World Nobel 3 - German, French share Nobel medicine prize, reax
NAME: WORLD NOBEL3 20081006I TAPE: EF08/1014 IN_TIME: 11:01:45:23 DURATION: 00:02:21:17 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION/RTL/AP Photos DATELINE: Various - 6 Oct 2008 / File RESTRICTIONS: See Script SHOTLIST: RTL - No Access Germany, Austria (except: Infoscreen, ATV+), German-speaking Switzerland (except: Telezueri), Luxemburg and Alto Adige Heidelberg, Germany - 6 October 2008 1. Harald zur Hausen, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner, receiving applause from his colleagues, outside building 2. Cutaway of Zur Hausen holding his glasses 3. Zur Hausen walking to microphones, being applauded 4. SOUNDBITE (German) Harald zur Hausen, joint winner of 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine: "I did not expect a Nobel Prize. How can you expect a Nobel Prize? It's always like a little lottery. I only knew that I had been nominated on occasion, and I knew that I was nominated this year." ++NIGHT SHOTS++ AP TELEVISION Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 6 October 2008 5. Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner, talking on mobile 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, joint winner of 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine: "I don't know what to say, it is a big surprise for me, I am very moved, and I think it's a very important recognition of the science in Europe, in France in particular. For me, I am very glad that he did this announcement when I am in Cambodia because for me there is a cooperation between France, the national agency for AIDS research, and the developing countries, in particular Cambodia, it is very important." 7. Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner, talking on mobile AP Television Abidjan, Ivory Coast - 6 October 2008 8. Back shot of President of Ivory Coast, Laurent Gbagbo, shaking hands with Leading AIDS researcher Luc Montagnier of France 9. SOUNDBITE: (French) Luc Montagnier, joint winner of 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine: "I am honoured to share this award with my collaborator and I think there are others who also deserve it as well as the two of us. With this, the Stockholm committee sends a strong message that shows that AIDS is a health problem for the entire world and we need to support research because AIDS is an epidemic that is ever present." 10. Montagnier seated in audience in presidency room 11. Close-up of man listening 12. Various of audience at international AIDS meeting in Abidjan 13. Leaflet on AIDS 14. Montagnier talking AP Photos - No Access Canada/For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile FILE: Paris, France - 14 July 2003 15. STILL of Leading AIDS researcher Luc Montagnier of France addressing the 2nd International AIDS Society Conference on HIV pathogenesis and treatment AP Television FILE: Paris, France - 5 June 2006 16. Mid of Montagnier speaking during interview 17. Photos on wall of Montagnier with celebrities 18. Montagnier speaking 19. Shelf with books on AIDS 20. Side shot of Montagnier STORYLINE: Three European scientists shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for separate discoveries of viruses that cause AIDS and cervical cancer, breakthroughs that helped doctors fight the deadly diseases. French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier were cited for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, in 1983. They shared the award with Germany's Harald zur Hausen, who was honoured for finding human papilloma viruses that cause cervical cancer, the second most common cancer among women. Zur Hausen, a German medical doctor and scientist, received half of the 1.4 (m) million dollar prize, while the two French researchers shared the other half. Zur Hausen discovered two high-risk types of the HPV virus and made them available to the scientific community, ultimately leading to the development of vaccines protecting against infection. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the vaccine Gardasil in 2006 for the prevention of cervical cancer in girls and women ages 9 to 26. The vaccine works by protecting against strains of the human papillomavirus, or HPV - including the two that zur Hausen discovered - that cause most cases of cervical cancers. The HPV virus, transmitted by sexual contact, causes genital warts that sometimes develop into cancer. In its citation, the Nobel Assembly said Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier's discovery was one prerequisite for understanding the biology of AIDS and its treatment with antiviral drugs. The pair's work in the early 1980s made it possible to study the virus closely. That in turn let scientists identify important details in how HIV replicates and how it interacts with the cells it infects, the citation said. It also led to ways to diagnose infected people and to screen blood for HIV, which has limited spread of the epidemic, and helped scientists develop anti-HIV drugs, the citation said. "The combination of prevention and treatment has substantially decreased spread of the disease and dramatically increased life expectancy among treated patients," the citation said. Barre-Sinoussi said that when she and Montagnier isolated the virus 25 years ago they naively hoped that they would be able to prevent the global AIDS epidemic that followed. The Nobel Assembly said zur Hausen "went against current dogma" when he found that some kinds of human papilloma virus, or HPV, caused cervical cancer. He realised that DNA of HPV could be detected in tumours, and uncovered a family of HPV types, only some of which cause cancer. The discovery led to an understanding of how HPV causes cancer and the development of vaccines against HPV infection, the citation said.
The AIDS years, death, life
France 5
NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS IN MEDICINE
Photographs of the French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier who discovered the virus that caused AIDS and German scientist Harald Zur Hausen who discovered the Human Papilloma Virus that causes cervical cancer. The three received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2008.
[Parliamentary elections debate]
Méditerranée
Senegal Conference - 15th annual meeting on Aids and STIs in Africa
NAME: SEN CONF 20081203I TAPE: EF08/1217 IN_TIME: 11:09:32:24 DURATION: 00:02:48:22 SOURCES: AP TELEVISION DATELINE: Dakar, 3 Dec 2008 RESTRICTIONS: SHOTLIST: 1. Wide exterior of conference venue, the Meridien hotel 2. Mid of International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) banner 3. Mid of security guard 4. Red AIDS symbol 5. Digital screen showing logo of ICASA 2008 6. SOUNDBITE: (French) Francoise Barre Sinoussi, Nobel prize winner for science: "You know that thanks to this policy of access to anti-retro virus (drugs) and to the international efforts and in particular of course the efforts of the Global Fund, there is a clear improvement in patients' access to care since we globally went from 200-thousand people who needed to be treated and who were actually treated to three million people today receiving treatment." 7. Close of conference banner 8. SOUNDBITE: (French) Francoise Barre Sinoussi, Nobel prize winner for science: "We talk about a vaccination that would prevent infection. We also need to think about preventing the spread of the infection becoming AIDS. To have infected patients who perfectly control their infection and who do not evolve towards AIDS, that would already be a huge step. For this, we have elements to think that this could be possible." 9. Wide of Senegalese women dancing outside 10. Wide of conference 11. Mid of Senegalese President Abdoulaye Wade, sitting down 12. Wide of conference 13. Various of audience 14. SOUNDBITE: (French) Abdoulaye Wade, Senegalese President: "To this effect, we need to defeat the code of silence and in each country and in all the layers of the society, talk about AIDS and its dangers and the dangers it represents for us, and face the reality of the HIV Aids pandemic." 15. Wide of conference room with Senegalese singer Youssou N'Dour singing the ICASA anthem 16. Mid of N'Dour singing 17. Mid of Senegalese President Wade listening to N'Dour 18. Mid of N'Dour singing 19. Audience applauding N'Dour STORYLINE: The 15th annual meeting of the International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) opened on Wednesday in the Senegalese capital Dakar, aimed at trying to stop the spread of HIV and providing more anti-retroviral treatment for African countries. Scientists, humanitarian organisations and members from various African communities affected by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, are expected to attend the four day conference, focusing on Africa's response to the AIDS pandemic. The conference opened a day after giant puppets of US President-elect and French President Nicolas Sarkozy were paraded through the streets of Dakar to remind Western governments of financial commitments they've made to combat AIDS in Africa. Addressing delegates, Senegalese President Abdoulaye Wade said the code of silence on AIDS needs to be defeated, if there is any chance of stopping the HIV/AIDS pandemic. On Monday, ceremonies across the globe marked World AIDS Day. According to a United Nations report published in August, an estimated 33 (m) million people worldwide are infected with the HIV virus, the vast majority of them in Africa. Some 500-thousand children are born each year infected with HIV and 290-thousand of them died in 2007 as a result, according to the Global Fund.
[Parliamentary elections debate]
Méditerranée
Silvers Geek Senior Trophy
Nord
SJT LUC MONTAGNIER DIED
FR3 / France 3
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