remained defined. He never gave up hope, he never surrendered. A theologian once told me that Dr. Martin Luther King marched in the southern United States, not to be free, but because he was free. Mr. Mandela remained free even in jail. His Spirit gave us on the outside the commitment to fight for our freedom, in whatever manner, whether it be in exile, prison, or even in death. For us, Mr. Mandela's release is the beginning not the end of a struggle. Apartheid is alive and well. I'm still not legally a citizen of South Africa. And neither is Mr. Mandela, Archbishop Tutu, nor anyone of the 30 million South Africans whose skin is color is not white. The ideas for which Mr. Mandela was jailed are not yet at hand, nor will they ever be until apartheid is abolished.
LONDON FEED
BUDAPEST - PREMIER / THAILAND - FLOODS / ATHENS - ONASSIS / SOUTH AFRICA - SHARPEVILLE SIX / LONDON - PROTEST / USSR - AZERBAIJAN PRESS CONFERENCE / AUSTRALIA - ROYALS / NORTHERN IRELAND - BOMB
PDA-LB-013 Beta SP; 1 inch
GENERATIONS OF RESISTANCE HUSH HOGGIES HUSH: TOM JOHNSON'S PRAYING PIGS
NECRO NELSON MANDELA (with lots of sound Mandela SVP)
Sharpeville Massacre Aftermath
Scenes from the aftermath of the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa people in the township protest the pass laws, their arrival at the police station and encounter with the police, and paramedics attend to the injured and the dead.
SOUTH AFRICA GOES
South Africa Goes.<br/><br/>L/S Exterior Lancaster House slip pan. Angle shot flags. L/S Prime Minister Harold Macmillan leaving Lancaster House. C/U Nehru watching. L/S Pan Prime Minister's car drives away. M/S Dr. Verwoerd leaving Lancaster House and getting into car. M/S Press photographers. C/U Pan Dr. Verwoerd drives away in car. L/S Cars driving away from Lancaster House. L/S Gold mine workings in south Africa. C/U Earth moving along conveyor belt. Angle shot as earth drops down. Man using drill worked with his feet. M/S Gold being poured out into mould. M/S Bars of gold stacked up. L/S of the diamond mines in South Africa. L/S Massive bull dozers at work. L/S Diamond mines. M/S Earth and stones etc. being sifted for diamonds. M/S Man picking out two diamonds. C/U Tipping out a whole load of diamonds onto tray. L/S Shanti town and Derelict shacks. C/U Pan up injured coloured man laying on the ground (this scene from Sharpeville). L/S Burnt out post office. C/U Man showing burnt out files. <br/><br/>M/S Mass of debris. M/S General Smuts. C/U General Smuts. L/S Malan. C/U Malan. L/S Rhodes statue. C/U Three scenes. The original diamond rush. L/S Cape Town and liner waiting to take Macmillan back to England. M/S Macmillan shaking hands with Dr. Verwoerd. M/S People waving. M/S Macmillan and Lady Dorothy waving from gangway of ship. L/S Cape town and Table Mountain. C/U Voting placard "Vote yes for our Republic" pan down to another notice "Save South Africa vote No to a republic". L/S Pan people voting at voting booths. L/S Massed crowds in street. L/S Sir de Villiers Graaff, leader of the opposition party addressing crowds. L/S Pan massed crowds listening. M/S Street scene. C/U Sign "Don't sell out to Verwoerd" "Vote No". M/S Verwoerd addressing crowds holding a dove. M/S Crowds listening. M/S Dr. Verwoerd. C/U Pan down placard "Vote Yes for our republic". L/S Group of coloured men standing on street corner. M/S Electric sign over shop showing the state of the voting Yes 50,9574 No 56,3561 M/S. Coloured men waiting about on street corner. L/S Cape Town.
03/20/70 C0009426 / COLOR UNITED NATIONS: UNITED NATIONS APARTHEID COMMITTEE ASKS END TO RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ON ANNIVERSARY OF SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE:
03/20/70 C0009426 / COLOR UNITED NATIONS: UNITED NATIONS APARTHEID COMMITTEE ASKS END TO RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ON ANNIVERSARY OF SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE: NXC 1855 "UNITED NATIONS - SHARPEVILLE" SHOWS: MS 2S TRUSTEESHIP COUNCIL CHAMBERS: MS PRINCESS ASHRAF PAHLAVI AND OTHERS AT DAIS: SOF UNITED NATIONS SECY GENERAL U THANT: LS COUNCIL: MS SOF PRINCESS PAHLAVI: (SHOT 3/20/70 104FT) APARTHEID - SOUTH AFRICA UNITED NATIONS - SOUTH AFRICA UNITED NATIONS (SS)) TRUSTEESHIP COUNCIL RACISM - GENERAL SOUTH AFRICA - SHARPEVILLE (MASSACRE ANNIVERSARY) PAHLAVI, ASHRAF - SOF THANT, U - SOF MORRISON / 104 FT / 16 COL / POS / D24552 296 FT / 16 COL / POS / CUTS /
PDA-LB-014 Beta SP; 1 inch
WINNIE MANDELA