United States, 1950s: boy sick in bed
United States, 1950s: boy sick in bed. Boy with fever. Thermometer in mouth of boy, Lady checks pulse of boy. Germs under microscope. Scientist in laboratory
Bridgeman Images Details
PA-1341 Beta SP; PA-0513 Digibeta
Sniffles and Sneezes
AMERICAN ICONS
MAN TOSSING & TURNING IN BED, SICK WITH TYPHOID FEVER
Pakistan Disease
AP-APTN-0930: Pakistan Disease Friday, 13 August 2010 STORY:Pakistan Disease- REPLAY Unsanitary conditions in IDP camps causing spread of diseases LENGTH: 02:19 FIRST RUN: 0830 RESTRICTIONS: AP Clients Only TYPE: Urdu/Natsound SOURCE: AP TELEVISION STORY NUMBER: 654146 DATELINE: Multan - 13 August 2010 LENGTH: 02:19 AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST 1. Various of sick child crying in his father arms in Children hospital complex, Multan ward 2. Pan of ward with sick children lying on beds 3. Close of child being fed 4. Wide of mothers with children on hospital beds 5. Close of drip 6. Various of sick child in his mother's arms 7. Doctor checking sick children 8. Close of crying child 9. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Professor Doctor Mukhtar Hussain, In charge of Children hospital complex in Multan: "Before the floodwater normally we checked only forty children a day. Now the number has increased twice. Some children are directly coming from flood effected areas and some are living with their relatives as guests in Multan city. All these areas have been badly effected by floodwater so children are suffering from gastrointestinitis, diarrhoea and fever. We are providing them treatment." 10. Wide of medical team in make shift camp set up in a school 11. Various of toddler being checked 12. Reverse shot of women taking medicines from ambulance 13. Various of children taking bath in camp area STORYLINE Fever, stomach problems and skin diseases were spreading among Pakistani flood victims adding another dimension of danger to a widespread crisis that could get even worse in the coming days. Aid workers warn that waterborne diseases and other illnesses could raise the death toll from more than two weeks worth of flooding to well past the estimated 1,500 people who have perished so far. The US said on Friday that it would give three (m) million US dollars to help establish 15 treatment centres for waterborne illnesses in the aftermath of the floods, which are estimated to have directly or indirectly affected some 14 (m) million people. The floods have been described as the worst natural disaster in Pakistan's 63 year history. Up to one-fourth of the country is or had been affected by the floods. Children hospital complex in Multan has been set to receive the children with waterborne diseases. According to Professor Doctor Mukhtar Hussain, who is in charge of Children hospital complex, the number of sick children they receive everyday has increased as the flood hit the country. "Before the floodwater normally we checked only forty children a day. Now the number has increased twice," said Doctor Mukhtar Hussain. "Children are suffering from gastrointestinitis, diarrhoea and fever. We are providing them treatment," he added. More rain fell around the country on Thursday, and monsoon season is forecast to last several weeks still. The United Nations warned the crisis was far from over, saying dams in Sindh province could still burst in the coming days. Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani appealed for more help from the international community, as authorities rushed to evacuate thousands of people threatened by flooding that submerged villages in the south. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN APEX 08-13-10 0546EDT
VALLEY FEVER TURNS FATAL
A NEW MALADY CALLED VALLEY FEVER, ARISING FROM EARTHQUAKES, HAS STARTED TAKING LIVES IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
The fever for hours
Radio France: filmed programmes
EBC-209 Beta SP
THE DOCTOR - 2ND EDITION
China Aids - Villagers who sold blood struck by Aids
TAPE: EF01/0469 IN_TIME: 22:57:53 DURATION: 2:13 SOURCES: BBC RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Wenlou, Recent SHOTLIST: 1. Tracking shot of road 2. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Passerby saying "Over there they are all just waiting to die." 3. Countryside where newly dug graves lie 4. Poster on door 5. Door 6. Two men sitting down 7. Villagers waiting by side of road 8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Villager saying "My son and my wife are dying of AIDS." 9. Villager walks into health clinc 10. AIDS stricken villagers lying on makeshift beds 11. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Villager saying "I need medicine but I have no money to pay for it." 12. SOUNDBITE (Cantonese) Villager saying "I know I am going to die - I have a fever all the time now." 13. Villagers in clinic 14. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Villager saying "There is nothing more I can do he says. I have spent every last penny I have and if you don't pay they don't give you any medicine." 15. Various of ill villagers lying on makeshift beds STORYLINE: In China's Hainan province, the village of Wenlou is known locally as the "AIDS village". On the edge of Wenlou are freshly dug graves and over many doors hang black and white funeral banners. Villagers who sold their blood to blood dealers were contaminated when filthy needles were used and now, out of 800 villagers, 500 are HIV positive and about 40 are dying each year. One man said he sold his blood more than 10 times and was paid about five dollars for each half litre of blood. He's been sick for four months now. The local health clinic is ill equipped for many common illnesses but when it comes to AIDS, there is very little they can do. These patients are suffering from AIDS related infections - for this man there is no bed so he lies on a bench instead. These villagers are victims of greed. They sold their blood for cash at centres set up by local health officials. The officials then sold on the blood to pharmaceutical companies for profit - it was a business scheme that brought HIV to Wenlou. The HIV virus is now running out of control. Local government appears to be trying to contain the scandal - securing the village to prevent news from leaking out while doing nothing to help those already dying. Reearchers estimate that in their search for profit, the blood dealers may have infected 600-thousand people.
High Voltage Emergency Department
Centre Est
1930s NEWSREELS
SEDGWICK EXAMINES FARMER'S DAUGHTER LYING SICK IN BED. FINDS TYPHOID FEVER. SEDGWICK ASKS FARMER TO SHOW HIM WHERE HE KEEPS HIS MILK.
Flu - Bug
THE FLU BUG IS BITING PEOPLE IN THE BOSTON AREA CAUSING PLENTY OF PROBLEMS.
Sick - Kid - Daycare
A DAYCARE FOR YOUR KIDS FOR WHEN THEY'RE SICK ... YOU CAN STILL GO TO WORK KNOWING THEY ARE BEING WATCHED EXTRA WELL.
Ecuador Contamination - Hundreds of people taken ill because of contaminated water
TAPE: EF02/0948 IN_TIME: 04:26:51 DURATION: 2:29 SOURCES: APTN RESTRICTIONS: DATELINE: Ibarra, Ecuador - November 7, 2002 SHOTLIST: 1. Various of Ibarra 2. Various water processing facility 3. Wide shot San Vicente de Paulo hospital in Ibarra 4. Mid shot hospital 5. Interior of hospital 6. Young girl getting examined 7. Young patient sleeping 8. Close shot IV 9. Young boy being given medicine 10. Young man getting treatment 11. Various families inside hospital with children 12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Voxpop, Patient: "From drinking water. It was dirty water, we drank it at school and I got sick." 13. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Voxpop, Patient: "I drank a glass of water in the morning, by the afternoon I had fever. Very bad, I can't get over it." 14. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Voxpop, Patient: "Terrible stomach ache, from drinking water with my medication. I thought, I just drank water. Now I'm in pain." 15. Various patients at hospital 16. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Vaca, Medical doctor at San Vicente de Paulo hospital: "It's a bacteria found in sewage. The only way to determine it for sure is with the lab results, but based on the symptoms and on experience of over 20 years, it is water contamination." 17. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Fernando Navarro, City of Ibarra official: "Even though the water, the drinking water, comes from many sources, it seems the rain water contributed to its mixing with bad waters. It's happening in many areas of the city. This is what makes it worrisome." 18. People standing at hospital pharmacy to get medicine 19. Patient in hospital bed STORYLINE: A child is reported to have died, and hundreds are reportedly ill after drinking water in the Ecuadorean city of Ibarra, health authorities said on Thursday. The child, a two-year-old boy, was reported to have died after suffering complications from contaminated water. According to authorities, nearly 300 people were admitted to local hospitals in the highland city, north of the capital Quito, between October 31st and November 5th complaining of similar symptoms. Most of the affected people were suffering from intestinal pain, as well as nausea, vomiting and fever. According to preliminary studies by the Ecuadorean Ministry of Health, drinking water in the city may have been contaminated by sewage.
TV Variety
TV COMMERCIAL FOR DRISTAN, MAN GETS READY FOR WORK ADJUSTS TIE AND WOMAN IS SICK IN BRASS BED, SHE HAS A FEVER, CU OF WOMAN LOOKING AT THERMOMETER, STRETCHES IN BED AND FEELS BETTER, LOOKS IN MIRROR IN NIGHTGOWN, HUSBAND HUGS HER
[Start Tray]
A2 / France 2
DN-LB-449 Beta SP
MEDICAL SCENES IN FRANCE
RELIGION
A SICK CHILD LAYS IN HIS BED, THE CHILD SWEATS HEAVILY DUE TO A HIGH FEVER. THE YOUNG BOYS PARENTS STAND BY HIS SIDE. THE PARENTS ARE NOBLY RICH DRESSED IN COLORFUL SILK AND SATIN ROBES. A DOCTOR DIAGNOSES DEATH BY THE BOYS BEDSIDE.
PA-1093 1 inch; PA-0578 Digibeta
Lucky Junior
Peru Dengue
AP-APTN-0930: Peru Dengue Friday, 16 November 2012 STORY:Peru Dengue- 4:3 Peru's health minister visits hospital in dengue fever outbreak region LENGTH: 01:58 FIRST RUN: 0230 RESTRICTIONS: No Access Peru TYPE: Natsound/Spanish SOURCE: CHANNEL 7 STORY NUMBER: 867211 DATELINE: Pucalpa - 15 Nov 2012 LENGTH: 01:58 SHOTLIST 1. Wide of hallway at hospital that is filled with patients infected with dengue 2. Various of patients recovering from dengue in crowded hospital wards 3. Tracking of doctor drawing child's blood 4. Mid of children lying on hospital bed 5. Tracking of Midori de Habich, Peru's Health Minister, arriving at hospital to visit patients 6. Various of de Habich greeting patients 7. Pan right of de Habich walking through hospital 8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Midori de Habich, Peru's Health Minister: "This area (Ucayali) is an area that is going to be exposed to dengue. A virus is circulating, as you know, that is very aggressive. This could not be predicted. But we must not let our guard down. We're never free from an outbreak (of dengue). So, the big message is to continue (to be on guard) even when this this outbreak is over. Let's continue (with fumigation and prevention) and continue to make an appeal to families because this is not a disease that is resolved or avoided in health facilities." 9. Pan of patients in hospital beds 10. Close of doctor drawing baby's blood UPSOUND: Baby screams 11. Various of patients in bed SHOTLIST Peru's Health Minister, Midori de Habich, visited a hospital on Thursday in a region of the country where six people have died and at least 1800 are sick following an outbreak of dengue fever. De Habich met with patients and doctors at a hospital in the city of Pucallpa located in the jungle region of Ucayali, which is is kilometres (304 miles) northeast of Lima. "This area is an area that is going to be exposed to dengue. A virus is circulating, as you know, that is very aggressive," said De Habich. "This could not be predicted. But we must not let our guard down. We're never free from an outbreak. So, the big message is to continue (to be on guard) even when this outbreak is over." The Health Minister urged people to continue with fumigation and prevention efforts because dengue "is not a disease that is resolved or avoided in health facilities". The Ministry of Health has sent 40 tonnes (36,287 kilogrammes) of medicine and supplies to combat dengue in Ucayali. Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a virus that is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is very common in hot and tropical areas such as the north coast and jungle of Peru. Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: infoaparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. APTN AP-WF-11-16-12 1056GMT
Reporters: [12 November 2022 broadcast]
France 24
An eye on the world: [October 06, 2022 issue]
LCI
DN-252 Beta SP
WWII BOMB DAMAGE IN JAPAN
China Virus - China raises virus death toll to 21, reports 593 more children infected
NAME: CHN VIRUS 20080502I TAPE: EF08/0459 IN_TIME: 10:37:53:18 DURATION: 00:00:55:18 SOURCES: CCTV DATELINE: Fuyang - 2 May 2008 RESTRICTIONS: No Access China SHOTLIST 1. Wide exterior of Fuyang 2nd People's hospital 2. Mid of doctor checking child at hospital 3. Parents by children 4. Mid of children on hospital bed 5. Mid of reception desk 6. Mid of doctors checking child at Fuyang 1st People's hospital 7. Wide of hospital corridor 8. Mid of doctors and nurses moving bed 9. Mid tilt down from nurse to mother and child 10. Pan of mums and children on sickbeds in front of an elevator 11. Close up of sick child 12. Various sickbeds in corridors 13. Mid pan children being checked STORYLINE Another child died of an intestinal virus in eastern China, raising the death toll to 21, while 593 new cases of infection were reported, a state news agency said on Friday. The report by the Xinhua News Agency gave no details of the latest death from Enterovirus 71. It cited Gao Kaiyan, director of the Provincial Health Department for the eastern province of Anhui. The total number of children infected has risen to 2,477 in Fuyang, the city in Anhui where the disease was first reported in March, Xinhua said. It said all were under age 6 and most were under 2. The government says it is investigating the source of the outbreak. CCTV reported that the two major hospital in Fuyangs, the 1st and 2nd People's hospital, had added hundreds of sickbeds in corridors to accommodate the high numbers of children with the virus. Enterovirus 71 mainly strikes children under age 10 and causes hand, foot and mouth disease, with symptoms such as fever, mouth sores and a rash with blisters. It is not related to foot and mouth disease, which infects cattle, sheep and swine. Some 738 children have recovered and 702 are still hospitalised, 36 of them in serious condition, Xinhua said. It said 1,017 children were being treated as outpatients. Some children have been diagnosed with brain, heart and lung damage, the report said.